Subject-Orientation and Critique on Power

Subjektorientierung und Machtkritik

Abstract: In the discourse of history didactics, the view has been predominantly taken in recent years that historical learning – in addition to historical content – must take greater account of learners with their individual experiences and knowledge when designing history lessons. This subject orientation would increase the effectiveness of history teaching.
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-14614
Languages: English, German


In the discourse of history didactics, the view has been predominantly taken in recent years that historical learning – in addition to historical content – must take greater account of learners with their individual experiences and knowledge when designing history lessons. This subject orientation would increase the effectiveness of history teaching.

The Decline of the Canon

In German history didactics, the word “subject-orientation” has prevailed regarding this assumption. The term means that the learners’ ideas, previous experiences, feelings, interests, social imprints, etc., should be evaluated empirically and, as securely as possible, as genuine points of contact for historical learning processes. The lessons are to be designed on the basis of this diagnosis. This is at least the position of history didactics. However, teaching in schools is not only based on scientific findings. For schools, curricula have an important function. But do the curricula permit such subject-orientation, or are they not rather a reflection of political negotiation processes with possibly completely different interests? To put it another way: What dangers lurk for subject-orientation when politically powerful content-oriented curricula demand ideologically charged master narratives?

First of all, subject-orientation emphasizes the value not only of individual historical abilities and skills, but also of interests and motivations, without saying anything about the content to be taught. However, the diagnosis of such qualities and interests in the subject inevitably has an influence on what content should be taught. If subject-orientation is also to be understood as turning to individual interests, this can also mean turning away from binding content or even a canon for history teaching. The contents of historical learning would therefore not be the big, connecting stories, but the many small stories that are of significance in the socio-culturally shaped everyday life of the pupils.[1]

Attention to Curricula!

And yet: History teaching takes place in societies that are anything but in agreement on the question of whether the learning subject is relevant for the design of history teaching. Curricula, for example, are also “administrative regulations” and “planning instruments” which on the one hand may be scientifically influenced, but on the other hand generally express political opinions. However, political opinions or majorities can change rapidly. The question of whether curricula should then still meet scientific standards depends on the confidence political decision-makers have in science if at all. In the wake of the rise of right-wing extremist parties, the skepticism about academic discourses and the demand for stronger national identities, attempts are already being made to misuse history and thus history teaching for political purposes and to reawaken national master narratives. This is evident, for example, not only in Poland and Hungary,[2] but in Germany as well, as the far-right AfD (Alternative for Germany) is propagating the teaching of history to promote patriotism and a nationally defined formation of identity.[3] The heuristic achievement whereby identities in various societies can only be thought of in the plural is regarded as a negative. Moreover, such positions are occasionally flanked by a scientific point of view. Jörn Rüsen, for example, takes the view that it is precisely because of the diversity within a society that a “leading culture” is needed, which also makes historical orientation possible for newly immigrated citizens. The ‘domestic’, identity-creating ‘cultural achievements’ would provide an opportunity for a community-building tradition, for example by referring to Luther, Humboldt, Schleiermacher, Kant, or Herder.[4]

An Opportunity for Critique on Power

How can history lessons respond to these different expectations? Martin Lücke writes aptly that history teaching takes place in societies that use “powerful mechanisms” to control exclusion, integration, and participation.[5] History teaching is part of these societies. Therefore, it is not enough to consider these mechanisms solely in their historical dimension. It is rather a matter of deconstructing current historical learning with pupils. The contradiction between subject-orientation (“Your interests are an essential impulse for teaching history.”) and history politics (“History teaching is national identity formation with corresponding contents.”) must be discussed with them in class.

If subject-orientation is understood holistically and not only as an approach for diagnosing learning outcomes and enabling individual learning paths, then it must also be discussed with the learners why their interests may not be considered in the normative demands of educational policy. The deconstruction of history teaching and its status in society can thus also contribute to subject-orientation, for example by addressing the absence of individual student perspectives in the curricula with the learners. Curricula must be questioned: What interests do politicians and scientists have in favoring ‘their’ stories as those to be dealt with in class? What interests do teachers have? What interests do I have? Why does the curriculum say something about regional history, whilst the history of China, for example, remains unaddressed? What does the lack of subject-orientation say about state politics? Why do we need curricula at all?

Ultimately, the authority of curricula should also be questioned in the classroom. Of course, it will cause teachers problems regarding loyalty if they encourage students to question current power relations. But isn’t historical thinking always a critique on power? Subject-orientation also means enabling individuals to evaluate power, doesn’t it?

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Sirkka, Ahonen. “Politics of identity through history curriculum: Narratives of the past for social exclusion or inclusion?.” Journal of Curriculum Studies 33, no. 2 (2001): 179-194. https://doi.org/10.1080/00220270010011202.
  • Claire, Alexander, and Weekes-Bernard, Debbie. “History lessons: inequality, diversity and the national curriculum.” Race Ethnicity and Education 20, no. 4 (2017): 478-494. https://doi.org/10.1080/13613324.2017.1294571.
  • Paulson, Julia. “‘Whether and How?’ History Education about Recent and Ongoing Conflict: A Review of Research.” Journal on Education in Emergencies 1, (2017): 115-141. https://doi.org/10.17609/n84h20.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] Martin Lücke, “Diversität und Intersektionalität als Konzepte der Geschichtsdidaktik,” in Handbuch Praxis des Geschichtsunterrichts, ed. Michele Barricelli and Martin Lücke (Schwalbach/Ts: Wochenschau Verlag, 2017), 145.
[2] “Türkei, Ungarn, Polen: Wie mit Schulbüchern Politik gemacht wird,” DW. Made for minds, https://www.dw.com/de/türkei-ungarn-polen-wie-mit-schulbüchern-politik-gemacht-wird/a-41006339 (last accessed 13 October 2019).
[3] “Geschichtsunterricht sollte zu Demokraten und Patrioten erziehen,” 8. November 2016, AfD Kompakt, https://afdkompakt.de/2016/11/08/geschichtsunterricht-sollte-zu-demokraten-und-patrioten-erziehen/ (last accessed 13. October 2019).
[4] Jörn Rüsen, “Deutsche Kultur – gähnende Leere oder wirksame Orientierung,” 21. September 2017, L.I.S.A. Wissenschaftsportal Gerda Henkel Stiftunglisa, gerda-henkel-stiftung.de/deutsche_kultur_gaehnende_leere_oder_wirksame_orientierung?nav_id=7256 (last accessed 13 October 2019).
[5] Martin Lücke, “Diversität und Intersektionalität als Konzepte der Geschichtsdidaktik,” in Handbuch Praxis des Geschichtsunterrichts, ed. Michele Barricelli and Martin Lücke (Schwalbach/Ts: Wochenschau Verlag, 2017), 136.

_____________________

Image Credits

Curriculum Vitae Graffiti © Japleenpasricha CC BY-SA 4.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

Recommended Citation

Barsch, Sebastian: Subject-Orientation and Critique on Power. In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 29, DOI:  dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-14614.

Editorial Responsibility

Isabella Schild / Thomas Hellmuth (Team Vienna)

Im geschichtsdidaktischen Diskurs der letzten Jahre hat sich überwiegend die Ansicht durchgesetzt, dass Historisches Lernen dann besonders gut gelingen kann, wenn es neben den historischen Inhalten stärker auch die Lernenden mit ihren individuellen Erfahrungen und Kenntnissen für die Gestaltung von Geschichtsunterricht berücksichtigt.

Der Untergang des Kanons

Eine so verstandene Subjektorientierung bedeutet demnach, “Vorstellungen, Vorerfahrungen, Gefühle, Interessen, gesellschaftliche Prägungen etc. […] als echte Anknüpfungspunkte für historische Lernprozesse” der jeweiligen Lerngruppe empirisch möglichst abgesichert zu erfassen und den Unterricht dahingehend auszurichten. Soweit die Wissenschaft. Erlauben aber die normativen Rahmenbedingungen schulischen Lernens – die Lehrpläne – eine solche Subjektorientierung, oder sind diese nicht vielmehr ein Abbild politischer Aushandlungsprozesse mit möglicherweise ganz anderen Interessen? Oder anders gefragt: Welche Gefahren lauern der Subjektorientierung, wenn politisch Mächtige stofforientierte Lehrplänen mit ideologisch aufgeladenen Meistererzählungen fordern?

Die Subjektorientierung betont zunächst einmal den Wert der individuellen historischen Fähigkeiten und Fertigkeiten, aber auch Interessen und Motivationen, ohne etwas über die zu unterrichtenden Inhalte historischen Lernens auszusagen. Jedoch hat die Diagnostik derartiger im Subjekt veranlagter Eigenschaften und Interessen zwangsläufig auch einen Einfluss darauf, welche Inhalte konkret unterrichtet werden sollten. Wenn unter Subjektorientierung auch die Hinwendung zu den individuellen Interessen verstanden wird, kann dies auch die Abkehr von verbindlichen Inhalten oder gar einem Kanon für den Geschichtsunterricht bedeuten. Gegenstand des historischen Lernens wären demnach nicht die großen, verbindenden Geschichten, sondern die vielen kleinen Geschichten, welche im sozio-kulturell geprägten Alltag der Schüler*innen Bedeutung haben.[1]

Achtung vor den Lehrplänen!

Aber: Geschichtsunterricht findet in Gesellschaften statt, die sich in dieser Frage, ob das lernende Subjekt relevant für die Gestaltung von Geschichtsunterricht ist, alles andere als einig sind. Lehrpläne etwa sind auch “Verwaltungsvorschriften” und “Planungsinstrumente”, die zwar wissenschaftlich beeinflusst sein mögen, in der Regel aber Ausdruck politischer Meinungsbildung sind. Politische Meinungen oder Mehrheiten können sich jedoch rasch ändern. Die Frage, ob Lehrpläne dann noch wissenschaftlichen Standards entsprechen sollen, hängt davon ab, welches Vertrauen politische Entscheider*innen überhaupt in die Wissenschaft haben. Im Zuge des Erstarkens rechtsextremer Parteien, der Skepsis an akademischen Diskursen und der Forderung nach einer Stärkung nationaler Identitäten werden schon jetzt Versuche unternommen, die Geschichtswissenschaft und somit auch den Geschichtsunterricht für politische Zwecke zu missbrauchen und nationale Meistererzählungen wiederzuerwecken. Dies zeigt sich beispielsweise in Polen und Ungarn.[2] Aber auch in Deutschland propagiert die rechtsextreme AfD einen Geschichtsunterricht, der Patriotismus und eine national definierte Identitätsbildung fördern soll.[3] Die heuristische Errungenschaft, dass Identitäten in diversen Gesellschaften nur im Plural gedacht werden können, wird dabei negativ bewertet. Flankiert werden solche Positionen überdies gelegentlich auch von wissenschaftlicher Seite. Jörn Rüsen etwa vertritt die Position, dass es gerade aufgrund der Vielfalt der Gesellschaft einer “Leitkultur” bedürfe, welche historische Orientierung auch für neu zugewanderte Bürger*innen ermögliche. Die ‘eigenen’, identitätsstiftenden ‘Kulturleistungen’ böten dabei einen Anlass für eine gemeinschaftsbildende Tradition, etwa durch Bezug auf die Personen Luther, Humboldt, Schleiermacher, Kant oder Herder.[4]

Chance zur Machtkritik

Wie kann der Geschichtsunterricht auf diese verschiedenen Erwartungshaltungen reagieren? Martin Lücke schreibt zutreffend, dass Geschichtsunterricht in Gesellschaften stattfindet, die mit “machtvollen Mechanismen” Ausgrenzung, Integration und Teilhabe steuern.[5] Geschichtsunterricht ist ein Teil dieser Gesellschaften. Daher sollte es nicht dabei bleiben, diese Mechanismen nur in ihrer historischen Dimension zu betrachten. Vielmehr gilt es, auch die Gegenwart historischen Lernens mit den Schüler*innen zu de-konstruieren, mit ihnen den machtvollen Widerspruch zwischen Subjektorientierung (“Eure Interessen sind ein wesentlicher Impuls für den Geschichtsunterricht”) und Geschichtspolitik (“Geschichtsunterricht ist nationale Identitätsbildung mit entsprechenden Inhalten”) zu erörtern.

Wird Subjektorientierung umfassend und nicht nur als Ansatz zur Diagnostik von Lernausgangslagen und Ermöglichung individueller Lernwege verstanden, so muss mit den Lernenden auch reflektiert werden, warum ihre Interessen möglicherweise in den normativen Forderungen der Bildungspolitik unberücksichtigt bleiben. In der De-Konstruktion des Geschichtsunterrichts und seiner Bedingungen in der Gesellschaft kann damit auch ein Beitrag zur Subjektorientierung liegen, etwa indem die Abwesenheit von Schüler*innenorientierung mit den Lernenden thematisiert wird. Lehrpläne müssten in Frage gestellt werden: Welche Interessen haben Politiker*innen, aber auch Wissenschaftler*innen, ‘ihre’ Geschichten als die im Unterricht zu behandelnden zu bevorzugen? Welche Interessen haben die Lehrer*innen? Welche Interessen habe ich? Warum steht in den Lehrplänen etwas über Regionalgeschichte, die Geschichte Chinas aber bleibt verborgen? Was sagt das Fehlen von Subjektorientierung und der mit ihr auch verbundenen Forderung des Entwickelns eigener Fragen durch die Lernenden über die staatliche Politik aus? Warum brauchen wir überhaupt Lehrpläne?

Letztlich müsste auch im Unterricht die Autorität von Lehrplänen in Frage gestellt werden. Natürlich wird es Lehrer*innen in Loyalitätsprobleme bringen, wenn sie die Schüler*innen dazu ermuntern, gegenwärtige Herrschaftsverhältnisse in Frage zu stellen. Aber ist historisches Denken nicht auch immer Machtkritik? Bedeutet Subjektorientierung nicht auch, die einzelnen zur Machtkritik zu befähigen?

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Sirkka, Ahonen. “Politics of identity through history curriculum: Narratives of the past for social exclusion or inclusion?.” Journal of Curriculum Studies 33, no. 2 (2001): 179-194. https://doi.org/10.1080/00220270010011202.
  • Claire, Alexander, and Weekes-Bernard, Debbie. “History lessons: inequality, diversity and the national curriculum.” Race Ethnicity and Education 20, no. 4 (2017): 478-494. https://doi.org/10.1080/13613324.2017.1294571.
  • Paulson, Julia. “‘Whether and How?’ History Education about Recent and Ongoing Conflict: A Review of Research.” Journal on Education in Emergencies 1, (2017): 115-141. https://doi.org/10.17609/n84h20.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] Martin Lücke, “Diversität und Intersektionalität als Konzepte der Geschichtsdidaktik,” in Handbuch Praxis des Geschichtsunterrichts, ed. Michele Barricelli and Martin Lücke (Schwalbach/Ts: Wochenschau Verlag, 2017), 145.
[2] “Türkei, Ungarn, Polen: Wie mit Schulbüchern Politik gemacht wird,” DW. Made for minds, https://www.dw.com/de/türkei-ungarn-polen-wie-mit-schulbüchern-politik-gemacht-wird/a-41006339 (last accessed 13 October 2019).
[3] “Geschichtsunterricht sollte zu Demokraten und Patrioten erziehen,” 8. November 2016, AfD Kompakt, https://afdkompakt.de/2016/11/08/geschichtsunterricht-sollte-zu-demokraten-und-patrioten-erziehen/ (letzter Zugriff 13. Oktober 2019).
[4] Jörn Rüsen, “Deutsche Kultur – gähnende Leere oder wirksame Orientierung,” 21. September 2017, L.I.S.A. Wissenschaftsportal Gerda Henkel Stiftunglisa, gerda-henkel-stiftung.de/deutsche_kultur_gaehnende_leere_oder_wirksame_orientierung?nav_id=7256 (letzter Zugriff 13. Oktober 2019).
[5] Martin Lücke, “Diversität und Intersektionalität als Konzepte der Geschichtsdidaktik,” in Handbuch Praxis des Geschichtsunterrichts, ed. Michele Barricelli and Martin Lücke (Schwalbach/Ts: Wochenschau Verlag, 2017), 136.

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Curriculum Vitae Graffiti © Japleenpasricha CC BY-SA 4.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Barsch, Sebastian: Subjektorientierung und Machtkritik. In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 29, DOI:  dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-14614.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Isabella Schild / Thomas Hellmuth (Team Vienna)

Copyright (c) 2019 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 7 (2019) 29
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-14614

Tags: , ,

3 replies »

  1. To all our non-German speaking readers we recommend the automatic DeepL-Translator for 8 European languages. Just copy and paste.

    Sachlichkeit als Vernunftgebot

    Es kränkt mich, mit meinen Überlegungen zur Geschichtskultur, insbesondere zum Themenbereich der historischen Identität, als wissenschaftlichen Flankenschutz der AFD diffamiert zu werden. Eine solche Art der Qualifikation ist dazu angetan, die allgemeine Vergiftung öffentlicher Diskurse über Politik und Gesellschaft ein erhebliches Stück weiter zu treiben und im Diskurs der Geschichtsdidaktik Fuß fassen zu lassen. Wer auch nur eine oberflächliche Kenntnis meiner Vorstellung zur Geschichtskultur, Identität und Leitkultur hat, sollte wissen, dass ich etwas völlig anderes im Sinn habe als die AfD. Dass Nation zu einem Schlüsselbegriff rechter Populisten geworden ist, kann ohne die Tatsache nicht verständlich gemacht werden, dass dieses Thema trotz seiner enormen Bedeutung für die moderne Gesellschaft und seiner unbestreitbaren Wichtigkeit für die Geschichtskultur der Gegenwart,[1] von der Geschichtsdidaktik nicht intensiv kritisch aufgegriffen, sondern mit der Selbstpositionierung als post-national den rechten populistischen Bewegungen überlassen wurde.

    Dabei bildet sich im Rahmen der europäischen Einigung neben dem Rekurs auf traditionalistischen Nationalismus ein ganz anderes und neues Konzept nationaler Zugehörigkeit aus. Es bedürfte intensiver geschichtsdidaktischer Analyse (etwa im Anschluss an die konkreten Arbeiten des Georg-Eckert-Instituts für internationale Schulbuchforschung). Beispielhaft für diese geschichtskulturelle Innovation stehen das deutsch-französische Verhältnis oder einschlägige Diskurse in Skandinavien. Statt diesen Veränderungen nachzuspüren, wird mein Versuch mit Mitteln einer simplen politischen Diffamierung zurückgeschlagen. Wenn es schon nichts zu diskutieren gibt, dann reichen Schläge unter die akademische Gürtellinie sachlicher Argumentation aus, um Hinweise auf Realitätsverweigerungen und Diskurslücken abzulehnen.

    Zur Sache möchte ich darauf aufmerksam machen, dass es seit den siebziger Jahren des vorigen Jahrhunderts eine einschlägige und recht kontroverse Diskussion über den Begriff “Schülerinteresse” gibt. Schon hier wurden subjektive Schülerinteressen gegen objektive Machtinteressen gesellschaftlicher Institutionen ausgespielt. Sollte es nicht angesichts der in dieser Diskussion sich bekämpfenden politischen Gegensätze und ihrer fundamentalen Unverträglichkeit nicht besser darum gehen, den Geschichtsunterricht auf die gültigen Verfassungsprinzipien der Legitimität von Macht hin zu organisieren und die Schülerinnen und Schüler als potentielle Bürgerinnen und Bürger einer modernen Demokratie anzusprechen? Angesichts der aktuellen Auflösung eines tragfähigen Gemeinsinns der politischen Kultur bedarf diese Grundlage dringend einer Verstärkung durch die historische und politische Bildung.

    Fußnoten

    [1] Stefan Berger, The Past as History. National Identity and Historical Consciousness in Modern Europe (London: Palgrave Macmillan 2015); Stefan Berger und Chris Lorenz, Nationalizing the Past. Historians as Nation Builders in Modern Europe (London: Palgrave Macmillan 2010).
    [2] Annette Kuhn, “Schüler- und Schülerinneninteresse,” in Handbuch der Geschichtsdidaktik, ed. Klaus Bergmann, Klaus Fröhlich, Anette Kuhn, Jörn Rüsen und Gerhard Schneider (Seelze-Velber: Kallmeyer, 1997), 357 – 361.
    [3] Siehe dazu: Jörn Rüsen, “Gesellschaftsvertrag – Historische Skizze einer Idee mit einem Ausblick auf die Gegenwart,” in Gespaltenes Land. Brauchen wir einen neuen Gesellschaftsvertrag? ed. Holk Freytag (Dresden: Sandstein, 2018), 26-42.

  2. To all our non-German speaking readers we recommend the automatic DeepL-Translator for 8 European languages. Just copy and paste.

    Komplexität als Notwendigkeit

    Wir geraten nun in den Austausch über einen anderen als den von mir verfassten Text. Auf diesen habe ich zugegebenermaßen überspitzt verwiesen, so dass ich Ihren Widerspruch nachvollziehen kann. Gerne möchte ich daher einige Gedanken weiter ausführen.

    Bez. der Anmerkung, dass ich Ihre “Überlegungen zur Geschichtskultur, insbesondere zum Themenbereich der historischen Identität” außer Acht lassen würde, möchte ich betonen, dass ich mich nicht auf Ihr Gesamtwerk beziehe, sondern auf Ihren Beitrag zur deutschen Kultur, den Sie 2017 als Reaktion auf eine Kolumne der damaligen Integrationsbeauftragten des Bundes A. Özoğuz verfassten.[1] Sicher, es handelt sich um einen Meinungsbeitrag, er kommt ohne weitere Verweise aus. Jedoch werden die vertretenen Positionen im Duktus der wissenschaftlichen Autorität vorgetragen. Das Format garantiert eine Reichweite, die wissenschaftliche Publikationen oft nicht haben. Komplexe Fragen, die kontrovers verhandelt werden, werden bei Ihnen indes verkürzt dargestellt. Ich möchte die Inhalte der Repliken auf Ihren Beitrag nicht wiederholen, sie sind nachzulesen. Nur ausschnitthaft: Die Kritik an der vermeintlichen “Evidenz einer spezifisch deutschen Kultur” wurde umfassend etwa von A. Körber vorgebracht, der argumentiert, dass der Begriff “Kulturen” (im Plural) analytisch durchaus hilfreich ist, um gesellschaftliche Gemeinsamkeiten zu erfassen. Normativ wirkt er jedoch exkludierend, v.a. dann, wenn unter Verweis auf eine “nationale” Kultur “bestimmtes Verhalten und Denken” gefordert wird.[2]

    Kritisierbar sind für mich zudem die im Beitrag verwendeten rhetorischen Mittel, die einer nüchternen Analyse nicht unbedingt Vorschub leisten. So wird Özoğuz’ nur verkürzt wiedergegeben. Den Satz, dass es eine “spezifisch deutsche Kultur […] jenseits der Sprache” nicht gäbe, ergänzt sie nämlich: “Schon historisch haben eher regionale Kulturen, haben Einwanderung und Vielfalt unsere Geschichte geprägt. Globalisierung und Pluralisierung von Lebenswelten führen zu einer weiteren Vervielfältigung von Vielfalt.”[3]
    Ebenso kritisch erscheint mir die Gegenüberstellung vermeintlich homogener Gruppen. Sie sprechen von der “Integration des Holocaust in das historische Selbstbild der Deutschen” als eine “Leistung”, welche die “türkisch-stämmigen Einwanderer” mit “ihrem Völkermord an den Armeniern nicht schaffen”. Wer sind denn DIE Deutschen und DIE türkisch-stämmigen Einwanderer, warum existieren sie in diesem Text nur als Kollektiv? Auch darauf wurde schon kritisch eingegangen.[4]

    Ihrer Kritik, ich würde “Schläge unter die akademische Gürtellinie sachlicher Argumentation” austeilen möchte ich entgegnen, dass ich aus Ihrem Text vor allem eine nicht ausgewogene normative Forderung nach einer national definierten Identität herauslese. Ich denke daher nicht, dass meine Reaktion darauf ein Befördern der “Vergiftung öffentlicher Diskurse über Politik und Gesellschaft“ ist. Sie ist eine öffentliche Reaktion auf einen öffentlichen Beitrag, der vor allem geschichtspolitisch argumentiert. Ja, Schule und Geschichtsunterricht sind politisch gewollte Institutionen der Geschichtskultur (im Sinne ihrer politischen und wissenschaftlichen Dimensionen) und somit Teil der praktisch wirksamen Artikulation von Geschichtsbewusstsein in der Gesellschaft. Aber: Welche Artikulationen von welchen Gruppen können im Machtgefüge praktisch wirksam werden?
    Ich stimme überein, dass “Nation” von der Geschichtsdidaktik kritisch aufgegriffen werden muss. Es gibt nationale Identitäten in der Selbstverortung von Individuen und Staaten. Bedenklich wird es, wenn (von wem auch immer) bestimmt wird, wie diese Identitäten auszusehen hätten. Ein solches Verständnis wäre auch ein Rückschritt zum aktuellen wissenschaftlichen Diskurs, in dem selbst-kritische Praktiken in nationalen Geschichtsschreibungen ebenso immer größeren Raum einnehmen wie die zahlreichen “forms of writing both sub- and transnational forms of history”[5] Dies bedeutet eben auch, dass die Aushandlungsprozesse über “Nation” und “nationale Identität” offengelegt werden. Gleiches gilt für den Diskurs darüber, was unter “Kulturleistungen” verstanden werden kann.

    Das Gelingen von Integration sollte an Kriterien wie die Akzeptanz von Verfassungsprinzipien und der Zustimmung zu demokratischen Werten und nicht an ein Bekenntnis zu (geschichts)kulturellen Inhalten, die über machtvolle Positionen als “gemeinsam sinnhaft (kulturell)” verbindlich gesetzt werden, gekoppelt werden. Fraglich ist nicht die Sinnhaftigkeit einer solchen Kohärenz an sich, sondern die Frage, unter welchen Bedingungen sie erreicht wird.
    Oft prägen einfache Antworten auf komplexe Fragen öffentliche Diskurse auch in Fragen des historischen Selbstverständnisses von Gesellschaft. Es sind andere Strategie nötig, um der Pluralität der Sichtweisen gerecht zu werden. Beiträge zu dieser Debatte sollten m.E. wesentlich differenzierter unter Einbezug kontroverser Perspektiven auch den eigenen Anspruch auf Deutungsmacht kritisch hinterfragen und diese kritische Selbstverortung offenlegen.

    [1] Jörn Rüsen, Deutsche Kultur–gähnende Leere oder wirksame Orientierung?, https://lisa.gerda-henkel-stiftung.de/deutsche_kultur_gaehnende_leere_oder_wirksame_orientierung?nav_id=7256 (20.11.2019)
    [2] Andreas Körber, Zur Debatte um “Deutsche Kultur”, https://lisa.gerda-henkel-stiftung.de/andreas_koerber_zur_debatte_um_deutsche_kultur?nav_id=7269 (20.11.2019)
    [3] Aydan Özoğuz, “Gesellschaftsvertrag statt Leitkultur”, Tagesspiegel vom 14. Mai 2017, https://causa.tagesspiegel.de/gesellschaft/wie-nuetzlich-ist-eine-leitkultur-debatte/leitkultur-verkommt-zum-klischee-des-deutschseins.html (20.11.2019)
    [4] Nina Reusch, Zur Debatte um “Deutsche Kultur“, https://lisa.gerda-henkel-stiftung.de/nina_reusch_zur_debatte_um_deutsche_kultur?nav_id=7274 (20.11.2019).
    [5] Stefan Berger, The Past as History. National Identity and Historical Consciousness in Modern Europe (London 2015), 357.

  3. To all our non-German speaking readers we recommend the automatic DeepL-Translator for 8 European languages. Just copy and paste.

    Ich stimme zu, dass es nützlich wäre, “differenzierter” unter Einbezug kontroverser Perspektiven auch den eigenen Anspruch auf Deutungsmacht kritisch zu hinterfragen und diese kritische Selbstverortung offenzulegen. Nur: Wie soll das in der Form kurzer Beiträge in Public History Weekly erfolgen? Meine “Selbstverortung” liegt in meinen Publikationen vor.
    Was die angesprochenen Fragen betrifft, so fordere ich einen common sense der politischen Kultur unseres Landes als Bedingung der Möglichkeit einer funktionierenden Demokratie ein. Diesen common sense würde die kulturelle Grundüberzeugung derjenigen ausmachen, die bewusst Bürgerinnen und Bürger unseres Staates sind oder sein wollen. Es wäre nützlich, hier Vorschläge zu unterbreiten, statt gegen eine missliebige Position zu polemisieren.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest