The Tension Between Historical Thinking and Historical Culture

Im Spannungsfeld von historischem Denken und Geschichtskultur

 

Abstract: When following the debate around history teaching, it becomes apparent that opinions vary widely. In this regard, it often remains unclear in how far conflicting demands are made when it comes to historical learning. This article argues that it is helpful to describe historical learning as a trilemma.
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-14602
Languages: English, German


When following the debate around history teaching, it becomes apparent that opinions vary widely. In this regard, it often remains unclear in how far conflicting demands are made when it comes to historical learning. This article argues that it is helpful to describe historical learning as a trilemma.

A Relevant Category?

“Upon summarizing the findings of the scientific analysis […], it becomes clear that the constructiveness of history and subjectivity representing moments of historical recognition and learning in the past 250 years have virtually been fundamental axioms of the debate.”[1] Despite the explicit manner in which Wolfgang Hasberg lays out his findings regarding the scientific discourse, it would appear that they contradict many experiences in history lessons. Conversely, it has become ever clearer in empirical studies that historical terms which are in stark contrast to this discourse are in fact often used by pupils. For example, “blank positivity” occurred highly frequently in those end-of-year high school exams which were looked at—with no sign whatsoever of subjectivity and constructiveness.[2] It is not rare for experiences with history lessons to be disillusioning as well as problematic in the eyes of the pupils, as the lessons fail to produce adequate references to the subject: “I never liked history at school. What’s the point of people like us studying history? I find it dull and irrelevant.”[3]

Furthermore, empirical research has also led to the conclusion that historical learning takes place in the history lesson when pupils are able to produce references to their historical identity constructions, meaning that a reference to the subject is successfully established.[4] The continued discussion about the significance of subject orientation in historical learning is certainly worthwhile, as this matter is handled in very different ways within historical-didactic concepts regarding historical thinking and learning.

Three Dimensions

One approach to historical learning is to differentiate between the elaboration of historical thinking, the extension of and reflection on one’s own access to historical orientations, and the introduction to and reflection of historical culture:[5] Because historical learning typically falls back on historical-cultural media and therefore discusses conventional questions, interpretations, and concepts in school books for example, it is consequently always to be understood as an introduction to historical culture. Due to historical-culturally relevant narratives changing at the same time as well as the fact that it remains to be seen which narratives young people have to deal with in future, historical learning aims at dealing with these histories in a critical manner, as adhered to by the competency model of historical thinking for example.[6] However, such development in competence is to be expected above all when pupils ascribe meaning to the questions being dealt with.

Therefore, historical learning in this sense should not on the one hand be solely geared to the needs of the pupils regarding historical orientation, because it always remains anchored in historical-cultural discussions whilst the specific needs of pupils require reflection. On the other hand, such subjective input also should not be excluded from historical learning, as the establishment and reflection of the needs of pupils constitutes a requirement for learning and educational processes. The systematic interrelationship between the pupils’ historical identity constructions within the context of historical culture and the capacities of historical thinking offers scope in terms of how this can both be explained from a theoretical standpoint and be deemed integrable from a pragmatic point of view.

Trilemma of the History Lesson

If the history lesson aims to use historical learning which can be differentiated through the three dimensions named, the important question is how such a teaching term can specifically be made useful for the history lesson. As such, there exists a complex tension amidst varying demands, as it is impossible to take into consideration the competences of historical thinking, the subject orientation of the pupils and historical culture at the same time. One solution is to comprehend historical learning as a trilemma, meaning three demands, whereby the combination of only two of them is to be always implemented whilst the third is (temporarily) excluded.[7] The three sides of the triangle can be termed accordingly so that different access channels can be made visible for the conception of the lesson. The following three access channels can be discerned:

– Competence-oriented historical learning with a view to historical identities. This represents a lesson which places emphasis on independent historical narratives,[8] or—to use the competence-theoretical term—reconstruction competency. It is particularly important to give the pupils the opportunity to be able to tell truly independent narratives. The many papers handed in for the Federal President’s history competition certainly serve as a prime example.
– Competence-oriented historical learning with a view to historical culture: This constitutes a lesson which places emphasis on the deconstruction of historical narratives in historical culture. A platform is provided where controversial narratives are compared to one another based not only on which can be plausibly justified but also on who supports them and based on which interests. For example, a lesson can focus on the debates over street names and their name changes, whereby the resulting historical constructions of meaning are examined whilst being compared to each other.
– Historical learning as a reflection of identity in the context of historical culture: This is a lesson which brings up the discussion about how the pupils react to various narratives in historical culture in terms of which ones they find convincing and which ones they reject. Exemplarily, a lesson can be called in which the pupils receive the opportunity to take positions on street name changes or other controversial issues requiring interpretation. Of course, this can only be devised as an open, non-compulsory discussion forum when dealing with pupils in schools.

In conclusion, a pragmatic perspective stipulates that not all demands of historical learning are to be met at the same time during history lessons, and that no lesson discusses the three dimensions of historical learning in equal measure. Above all, it is important to identify and justify the respective focal points within a theoretical framework. At the same time, the conceptualization of the trilemma also serves to shift between access channels during a series of lessons so that all three dimensions of historical learning can explicitly be taken into account.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Meyer-Hamme, Johannes. Historische Identitäten und Geschichtsunterricht: Fallstudien zum Verhältnis von kultureller Zugehörigkeit, schulischen Anforderungen und individueller Verarbeitung. Idstein: Schulz-Kirchner, 2009.
  • Meyer-Hamme, Johannes. “Was heißt ‘historisches Lernen’? Eine Begriffsbestimmung im Spannungsfeld gesellschaftlicher Anforderungen, subjektiver Bedeutungszuschreibungen und Kompetenzen historischen Denkens.” In Geschichtsunterricht im 21. Jahrhundert: Eine geschichtsdidaktische Standortbestimmung, Hrsg. Thomas Sandkühler, Charlotte Bühl-Gramer, Anke John, Astrid Schwabe und Markus Bernhardt, 75-92. Göttingen: V&R unipress, 2018.
  • Boger, Mai-Anh. Theorien der Inklusion: Die Theorie der trilemmatischen Inklusion zum Mitdenken. Münster: edition assemblage, 2019.

Web Resources

_____________________
[1] Wolfgang Hasberg, “Canossa – Ein Erinnerungsort in Bedrängnis. Zur Dignität historischen Wissens im Deutungsgeschäft Geschichte,” in Historisches Wissen. Geschichtsdidaktische Erkundung zu Art, Tiefe und Umfang für das historische Lernen, ed. Christoph Kühberger (Schwalbach/Ts.: Wochenschau-Verlag, 2012), 213–236.
[2] Bernd Schönemann, Holger Thünemann, and Meik Zülsdorf-Kersting, Was können Abiturienten? Zugleich ein Beitrag zur Debatte über Kompetenzen und Standards im Fach Geschichte (Berlin: LIT Verlag, 2010), 141.
[3] Gillian Wilson, “Our History or Your History? (Part 1). An Assessment of the issues associated with teaching history to meet the needs of a multicultural society,” Teaching History 86 (1997): 6–7.
[4] Johannes Meyer-Hamme, Historische Identitäten und Geschichtsunterricht: Fallstudien zum Verhältnis von kultureller Zugehörigkeit, schulischen Anforderungen und individueller Verarbeitung (Idstein: Schulz-Kirchner, 2009).
[5] Johannes Meyer-Hamme, “Was heißt ‘historisches Lernen’? Eine Begriffsbestimmung im Spannungsfeld gesellschaftlicher Anforderungen, subjektiver Bedeutungszuschreibungen und Kompetenzen historischen Denkens,” in Geschichtsunterricht im 21. Jahrhundert: Eine geschichtsdidaktische Standortbestimmung, eds. Thomas Sandkühler, Charlotte Bühl-Gramer, Anke John, Astrid Schwabe, and Markus Bernhardt (Göttingen: V&R unipress, 2018), 75-92.
[6] Andreas Körber, Waltraud Schreiber, and Alexander Schöner, eds., Kompetenzen historischen Denkens: Ein Strukturmodell als Beitrag zur Kompetenz-Orientierung in der Geschichtsdidaktik (Neuried: Ars una, 2007).
[7] Mai-Anh Boger, Theorien der Inklusion: Die Theorie der trilemmatischen Inklusion zum Mitdenken (Münster: edition assemblage, 2019).
[8] Jörn Rüsen, Historisches Lernen: Grundlagen und Paradigmen (Köln/Weimar/Wien: Böhlau, 1994).

_____________________

Image Credits

Pyramid Forms. Views of the Louvre Pyramid. © 2017 Bill Smith, via Flickr CC BY 2.0.

Recommended Citation

Meyer-Hamme, Johannes: The Tension between Historical Thinking and Historical Culture. In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 29, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-14602.

Editorial Responsibility

Judith Breitfuss / Thomas Hellmuth (Team Vienna)

Bei der Auseinandersetzung mit der Debatte um den Geschichtsunterricht fällt auf, dass sehr unterschiedliche Positionen formuliert werden. Dabei ist oft unklar, in welchem Verhältnis widersprüchliche Ansprüche an das historische Lernen gestellt werden. Hilfreich ist es, historisches Lernen als Trilemma zu beschreiben.

Eine relevante Kategorie?

“Fasst man die Befunde der wissenschaftlichen Analyse zusammen […], dann ist zu konstatieren, dass die Konstruktivität von Geschichte und die Subjektivität als Momente historischen Erkennens und Lernens in den letzten 250 Jahren geradezu fundamentale Axiome des Diskurses gewesen sind.”[1] So eindeutig, wie dies Wolfgang Hasberg für den wissenschaftlichen Diskurs beschreibt, so sehr steht dies im Widerspruch zu vielen Erfahrungen aus dem Geschichtsunterricht. In empirischen Studien wird immer wieder deutlich, dass nicht selten ein Geschichtsbegriff bei den Lernenden dominiert, der zu diesem Diskurs in einem krassen Widerspruch steht. So dominierte in untersuchten Abiturklausuren der “blanke Positivismus” – von Subjektivität und Konstruktivität keine Spur.[2] Nicht selten sind die Erfahrungen mit Geschichtsunterricht ernüchternd und aus Sicht der Lernenden problematisch, weil sie keine Subjektbezüge herstellen: “I never liked history at school. What’s the point of people like us studying history? I find it dull and irrelevant.”[3]

Andererseits zeigt sich empirisch ebenfalls, dass historisches Lernen im Geschichtsunterricht stattfindet, wenn die Lernenden Bezüge zu ihren historischen Identitätskonstruktionen herstellen können, also ein Subjektbezug gelingt.[4] Es lohnt sich, den Stellenwert der Subjektorientierung im historischen Lernen weiter zu diskutieren, denn in den geschichtsdidaktischen Konzepten zum historischen Denken und Lernen wird diese Frage recht unterschiedlich beantwortet.

Drei Dimensionen

Ein Ansatz, historisches Lernen zu denken, ist, zwischen der Elaboration historischen Denkens, der Erweiterung und Reflexion des eigenen Zugangs zu historischen Orientierungen und der Einführung in und Reflexion von Geschichtskultur zu unterscheiden:[5] Weil jedes historische Lernen auf geschichtskulturelle Medien zurückgreift und damit beispielsweise in Schulbüchern konventionelle Fragestellungen, Deutungen und Konzepte thematisiert, ist es immer auch als eine Einführung in die Geschichtskultur zu verstehen. Da sich zugleich die geschichtskulturell relevanten Erzählungen wandeln und offen ist, mit welchen Narrationen die Jugendlichen in Zukunft umgehen müssen, zielt historisches Lernen auf einen kritischen Umgang mit diesen Geschichten, wie dies etwa im Kompetenzmodell historischen Denkens festgehalten wird.[6] Eine solche Kompetenzentwicklung ist aber vor allem dann zu erwarten, wenn die Lernenden den verhandelten Fragen eine Bedeutung zuschreiben.

Historisches Lernen in diesem Sinne sollte sich also weder allein an den historischen Orientierungsbedürfnissen der Lernenden orientieren, weil es immer in geschichtskulturelle Diskurse eingebettet bleibt und diese reflexionsbedürftig sind. Noch sollten beim historischen Lernen diese subjektiven Zugänge ausgeklammert werden, weil die Anknüpfung an und Reflexion von diesen eine Voraussetzung für Lern- und Bildungsprozesse ist. Die systematische Verzahnung der historischen Identitätskonstruktion der Lernenden im Kontext von Geschichtskultur und den Fähigkeiten historischen Denkens bietet einen Rahmen, wie dies theoretisch begründet und pragmatisch anschlussfähig gemacht werden kann.

Trilemma des Geschichtsunterrichts

Wenn Geschichtsunterricht auf historisches Lernen zielt und dieses durch die drei genannten Dimensionen differenziert werden kann, dann stellt sich die Frage, wie ein solcher Lernbegriff konkret für den Geschichtsunterricht nutzbar gemacht werden kann. Dabei stehen die unterschiedlichen Anforderungen in einem Spannungsverhältnis zueinander, denn zugleich die Kompetenzen historischen Denkens, die Subjektorientierung der Lernenden und Geschichtskultur zu berücksichtigen, ist nicht möglich. Abhilfe schafft hier, historisches Lernen als Trilemma zu begreifen, also als drei Anforderungen, von denen immer nur die Kombination von zwei zu verwirklichen sind und die dritte (vorläufig) ausgeklammert wird.[7] Die Seiten des Dreiecks können dann benannt werden, so dass verschiedene Zugriffe für die Unterrichtskonzeption sichtbar werden. Zu unterscheiden wären dann drei Zugriffe:

– Kompetenzorientiertes Geschichtslernen mit Blick auf historische Identitäten: Dies ist ein Unterricht, der auf das eigenständige historische Erzählen setzt,[8] kompetenztheoretisch ausgedrückt auf die Re-Konstruktionskompetenz. Wichtig ist hier, den Lernenden die Möglichkeit zu geben, wirklich eigenständige Geschichten erzählen zu können. Als Paradebeispiele sind hier sicherlich viele Arbeiten zum Geschichtswettbewerb des Bundespräsidenten zu sehen.
– Kompetenzorientiertes Geschichtslernen mit Blick auf Geschichtskultur: Dies ist ein Unterricht, der auf die De-Konstruktion historischer Erzählungen in der Geschichtskultur setzt. Es können kontroverse Erzählungen daraufhin verglichen werden, welche plausibel begründet werden können, aber auch, wer diese aus welchen Interessen vertritt. Exemplarisch kann ein Unterricht über die Debatten um Straßennamen und deren Umbenennungen genannt werden, bei dem die dabei formulierten historischen Sinnbildungen vergleichend untersucht werden.
– Geschichtslernen als Identitätsreflexion im Kontext von Geschichtskultur: Dies ist ein Unterricht, der thematisiert, wie sich die Lernenden zu unterschiedlichen Erzählungen in der Geschichtskultur verhalten, welche sie überzeugend finden, welche sie ablehnen. Exemplarisch kann ein Unterricht genannt werden, in dem die Lernenden die Möglichkeit bekommen, sich zu Straßenumbenennungen oder anderen kontroversen Deutungsfragen, positionieren können. Selbstverständlich kann dies in der Institution Schule nur als Gesprächsangebot an die Lernenden konzipiert werden, nicht als Zwang.

In pragmatischer Perspektive ist also festzuhalten, dass in Geschichtsstunden nicht alle Forderungen historischen Lernens gleichzeitig zu bedienen sind, mehr noch, dass kein Unterricht die drei Dimensionen historischen Lernens gleichermaßen thematisiert. Es geht vor allem darum, die jeweiligen Schwerpunktsetzungen in einem theoretischen Rahmen zu verorten und zu begründen. Zugleich dient die Konzeption des Trilemmas auch dazu, im Laufe einer Unterrichtsreihe die Zugriffe zu wechseln, so dass alle drei Dimensionen historischen Lernens explizit berücksichtigt werden können.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Meyer-Hamme, Johannes. Historische Identitäten und Geschichtsunterricht: Fallstudien zum Verhältnis von kultureller Zugehörigkeit, schulischen Anforderungen und individueller Verarbeitung. Idstein: Schulz-Kirchner, 2009.
  • Meyer-Hamme, Johannes. “Was heißt ‘historisches Lernen’? Eine Begriffsbestimmung im Spannungsfeld gesellschaftlicher Anforderungen, subjektiver Bedeutungszuschreibungen und Kompetenzen historischen Denkens.” In Geschichtsunterricht im 21. Jahrhundert: Eine geschichtsdidaktische Standortbestimmung, Hrsg. Thomas Sandkühler, Charlotte Bühl-Gramer, Anke John, Astrid Schwabe und Markus Bernhardt, 75-92. Göttingen: V&R unipress, 2018.
  • Boger, Mai-Anh. Theorien der Inklusion: Die Theorie der trilemmatischen Inklusion zum Mitdenken. Münster: edition assemblage, 2019.

Webressourcen

_____________________
[1] Wolfgang Hasberg, “Canossa – Ein Erinnerungsort in Bedrängnis. Zur Dignität historischen Wissens im Deutungsgeschäft Geschichte,” in Historisches Wissen. Geschichtsdidaktische Erkundung zu Art, Tiefe und Umfang für das historische Lernen, ed. Christoph Kühberger (Schwalbach/Ts.: Wochenschau-Verlag, 2012), 213–236.
[2] Bernd Schönemann, Holger Thünemann, and Meik Zülsdorf-Kersting, Was können Abiturienten? Zugleich ein Beitrag zur Debatte über Kompetenzen und Standards im Fach Geschichte (Berlin: LIT Verlag, 2010), 141.
[3] Gillian Wilson, “Our History or Your History? (Part 1). An Assessment of the issues associated with teaching history to meet the needs of a multicultural society,” Teaching History 86 (1997): 6–7.
[4] Johannes Meyer-Hamme, Historische Identitäten und Geschichtsunterricht: Fallstudien zum Verhältnis von kultureller Zugehörigkeit, schulischen Anforderungen und individueller Verarbeitung (Idstein: Schulz-Kirchner, 2009).
[5] Johannes Meyer-Hamme, “Was heißt ‘historisches Lernen’? Eine Begriffsbestimmung im Spannungsfeld gesellschaftlicher Anforderungen, subjektiver Bedeutungszuschreibungen und Kompetenzen historischen Denkens,” in Geschichtsunterricht im 21. Jahrhundert: Eine geschichtsdidaktische Standortbestimmung, eds. Thomas Sandkühler, Charlotte Bühl-Gramer, Anke John, Astrid Schwabe, and Markus Bernhardt (Göttingen: V&R unipress, 2018), 75-92.
[6] Andreas Körber, Waltraud Schreiber, and Alexander Schöner, eds., Kompetenzen historischen Denkens: Ein Strukturmodell als Beitrag zur Kompetenz-Orientierung in der Geschichtsdidaktik (Neuried: Ars una, 2007).
[7] Mai-Anh Boger, Theorien der Inklusion: Die Theorie der trilemmatischen Inklusion zum Mitdenken (Münster: edition assemblage, 2019).
[8] Jörn Rüsen, Historisches Lernen: Grundlagen und Paradigmen (Köln/Weimar/Wien: Böhlau, 1994).

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Pyramid Forms. Views of the Louvre Pyramid. © 2017 Bill Smith, via Flickr CC BY 2.0.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Meyer-Hamme, Johannes: The Tension between Historical Thinking and Historical Culture. In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 29, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-14602.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Judith Breitfuss / Thomas Hellmuth (Team Vienna)

Copyright (c) 2019 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 7 (2019) 29
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-14602

Tags: , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

I accept that my given data and my IP address is sent to a server in the USA only for the purpose of spam prevention through the Akismet program.More information on Akismet and GDPR.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest