Witness Auschwitz? How VR is changing Testimony

Witness Auschwitz? Wie VR Zeugenschaft verändert

Abstract:
The author explores the question of whether the culture of memory is changing through the use of digital media? Using concrete examples of virtual reality offerings and holograms of Holocaust survivors, she formulates the thesis that a change in the culture of remembrance towards a digital-somatic phase is to be expected through immersive media, as new formats are set aside for the established models of testimony, especially in connection with the Holocaust.
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-15689
Languages: English, German


In 2017 the Italian studio 101% presented the VR simulation “Witness: Auschwitz” at the Gamescon in Cologne.[1] The project was immediately met with criticism. Many scholars rejected it for breaking a taboo and several blogs discussed the ethical limits of VR.[2] Until today nothing but the opening sequence has been presented. It shows the opening gate of Auschwitz-Birkenau on a sunny day in the present. A suitcase is lifted by an invisible hand and, all of a sudden, the atmosphere changes: the landscape is snowy, the twittering of birds is replaced by the howling of sirens and commandments in German like “get off the train” and the user moves over the train tracks towards the gate that opens before him.

Not More Than a Movie?

So far, Witness: Auschwitz does not show much more than any old Holocaust movie. Why then was the simulation met with so much criticism? The reason may not lie so much in what 101% has shown so far, but in what the studio promises: an immersive experience of the harrowing past. In fact, as I will argue in a research project financed by the Grimme Forschungskolleg, Witness: Auschwitz is at the beginning of a change in memorial culture towards a digital-somatic phase.[3] This change entails, amongst other things, a new understanding of the concept of “witness” on which I will concentrate in this article.

Old Dimensions of Testimony, New Media

In 2013 New Dimensions in Testimony, a project by the USC Shoah Foundation, was met with a similar amount of attention as Witness: Auschwitz. The promotion video showed a school class interviewing a hologrammatic representation of Holocaust survivor Pinchas Gutter projected onto a rectangular see-through screen.[4] At least German scholars tended to criticise the project. When talking about the project they tended to use vocabulary of ghost stories. For Aleida Assmann, the virtual witnesses seemed “ghostly”,[5] Micha Brumlik referred to them as a “ghost- and phantom-play”.[6] By now the USC Shoah Foundation has recorded more than twenty interviews, the word “new” has been deleted from the project title, and the word “hologram” banned from the official vocabulary because of the technical impossibility to program them in the near future. Further projects have been founded in the UK, in Germany and in Israel.[7] Even if the criticism has not completely worn off, most people seem to have accepted by now that the virtual witnesses are here and that they will stay.

Like the project Witness: Auschwitz, the project Dimensions in Testimony carries the concept of “witness” respectively “testimony” in its title. The latter has become one of the key terms for the memory of the Holocaust. The survivor witness who, with the aim of preventing repetition, gives testimony of a massive crime that she experienced herself, has been established as a third type of witness alongside the juridical witness and the martyr.[8] The testimony of the survivor witness is enabled by the secondary witness who listens to the survivor witness‘ testimony and ideally helps her to work through her traumatic experience. Moreover, by distributing the testimony, the secondary witness makes sure that the testimony will not be forgotten. The secondary witness should thereby always be aware of her difference to the survivor witness and should not identify with the latter.[9]

It is this understanding of witnessing that Dimensions in Testimony tries to transpose to the future. The virtual witnesses should serve as a replacement of real conversations with survivors, once they will no longer be possible.[10] Unlike the video testimonies, which allowed to record the process of giving testimony at a specific moment in time, the testimony of the virtual witnesses will always be composed anew out of recorded answers. The media should thereby ideally be forgotten – an aspect that does not work too well at the moment and probably explains the ghost story vocabulary in the criticisms: according to the theory of the “uncanny valley” of robotics scholar Masahiro Mori, humanoid representations appear especially uncanny when they show a great similarity to humans but let their un-humanness ever again shine through.[10] However, that may be, the “new” in the original title of the project applies more to the medium than to the understanding of the concept of “witness” and “testimony”. The dialogic structure of giving testimony is kept, even if it is now digitally simulated, and so is the relationship between the survivor witness and the secondary witness. The aura and authority of the survivor witness might thereby even be enforced – she now really seems to be talking from beyond the grave.

Visits to the Crime Scene – Early VR Simulations

Witness: Auschwitz is not the first project to use VR as a means to visualise former concentration- and extermination camps. In 2016 the Bavarian crime commission presented a VR simulation of Auschwitz used in the last trials against Nazi perpetrators.[11] Again since 2016 a VR simulation of Sobibor can be seen at the Vugh memorial in the Netherlands.[12] At the Bergen-Belsen memorial again, the former camp structure can be visited with the help of an AR app since 2015.[13] What all of these models have in common is a forensic, respectively a historical view on the camps. What can be seen are empty barracks and train waggons – sometimes with heaps of everyday objects. Thus, the users see the camps in a state that they have never been in: functional but deserted.

Like Dimensions in Testimony, these simulations make use of an understanding of witnessing that is compatible with the established use of the concept. The user becomes a secondary witness that visits a crime scene without having been affected by the crime herself. Their role can be compared to that of the liberator or to that of the visitor of a concentration camp memorial – with the difference that her visit takes place in a simulated past. The USC Shoah Foundation has recently brought together this physical/spatial form of secondary witnessing with the auditory one in the movie The Last Goodbye combining a virtual testimony of Pinchas Gutter with a VR film of the Majdanek memorial.[14]

The User as a Survivor Witness

Witness: Auschwitz, on the other hand, wants to turn the user herself into a survivor witness. 101% observes that they want to simulate “everyday life” in the camps. They want to especially focus on details like soap holders and lighting.

“That particular stuff, the daily life – we give you the opportunity to live inside it and have your own experience […] It’s simply too far for our imagination to grasp,” observes Daniele Anzara, one of the developers.[15]

However, what 101% does not want to show is one of the most fundamental elements of everyday life in the camps: the violence. So far it remains unclear whether Witness: Auschwitz will allow its users options for action or whether they will mainly be able to move through the camp, with the difference that in this instance, the camp will not be deserted.

The last option has recently been chosen by both an Israeli and an American project. The Israeli project Memento combines virtual witnesses with a representation of their life stories in VR that the users will experience from their own perspective.[16] Memento thereby tries to achieve what the concept of “secondary witnessing” actually forbids – an identification of the secondary witness with the survivor witness.

Similarly, former students of the Carnegie Mellon University have developed a simulation of a Journey through the Camps. The storyboard follows the different episodes of a prisoner with the corresponding emotions: train – arrival, confusion; shower room – fear, uncertainty; barracks – survival, suffering; crematorium – processing loss, mourning.[17]

All three projects underline the educational value of their simulations. In fact, as Alison Landsberg has rather optimistically argued, media can transfer foreign memories onto their consumers who adopt them like a prothesis. This “prosthetic memory” will in the ideal case lead to a more responsible and ethical behaviour.[18] However, the simulations also show signs of what Silke Arnold-de Simine has called a “dark nostalgia” – the wish to have lived through a traumatising event. Such a wish is, of course, only possible if said event is temporally and spatially sufficiently distant from the wisher so that he will not actually run the risk of experiencing it.[19] While secondary witnessing places the “other” who needs assistance in the centre, dark nostalgia concentrates on the ego that longs to be special.

Virtual reality will very likely become established as a medium of memorial culture. Projects concentrating on the memory of the Holocaust or other traumatising events will need to keep the right balance between prosthetic memory and dark nostalgia.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Landsberg, Alison. Prosthetic Memory: American Remembrance in the Age of Mass Culture. New York: Columbia University Press, 2004.
  • Arnold-de Simine, Silke. Mediating Memory in the Museum. Trauma, Empathy, Nostalgia. Houndmills and New York: Plagrave Macmillan, 2013.
  • Friedländer, Saul (Ed.). Probing the Limits of Representation. Nazism and the Final Solution. Harvard: Harvard University Press.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] http://witnessauschwitz.com/ (last accessed 26 March 2020).
[2] Elliot Gardner, “Does a VR Auschwitz Simulation cross an ethical line?,” Alphr (4. Oktober 2017), https://www.alphr.com/life-culture/1007241/does-a-vr-auschwitz-simulation-cross-an-ethical-line (last accessed 26 March 2020), Christian Huberts, “Einmal kurz Opfer sein… VR Technologie und ethische Grenzen,“ piqd (11. Oktober 2017), https://www.piqd.de/technologie-gesellschaft/einmal-kurz-opfer-sein-vr-technologie-und-ethische-grenzen (last accessed 26 March 2020), Christian Schiffer, “VR-Experience Auschwitz: Die Banalisierung des Holocaust?,“ fluter (1. Dezember 2017), https://www.fluter.de/studio-baut-vr-modell-von-kz-auschwitz (last accessed 26 March 2020).
[3] Cf. the project website: https://www.grimme-forschungskolleg.de/portfolio/witness-auschwitz-2020/ (last accessed 26 March 2020).
[4]  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=woxb_NPfxjI (last accessed 26 March 2020).
[5] Aleida Assman interviewed by Karin Janker, “Deutschlands ethischer Imperativ. Schafft es die AdF, die ‚erinnerungspolitische Wende um 180 Grad‘ zu erzwingen? Wohl kaum, sagt Aleida Assmann,” Süddeutsche Zeitung (14 February 2018), 10.
[6] Micha Brumlik, “Hologramm und Holocaust. Wie die Opfer der Shoah zu Untoten werden,“ in Erinnerungskulturen: Eine pädagogische und bildungspolitische Herausforderung, ed. Meike Sophia Baader and Tatjana Freytag (Köln: Böhlau, 2015), 19-30.
[7] The projects are: “The Forever Project” of the National Holocaust Centre and Museum in Laxton, https://www.holocaust.org.uk/foreverproject1, a project taking place at the LMU since 2018, as well as the Israeli project „Memento“ that I will refer to later on (last accessed 26 March 2020).
[8] Sibylle Krämer, Medium, Bote, Übertragung. Kleine Metaphysik der Medialität (Frankfurt a.M.: Suhrkamp, 2008), 223-260.
[9] Ulrich Baer, “Einleitung,” in Niemand zeugt für den Zeugen: Erinnerungskultur nach der Shoah, ed. Ulrich Baer (Frankfurt a.M.: Suhrkamp, 2000), 7-31.
[10] Heather Maio, David Traum, and Paul Debevec, “New Dimensions in Testimony. How New Technology – and Interview Questions – will contribute to the Dialogue between Students and Survivors,” Pastforward (Sommer 2012), 23-25.
[11] Masahiro Mori, “The Uncanny Valley,” IEEE Spectrum https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/humanoids/the-uncanny-valley (last accessed 26 March 2020).
[12] “Aufklärung von NS-Verbrechen: Das Grauen von Auschwitz mittels VR-Brille nacherleben,” Sputnik News (21 January 2017) https://sptnkne.ws/dw7Y (last accessed 26 March 2020).
[13] Cf. the project website: https://www.hva.nl/create-it/gedeelde-content/projecten/archief-projecten-crossmedia/vr-tour-sobibor.html (last accessed 26 March 2020).
[14] Cf. the project website: http://www.belsen-project.specs-lab.com/ (last accessed 26 March 2020).
[15] Cf. the website of the film: https://www.moving-picture.com/what-we-do/ar-vr/usc-shoah-the-last-goodbye (last accessed 26 March 2020).
[16] Elliot Gardner, “Does a VR Auschwitz Simulation cross an ethical line?,“ Alphr (4. Oktober 2017), https://www.alphr.com/life-culture/1007241/does-a-vr-auschwitz-simulation-cross-an-ethical-line (last accessed 26 March 2020).
[17] Simona Shemer, “VR Tech is Playing a Key Role in Holocaust Education and Awareness,” NoCamels (21 August 2018) https://nocamels.com/2018/08/virtual-reality-tech-holocaust/, https://www.facebook.com/akim.dolinsky/videos/10216262891147654/( last accessed 26 March 2020), the promotion film is available at:
[18] Cf. the project website: https://medium.com/stitchbridgevr/a-vr-journey-through-the-concentration-camps-of-the-holocaust-d9c9fe7beed2(last accessed 26 March 2020) and https://www.stitchbridge.com/work/journeyvr (last accessed 26 March 2020).
[19] Alison Landsberg, Prosthetic Memory: American Remembrance in the Age of Mass Culture (New York: Columbia University Press, 2004).
[20] Silke Arnold-de Simine, Mediating Memory in the Museum. Trauma, Empathy, Nostalgia (Houndmills and New York: Plagrave Macmillan, 2013), 59. 

_____________________

Image Credits

Screenshot YouTube-Video “Witness Auschwitz” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-glSpkA4Akc&feature=emb_logo (last accessed 26 March 2020).

Recommended Citation

de Jong, Steffi: Witness Auschwitz? How VR is changing Testimony. In: Public History Weekly 8 (2020) 4, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-15689.

Editorial Responsibility

Christian Bunnenberg / Lukas Tobler / Peter Gautschi (Team Lucerne)

2017 stellte das italienische Studio 101% auf der Gamescom in Köln seine VR-Simulation “Witness: Auschwitz” vor.[1] Sofort wurde Kritik laut. Auf Tagungen wurde die Simulation gerne als Tabubruch abgelehnt und auf Technologieblogs die Frage diskutiert, wo eigentlich die ethischen Linien der virtuellen Realität verlaufen sollten.[2] Dabei ist bis heute nichts weiter als die Eröffnungssequenz zu sehen. Diese zeigt das Eingangstor von Auschwitz-Birkenau an einem sonnigen Tag in der Gegenwart. Ein Koffer wird von einer unsichtbaren Hand aufgehoben und quasi schlagartig ändert sich die Atmosphäre: Es liegt Schnee, das Vogelgezwitscher wird von heulenden Sirenen und Befehlen auf Deutsch wie “Runter vom Zug” ersetzt, und die Nutzer*in bewegt sich über die Gleise zum Eingangstor hin, das sich öffnet.

Nicht mehr als ein Film?

Soweit zeigt Witness: Auschwitz also nicht viel anderes als jeder beliebige Holocaustfilm. Wieso also diese Aufregung? Sie liegt wohl nicht so sehr an dem, was 101% bisher gezeigt hat, sondern an dem, was 101% verspricht: nämlich ein immersives Erlebnis der grausamen Vergangenheit. Wie ich in einem vom Grimme-Forschungskolleg finanzierten Forschungsprojekt zeigen werde, bahnt sich mit Witness Auschwitz und anderen VR-Simulationen von Konzentrations- und Vernichtungslagern tatsächlich ein Wandel der Erinnerungskultur hin zu einer neuen, digital-somatischen Phase, an.[3] Dieser Wandel führt, und darauf werde ich in diesem Artikel eingehen, unter anderem zu einer Neudefinition des Zeugenbegriffs.

Alte Dimensionen der Zeugenschaft, neue Medien

Nicht viel weniger Aufsehen als Witness: Auschwitz erregte 2013 New Dimensions in Testimony, ein Projekt der USC Shoah Foundation. In einem Imagefilm war eine Schulklasse zu sehen, die ein auf eine rechteckige durchsichtige Oberfläche projiziertes Hologramm des Holocaustüberlebenden Pinchas Gutter interviewte.[4] Aus Kreisen von Wissenschaftler*innen und Gedenkstättenmitarbeiter*innen waren vor allem kritische Stimmen zu hören, wobei häufig ein Vokabular der Geistergeschichten gewählt wurde. Aleida Assmann sprach davon, dass die virtuellen Zeitzeug*innen “gespenstisch” seien,[5] Micha Brumlik bezeichnete sie als ein “Geister- und Gespensterstück”.[6] Mittlerweile wurden von der USC Shoah Foundation mehr als 20 Interviews aufgenommen, das Wort “new” aus dem Titel des Projekts und der Begriff “Hologramm” wegen der Unmöglichkeit der technischen Umsetzbarkeit aus dem offiziellen Vokabular gestrichen. Weitere Projekte wurden in Großbritannien, Deutschland und Israel ins Leben gerufen.[7] Auch wenn die Kritik an den virtuellen Zeitzeug*innen nicht komplett abgeklungen ist, so scheint man sich mittlerweile damit abgefunden zu haben, dass sie da sind und wohl auch bleiben werden.

Wie das Projekt Witness: Auschwitz führt das Projekt Dimensions in Testimony den Begriff der Zeug*in respektive des Zeugnisses im Titel. Letzterer hat sich als einer der Schlüsselbegriffe der Erinnerung an den Holocaust herauskristallisiert. Die Überlebenszeug*in die, mit dem Ziel eine Wiederholung abzuwenden, von einem Verbrechen berichtet, das sie am eigenen Leib erfahren hat, hat sich nach 1945 neben der Gerichtszeug*in und der Märtyrer*in als dritter Zeugentypus etabliert.[8] Dieser Überlebenszeug*in wird die sekundäre Zeug*in zur Seite gestellt, die ihr Zeugnis überhaupt erst ermöglicht. Die sekundäre Zeug*in hört der Überlebenszeug*in zu und hilft ihr, im Idealfall, ihre traumatischen Erlebnisse zu verarbeiten. Zudem trägt sie durch die Verbreitung des Zeugnisses dazu bei, dass letzteres nicht in Vergessenheit gerät. Dabei sollte sich die sekundäre Zeug*in ihrer Andersartigkeit bewusst sein und sich nicht mit der Überlebenszeug*in identifizieren.[9]

Genau diese Form des Zeugnisses will Dimensions in Testimony durch den Gebrauch von virtuellen Zeitzeug*innen in die Zukunft tragen. Die virtuellen Zeitzeug*innen sollen als Ersatz für ein reales Zeitzeug*innengespräch dienen, wenn dieses nicht mehr möglich sein wird.[10] Anders als Videozeugnisse, die ja den Prozess des Zeugnisablegens zu einem bestimmten Moment festhalten, wird das Zeugnis der virtuellen Zeitzeug*in immer wieder neu aus abgespeicherten Antworten zusammengesetzt. Dabei sollte im Idealfall das Medium in den Hintergrund treten – ein Aspekt der zurzeit nur leidlich funktioniert und wohl auch die Benutzung eines Vokabulars der Geistergeschichten in den Kritiken erklärt. Laut der Theorie des “uncanny valley” des Roboterwissenschaftlers Masahiro Mori erscheinen humanoide Darstellungen nämlich gerade dann als besonders unheimlich, wenn sie dem Menschen sehr ähnlich sind, ihre Nicht-Menschlichkeit aber immer wieder subtil durchscheint.[11] Nichtsdestotrotz bezieht sich das “new” im ursprünglichen Namen des Projektes vor allem auf das Medium, nicht aber auf den Begriff des Zeugnisses. Erhalten bleibt nämlich der dialogische Charakter des Zeugnisablegens, selbst wenn dieser nun digital simuliert wird. Erhalten bleibt auch das Verhältnis zwischen Überlebenszeug*in und sekundärer Zeug*in. Dabei wird die Auratisierung und Autorität der Überlebenszeug*in unter Umständen sogar noch verstärkt – spricht diese nun ja quasi tatsächlich aus dem Jenseits.

Tatortbesichtigung – Frühe VR Simulationen

Witness: Auschwitz ist nicht das erste Projekt welches VR zum Zweck der Visualisierung ehemaliger Konzentrations- und Vernichtungslager einsetzt. 2016 stellte das Bayrische Landeskriminalamt ein VR-Modell von Auschwitz vor, welches in den letzten Prozessen gegen NS-Verbrecher eingesetzt wird.[12] Ebenfalls seit 2016 ist in der Gedenkstätte Vugh in den Niederlanden eine VR-Simulation von Sobibor zu sehen.[13] In der Gedenkstätte Bergen-Belsen wiederum kann die ehemalige Lagerstruktur seit 2015 mit Hilfe einer AR-App besichtigt werden.[14] Was all diesen Modellen gemeinsam ist, ist ein forensischer, respektive ein geschichtswissenschaftlicher Blick auf die Lager. Zu sehen sind leere Baracken und Zugwaggons. Allenfalls befinden sich darin einige Objekthaufen. Die Nutzer*innen sehen die Lager also in einem Zustand, in dem sie nie existierten: funktionierend, aber menschenleer. Wie in Dimensions in Testimony kommt auch in diesen Simulationen ein Konzept der Zeugenschaft zum Ausdruck, das sehr gut mit etablierten Zeugenbegriffen kompatibel ist. Die Nutzer*in wird hier zu einer sekundären Zeug*in, die einen Ort des Verbrechens besucht, ohne selbst von diesem Verbrechen belangt zu werden. Ihre Rolle ist vergleichbar mit der der Befreier*innen oder der einer Gedenkstättenbesucher*in – nur dass dieser Besuch eben in einer simulierten Vergangenheit stattfindet. Die USC Shoah Foundation hat diese beiden Formen der räumlichen/physischen und der auditiven sekundären Zeugenschaft kürzlich in dem VR Film The Last Goodbye zusammengebracht, der das Hologramm von Pinchas Gutter mit einer Simulation der Gedenkstätte Majdanek kombiniert.[15]

Die Nutzer*in als Überlebenszeug*in

Witness: Auschwitz nun versucht die Nutzer*in selbst zur Überlebenszeug*in zu machen. Simuliert werden soll der “Alltag” in Auschwitz, wobei die Macher*innen dezidiert den Fokus auf kleine Details wie Seifenspender und Lampen legen.

“That particular stuff, the daily life – we give you the opportunity to live inside it and have your own experience […] It’s simply too far for our imagination to grasp,” beobachtet der Entwickler Daniele Anzara.[16]

Was allerdings nicht gezeigt werden soll, ist das wohl grundlegendste Element des Alltags in Auschwitz: die Gewalt.

Noch ist unklar, ob es in Witness: Auschwitz auch Handlungsoptionen geben wird, oder ob die Nutzer*in sich lediglich durch das Lager bewegen wird, nur dass dieses jetzt eben nicht menschenleer sein wird. Letztere Option haben kürzlich ein israelisches und ein amerikanisches Projekt gewählt. Für das israelische Projekt Memento werden virtuelle Zeitzeug*innen mit einer Darstellung ihrer Geschichte in VR verbunden, die die Nutzer*in aus der Ich-Perspektive erlebt.[17] Somit versucht das Projekt Memento eben genau das zu erreichen, was das Konzept der “sekundären Zeugenschaft” verbietet – nämlich eine Identifikation der sekundären Zeug*in mit der Überlebenszeug*in.

Ähnlich versucht eine von ehemaligen Student*innen der Carnegie Mellom University entwickelte Simulation betitelt Journey through the Camps eine Reise durch die Lager zu simulieren. Dabei geht das Storyboard von den verschiedenen Stationen eines Häftlings mit den dazugehörigen Emotionen aus: Zug – Ankunft, Verwirrung; Duschraum – Angst, Unsicherheit; Barracken – Überleben, Leiden und Krematorium – mit Verlust umgehen, Trauer.[18]

Alle Projekte betonen den didaktischen Wert ihrer Simulationen. Tatsächlich hat beispielweise Alison Landsberg sehr optimistisch argumentiert, dass über Medien eine “prosthetic memory”, eine Aneignung einer fremden Erinnerung, erfolgen kann, die im Idealfall zu einem verantwortungsvolleren und ethischen Verhalten führt.[19] Zum Ausdruck kommt aber auch das, was Silke Arnold-de Simine eine “dark nostalgia” genannt hat – ein durch eine sichere zeitliche und räumliche Distanz geäußerter Wunsch, ein traumatisierendes Erlebnis selbst gemacht zu haben.[20] Bei einem solchen Wunsch aber steht nicht mehr, wie beim Konzept der sekundären Zeugenschaft, das Gegenüber im Mittelpunkt, das unsere Unterstützung benötigt, sondern das eigene Ego, das sich danach sehnt etwas Besonderes zu sein.

Virtual Reality wird sich mit sehr großer Wahrscheinlichkeit auch als erinnerungskulturelles Medium durchsetzen. Es wird dabei darauf ankommen, die Balance zwischen einer prothetischen Erinnerung und einer dunklen Nostalgie zu halten.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Landsberg, Alison. Prosthetic Memory: American Remembrance in the Age of Mass Culture. New York: Columbia University Press, 2004.
  • Arnold-de Simine, Silke. Mediating Memory in the Museum. Trauma, Empathy, Nostalgia. Houndmills and New York: Plagrave Macmillan, 2013.
  • Friedländer, Saul (Ed.). Probing the Limits of Representation. Nazism and the Final Solution. Harvard: Harvard University Press.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] http://witnessauschwitz.com/ (letzter Zugriff 26. März 2020).
[2] Elliot Gardner, “Does a VR Auschwitz Simulation cross an ethical line?,” Alphr (4. Oktober 2017), https://www.alphr.com/life-culture/1007241/does-a-vr-auschwitz-simulation-cross-an-ethical-line (letzter Zugriff 26. März 2020), Christian Huberts, “Einmal kurz Opfer sein… VR Technologie und ethische Grenzen,“ piqd (11. Oktober 2017), https://www.piqd.de/technologie-gesellschaft/einmal-kurz-opfer-sein-vr-technologie-und-ethische-grenzen (letzter Zugriff 26. März 2020), Christian Schiffer, “VR-Experience Auschwitz: Die Banalisierung des Holocaust?,“ fluter (1. Dezember 2017), https://www.fluter.de/studio-baut-vr-modell-von-kz-auschwitz (letzter Zugriff 26. März 2020).
[3] Siehe die Projektwebsite: https://www.grimme-forschungskolleg.de/portfolio/witness-auschwitz-2020/ (letzter Zugriff 26. März 2020).
[4]  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=woxb_NPfxjI (letzter Zugriff 26. März 2020).
[5] Aleida Assman im Interview mit Karin Janker, “Deutschlands ethischer Imperativ. Schafft es die AdF, die ‚erinnerungspolitische Wende um 180 Grad‘ zu erzwingen? Wohl kaum, sagt Aleida Assmann,” Süddeutsche Zeitung (14 February 2018), 10.
[6] Micha Brumlik, “Hologramm und Holocaust. Wie die Opfer der Shoah zu Untoten werden,“ in Erinnerungskulturen: Eine pädagogische und bildungspolitische Herausforderung, ed. Meike Sophia Baader and Tatjana Freytag (Köln: Böhlau, 2015), 19-30.
[7] Bei den Projekten handelt es sich um: „The Forever Project“ des britischen National Holocaust Centre and Museum in Laxton, https://www.holocaust.org.uk/foreverproject1, ein seit 2018 an der LMU in München angesiedeltes Projekt, sowie das israelische Projekt „Memento,“ von dem weiter unten noch die Rede sein wird. (letzter Zugriff 26. März 2020).
[8] Sibylle Krämer, Medium, Bote, Übertragung. Kleine Metaphysik der Medialität (Frankfurt a.M.: Suhrkamp, 2008), 223-260.
[9] Ulrich Baer, “Einleitung,” in Niemand zeugt für den Zeugen: Erinnerungskultur nach der Shoah, ed. Ulrich Baer (Frankfurt a.M.: Suhrkamp, 2000), 7-31.
[10] Heather Maio, David Traum, and Paul Debevec, “New Dimensions in Testimony. How New Technology – and Interview Questions – will contribute to the Dialogue between Students and Survivors,” Pastforward (Sommer 2012), 23-25.
[11] Masahiro Mori, “The Uncanny Valley,” IEEE Spectrum https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/humanoids/the-uncanny-valley (letzter Zugriff 26. März 2020).
[12] “Aufklärung von NS-Verbrechen: Das Grauen von Auschwitz mittels VR-Brille nacherleben,” Sputnik News (21 January 2017) https://sptnkne.ws/dw7Y (letzter Zugriff 26. März 2020).
[13] Siehe die Projektwebsite: https://www.hva.nl/create-it/gedeelde-content/projecten/archief-projecten-crossmedia/vr-tour-sobibor.html (letzter Zugriff 26. März 2020).
[14] Siehe die Projektwebsite: http://www.belsen-project.specs-lab.com/ (letzter Zugriff 26. März 2020).
[15] Siehe die Filmwebsite: https://www.moving-picture.com/what-we-do/ar-vr/usc-shoah-the-last-goodbye (letzter Zugriff 26. März 2020).
[16] Elliot Gardner, “Does a VR Auschwitz Simulation cross an ethical line?,“ Alphr (4. Oktober 2017), https://www.alphr.com/life-culture/1007241/does-a-vr-auschwitz-simulation-cross-an-ethical-line (letzter Zugriff 26. März 2020).
[17] Simona Shemer, “VR Tech is Playing a Key Role in Holocaust Education and Awareness,” NoCamels (21 August 2018) https://nocamels.com/2018/08/virtual-reality-tech-holocaust/, https://www.facebook.com/akim.dolinsky/videos/10216262891147654/( letzter Zugriff 26. März 2020), the promotion film is available at:
[18] Siehe die Projektwebsite: https://medium.com/stitchbridgevr/a-vr-journey-through-the-concentration-camps-of-the-holocaust-d9c9fe7beed2(letzter Zugriff 26. März 2020) and https://www.stitchbridge.com/work/journeyvr (letzter Zugriff 26. März 2020).
[19] Alison Landsberg, Prosthetic Memory: American Remembrance in the Age of Mass Culture (New York: Columbia University Press, 2004).
[20] Silke Arnold-de Simine, Mediating Memory in the Museum. Trauma, Empathy, Nostalgia (Houndmills and New York: Plagrave Macmillan, 2013), 59. 

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Screenshot YouTube-Video “Witness Auschwitz” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-glSpkA4Akc&feature=emb_logo (letzter Zugriff 26. März 2020).

Empfohlene Zitierweise

de Jong, Steffi: Witness Auschwitz? Wie VR Zeugenschäft verändert. In: Public History Weekly 8 (2020) 4, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-15689.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Christian Bunnenberg / Lukas Tobler / Peter Gautschi (Team Lucerne)

Copyright (c) 2020 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 8 (2020) 4
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-15689

Tags: , , ,

1 reply »

  1. To all our non-German speaking readers we recommend the automatic DeepL-Translator for 8 European languages. Just copy and paste.

    Danke, das ist für mich ein wichtiger Beitrag. Die Frage der Bedeutung von “Immersion” bzw. “immersiven” oder Immersion suggerierenden / imitierenden Technikenund Medien sowohl für psychische Prozesse als auch für die Konzepte, mit denen wir Geschichte und Vergangenheit begrifflich fassen, wird eines der wesentlichen Aufgabenfelder der kommenden Jahre sein. Neben den im Artikel angesprochenen Erwartungen und Hoffnungen einer derart medial zu induzierenden (oder wenigstens zu ermöglichenden) “Erinnerung” als Beitrag zu einem besseren Verhalten, die an die ebenso häufigen wie fragwürdigen Zuschreibungen gegen Rechtsradikalismus etc immunisierender Zwecke zu Gedenkstättenbesuchen betrifft das auch deutlich konkretere Konzepte und Ziele historischen Denkens und Lernens. Inwiefern schleifen solche Medien oder auch nur bestimmte Nutzungen derselben die Einsichten in die nötige Differenzierung zwischen Vergangenheit und Geschichte, in die Unhintergehbarkeit von Perspektivität ein — oder (bzw. inwieweit) ermöglichen sie bei reflexiver Nutzung gerade die Beförderung von Einsichten und den Aufbau von Konzepten bei Nutzern, die es ihnen ermöglichen, nicht nur mittels dieser neuen Medien und medialen Techniken (die ja tatsächlich bleiben und noch weiter entwickelt werden) zu lernen, sondern immer auch (!) über die Bedeutung dieser Medien und Techniken mit zu reden.

    Dabei ist vieles, was diese Medien anbieten, so neu gerade nicht, aber durch Multimedialität und Interaktivität und Dynamik aber wohl zugleich eindrücklicher (auch ggf. auffälliger) und schwieriger mit reflexiver Distanz wahrzunehmen und zu verarbeitet: Imagination und “Einfühlung”, Angebote für und gar Ansprüche an “Perspektivenwechsel”, Detailtreue als Mittel der Herstellung nicht so sehr argumentativ-kognitiver, sondern atmosphärischer Beglaubigung, das Doppelspiel der Herstellung einer Alterität bei gleichzeitiger Einrumpfung des wahrgenommenen Abstands (Immersion) — all das ist auch in Texten, Filmen, etc. schon angelegt bzw. vorhanden. Medienspezifisch aber scheinen die Ansprüche an die Verfügung über Wahrnehmungsmuster und Verarbeitungsroutinen zu sein, mit denen die Nutzung solcher Medien nicht einfach zur Realisation der von den “Macher*innen” (Autori*nnen) vorgesehenen (und ja ihrerseits zeit- und perspektivengebundenen) Perzeptions-Intentionen wird, sondern zugleich (nicht stattdessen!) zu einer kritischen Reflexion befähigt.

    Diese kritische Reflexion darf dabei aber nicht einfach negative Verdammung der “neuen Techniken” sein, etwa eines durch sie beförderten Unterlaufens erinnerungskultureller und -politischer, erkenntnistheoretischer und didaktischer Prinzipien und Standards. Sie darf ich gerade nicht auf die Kritik der neuen Medien allein richten, sondern müssen gerade auch die durch sie (volens oder auch nolens) neu aufgeworfenen Fragen an das eigene historische Denken, Erinnern und Lernen einbeziehen. Dafür ist der Beitrag von Steffi de Jong ein wesentlicher Auftakt – gerade in Bezug auf eine (weitere) Differenzierung des Konzepts “(Zeit-)Zeugenschaft”.

    Nicht zuletzt, aber auch in didaktischer Hinsicht wird es nicht nur (wenn überhaupt) darauf ankommen, “das” Potential von Zeitzeugen für historisches Lernen weiter zu erforschen und den Einsatz im Unterricht zu optimieren, sondern vielmehr das Spektrum erkenntnistheoretischer und lernförderlicher Aspekte, das sich im Spektrum unterschiedlicher (Zeit-)Zeugenbegriffe bereits jetzt erkennen lässt, das sich aber medienspezifisch erweitert (bzw. erweitert wird) gegenüber und mit den Lernenden (zunehmend) transparent zu machen. (Zeit-)Zeugenschaft nicht nur als persönliche Form der “Betroffenheit” von “Geschichte” und als Form der Beteiligung an einer kritische-reflexiven Erinnerungskultur, sondern auch als ein Komplex kultureller Formen und Funktionen historischen Denkens müssen — das zeigt der Beitrag beispielheft auf — verstärkt zum Gegenstand historischen Lernens werden. Nur so — denke ich — können diese “neuen”, immersiven und interaktiven Formen mit ihrer medialen Herstellung (oder auch nur Simulation) von Betroffenheit und “Agency” nicht nur Instrumente eines – im schlimmsten Fall gar überwältigenden – fremd bestimmten Umgangs mit simulierter “Vergangenheit” sein, sondern Gegenstand produktiven, weil reflexiven Denkens und Lernens über die Bedeutung(en) dieser Vergangenheit(en) für unsere Gesellschaft und unseren Umgang damit.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

I accept that my given data and my IP address is sent to a server in the USA only for the purpose of spam prevention through the Akismet program.More information on Akismet and GDPR.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest