History at the Original Site

Geschichte am Originalschauplatz

Monthly Editorial: April 2022

Abstract:
Original sites where historical events took place offer access to history for people from the present. They are advertised by history educators as well as tourism providers as “monuments” and as “authentic witnesses of a long history”. But authenticity of the original historical site, understood as the empirically verifiable situating of past events at precisely this place must be attributed from experts and medially conveyed to visitors.
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2022-19612
Languages: English, Deutsch


The past is irrevocably gone. It thereby eludes our primary visual space. Now, as is well known, historical education is only possible when people turn to the universe of the historical and encounter it. Original sites where historical events took place seem to facilitate the access to history for people from the present.

Sites with History

Original historical sites can be understood as real places where depicted history took place, sometimes solely landscapes without perceptible remains of battles that happened there, but also localities where castle ruins, city walls, churches, town halls, prisons, train stations or bus depots of the past, or reconstructed buildings – sometimes also models – can be found, which formed the surroundings for past human action or suffering. Historical original site is thus more narrowly understood as memory space (Lieux de Mémoire) in the sense of Pierre Nora,[1] for whom the term “site” can also be understood in a figurative sense, for example as a mythical figure or a work of art, and also more narrowly as material culture,[2] which also includes movable objects.

Boring and Mute Places?

History educators and tourism providers promote visits to original historical sites. These are designated as a “monument” and as an “authentic witness of a long history”.[3] Special experiences are promised that make history “tangible” and understandable, and due to the “aura” of the place, special feelings would be awakened. At original sites the historically distant suddenly seems very close. Thus today, at the “Schnitzturm” in Stansstad, we look out over Lake Lucerne, believing we can recognize the ships of the French army of 1798 on the lake advancing against Nidwalden to defeat the followers of the old order there. We hear the shots of the defenders, the shouting of the attackers, the thunder of cannons – or else we see and hear nothing at all if we know nothing about what happened at the original historical scene or if there are no stagings that represent the events. Without history knowledge about or stagings of the events, it is often unspectacular and boring at original sites, as the German poet Johann Gottfried Seume already had to experience, who traveled on foot from Leipzig to Syracuse in 1802 and was disappointed, because he found nothing spectacular at the many original historical sites which he visited, nor did any special feelings arise in him.[4]

Authentic Places?

Indeed, there is hardly any other form of historical learning that guarantees authenticity as well as a visit to the original historical site.[5] But authenticity of the original historical site, understood as the empirically verifiable situating of past events at precisely this place, rarely reveals itself on its own. Much rather, it must be attributed from experts and medially conveyed to visitors.[6] Hans-Jürgen Pandel has differentiated authenticity in the German-speaking area for history didactics.[7] Among other things, he distinguishes between person, event, and object authenticity in which it is necessary that the object be an original, that its authorship be clarified and that its substance be unchanged. However, this is hardly ever the case with a building: the roof was renewed, outbuildings were torn down, new windows were installed, the floor was renovated, new supports were put in place, the basement was secured. Even then, if today’s photographs of the original historical site look exactly the same as the painting from the past, it is to be expected that authenticity can only be attributed to a limited extent – so that “authentication strategies” are, first and foremost, “marketing strategies.”[8]

Lifeless or Lively Places?

Thus, in order to ensure history education at original historical sites, one, first of all, needs good marketing, ideally with authenticity or the promise of being able to travel back in time, so that potential visitors perceive and visit the site at all. And afterwards one needs stagings that bring the lifeless places to life. History becomes vivid with acting and suffering people, with stories that happened at the scene. These stories are not told by the original historical site, these stories are told by the people who experienced them, or by history mediators. They do this as guides on site, with stelae, images and texts. In this way they stimulate the imagination of the visitors, enrich the reality on site (“augmented reality” with or without digital media), superimpose the present with the past – or vice versa. Of course, digital media offer new possibilities for bringing original historical sites to life, be it with videotaped eyewitnesses, explanatory videos, podcasts or mixed reality. And beyond that, re-enactment stagings and living history fascinate visitors and highlight the relevance of the site.[9] This also happens by awarding a UNESCO World Heritage title, which, among other things, grants authenticity, uniqueness and universal significance to original historical sites.

Places of Longing, Remembrance, Commemoration, Education?

“The concept of the original site is a magical totem, an incantation: It is to make the disappearance of the past disappear” formulated Valentin Groebner on October 15, 2010 in his lecture “History Mediation at the Original Site” in Windisch/Königsfelden. Groebner, who preoccupied himself extensively with the tourist use of history,[10] draws attention to the fact that original historical sites are magical helpers that promise to immerse us visitors into the past and to be able to leave the present behind us. History mediation at the original historical site can fulfill the longing of people who would like to escape from the challenging and stressful everyday life in this way and visit an alternative world. However, it can also open up spaces for remembrance or commemoration of people who have suffered or died in the places concerned.[11] Oftentimes, in such contexts, museums are also built at the original historical sites.

However, the teaching of history at the original historical site can also direct the view in the other direction, i.e. not from the present to the past, but from the past for orientation towards the present and the future. In a sense, history is offered as a teacher, be it in the direction of qualifying individuals for critical thinking or be it in the direction of community building for identity formation – or simply for entertainment. And of course, several target orientations are often combined at concrete original historical sites: The Auschwitz-Birkenau extermination camp can, at the same time, be a place of remembrance, commemoration and education.

It is therefore up to the visitors to decide how they “make use of” history at the original historical site and the educational offers.[12] This also holds true for offers for students who usually account for a significant share of the visitor volume.[13] If specific offers succeed in encouraging visitors to attentively explore the original historical sites, to tell them about the events, to contextualize these and to motivate them to link history with their present, then original historical sites undoubtedly contribute to history education.[14] In this way, they enable visitors to deal competently with history, responsibly with society and reflectively with themselves.

Contributions of this Month

This editorial month features a number of examples of how history is dealt with at original historical sites or how history education is offered there.

Joanna Wojdon reports from the Depot History Center in Wroclaw, a museum and research facility at the original site of the first strike in Wroclaw in the summer of 1980. She points out how those who are responsible attach more importance to the current use of the original historical site than to the preservation of the localities. There is, however, a permanent exhibition on the strike, which is tellingly staged underground, but equally important are other topics on contemporary history which are exhibited on the first floor, and, in particular, cultural events that take place at the original historical site. „It is not a historic place that attracts people to the Depot History Center, but the Depot attracts people to the place, skillfully using its historical potential”, Joanna Wojdon concludes at the end of her contribution.

DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2022-19615

Victoria Kumar presents in her contribution the digital educational tool IWalk and uses the example of “Mauthausen Memorial: Traces of a Crime” to show how learning about the Holocaust at original historical sites can succeed with digital media. The author begins by outlining changed teaching-learning habits and settings which have also strongly influenced the development of new teaching materials. By means of the IWalk app, which was developed by the USC Shoah Foundation and is meanwhile used in more than a dozen countries, one succeeds particularly well in presenting eyewitness accounts at the original site, and thereby drawing the attention of visitors to inconspicuous objects on site that are otherwise easily overlooked.

DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2022-19616

Each original historical site is unique and one of a kind. But Rome can claim, in addition, to have been the capital of a world empire and therefore to have been considered the “Eternal City” since the 1st century BC. Rome is an extraordinary palimpsest of historical places, and the knowledge of the buildings that have been superimposed over the centuries on the same original historical site is a fundamental experience for the visitors, also on an emotional level. Luigi Cajani shows in his contribution a series of tools to interpret this palimpsest, from the most traditional to the most modern, in relation to the ruins of antiquity, which have always been a source of particular fascination.

DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2022-19624

To conclude the theme month, Akiko Utsunomiya and Nobuyuki Harada report from Hiroshima, the original historical site of the first atomic bombing. Hiroshima has become a symbol of the horrors of war and especially of a possible nuclear war – with frightening topicality. In Japan, commemoration of the victims plays a major role in national culture and national self-understanding. In their contribution, the authors first examine how the story of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima has been passed down in different eras. They then present some of the activities that have been undertaken to ensure the transmission of the story of the atomic bombing at the original historical site, and finally examine some of the new initiatives that have been undertaken in recent years and offer reflections on the transmission of this story in the future.

DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2022-19618

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Ulrich Mayer. “Historische Orte als Lernorte.” In Handbuch Methoden im Geschichtsunterricht, ed. Ulrich Mayer, Hans-Jürgen Pandel, and Gerhard Schneider (Schwalbach Ts.: Wochenschau Verlag, 2016), 389-407.
  • Josef Memminger, and Ruth Sandner. “Touristisch aufbereitete historische Stätten und (Re-) Konstruktionen.” In Geschichtskultur – Public History – Angewandte Geschichte, ed. Felix Hinz, and Andreas Körber (Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2020), 304-325.
  • Valentin Groebner. “Touristischer Geschichtsgebrauch. Über einige Merkmale neuer Vergangenheiten im 20. und 21.Jahrhundert.” Historische Zeitschrift 296, no. 2 (2013): 408-428.

Web Resources

_____________________

 [1] Pierre Nora, Les lieux de mémoire (Paris: Gallimard, 1984).
[2] Wikipedia, “Heritage asset”, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Material_culture (last accessed 24 March 2022).
[3] Schweiz Tourismus – MySwitzerland, “Museum Aargau Geschichte am Schauplatz vermitteln”, https://www.myswitzerland.com/de-ch/erlebnisse/museum-aargau-geschichte-am-schauplatz-erleben/ (last accessed 24 March 2022).
[4] Johann Gottfried Seume, Spaziergang nach Syrakus im Jahre 1802 (Braunschweig / Leipzig: Vieweg, 1803). https://www.deutschestextarchiv.de/book/show/seume_syrakus_1803. 143.
[5] Ulrich Mayer, “Historische Orte als Lernorte,” in Handbuch Methoden im Geschichtsunterricht, ed. Ulrich Mayer, Hans-Jürgen Pandel, and Gerhard Schneider (Schwalbach Ts.: Wochenschau Verlag, 2016), 389-407, here 394.
[6] Christine Gundermann, Juliane Brauer, Filippo Carlà-Uhink, Georg Koch, Judith Keilbach, Thorsten Logge, Daniel Morat, Arnika Peselmann, Stefanie Samida, Astrid Schwabe, and Miriam Sénécheau, Schlüsselbegriffe der Public History (Göttingen / Stuttgart: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht; UTB GmbH, 2021), 19-43.
[7] Hans-Jürgen Pandel, “Authentizität”, in Wörterbuch Geschichtsdidaktik, 4., revised edition (Frankfurt/M.: Wochenschau Verlag, 2022), 34-36.
[8] Ibid.
[9] Josef Memminger, and Ruth Sandner, “Touristisch aufbereitete historische Stätten und (Re-) Konstruktionen,” in Geschichtskultur – Public History – Angewandte Geschichte, ed. Felix Hinz and Andreas Körber (Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2020), 304-325.
[10] Valentin Groebner, “Touristischer Geschichtsgebrauch. Über einige Merkmale neuer Vergangenheiten im 20. und 21.Jahrhundert,” Historische Zeitschrift 296, (2013): 408-428.
[11] Holger Thünemann, and Oliver von Wrochem, “Gedenkstätten,” in Geschichtskultur – Public History – Angewandte Geschichte, ed. Felix Hinz, and Andreas Körber (Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2020), 344-358.
[12] Guy P. Marchal, Schweizer Gebrauchsgeschichte. Geschichtsbilder, Mythenbildung und nationale Identität, 2., unchanged edition (Basel: Schwabe Verlag, 2007).
[13] Berit Pleitner, “Ausserschulische historische Lernorte,” in Handbuch Praxis des Geschichtsunterrichts 2, ed. Michele Barricelli, and Martin Lücke (Schwalbach Ts.: Wochenschau Verlag, 2017), 290-307; Peter Gautschi, Armin Rempfler, Barbara Sommer Häller, and Markus Wilhelm (ed), Aneignungspraktiken an ausserschulischen Lernorten. Tagungsband zur 5. Tagung Ausserschulische Lernorte der PH Luzern vom 9. und 10. Juni 2017 (Vienna / Zurich: Lit, 2018).
[14] Peter Gautschi, “Holocaust und Historische Bildung – Wieso und wie der nationalsozialistische Völkermord im Geschichtsunterricht thematisiert werden soll,” in Nationalsozialismus und Holocaust. Materialien, Zeitzeugen und Orte der Erinnerung in der schulischen Bildung, ed. Werner Dreier, and Falk Pingel (Innsbruck / Vienna: Studien Verlag, 2021), 21-35.

_____________________

Image Credits

“Schnitzturm” (Carved tower) in Stansstad with view of Lake Lucerne. Original historical site of the French invasion in 1798; defensive position of the people of Nidwalden. In front of the tower is a stele commemorating a French general and a Nidwalden soldier. Cf. also https://franzoseneinfall.ch/orte/1/ (last accessed 30 March 2022). © Photo Jasmine Steger, 26 March 2022.

Recommended Citation

Gautschi, Peter: History at the Original Site. In: Public History Weekly 10 (2022) 3, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2022-19612.

Translated by Kurt Brügger https://www.swissamericanlanguageexpert.ch/

Editorial Responsibility

Barbara Pavlek Löbl / Marko Demantowsky

Vergangenheit ist unwiderruflich vorbei. Sie entzieht sich dadurch unserer primären Anschauung. Nun ist bekanntlich historische Bildung nur möglich, wenn Menschen sich dem Universum des Historischen zuwenden und ihm begegnen. Originale Schauplätze, an denen historische Ereignisse stattgefunden haben, scheinen Menschen aus der Gegenwart den Zugang zu Geschichte zu erleichtern. 

Orte mit Geschichte

Mit historischen Originalschauplätzen sind reale Orte gemeint, an denen sich dargestellte Geschichte ereignete, manchmal ausschließlich Landschaften ohne wahrnehmbare Überreste von Schlachten, die dort stattgefunden haben, aber auch Lokalitäten, an denen sich Burgruinen, Stadtmauern, Kirchen, Rathäuser, Gefängnisse, Bahnhöfe oder Busdepots von früher oder nachgebaute Gebäude – manchmal auch Modelle – finden, die die Umgebung für vergangenes menschliches Handeln oder Leiden bildeten. Historischer Originalschauplatz wird also enger verstanden als Erinnerungsort im Sinne von Pierre Nora,[1] bei dem der Begriff “Ort” auch im übertragenen Sinne verstanden werden kann, zum Beispiel als mythische Gestalt oder als Kunstwerk, und auch enger als materielles Kulturgut,[2] zu dem ebenfalls bewegliche Objekte gehören.

Langweilige und stumme Orte?

Geschichtsvermittler:innen und Tourismusanbieter:innen werben für den Besuch historischer Originalschauplätze. Diese werden als “Denkmal” und “als authentischer Zeuge einer langen Geschichte”[3] bezeichnet. Versprochen werden besondere Erlebnisse, die Geschichte “erfahrbar” und verständlich machen, und dank der “Aura” des Ortes würden besondere Gefühle geweckt. An originalen Schauplätzen scheint plötzlich das historisch Ferne ganz nah. So blicken wir denn heute beim Schnitzturm in Stansstad auf den Vierwaldstättersee hinaus, glauben auf dem See die Schiffe der französischen Armee von 1798 zu erkennen, die gegen Nidwalden vorstoßen, um dort die Anhänger der alten Ordnung zu besiegen. Wir hören die Schüsse der Verteidiger, das Schreien der Angreifer, das Donnergrollen von Kanonen – oder aber wir sehen und hören gar nichts, wenn wir nichts über die Geschehnisse am historischen Originalschauplatz wissen oder wenn keine Inszenierungen vorhanden sind, die die Ereignisse repräsentierten. Ohne geschichtliches Wissen oder Inszenierungen zu den Geschehnissen ist es an originalen Schauplätzen oft unspektakulär und langweilig, wie das schon der deutsche Dichter Johann Gottfried Seume erleben musste, der 1802 von Leipzig zu Fuß nach Syrakus reiste und enttäuscht war, weil er an den vielen historischen Originalschauplätzen, die er aufsuchte, nichts Spektakuläres fand, und es stellten sich bei ihm auch keine besonderen Gefühle ein.[4]

Authentische Orte?

Zwar gebe es kaum eine andere Art des historischen Lernens, die Authentizität so gut gewährleiste wie der Besuch am originalen historischen Schauplatz.[5] Aber Authentizität des historischen Originalschauplatzes, verstanden als die empirisch überprüfbare Situierung von vergangenen Ereignissen an genau diesem Platz, erschließt sich selten von allein. Vielmehr muss sie von Expert:innen zugeschrieben und den Besucher:innen medial vermittelt werden.[6] Hans-Jürgen Pandel hat Authentizität im deutschsprachigen Raum für die Geschichtsdidaktik ausdifferenziert.[7] Er unterscheidet unter anderem Personen-, Ereignis- und Objektauthentizität, bei der es notwendig sei, dass das Objekt ein Original ist, dass seine Urheberschaft geklärt und seine Substanz unverändert sein muss. Dies allerdings ist kaum je bei einem Bauwerk der Fall: Das Dach wurde erneuert, Nebengebäude wurden abgerissen, neue Fenster eingesetzt, der Fußboden saniert, neue Stützen eingezogen, der Keller abgesichert. Selbst dann, wenn heutige Fotografien vom originalen historischen Schauplatz genau gleich aussehen wie das Gemälde von früher, ist zu erwarten, dass Authentizität nur bedingt zugeschrieben werden kann – sodass “Authentisierungsstrategien” in erster Linie “Marketingstrategien” sind.[8]

Leblose oder belebte Orte?

Um an historischen Originalschauplätzen historische Bildung zu ermöglichen, braucht es also zuerst ein gutes Marketing, am besten mit Authentizität oder dem Versprechen, in die Vergangenheit reisen zu können, damit mögliche Besucher:innen den Schauplatz überhaupt wahrnehmen und aufsuchen. Und es braucht danach Inszenierungen, die die leblosen Orte zum Leben erwecken. Geschichte wird anschaulich mit handelnden und leidenden Menschen, mit Geschichten, die sich am Schauplatz ereignet haben. Diese Geschichten erzählt nicht der historische Originalschauplatz, diese Geschichten erzählen die Menschen, die sie erlebt haben, oder Geschichtsvermittler:innen. Sie tun dies als Führer:innen vor Ort, mit Stelen, Bildern und Texten. Auf diese Weise regen sie die Imagination der Besucher:innen an, bereichern die Realität vor Ort (“augmented reality” mit oder ohne digitale Medien), überlagern die Gegenwart mit Vergangenem – oder umgekehrt. Natürlich bieten digitale Medien neue Möglichkeiten für die Belebung der historischen Originalschauplätze, sei es mit videografierten Zeitzeug:innen, mit Erklärvideos, Podcasts oder Mixed Reality. Und darüber hinaus faszinieren Reenactment-Inszenierungen und Living History die Besucher:innen und verdeutlichen die Relevanz des Ortes.[9] Dies geschieht auch durch die Verleihung eines UNESCO-Welterbe-Titels, mit dem unter anderem historischen Originalschauplätzen Authentizität, Einzigartigkeit und universelle Bedeutung zugesprochen werden.

Sehnsuchts-, Erinnerungs-, Gedenk- oder Bildungsorte?

“Der Begriff des Originalschauplatzes ist ein magisches Totem, eine Beschwörung: Er soll das Verschwundensein der Vergangenheit zum Verschwinden bringen” formulierte Valentin Groebner am 15. Oktober 2010 in seinem Vortrag “Geschichtsvermittlung am Originalschauplatz” in Windisch/Königsfelden. Groebner, der sich intensiv mit dem touristischen Geschichtsgebrauch befasst,[10] macht darauf aufmerksam, dass historische Originalschauplätze zauberkräftige Helfer sind, die uns Besucher:innen versprechen, in die Vergangenheit eintauchen und die Gegenwart hinter uns lassen zu können. Geschichtsvermittlung am historischen Originalschauplatz kann die Sehnsucht von Menschen bedienen, die auf diese Weise dem herausfordernden und belastenden Alltag entfliehen und eine Gegenwelt aufsuchen möchten. Sie kann Räume zur Erinnerung eröffnen oder zum Gedenken an Menschen, die an den betreffenden Orten gelitten haben oder verstorben sind.[11] Oftmals werden in solchen Zusammenhängen an den betreffenden historischen Originalschauplätzen auch Museen gebaut.

Geschichtsvermittlung am historischen Originalschauplatz kann den Blick aber auch in die andere Richtung, also nicht von der Gegenwart in die Vergangenheit, sondern von der Vergangenheit hin zur Orientierung in Gegenwart und Zukunft richten. Geschichte wird gewissermaßen als Lehrmeisterin angeboten, sei es in Richtung Qualifikation von Individuen für kritisches Denken oder in Richtung Vergemeinschaftung zur Identitätsstiftung – oder schlicht zur Unterhaltung. Und selbstverständlich werden an konkreten historischen Originalschauplätzen oft mehrere Zielorientierungen kombiniert: Das Vernichtungslager Auschwitz-Birkenau kann gleichzeitig Erinnerungs-, Gedenk- und Bildungsort sein.

Wie die Besucher:innen Geschichte am historischen Originalschauplatz und die Vermittlungsangebote nutzen beziehungsweise “gebrauchen”[12], ist deshalb ihnen überlassen. Das trifft auch auf die Angebote für Schüler:innen zu, die üblicherweise einen erheblichen Anteil am Besucher:innen-Aufkommen ausmachen.[13] Wenn es gelingt, mit spezifischen Angeboten die Besucher:innen zur aufmerksamen Erschliessung der historischen Originalschauplätze anzuregen, ihnen die Geschehnisse zu erzählen, zu kontextualisieren und sie zu motivieren, Geschichte mit ihrer Gegenwart zu verknüpfen, dann tragen historische Originalschauplätze zweifellos zur historischen Bildung bei.[14] Sie ermöglichen auf diese Weise den Besucher:innen einen kompetenten Umgang mit Geschichte, einen verantwortungsvollen Umgang mit Gesellschaft und einen reflektierten Umgang mit sich selber.

Beiträge dieses Monats

In diesem Themenmonat werden eine Reihe von Beispielen vorgestellt, wie mit Geschichte an originalen Schauplätzen umgegangen oder wie historische Bildung angeboten wird.

Joanna Wojdon berichtet vom Depot History Center in Wroclaw, einem Museum und einer Forschungseinrichtung am originalen Schauplatz des ersten Streiks in Wroclaw im Sommer 1980. Sie zeigt auf, wie die Verantwortlichen dort der heutigen Nutzung des historischen Originalschauplatzes mehr Bedeutung zumessen als der Erhaltung der Lokalitäten. Zwar gibt es eine Dauerausstellung zum Streik, die bezeichnenderweise im Untergrund inszeniert wird, aber ebenso wichtig sind andere Themen zur Zeitgeschichte, die im Erdgeschoss ausgestellt sind, und insbesondere auch kulturelle Anlässe, die am historischen Originalschauplatz stattfinden. “Es ist nicht der historische Originalschauplatz, der die Menschen ins Depot History Centre lockt, sondern das Depot zieht die Menschen an, indem es sein historisches Potenzial geschickt nutzt”, folgert Joanna Wojdon am Schluss ihres Beitrags.

DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2022-19615

Victoria Kumar präsentiert in ihrem Beitrag das digitale Bildungstool IWalk und zeigt am Beispiel “Mauthausen Memorial: Spuren eines Verbrechens”, wie mit digitalen Medien das Lernen über den Holocaust an historischen Originalschauplätzen gelingen kann. Der oder die Autor:in skizziert eingangs veränderte Lehr-Lerngewohnheiten und -settings, die auch die Entwicklung von neuen Unterrichtsmaterialien stark beeinflusst haben. Mit Hilfe der IWalk-App, die von der USC Shoah Foundation entwickelt wurde und mittlerweile in über einem Dutzend Länder eingesetzt wird, gelingt besonders gut, Zeitzeug:innen-Berichte am Originalschauplatz zu präsentieren und dadurch die Aufmerksamkeit der Besucher:innen auf unscheinbare Objekte vor Ort zu richten, die sonst leicht übersehen werden.

DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2022-19616

Jeder historischer Originalschauplatz ist einzigartig und einmalig. Aber Rom kann für sich darüber hinaus beanspruchen, die Hauptstadt eines Weltreichs gewesen zu sein und deshalb auch seit dem 1. Jahrhundert v. Chr. als “Ewige Stadt” zu gelten. Rom ist ein außergewöhnliches Palimpsest historischer Orte, und das Wissen um die Gebäude, die sich im Laufe der Jahrhunderte an ein und demselben historischen Originalschauplatz überlagert haben, ist eine grundlegende Erfahrung für die Besucher:innen, auch auf emotionaler Ebene. Luigi Cajani zeigt im Beitrag eine Reihe von Instrumenten zur Interpretation dieses Palimpsests, von den traditionellsten bis zu den modernsten, in Bezug auf die Ruinen der Antike, die schon immer eine Quelle besonderer Faszination waren.

DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2022-19624

Zum Abschluss des Themenmonats berichten Akiko Utsunomiya und Nobuyuki Harada aus Hiroshima, dem historischen Originalschauplatz des ersten Atombombenabwurfs. Hiroshima ist zu einem Symbol für die Schrecken des Krieges und vor allem eines möglichen Atomkrieges geworden – mit erschreckender Aktualität. Das Gedenken an die Opfer spielt in Japan eine große Rolle in der nationalen Kultur und im nationalen Selbstverständnis. Die Autor:innen untersuchen in ihrem Beitrag zuerst, wie die Geschichte des Atombombenabwurfs in Hiroshima in verschiedenen Epochen weitergegeben wurde. Dann werden einige der Aktivitäten vorgestellt, die unternommen wurden, um am historischen Originalschauplatz die Weitergabe der Geschichte des Atombombenabwurfs zu gewährleisten, und schließlich werden einige der neuen Initiativen der letzten Jahre untersucht und Überlegungen zur Weitergabe dieser Geschichte in der Zukunft angestellt.

DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2022-19618

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Ulrich Mayer. “Historische Orte als Lernorte.” In Handbuch Methoden im Geschichtsunterricht, ed. Ulrich Mayer, Hans-Jürgen Pandel, and Gerhard Schneider (Schwalbach Ts.: Wochenschau Verlag, 2016), 389-407.
  • Josef Memminger, and Ruth Sandner. “Touristisch aufbereitete historische Stätten und (Re-) Konstruktionen.” In Geschichtskultur – Public History – Angewandte Geschichte, ed. Felix Hinz, and Andreas Körber (Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2020), 304-325.
  • Valentin Groebner. “Touristischer Geschichtsgebrauch. Über einige Merkmale neuer Vergangenheiten im 20. und 21.Jahrhundert.” Historische Zeitschrift 296, no. 2 (2013): 408-428.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] Pierre Nora, Les lieux de mémoire (Paris: Gallimard, 1984).
[2] Wikipedia, “Kulturgut”, https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kulturgut (letzter Zugriff am 24. März 2022).
[3] Schweiz Tourismus – MySwitzerland, “Museum Aargau Geschichte am Schauplatz vermitteln”, https://www.myswitzerland.com/de-ch/erlebnisse/museum-aargau-geschichte-am-schauplatz-erleben/ (letzter Zugriff am 24. März 2022).
[4] Johann Gottfried Seume, Spaziergang nach Syrakus im Jahre 1802 (Braunschweig / Leipzig: Vieweg, 1803). https://www.deutschestextarchiv.de/book/show/seume_syrakus_1803. 143. (letzter Zugriff am 24. März 2022).
[5] Ulrich Mayer, “Historische Orte als Lernorte,” in Handbuch Methoden im Geschichtsunterricht, ed. Ulrich Mayer, Hans-Jürgen Pandel, und Gerhard Schneider (Schwalbach Ts.: Wochenschau Verlag, 2016), 389-407, hier 394.
[6] Christine Gundermann, Juliane Brauer, Filippo Carlà-Uhink, Georg Koch, Judith Keilbach, Thorsten Logge, Daniel Morat, Arnika Peselmann, Stefanie Samida, Astrid Schwabe, und Miriam Sénécheau, Schlüsselbegriffe der Public History (Göttingen, Stuttgart: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht; UTB GmbH, 2021), 19-43.
[7] Hans-Jürgen Pandel, “Authentizität”, in Wörterbuch Geschichtsdidaktik, 4., überarbeitete Auflage (Frankfurt/M.: Wochenschau Verlag, 2022), 34-36.
[8] Ibid.
[9] Josef Memminger, und Ruth Sandner, “Touristisch aufbereitete historische Stätten und (Re-) Konstruktionen,” in Geschichtskultur – Public History – Angewandte Geschichte, ed. Felix Hinz, and Andreas Körber (Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2020), 304-325.
[10] Valentin Groebner, “Touristischer Geschichtsgebrauch. Über einige Merkmale neuer Vergangenheiten im 20. und 21.Jahrhundert,” Historische Zeitschrift 296, (2013): 408-428.
[11] Holger Thünemann and Oliver von Wrochem, “Gedenkstätten,” in Geschichtskultur – Public History – Angewandte Geschichte, ed. Felix Hinz and Andreas Körber (Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2020), 344-358.
[12] Guy P. Marchal, Schweizer Gebrauchsgeschichte. Geschichtsbilder, Mythenbildung und nationale Identität, 2., unveränderte Auflage (Basel: Schwabe Verlag, 2007).
[13] Berit Pleitner, „Ausserschulische historische Lernorte,“ in Handbuch Praxis des Geschichtsunterrichts 2, ed. Michele Barricelli, und Martin Lücke (Schwalbach Ts.: Wochenschau Verlag, 2017), 290-307; Peter Gautschi, Armin Rempfler, Barbara Sommer Häller, und Markus Wilhelm (ed), Aneignungspraktiken an ausserschulischen Lernorten. Tagungsband zur 5. Tagung Ausserschulische Lernorte der PH Luzern vom 9. und 10. Juni 2017 (Wien / Zürich: Lit, 2018).
[14] Peter Gautschi, “Holocaust und Historische Bildung – Wieso und wie der nationalsozialistische Völkermord im Geschichtsunterricht thematisiert werden soll,” in Nationalsozialismus und Holocaust. Materialien, Zeitzeugen und Orte der Erinnerung in der schulischen Bildung, ed. Werner Dreier, und Falk Pingel (Innsbruck / Wien: Studien Verlag, 2021), 21-35. 

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Schnitzturm in Stansstad mit Blick auf den Vierwaldstättersee. Originaler Schauplatz beim Franzoseneinfall 1798; Verteidigungsstellung der Nidwaldner. Vor dem Turm steht eine Stele, die an einen französischen General und einen Nidwaldner Soldaten erinnert. Vgl. auch https://franzoseneinfall.ch/orte/1/ (letzter Zugriff 30. März 2022). © Foto Jasmine Steger, 26. März 2022.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Gautschi, Peter: Geschichte am Originalschauplatz. In: Public History Weekly 10 (2022) 3, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2022-19612.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Barbara Pavlek Löbl / Marko Demantowsky

Copyright © 2022 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 10 (2022) 3
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2022-19612

Tags: , , ,

1 reply »

  1. German version below. To all readers we recommend the automatic DeepL-Translator for 22 languages. Just copy and paste.

    OPEN PEER REVIEW

    The Silence of the Places

    “Thus today, at the “Schnitzturm” in Stansstad, we look out over Lake Lucerne, believing we can recognize the ships of the French army of 1798 on the lake advancing against Nidwalden to defeat the followers of the old order there. We hear the shots of the defenders, the shouting of the attackers, the thunder of cannons – or else we see and hear nothing at all if we know nothing about what happened at the original historical scene or if there are no stagings that represent the events.”

    Peter Gautschi opens his paper with a panoramic outline of scholarship on original historical sites and offers an overview of the current field, and useful definitions for those who want to engage with them analytically and didactically. Visitors seek these sites because they yearn for the presence of the past, because they feel a need for remembrance, or because they want to learn. The author’s focus is on the latter: his final thoughts direct the reader’s attention to pupils for whom the visit of such sites offers a relevant opportunity to learn historically (Sam Wineburg).

    All historical sites, how ever history saturated they may be, remain silent without knowledge, writes Peter Gautschi. He goes on pointing to the indispensable efforts of staging and orchestration, which are both, the work of public historians and the object of their research.

    This comment is the result of a lively discussion among the students of the Public History seminar at the University of Basel, and is thus co-authored by all of us together, written down by Alexandra Binnenkade.

    What stood out to us and what we will engage further with, was the connection between knowledge, emotions, and particular geographical locations. The opening quote highlights the importance of knowlege. While the acquisition of historical knowledge is the goal, emotions are the tool, or means of inner transportation to get there. The connection between emotions and knowledge therefore shapes the core of how such historical sites work.

    Emotions are flanked, in the text, by the key notions of experience and authenticity. From a didactical point of view, experience, individual and collective, is considered to be an efficient primer for historical learning. Authenticity underscores and enhances emotions, and emanates from objects, ruins, or other material remains of the events a place has come to represent. This combination turns a “historical site” into an “original”.

    The entanglement of geographical location, their narrativations over time, and today’s practices of use, is a relevant analytical focus for public historians. We noticed the recurring statement that emotions are not just “there” when visitors come to a site of historical remembrance, but must be evoked. Therein lies a certain ambivalence, since on the one hand emotions appear to be indispensable for the functioning of the site, on the other hand they are a means to an end. The need to evoke them seems to apply regardless of whether sites represent moments of triumph, nostalgia, grief, loss, or warning.

    However, visitors are not blank slates when they arrive. Their emotions have already been fostered before by movies, books, family histories, public events, teachers and textbooks. The emotions that arise in sites of public history are thus rather palimpsests than situative effects: Each visit adds new layers or shadings. Some visitors come back several times. Encountering the same kind of staging repeatedly, will their emotions, will their knowledge change? How should public historians analytically (and, why not: didactically) take this fact best into account? Should they engage in methodological and analytical detangling? and if so, how much context should researchers draw in?

    Many original historical sites were created as indispensable building blocks for the (self)imagination of national communities (I refer here to the term “imagined communities”, by Benedict Anderson 1983) or other occasions for identity politics. In this process hegemonic social groups took the lead and fixed authoritative messages. Fueled by such a past, some of these sites remain open for national and nationalistic use. They remain places of silence for those whose stories, images, names are not included in hegemonic discursive orders. Maybe not even the idea that such silences exist could surface in this context.

    With regard to historiographical analysis, original historical sites are easily thought of as stable entities. We came to the conclusion that the analysis becomes more comprehensive through a longue-durée-perspective on the changing waves of public attention many historical sites have received. Thus we would highlight the histories of transformation of these sites, which even includes their (temporary) abandonment and destruction. This interest could highlight connections between land ownership and narrative power, potentially leading to a focus on material properties. The original historical site of Verdun, to give an example, is narrativated today by French and German historians and must navigate conflicting narratives and emotions in one shared geographic space. Must knowledge and emotions be congruent in order to unsilence a place, or will incongruence provoke silence? Can emotionalizing, sometimes heavily reinforced through marketing or through purposefully built up knowledge aiming at imperative moral messages, even harm a site of historical importance?

    We then discussed examples of original historical sites, probing into the relation between emotions and knowledge. All historical sites, how ever history saturated they may be, remain silent without knowledge, writes Peter Gautschi. In the end we came to an opposite hypothesis: Not knowledge, but emotions are what keeps historical sites alive and makes them audible. Emotions are not the transmitter, the medium, the tool, but knowledge is.

    Would this impact our understanding of historical learning? Would it change the methods public historians use for analyzing original historical sites?

     

    __________

    Das Schweigen der Orte

    “Blicken wir beim Schnitzturm in Stansstad auf den Vierwaldstättersee hinaus, glauben wir auf dem See die Schiffe der französischen Armee von 1798 zu erkennen […] Wir hören die Schüsse der Verteidiger, das Schreien der Angreifer, das Donnergrollen der Kanonen – oder aber wir sehen und hören gar nichts, wenn wir nichts über die Geschehnisse am historischen Originalschauplatz wissen, oder wenn keine Inszenierungen vorhanden sind, die die Ereignisse repräsentieren.”

    Peter Gautschi eröffnet seinen Beitrag mit einem Panorama über die Forschung zu historischen Originalschauplätzen und bietet nützliche Definitionen für diejenigen, die sich analytisch und didaktisch mit diesen Orten beschäftigen wollen. Besucher suchen diese Stätten auf, weil sie sich nach der Gegenwart der Vergangenheit sehnen, weil sie ein Bedürfnis nach Erinnerung und Gedenken verspüren, oder weil sie etwas lernen wollen. Der Autor konzentriert sich auf Letzteres: Seine abschließenden Überlegungen richten die Aufmerksamkeit der Leserschaft auf Schüler, für die der Besuch solcher Stätten eine relevante Gelegenheit bietet, historisch zu lernen (Sam Wineburg).

    Alle historischen Orte, so geschichtsgesättigt sie auch sein mögen, bleiben ohne Wissen stumm, schreibt Peter Gautschi. Er verweist auf die unverzichtbaren Anstrengungen der Inszenierung, die sowohl die Aufgabe von Public Historians als auch Gegenstand ihrer Forschung ist.

    Dieser Kommentar ist das Ergebnis einer lebhaften Diskussion unter den Studierenden des Seminars Public History an der Universität Basel und wurde daher von uns allen gemeinsam verfasst, niedergeschrieben von Alexandra Binnenkade.

    Was uns auffiel und womit wir uns weiter beschäftigen werden, war die Verbindung zwischen Wissen, Emotionen und bestimmten geografischen Orten. Das Eingangszitat hebt die Bedeutung von Wissen hervor. Während der Erwerb von historischem Wissen das Ziel ist, sind Emotionen das Werkzeug oder das innerliche Transportmittel, um dorthin zu gelangen. Die Verbindung zwischen Emotionen und Wissen bildet daher den Kern der Funktionsweise solcher historischer Orte.

    Die Emotionen werden im Text von den Schlüsselbegriffen Erfahrung und Authentizität flankiert. Aus didaktischer Sicht gilt die Erfahrung – individuell und kollektiv – als wirksame Grundlage für historisches Lernen. Authentizität unterstreicht und verstärkt Emotionen. Sie geht aus von den Objekten, Ruinen oder anderen materiellen Überresten der Ereignisse, die ein Ort repräsentiert. Diese Kombination macht einen “historischen Schauplatz” zu einem “originalen”.

    Die Verflechtung von geografischen Orten, ihren Narrativierungen im Laufe der Zeit und den heutigen Nutzungspraktiken ist ein relevanter analytischer Schwerpunkt für Public Historians. Uns fiel die wiederkehrende Aussage auf, dass Emotionen nicht einfach “da” sind, wenn Besucher an einen historischen Originalschauplatz kommen, sondern erzeugt werden müssen. Darin liegt eine gewisse Ambivalenz, denn einerseits scheinen Emotionen für das Funktionieren des Ortes unverzichtbar zu sein, andererseits sind sie ein Mittel zum Zweck. Die Notwendigkeit, sie hervorzurufen, scheint unabhängig davon zu gelten, ob die Stätten Momente des Triumphs, der Nostalgie, der Trauer, des Verlusts oder der Warnung darstellen.

    Die Besucher sind jedoch keine unbeschriebenen Blätter, wenn sie ankommen. Ihre Emotionen wurden bereits zuvor durch Filme, Bücher, Familiengeschichten, öffentliche Veranstaltungen, Lehrer und Schulbücher geprägt. Die Emotionen, die an Stätten der öffentlichen Geschichte entstehen, sind also eher Palimpseste als situative Effekte: Jeder Besuch fügt neue Schichten oder Schattierungen hinzu. Manche Besucher kommen mehrmals wieder. Werden sich ihre Emotionen und ihr Wissen durch die wiederholte Begegnung mit der gleichen Art von Inszenierung verändern? Wie sollten Public Historians diese Tatsache analytisch (und, warum nicht: didaktisch) am besten berücksichtigen? Sollten sie sich auf eine methodische und analytische Entflechtung von vorher und nachher einlassen? Und wenn ja, wie viel Kontext sollten die Forscher:innen einbeziehen?

    Viele historische Originalschauplätze wurden als unverzichtbare Bausteine für die (Selbst-)Imagination nationaler Gemeinschaften (ich beziehe mich hier auf den Begriff “imagined communities” von Benedict Anderson 1983) oder andere identitätspolitische Bedürfnisse geschaffen. In diesem Prozess übernahmen hegemoniale gesellschaftliche Gruppen die Führung und legten autoritative Botschaften fest. Aufgrund dieser Vergangenheit bleiben einige solche Orte offen für nationale und nationalistische Zwecke, selbst wenn sie nicht immer so genutzt wurden. Sie bleiben deshalb Orte des Schweigens für diejenigen, deren Geschichten, Bilder und Namen nicht in die hegemoniale diskursive Ordnung passen. Vielleicht kann in einem derart national/identitär besetzten Kontext nicht einmal die Idee aufkommen, dass es solche Orte des Schweigens gibt, sodass auch keine Suche nach Alternativen in Gang kommt.

    Im Hinblick auf die historiografische Analyse können historische Originalschauplätze leicht als stabile Einheiten betrachtet werden. Wir kamen zum Schluss, dass eine Longue-Durée-Perspektive auf die Wellen öffentlicher Aufmerksamkeit, die viele historische Stätten erfahren haben, die Analyse verdichtet. Wir würden die Geschichte der Umwandlung dieser Stätten hervorheben, was sogar ihre (vorübergehende) Aufgabe und Zerstörung einschließt.

    Dieser Fokus könnte die Verbindungen zwischen Landbesitz und narrativer Macht aufzeigen, was möglicherweise dazu führt, dass die materiellen Eigenschaften bestimmter Orte mehr Aufmerksamkeit erhalten. Verdun, um ein Beispiel zu nennen, wird heute von französischen und deutschen Historikern narrativiert, die sich in einem gemeinsamen geografischen Raum mit widersprüchlichen Erzählungen und Emotionen auseinandersetzen müssen. Müssen Wissen und Emotionen kongruent sein, um einen Ort zum Schweigen zu bringen, oder wird umgekehrt deren Inkongruenz Schweigen provozieren? Kann Emotionalisierung, oft verstärkt durch Marketing-Logiken oder durch gezielt aufgebautes Wissen, das auf erwünschte moralische Botschaften abzielt, einem Ort von historischer Bedeutung sogar schaden?

    Anschließend haben wir Beispiele für historische Originalschauplätze diskutiert und auf die Beziehung zwischen Emotionen und Wissen geachtet. Alle historischen Stätten, so geschichtsgesättigt sie auch sein mögen, bleiben ohne Wissen stumm, schreibt Peter Gautschi. Am Ende kamen wir zu einer entgegengesetzten These: Nicht das Wissen, sondern die Emotionen sind es, die historische Stätten lebendig halten und hörbar machen. Nicht die Emotionen sind das Medium, das Werkzeug, sondern das Wissen.

    Würde sich dies auf unser Verständnis von historischem Lernen auswirken? Würden sich dadurch die Methoden ändern, die Historiker bei der Analyse von historischen Originalschauplätzen anwenden?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

I accept that my given data and my IP address is sent to a server in the USA only for the purpose of spam prevention through the Akismet program.More information on Akismet and GDPR.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest