Simple Examination Tasks Instead of Complicated Tests!

Einfache Prüfungsaufgaben statt komplizierter Tests!

Abstract:
This text deals with examination formats for history teaching and argues that teachers should consider how they want to assess the learning success of students right at the beginning of their planning work for history teaching. It also recommends using simple examination tasks instead of complicated tests, because students can also prove their historical thinking and learning by answering simple questions. However, it is important that learners always know how their performance is assessed. As subject-specific criteria, the plausibilities according to Jörn Rüsen can be used, after they have been introduced according to age and level.
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-16981
Languages: English, German


Whoever as a history teacher studies the current literature on examination formats and task cultures could easily despair. Therein complex examination tasks are proposed which transform challenging theoretical constructs into competence-oriented task formats[1], or time-consuming assessments are recommended which, by means of multiple choice tests, objectively, validly and reliably represent the performance of students.[2] In everyday school life such high demands are mostly not feasible. What must be done then?

Planning backwards

It is a truism – and yet, it is still too seldom implemented in the everyday planning process for history teaching: When planning a lesson consider as early as possible how you want to check the students’ learning success! Of course, teachers thereby need to, first of all, orient themselves on the curriculum, on guidelines or on the history textbook – at least on those documents which determine what the students have to know and what skills they have to be able to use.

In German-speaking Switzerland the binding document for secondary level I is the “Curriculum 21” (“Lehrplan 21”). Therein different competence areas, so-called “basic requirements”, are formulated.[3] They designate those competence levels which the students should reach at the latest by the end of the respective cycle. School as an institution and teachers have the assignment to ensure the achievement of these basic requirements in the lessons. Teachers thus plan their lessons, so to speak, backwards and orient themselves on what all students should have achieved after their teaching.[4] In the curriculum 21 we find the following requirements: “The students are able to point out the causes, course and consequences of an important event of Swiss history in the 20th century.” Or: “The students are able to recount the history of selected institutions and people that stood up for freedom, peace, prosperity, justice and sustainable development.” Or: “The students are able to explain what a selected memorial reminds of.”[5]

If it is clear to teachers what they intend or need to achieve with their history teaching, then they can, at the next stage in their planning process, determine how they want to check this target attainment. And when the test is developed, then teachers prepare the teaching/learning process along the criteria of good history teaching.[6] This orientation along the quality criteria is also important so that teachers in the teaching process maintain an open view of the students and the process flow and do not teach stubbornly to the test.[7] When determining the examination format, good history textbooks help find concrete proposals, for example in the accompanying materials for teachers as well as in the materials of experienced colleagues. Whoever wants or needs to develop his or her own materials better orients him or herself on the principle: Keep it as simple as possible!

Assigning Writing Tasks and Assessing Them Subject-Specifically

The most simple and shortest examination task is to ask students to produce a text: “Explain how the ‘J’-stamp happened to be put into the passports of German Jews in the 1940s.” Or: “Describe the contribution of Henry Dunant to the development of the Red Cross.” Or: “Expound on the historical background and the effect of the memorial of the ‘Traforo del Gottardo 1872-1882’ (Gotthard Tunnel) which today stands in Airolo.” As is true for all examination formats is also true for writing tasks: They have to be introduced into the teaching and prepared step by step. Writing tasks are, however, quickly assigned, but it is very demanding for students to develop a text. Luckily enough, there are a number of options to teach the learners how to write successfully and subject-specifically.[8]

It is important that the students know on what basis the texts written by them in the history lessons will be assessed. The plausibilities by Rüsen are, for example, particularly suited as subject-specific criteria.[9] The empirical plausibility of the texts produced can, amongst other things, be seen by the embedding of chronological markings in the text, by the denomination of historical personalities, institutions or locations, by references to sources or representations as well as by the number and quality of history-specific specialist terminology. If empirically refutable false statements occur in a text, then empirical plausibility is not fulfilled. Narrative plausibility is shown by the appropriate choice of a subject-specific title for the student’s text, by the explicit mentioning of causes and consequences as well as by the structuring of the text into semantic units. The normative plausibility becomes apparent by the occurrence of explicit references to the present and subject, and generally valid values and norms as well as by personal reasonings and relativizations of the statements.

The assessment criteria also are applied according to age and level. Over the course of their school time the students learn how to write their texts according to these criteria.[10] In this way, it is possible that, already in the secondary level I, students write texts of at least one page in length and therein present their material analyses, material judgements and value judgements – in brief: make public their historical thinking.

Assigning Portfolio Tasks and Assessing Products

Another possibility to get students to comprehensively demonstrate their historical thinking and learning are so-called portfolio tasks.[11] Thereby teachers instruct students, in the course of their history learning, to set up a collection folder with documents and other products reflecting their learning process. The spectrum of possible products is broad: protocols, collages, Leporello folders, posters, an analogue timeline or digital presentations, short podcasts, films and much more can be the basis of the assessment.

Clever portfolio assignments make it clear to learners what product they develop, how they proceed and what they should keep in mind in order to receive a good assessment. For achieving the initially presented basic competence-requirement, “the students are able to explain what a selected memorial reminds of”, the learners are asked to chose a memorial from their environment, to describe it in a Leporello folder, thereby to expound on the historical context of the memorial presented, to document the reactions of the public to the memorial and eventually to give their own view of the significance of the memorial.

As is true for all examination formats, it is also important to teachers to formulate the horizon of expectation when it comes to portfolio tasks, best of all immediately after determining the task and before planning the lesson. Criteria lists are helpful when they mirror certain characteristics for different aspects of tasks – e.g. historical context of the event.[12] The historical context of the event which the chosen memorial should remind of is well explained if, for example, the event is located in terms of time and place, if causes and consequences are mentioned and if the acting people are identified by name. From a selection of assessment criteria ensues a kind of checklist which can serve as a basis for the students when working and also for the teachers when assessing the examination.

Holding oral examinations

As is the case with writing tasks, also from portfolio tasks ensue data in a written form produced by students. Many teachers mainly rely on this possibility, amongst other things, because in this way the quality criteria of exams – objectivity, validity, reliability[13] – can rather be implemented and the assessments understood transparently. Thus, a certain security against appeals being lodged is guaranteed. It is often forgotten that also observation notes of teachers, for example, concerning a presentation of learners during the lesson, could be included into an assessment, the former of which keep a record of how competently or less competently they deal with the vast field of history. Oral examinations are still much too seldom implemented in everyday school life, although they allow an insight into the students’ historical thinking.[14]

Of course, as regards this examination format there are also a number of challenges to meet. Oral examinations, for example, require time. If teachers want to talk to all the learners of a class of 24 students for 10 minutes, they need at least 4 hours. During this time the other students have to be engaged in meaningful historical learning. Depending on the room situation in the school building and depending on the work discipline of the students this is more difficult or easier to be realized. Such oral examinations can also be carried out via digital media at a distance, the way it has recently taken place during the Corona distance learning.

Regarding this format it has also proved well if the scope of testing and the procedure are accurately defined. For checking the basic competence-requirement “the students are able to point out the causes, course and consequences of an important event of Swiss history in the 20th century”, nine events are made the subject of discussion in class and set for the oral examination. At the beginning of the oral examination the students chose a topic by the drawing of lots, and then they are given the time of 5 minutes for pointing out the causes, course and consequences. Another 5 minutes serve the purpose of the teacher asking detail questions on the students’ explanations – or the teacher presents a selected source related to the first chosen or to another topic and the students show whether they possess the competences to explore and interpret the material, and to gain orientation for the present and future therefrom.

Examinations as a Mirror for Teaching

Examinations are the business cards of history teaching.[15] They open up the classroom towards society. Never ever will a teacher be criticized more quickly and more vehemently by students, parents, colleagues or school supervising authorities as in the case when an assessment is made unprofessionally. Thus, it is doubtlessly well worth paying due attention to this issue – from the very beginning of planning a lesson!

Teachers do not have to implement all conceivable methods in the lessons as well as they do not have to use all possible examination formats. Some teachers like working with portfolios, others have made good experiences with multiple choice, again others examine by means of learning tasks. Analogous to teachers the situation presents itself with students. Therefore, it is worth trying out different formats over the course of one’s own teacher career and then working on optimizing the tests jointly with the students.[16] At any rate, it is worth using such basic formats like oral examinations, portfolio tasks and writing tasks. In this way, examinations will become a mirror of teaching into which we all like looking.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Adamski, Peter, and Markus Bernhardt. “Diagnostizieren – Evaluieren – Leistungen beurteilen.” In Handbuch Praxis des Geschichtsunterrichts: Band 2. Edited by Michele Barricelli and Martin Lücke, 401–435. Schwalbach/Ts: Wochenschau Verlag, 2012.
  • VanSledright, Bruce A. Assessing Historical Thinking and Understanding. Innovative Designs for New Standards. New York: Routledge, 2014.
  • Wunderer, Hartmann. “Tests und Klausuren.” In Handbuch Methoden im Geschichtsunterricht. Edited by Ulrich Mayer et al., 675–685. Schwalbach/Ts.: Wochenschau Verlag, 2016.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] Ulrich Trautwein, et all, Kompetenzen historischen Denkens erfassen. Konzeption, Operationalisierung und Befunde des Projekts Historical Thinking – Competencies in History” (Münster: HiTCH, 2017).
[2] Bruce A. VanSledright, “Assessing for Learning in the History Classroom,” in New Directions in Assessing Historical Thinking, ed. Kadriye Ercikan und Peter Seixas (New York: Routledge, 2015), 75–88.
[3] Deutschschweizerische Erziehungsdirektoren-Konferenz (D-EDK), eds., Lehrplan 21. Gesamtausgabe (Luzern: D-EDK, 2016), hier p. 8 (Überblick; Struktur des Fachbereichs- und der Modullehrpläne). Online at: https://v-fe.lehrplan.ch/index.php?code=e|100|1 (last accessed 15 June 2020).
[4] Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe, “What is backward design?” in Understanding by Design. 1 ed. (Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill Prentice Hall, 1998), 7–19. Online at: https://www.queensu.ca/teachingandlearning/modules/principles/documents/What%20is%20backward%20design.pdf (last accessed 21 June 2020).
[5] Deutschschweizerische Erziehungsdirektoren-Konferenz (D-EDK), ed., Lehrplan 21. RZG, (Luzern: D-EDK, 2016). Online at: https://lu.lehrplan.ch/index.php?code=b|6|4 (last accessed 15 June 2020).
[6] Peter Gautschi, Guter Geschichtsunterricht: Grundlagen, Erkenntnisse, Hinweise. 3rd edition, first edition 2009 (Schwalbach/Ts.: Wochenschau Verlag, 2015), 101.
[7] Richard P. Phelps, “Teach to the Test?,” The Wilson Quarterly 35, no. 4 (2011): 38–42. Online at: https://www.wilsonquarterly.com/quarterly/fall-2013-americas-schools-4-big-questions/teach-to-the-test/ (last accessed 21 June 2020).
[8] Cf. e. g. Joseph Memminger, Schüler schreiben Geschichte. Kreatives Schreiben im Geschichtsunterricht zwischen Fiktionalität und Faktizität (Schwalbach/Ts.: Wochenschau Verlag, 2007). Or: Olaf Hartung, “Geschichte schreibend lernen,” in Schreiben als Lernen. Kompetenzentwicklung durch Schreiben (in allen Fächern), ed. Sabine Schmölzer‐Eibinger and Eike Thürmann (Münster: Waxmann, 2015), 201–216; Jan Hodel et all, “Schülernarrationen als Ausdruck historischer Kompetenz,” Zeitschrift für Didaktik der Gesellschaftswissenschaften 4, no. 2 (2013): 121–145.
[9] Jörn Rüsen, “Objektivität,” in Handbuch der Geschichtsdidaktik. 5. revised edition, ed. Klaus Bergmann, Klaus Fröhlich and Annette Kuhn (Seelze-Velber: Kallmeyer, 1997), 160−163.
[10] Saskia Handro, “‘Sprachsensibler Geschichtsunterricht’. Systematisierende Überlegungen zu einer überfälligen Debatte,” in Geschichtsdidaktik in der Diskussion. Grundlagen und Perspektiven (Geschichtsdidaktik diskursiv – Public History und Historisches Denken, Bd. 1), ed. Wolfgang Hasberg and Holger Thünemann (Frankfurt a.M.: Peter Lang, 2016), 265–296.
[11] Peter Adamski, “Portfolio im Geschichtsunterricht. Leistungen dokumentieren – Lernen reflektieren,” Geschichte in Wissenschaft und Unterricht 54, no. 1 (2003): 32−50; Birgit Wenzel, “Aufgaben(kultur) und neue Prüfungsformen,” in Handbuch Praxis des Geschichtsunterrichts. Bd. 2, ed. Michele Barricelli and Martin Lücke (Schwalbach/Ts.: Wochenschau Verlag, 2012), 23–36, here 32–35; Christian Heuer and Mario Resch, “Aufgaben im Geschichtsunterricht. Stand und Perspektiven,” Geschichte für heute 11, no. 3 (2018): 5–23.
[12] Karin Fuchs, Peter Gautschi, Hans Utz et all, Zeitreise 3. Begleitband. Ausgabe für die Schweiz (Baar: Klett und Balmer, 2018), in particual p. 17-25. Online at: https://www.klett.ch/lehrwerke/zeitreise/zeitreise-1-3-downloads/zeitreise-1-3-downloads-diagnostizieren-pruefen-beurteilen-zeitreise-3 (last accessed 15 June 2020).
[13] Peter Gautschi, Geschichte lehren. 6. edition, first edition 1999 (Bern: Schulverlag plus, 2015), 166–167.
[14] On the importance of language for historical learning, cf. e.g.: Katharina Grannemann, Sven Oleschko and Christian Kuchler, Sprachbildung im Geschichtsunterricht. Zur Bedeutung der kognitiven Funktion von Sprache (Münster: Waxmann, 2018).
[15] Karin Fuchs and Nadine Ritzer, “Prüfungen – Visitenkarten des Geschichtsunterrichts,” in Forschungswerkstatt Geschichtsdidaktik 07. Beiträge zur Tagung geschichtsdidaktik empirisch 07 (Geschichtsdidaktik heute, Bd. 2), ed. Jan Hodel and Béatrice Ziegler (Bern: hep, 2009), 268–276.
[16] Michele Barricelli, “Geschichtsprojekte,” in GeschichtsMethodik. Handbuch für die Sekundarstufe I und II, 5., revised new edition, ed. Hilke Günther‐Arndt and Saskia Handro (Berlin: Cornelsen, 2015), 108–115.

_____________________

Image Credits

Albert Anker – Das Schulexamen © Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Recommended Citation

Gautschi, Peter, and Jasmine Steger: Simple Examination Tasks Instead of Complicated Tests! In: Public History Weekly 8 (2020) 7, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-16981.

Translation: Kurt Brügger, swissamericanlanguageexpert (https://www.swissamericanlanguageexpert.ch)

Editorial Responsibility

Isabella Schild / Thomas Hellmuth (Team Vienna)

Wer als Geschichtslehrer*in die aktuelle Literatur zu Prüfungsformaten und Aufgabenkulturen studiert, könnte verzagen. Da werden komplexe Prüfungsaufgaben vorgeschlagen, die anspruchsvolle theoretische Konstrukte in standardisierte, kompetenzorientierte Aufgabenformate überführen[1], oder aufwändige Assessments empfohlen, die mittels Multiple Choice-Tests die Leistungen der Schüler*innen objektiv, gültig und verlässlich darstellen.[2] Im Schulalltag sind solche hohen Ansprüche meist nicht umsetzbar. Was also ist zu tun? 

Rückwärts planen

Es ist eine Binsenwahrheit – und doch wird sie im alltäglichen Planungsprozess für Geschichtsunterricht immer noch zu selten umgesetzt: Überlege bei der Unterrichtsvorbereitung möglichst früh, wie du den Lernerfolg der Schüler*innen überprüfen willst! Selbstverständlich gilt es für Lehrer*innen dabei als erstes, sich am Lehrplan, an Richtlinien oder am Schulgeschichtsbuch zu orientieren – jedenfalls an denjenigen Dokumenten, die vorgeben, was Schüler*innen wissen und können müssen.

In der Deutschschweiz ist dieses verbindliche Dokument der “Lehrplan 21”. Darin sind zu den verschiedenen Kompetenzbereichen sogenannte “Grundansprüche” formuliert.[3] Sie bezeichnen diejenigen Kompetenzstufen, welche die Schüler*innen spätestens bis zum Ende des jeweiligen Zyklus erreichen sollen. Die Schule als Institution und die Lehrpersonen haben den Auftrag, das Erreichen dieser Grundansprüche im Unterricht zu ermöglichen. Lehrer*innen planen ihren Unterricht also gewissermaßen rückwärts und orientieren sich an dem, was alle Schüler*innen nach ihrem Unterricht erreichen sollen.[4] Für die Sekundarstufe I steht dort zum Beispiel: “Die Schüler*innen können zu einem wichtigen Ereignis der Schweizer Geschichte im 20. Jahrhundert Ursachen, Verlauf und Folgen aufzeigen.” Oder: “Die Schüler*innen können die Geschichte von ausgewählten Institutionen und Menschen erzählen, die sich im 20. und 21. Jahrhundert für Freiheit, Frieden, Wohlstand, Gerechtigkeit oder nachhaltige Entwicklung einsetzten.” Oder: “Die Schüler*innen können erklären, woran ein ausgewähltes Denkmal erinnert.”[5]

Wenn den Lehrpersonen klar ist, was sie mit ihrem Geschichtsunterricht erreichen wollen oder müssen, können sie im Planungsprozess als nächstes festlegen, wie sie diese Zielerreichung überprüfen wollen. Und wenn dann die Prüfung entwickelt ist, bereiten Lehrer*innen den Lehr-Lernprozess entlang der Kriterien guten Geschichtsunterrichts vor.[6] Diese Orientierung entlang der Gütekriterien ist auch wichtig, damit Lehrer*innen im Vermittlungsprozess den offenen Blick für die Schüler*innen und den Prozessablauf beibehalten und nicht stur auf die Prüfung hin unterrichten.[7] – Bei der Festlegung des Prüfungsformates helfen gute Schulgeschichtsbücher mit konkreten Vorschlägen, etwa in den Begleitmaterialien für Lehrer*innen, sowie Unterlagen von erfahrenen Kolleg*innen. Wer etwas Eigenes entwickeln will oder muss, orientiert sich günstigerweise am Grundsatz: Mach’ es so einfach wie möglich!

Schreibaufträge erteilen und fachspezifisch beurteilen

Die einfachste und kürzeste Prüfungsaufgabe ist, Schüler*innen zu einer Textproduktion einzuladen: “Erkläre, wie es in den 1940er-Jahren zur Einführung des ‘J’-Stempels in Reisepässen von deutschen Juden kam.” Oder: “Beschreibe den Beitrag von Henry Dunant zum Aufbau des Roten Kreuzes.” Oder: “Schildere die Vorgeschichte und die Wirkung des Denkmals ‘Traforo del Gottardo 1872-1882’, das heute in Airolo steht.” Wie bei allen Prüfungsformaten gilt auch bei Schreibaufträgen: Sie müssen Schritt für Schritt im Unterricht eingeführt und vorbereitet werden. Zwar sind Schreibaufträge von Lehrpersonen schnell gestellt, aber für Schüler*innen ist das Entwickeln eines Textes sehr anspruchsvoll. Glücklicherweise gibt es dafür eine Reihe von Möglichkeiten, um den Lernenden erfolgreiches und fachspezifisches Schreiben beizubringen.[8]

Wichtig ist, dass die Schüler*innen wissen, wonach die von ihnen im Geschichtsunterricht geschriebenen Texte beurteilt werden. Als fachspezifische Kriterien eignen sich beispielsweise die Plausibilitäten von Rüsen.[9] Die empirische Plausibilität der entstandenen Texte zeigt sich unter anderem an der Einbettung zeitlicher Markierungen im Text, an der Nennung historischer Personen, Institutionen oder Orte, an Verweisen auf Quellen oder Darstellungen sowie an der Anzahl und Güte von geschichtsspezifischen Fachbegriffen. Wenn im Text empirisch widerlegbare Falschaussagen vorkommen, ist die empirische Plausibilität nicht gegeben. Die narrative Plausibilität zeigt sich bei der passenden Wahl eines fachspezifischen Titels für den Schüler*innen-Text, bei der expliziten Nennung von Ursachen und Folgen sowie an der Strukturierung des Textes in Sinneinheiten. Die normative Plausibilität ist am Vorkommen expliziter Gegenwarts- und Subjektbezüge und allgemeingültiger Werte und Normen erkennbar, ebenso an persönlichen Begründungen oder Relativierungen der Aussagen.

Auch die Beurteilungskriterien werden alters- und niveaugerecht genutzt. Im Verlaufe der Schulzeit lernen die Schüler*innen, ihre Texte auf diese Kriterien hin zu schreiben.[10] Auf diese Weise gelingt es, dass Schüler*innen schon in der Sekundarstufe I Texte im Umfang von mindestens einer Seite schreiben und darin ihre Sachanalysen, Sachurteile und Werturteile vorstellen – kurz: ihr historisches Denken öffentlich machen.

Portfolioaufgaben stellen und Produkte beurteilen

Eine andere Möglichkeit, um Schüler*innen dazu zu bringen, ihr historisches Denken und Lernen umfassend unter Beweis zu stellen, sind sogenannte Portfolioaufträge.[11] Damit leiten Lehrer*innen die Lernenden an, im Verlauf ihres Geschichtslernens eine Sammelmappe mit Dokumenten und weiteren Produkten zu erstellen, die ihren Lernprozess spiegeln. Die Palette möglicher Produkte ist groß: Zur Beurteilung herangezogen werden Protokolle, Collagen, Leporellos, Plakate, ein analoger Zeitstrahl oder digitale Präsentationen, kurze Podcasts, Filme und vieles mehr.

Gute Portfolio-Aufträge machen den Lernenden klar, welches Produkt sie entwickeln, wie sie vorgehen und worauf sie achten müssen, damit sie eine gute Beurteilung bekommen. Zur Erreichung des eingangs vorgestellten Kompetenz-Grundanspruchs “Die Schüler*innen können erklären, woran ein ausgewähltes Denkmal erinnert” werden die Lernenden eingeladen, ein Denkmal aus ihrer Umgebung auszuwählen, es in einem Leporello zu beschreiben, dabei den historischen Kontext des Dargestellten zu erläutern, Reaktionen der Öffentlichkeit auf das Denkmal zu dokumentieren und schließlich selber Stellung zur Bedeutsamkeit des Denkmals zu nehmen.

Wie bei allen Prüfungsformaten ist für Lehrer*innen auch bei Portfolioaufgaben wichtig, den Erwartungshorizont zu formulieren, am besten gleich nach Festlegung der Aufgabe und vor der Unterrichtsplanung. Für viele sind Kriterienlisten hilfreich, die zu unterschiedlichen Aspekten der Aufgabe – z.B. historischer Kontext des Geschehens – bestimmte Ausprägungen ausformulieren.[12] Der historische Kontext, an den mit dem gewählten Denkmal erinnert werden soll, ist dann gut erläutert, wenn zum Beispiel das Geschehen zeitlich und örtlich situiert ist, wenn Ursachen und Folgen erwähnt und Handelnde mit Namen identifiziert sind. Durch eine Auswahl von Beurteilungskriterien ergibt sich eine Art Checkliste, die sowohl die Schüler*innen bei der Arbeit als auch die Lehrer*innen bei der Beurteilung der Prüfung als Grundlage nehmen können.

Prüfungsgespräche führen

Wie bei Schreibaufträgen entstehen bei Portfolioaufgaben ebenfalls Daten in schriftlicher Form, verfasst durch die Schüler*innen. Viele Lehrer*innen setzen hauptsächlich auf diese Möglichkeit, unter anderem, weil auf diese Weise die Gütekriterien von Prüfungen – Objektivität, Gültigkeit, Zuverlässigkeit[13] – eher umgesetzt und die Beurteilungen transparent nachvollzogen werden können. Somit ist eine gewisse Rekurssicherheit garantiert. Vergessen geht oft, dass für eine Beurteilung auch Beobachtungsnotizen von Lehrpersonen, zum Beispiel zu einer Präsentation von Lernenden, im Unterricht herangezogen werden könnten, die den kompetenten oder weniger kompetenten Umgang mit dem Universum des Historischen festhalten. Im Schulalltag noch viel zu wenig umgesetzt werden Prüfungsgespräche, obwohl doch gerade dabei historisches Denken gut sichtbar wird.[14]

Natürlich gibt es auch bei diesem Prüfungsformat eine Reihe von Herausforderungen zu bewältigen. Prüfungsgespräche erfordern zum Beispiel Zeit. Wenn Lehrer*innen mit allen Lernenden einer 24er-Klasse 10 Minuten reden wollen, benötigen sie mindestens 4 Stunden. Während dieser Zeit müssen die anderen Schüler*innen ja weiterhin sinnvoll historisch lernen. Je nach Raumsituation im Schulhaus und je nach Arbeitsdisziplin der Schüler*innen ist dies schwieriger oder leichter umzusetzen. Solche Prüfungsgespräche können ebenso mit digitalen Medien auf Distanz durchgeführt werden, wie sich jetzt während des Corona-Fernunterrichts gezeigt hat.

Auch bei diesem Format hat sich erfahrungsgemäß gut bewährt, wenn der Prüfungsumfang und der Ablauf genau definiert sind. Zur Überprüfung des Kompetenz-Grundanspruchs “Die Schüler*innen können zu einem wichtigen Ereignis der Schweizer Geschichte im 20. Jahrhundert Ursachen, Verlauf und Folgen aufzeigen” werden im Unterricht neun Ereignisse thematisiert und für das Prüfungsgespräch vorgegeben. Zu Beginn des Prüfungsgesprächs ziehen die Schüler*innen per Los ein Thema, und dann haben sie fünf Minuten Zeit, um Ursachen, Verlauf und Folgen aufzuzeigen. In den weiteren fünf Minuten stellt die Lehrperson Rückfragen zu den Erläuterungen der Schüler*innen – oder sie präsentiert zum gezogenen oder zu einem anderen Thema eine ausgewählte Quelle, und die Schüler*innen zeigen, ob sie über die Kompetenzen verfügen, um das Material zu erschließen, zu interpretieren und daraus Orientierung für ihre Gegenwart und Zukunft zu gewinnen.

Prüfungen als Spiegel des Unterrichts

Prüfungen sind Visitenkarten des Geschichtsunterrichts.[15] Sie öffnen das Schulzimmer hin zur Gesellschaft. Nie wird eine Lehrperson schneller und heftiger von Schüler*innen, Eltern, Kolleg*innen oder der Schulaufsicht kritisiert, als dann, wenn eine Beurteilung unprofessionell erfolgt. Es lohnt sich also zweifellos, diesem Thema gebührende Aufmerksamkeit zu schenken – von allem Anfang der Unterrichtsplanung an!

So wie Lehrer*innen im Unterricht nicht alle denkbaren Methoden umsetzen müssen, so müssen sie auch nicht alle möglichen Prüfungsformate einsetzen. Die einen Lehrpersonen arbeiten gerne mit Portfolios, andere machen gute Erfahrungen mit Multiple Choice-Aufgaben, wieder andere prüfen mit Lernaufgaben. Analog sieht es bei den Lernenden aus. Es ist deshalb lohnenswert, im Verlauf der eigenen Lehrer*innen-Laufbahn verschiedene Formate auszuprobieren und dann gemeinsam mit den Schüler*innen an der Optimierung der Prüfungen zu arbeiten.[16] Dabei lohnt es sich jedenfalls, solch grundlegende Formate wie Prüfungsgespräche, Portfolioaufgaben und Schreibaufträge zu nutzen. Auf diese Weise werden Prüfungen zu einem Spiegel des Unterrichts, in den alle gerne schauen.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Adamski, Peter, and Markus Bernhardt. “Diagnostizieren – Evaluieren – Leistungen beurteilen.” In Handbuch Praxis des Geschichtsunterrichts: Band 2. Edited by Michele Barricelli and Martin Lücke, 401–435. Schwalbach/Ts: Wochenschau Verlag, 2012.
  • VanSledright, Bruce A. Assessing Historical Thinking and Understanding. Innovative Designs for New Standards. New York: Routledge, 2014.
  • Wunderer, Hartmann. “Tests und Klausuren.” In Handbuch Methoden im Geschichtsunterricht. Edited by Ulrich Mayer et al., 675–685. Schwalbach/Ts.: Wochenschau Verlag, 2016.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] Ulrich Trautwein, u.a., Kompetenzen historischen Denkens erfassen. Konzeption, Operationalisierung und Befunde des Projekts Historical Thinking – Competencies in History” (Münster: HiTCH, 2017).
[2] Bruce A. VanSledright, “Assessing for Learning in the History Classroom,” in New Directions in Assessing Historical Thinking, ed. Kadriye Ercikan und Peter Seixas (New York: Routledge, 2015), 75–88.
[3] Deutschschweizerische Erziehungsdirektoren-Konferenz (D-EDK), eds., Lehrplan 21. Gesamtausgabe (Luzern: D-EDK, 2016), hier S. 8 (Überblick; Struktur des Fachbereichs- und der Modullehrpläne). Online unter: https://v-fe.lehrplan.ch/index.php?code=e|100|1 (letzter Zugriff am 15. Juni 2020).
[4] Grant Wiggins und Jay McTighe, “What is backward design?” in Understanding by Design. 1 ed. (Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill Prentice Hall, 1998), 7–19. Online unter: https://www.queensu.ca/teachingandlearning/modules/principles/documents/What%20is%20backward%20design.pdf (letzter Zugriff am 21. Juni 2020).
[5] Deutschschweizerische Erziehungsdirektoren-Konferenz (D-EDK), ed., Lehrplan 21. RZG, (Luzern: D-EDK, 2016). Online unter: https://lu.lehrplan.ch/index.php?code=b|6|4 (letzter Zugriff am 15. Juni 2020).
[6] Peter Gautschi, Guter Geschichtsunterricht: Grundlagen, Erkenntnisse, Hinweise. 3. Auflage, Erstauflage 2009 (Schwalbach/Ts.: Wochenschau Verlag, 2015), 101.
[7] Richard P. Phelps, “Teach to the Test?,” The Wilson Quarterly 35, no. 4 (2011): 38–42. Online unter: https://www.wilsonquarterly.com/quarterly/fall-2013-americas-schools-4-big-questions/teach-to-the-test/ (letzter Zugriff am 21. Juni 2020).
[8] Vgl. z.B. Joseph Memminger, Schüler schreiben Geschichte. Kreatives Schreiben im Geschichtsunterricht zwischen Fiktionalität und Faktizität (Schwalbach/Ts.: Wochenschau Verlag, 2007). Oder: Olaf Hartung, “Geschichte schreibend lernen,” in Schreiben als Lernen. Kompetenzentwicklung durch Schreiben (in allen Fächern), ed. Sabine Schmölzer‐Eibinger und Eike Thürmann (Münster: Waxmann, 2015), 201–216; Jan Hodel u.a., “Schülernarrationen als Ausdruck historischer Kompetenz,” Zeitschrift für Didaktik der Gesellschaftswissenschaften 4, no. 2 (2013): 121–145.
[9] Jörn Rüsen, “Objektivität,” in Handbuch der Geschichtsdidaktik. 5. überarbeitete Auflage, ed. Klaus Bergmann, Klaus Fröhlich und Annette Kuhn (Seelze-Velber: Kallmeyer, 1997), 160−163.
[10] Saskia Handro, “‘Sprachsensibler Geschichtsunterricht’. Systematisierende Überlegungen zu einer überfälligen Debatte,” in Geschichtsdidaktik in der Diskussion. Grundlagen und Perspektiven (Geschichtsdidaktik diskursiv – Public History und Historisches Denken, Bd. 1), ed. Wolfgang Hasberg und Holger Thünemann (Frankfurt a.M.: Peter Lang, 2016), 265–296.
[11] Peter Adamski, “Portfolio im Geschichtsunterricht. Leistungen dokumentieren – Lernen reflektieren,” Geschichte in Wissenschaft und Unterricht 54, no. 1 (2003): 32−50; Birgit Wenzel, “Aufgaben(kultur) und neue Prüfungsformen,” in Handbuch Praxis des Geschichtsunterrichts. Bd. 2, ed. Michele Barricelli und Martin Lücke (Schwalbach/Ts.: Wochenschau Verlag, 2012), 23–36, hier 32–35; Christian Heuer und Mario Resch, “Aufgaben im Geschichtsunterricht. Stand und Perspektiven,” Geschichte für heute 11, no. 3 (2018): 5–23.
[12] Karin Fuchs, Peter Gautschi, Hans Utz u.a., Zeitreise 3. Begleitband. Ausgabe für die Schweiz (Baar: Klett und Balmer, 2018), insbesondere S. 17-25. Online unter: https://www.klett.ch/lehrwerke/zeitreise/zeitreise-1-3-downloads/zeitreise-1-3-downloads-diagnostizieren-pruefen-beurteilen-zeitreise-3 (letzter Zugriff am 15. Juni 2020).
[13] Peter Gautschi, Geschichte lehren. 6. Auflage, Erstauflage 1999 (Bern: Schulverlag plus, 2015), 166–167.
[14] Zur Bedeutung von Sprache für historisches Lernen, vgl. z.B.: Katharina Grannemann, Sven Oleschko und Christian Kuchler, Sprachbildung im Geschichtsunterricht. Zur Bedeutung der kognitiven Funktion von Sprache (Münster: Waxmann, 2018).
[15] Karin Fuchs und Nadine Ritzer, “Prüfungen – Visitenkarten des Geschichtsunterrichts,” in Forschungswerkstatt Geschichtsdidaktik 07. Beiträge zur Tagung geschichtsdidaktik empirisch 07 (Geschichtsdidaktik heute, Bd. 2), ed. Jan Hodel und Béatrice Ziegler (Bern: hep, 2009), 268–276.
[16] Michele Barricelli, “Geschichtsprojekte,” in GeschichtsMethodik. Handbuch für die Sekundarstufe I und II, 5., überarb. Neuaufl., ed. Hilke Günther‐Arndt und Saskia Handro (Berlin: Cornelsen, 2015), 108–115.

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Albert Anker – Das Schulexamen © Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Gautschi, Peter und Jasmine Steger: Einfache Prüfungsaufgaben statt komplizierte Tests! In: Public History Weekly 8 (2020) 7, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-16981.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Isabella Schild / Thomas Hellmuth (Team Vienna)

Copyright (c) 2020 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 8 (2020) 7
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-16981

Tags: , ,

3 replies »

  1. To all our non-German speaking readers we recommend the automatic DeepL-Translator for 8 European languages. Just copy and paste.

    Nur ein kurzer Kommentar: In der Einleitung werden die Aufgaben des HiTCH-Tests (Anm. 1) als “Prüfaufgaben” angesprochen und im Weiteren gegen konkret gegen aus und für konkrete Unterrichtssituationen konzipierte Aufgaben gehalten.

    Das unterschlägt, dass es sich bei ersteren keineswegs um für Prüfungen, also die Erfassung konkreter und bewertbarer Lerngebnisse einzelner Schüler*innen handelt, sondern dass die mit ihnen und die ihnen unterliegenden statistischen Verfahren ermittelten Testwerte Aussagen über die Höhe und Verteilung gegenstandsunabhängiger (d.h. übertragbarer) Fähigkeiten in Gruppen machen, um diese miteinander zu vergleichen, nicht aber die “Leistungen” einzelner Schüler*innen zu bewerten.

    Im Gegensatz zu Prüfaufgaben können und sollen sie gerade nicht etwa individuelle Ausgangslagen, Anstrengung, Entwicklung etc. berücksichtigen, sondern den jeweiligen der in ohnen operationalisierten Fähigkeiten in einer Gruppe zu einem bestimmten Zeitpunkt erfassen. Das dient etwa der Evaluation unterschiedlicher Systeme, dem Monitoring von Entwicklungen usw.

    Sie sollen gerade auch Vergleiche zwischen Gruppen ermöglichen, welche unter ganz unterschiedlichen Bedingungen unterrichtet wurden, also etwa unterschiedliche Lehrpläne haben etc.

    Diese andere Funktion bedeutet auch, dass diese Aufgaben anderen Kriterien genügen müssen.

  2. To all our non-German speaking readers we recommend the automatic DeepL-Translator for 8 European languages. Just copy and paste.

    Peter Gautschi und Jasmine Steger ist grundsätzlich zuzustimmen, wenn sie eines der Stiefkinder der Didaktik, die Leistungsüberprüfung und die damit verbundene Selektionsfunktion von Schule, ins Licht rücken. In der geschichtsdidaktischen Literatur ist dieses Thema in der Tat unterbelichtet oder verbirgt sich etwas schamhaft unter dem Begriff der “Aufgabenkultur”. Neben den Diagnose- und Lernaufgaben, die von Pädagogen und Didaktikern immer gern behandelt werden, weil es dort um die positiv gedachte Förderung von Kompetenzen geht, fristen die Leistungsaufgaben ein Schattendasein, weil sie mit dem negativen Image der Allokationsfunktion unseres differenzierten und hierarchisch strukturierten Schulsystems verknüpft sind, mit dessen Hilfe auch soziale Chancen verteilt werden. Wenn die Autor*innen in Erinnerung rufen, dass “Prüfungen die Visitenkarten des Geschichtsunterrichts” sind und “das Schulzimmer hin zur Gesellschaft” öffnen, weisen sie nicht nur auf eine zentrale geschichtsdidaktische Aufgabe und Verantwortung hin, sondern ergreifen Partei für viele Studierende, die sich gerade in dieser Hinsicht für den alltäglichen Geschichtsunterricht schlecht vorbereitet fühlen.
    Doch wie sehen gute Prüfungsaufgaben aus? “Keep it simple”, antworten Gautschi und Steger – auch hier wird kaum jemand widersprechen. Der Teufel liegt – wie immer – im Detail. Denn was meint “simple” in diesem Zusammenhang? Offensichtlich ist “einfach” hier nicht im Sinne von “leicht zu lösen” gemeint, sondern im Sinne von “klar zu durchschauen”. Schüler*innen sollen immer wissen, was von ihnen zur Lösung der Aufgabe genau verlangt wird. Dabei helfen Erwartungshorizonte, was von den Autor*innen “rückwärts planen” genannt wird. Auch das ist keine aufregende Neu-Entdeckung. Wir wissen aber empirisch kaum etwas darüber, wie oft solche Erwartungshorizonte von Lehrpersonen angefertigt werden. “Schaun mer mal”, was kommt. Das ist in der Tat unprofessionell.
    Wie kommt man zu solchen Erwartungshorizonten? Das beantworten die Autor*innen des Beitrags leider auf einer sehr allgemeinen Ebene. Sie bieten als Kriterien die Rüsenschen Triftigkeiten an. Dem kann man sicher zustimmen, aber das Problem ist doch nicht, dass die Herstellung von Triftigkeiten eine überzeugende historische Operation ist, sondern wie man Schüler*innen dazu bringt, einen Text zu formulieren, in dem sie diese fach- und bildungssprachlich korrekt zum Ausdruck bringen.
    Meiner Ansicht nach liegt die Antwort auf die Frage nach guten Prüfungsaufgaben genau in der Konkretisierung dieses fachspezifischen Schreibens. Eine Schlüsselfunktion nehmen dabei die Operatoren ein. Die Aufgabe “Beschreibe den Beitrag von Henry Dunant zum Aufbau des Roten Kreuzes” ist nicht unbedingt so zu verstehen, wie sie möglicherweise gemeint ist.[1] Die Schüler*innen könnten zum Beispiel denken, es gehe um die Beschreibung eines konkreten “Beitrags”, den Henry Dunant geschrieben oder gespendet hat. Das heißt, in der Aufgabe ist gar nicht “Beschreiben” gemeint, die Schüler*innen sollen vielmehr erklären, warum es zum Aufbau des Roten Kreuzes durch Henry Dunant gekommen ist.
    Mit der Formulierung eines Erwartungshorizontes können sich Lehrpersonen klar machen, welcher Operator geeignet ist, um das dort formulierte Ziel zu erreichen. Die Operatoren “Beschreiben”, “Erklären” und “Schildern” erfordern wiederum eine bestimmte Textsorte, ein Genre. Dafür müssen die Lernenden Mustervorstellungen erwerben. Mareike-Cathrine Wickner hat das am Beispiel eines Sachurteils entwickelt.[2] Wenn die Schüler*innen erklären sollen, warum es zum Aufbau des Roten Kreuzes durch Henry Dunant gekommen ist, wird zunächst die Formulierung einer Hinsicht oder einer These erwartet: “Die Gründung des Roten Kreuzes hängt eng mit den Erlebnissen Henry Dunants zusammen, die er 1859 bei einer Reise zum Schlachtfeld von Solferino gewonnen hatte.” Damit erhält der anschließende Text seine Struktur, so dass sich auch die folgenden Teile der Textsorte “Erklärung” einigermaßen genau bestimmen lassen und die Stellen, an denen sich die epistemischen Operationen der Triftigkeiten unterbringen lassen. Man kann solche Genres mit Mustertexten erfolgreich einüben.[3] Derartige fachspezifische Spracharbeit kann Lehrer*innen zur Abfassung von Erwartungshorizonten und damit zur Formulierung von guten Aufgaben sensibilisieren, die von Schüler*innen fachsprachlich angemessen beantwortet werden können.[4]

    ______________________
    [1] Schmölzer-Eibinger, Sabine. “Sprache als Medium des Lernens im Fach.” In Sprache im Fach. Sprachlichkeit und fachliches Lernen, edited by Michael Becker-Mrotzek u.a., 25-40. Münster: Waxmann Verlag, 2013.
    [2] Wickner, Mareike-Cathrine. “So schließt sich der Kreis. Textsortenspezifische Schreibförderung im Geschichtsunterricht mit dem “Genre Cycle”.” In Geschichte lernen 31, Heft 182 (2018): 49–56.
    [3] Husemann, Charlotte. “Fachspezifische Sprachhandlungen konkretisieren. Schüler*innentexte zum Beschreiben, Erklären und Begründen im Rahmen des Historischen Sachurteils.” In Sprache(n) des Geschichtsunterrichts. Sprachliche Vielfalt und Historisches Lernen, edited by Thomas Sandkühler, und Markus Bernhardt. Göttingen: 2020 (im Druck).
    [4] Bernhardt, Markus, und Franziska Conrad. “Sprachsensibler Geschichtsunterricht Sprachliche Bildung als Aufgabe des Fachs Geschichte.” Geschichte lernen 30, Heft 182 (2018): 2–9.

  3. Avatar

    To all our non-German speaking readers we recommend the automatic DeepL-Translator for 8 European languages. Just copy and paste.

    Ich möchte mit meinem Kommentar den Blick auf die schulische Praxis lenken. Peter Gautschi und Jasmine Steger bieten einen anregenden Impuls zu einem Aspekt historischen Lernens, der in der österreichischen Schulrealität gern kleingeredet und von der Fachdidaktik, wohl wegen der aufwändigen Theoriearbeit, wenig beachtet wird: der Umgang mit “Leistungsfeststellung” und die daraus resultierende Beurteilung.

    Die Bandbreite der Vorstellungen zur Überprüfung von Lernprogression und deren Bewertung ist groß. Die (alte) Leistungsbeurteilungsverordnung sieht vier Möglichkeiten der Ermittlung fachlicher Schüler*innen-„Leistungen“ vor: die “laufende Beobachtung der Mitarbeit” (§ 4), die “praktische Übung” (§ 6), die “schriftliche Überprüfung” (§ 8) und die “Prüfung” (§ 5). Im Alltag dominieren die Formate Mitarbeitsbeobachtung und Test. Übungen kommen meist als Präsentationen (“Referat”), seltener in Form von Projekten zu Anwendung. Prüfungen treten in den Hintergrund.

    Ob mit diesen Instrumenten tatsächlich Lernergebnisse und Erkenntnisse sowie deren Entwicklung diagnostisch erkundet und durch Beurteilungen abgebildet werden, ist fraglich.

    Dafür gibt es aus meiner Sicht zwei Gründe: Einerseits erleben wir in einigen Schultypen (v. a. Mittelschule, Berufsbildende Schulen) eine Art von Geringschätzung des Fachs Geschichte und der Politischen Bildung, die dazu führt, dass Lehrende, die captatio benevolentiae ihrer Schüler*innen durch “gute Noten” sicherzustellen trachtet.

    Andererseits gibt es beim Modus der Leistungsermittlung und der Auffassung von deren Zweck einen ausgeprägten Individualismus. Der Spannungsbogen der Erwartungen reicht von der ehrgeizigen Lösung (zu) anspruchsvoller Aufgaben über die Erfüllung einfacher, fragmentierter Reproduktionsleistungen in mehr oder weniger ausführlicher Weise bis zur Zufriedenheit damit, wenn annähernd zur Sache gesprochen bzw. geschrieben wird. Sinnbildung nach Rüsen, evident gemacht in narrativierender Weise, steht selten im Fokus der Diagnose.

    Parallel dazu ist das Erscheinungsbild der zur Anwendung gelangenden Ermittlungsformen von “Leistung” ein Spiegelbild herrschender Verunsicherung, wie zu verfahren ist, um Motivation (“Schülerfreundlichkeit”) und Diagnose unter einen Hut zu bringen. Zu beobachten ist erhöhte Achtsamkeit gegenüber formalen Erfordernissen (Zeitvorgaben, Zahl der Aufgaben/Fragen, “Stoff”-Menge etc.), damit im Falle eines Widerspruchs die Beurteilung nicht a priori wegen rechtlicher Fehler der Prüfenden aufzuheben ist. Dies gilt insbesondere für Prüfungsverfahren mit Öffentlichkeitscharakter (Matura, kommissionelle Prüfungen).

    Didaktische Intentionen (Subjektorientierung, Differenzierung, Kompetenzaufbau) und Ansprüche (Diagnose von Lern- und Erkenntnisfortschritten) treten tendenziell in den Hintergrund. Sie werden hauptsächlich in professionellen Communitys diskutiert, die Aufmerksamkeit der Schul-Öffentlichkeit erringen sie, wenn überhaupt, eher nebenher. Diese Einschätzung basiert auf Rückmeldungen Studierender aus diversen Fachpraktika sowie eigenen Erfahrungen in der Fortbildung, denn belastbare empirische Befunde zur Praxis domänenspezifischer Leistungsbeurteilung im Unterrichtsalltag stehen, wie Markus Bernhardt moniert, aus.

    Weil die Verunsicherung groß ist, sind praktikable Anregungen wertvoll. Auch wenn Gautschi/Steger von einer “Binsenwahrheit” sprechen, ist es keineswegs Usus, dass Geschichtsunterricht bzw. Politische Bildung nach rückwärtigem Lerndesign geplant werden. Wäre dem so, könnten selbst in der österreichischen Verfasstheit, wo es, anders als in der Schweiz, keine festgesetzten “Grundansprüche” im Sinne zu erreichender Kompetenzstufen gibt, nachvollziehbare Bewertungskriterien entwickelt werden.

    Die LBVO spricht in ihrer Notendefinition vom “Wesentliche[n]” (§ 14) als Dreh- und Angelpunkt der Beurteilung. Die Formulierung ermöglicht Planenden, je nach Modul bzw. Thema, “die wesentlichen Bereiche” (inhaltlich, methodisch und mit Blick aus Kompetenzentwicklung) vorab zu definieren und zu beschreiben. Werden sie erreicht (“zur Gänze erfüllt”), wäre das Äquivalent zum “befriedigend” gefunden, und es könnte nach oben (Richtung “sehr gut”) und unten (Richtung “nicht genügend”) eigenverantwortlich nachvollziehbar gestuft werden. Kriterien wären festzulegen.

    Die Vorgangsweise würde sowohl dem Anspruch auf Individualität bei Lehrenden (Planung und Zieldefinition) wie auch bei Schüler*innen (Lern- und Erkenntnisfortschritte) genügen und Reliabilität sowie eine begrenzte Validität sicherstellen. Das Prinzip ist, wie Gautschi/Steger darstellen, auf alle Formen der Leistungsfeststellung und -bewertung anwendbar. Voraussetzung für das Gelingen ist Bewusstseinsschärfung bei den Betroffenen, denn es nutzt wenig, wenn zwar beispielsweise Schreibaufträge mit Operatoren versehen werden, um dem formalen Erfordernis der Anwendung handlungsleitender Verben zu entsprechen, es aber unklar bleibt, welches Resultat aus der Aufgabe erwachsen soll. Ist das nicht vorab überlegt und festgelegt worden, kommt es in der Durchführung zur u.a. zu Missverständnissen und Fehldeutungen im epistemologischen Umgang mit Texten, an denen aber nicht gearbeitet werden kann, weil keine Vorstellung vom Aufbau der erforderlichen Fähigkeiten und Fertigkeiten existiert. (Auf Schreibdidaktik hat Bernhardt hingewiesen).

    Und so sieht sich der*die Prüfende im Zuge des diagnostischen Verfahrens häufig mit ungefilterter Wiedergabe von Inhalten, nicht erkannten Hauptaussagen, mangelnder Kontextualisierungsfähigkeit, problematischem Umgang mit Begriffen u. dgl. konfrontiert, statt des implizit erhofften Nachweises empirischer, narrativer und normativer Plausibilitäten. In der Bewertung wird, um die Reputation zu wahren, gern “Milde” walten gelassen.

    Die Anregungen von Gautschi/Steger, in der Planung Erwartungen zu konkretisieren und präzise zu beschreiben, sowie für die Überprüfung wenig komplexe, dafür zielgerichtete Aufgaben zu entwerfen, wäre ein notwendiger Schritt zur tatsächlichen Erfassung von Fähigkeiten und Fertigkeiten. Schülergruppenspezifische und themenbezogene Entwicklungsstufen und darauf abgestimmte Aufgabenarrangements können auf diese Weise Eingang in die Unterrichtsarbeit finden und erhobene Lernergebnisse hätten diagnostischen Charakter. Man kann an ihnen weiterarbeiten. Der Vorschlag ist also praxisrelevant und sollte im Unterricht an österreichischen Schulen ausprobiert werden. Voraussetzung ist die Bereitschaft vom Lehrenden, sich mit Fragen der Diagnostik und der Beurteilung auseinanderzusetzen und für allfällige Änderungen am eigenen Unterricht offen zu sein.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

I accept that my given data and my IP address is sent to a server in the USA only for the purpose of spam prevention through the Akismet program.More information on Akismet and GDPR.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest