Digital Public History

Monthly Editorial April 2020 | Einführung in den Monat April 2020

Teaching and imparting history is a demanding project. How are we able to give the students and the broad public an understanding of something that is no longer here and that is past? Digitalization offers completely new possibilities to visualize past events, but also harbors new dangers. One way or another: Public history and thus the relationship between the people of today and the vast field of history is fundamentally influenced by the digitalization.

Explaining the Present

For over 2500 years people have thought in historical terms[1] and learnt from history. They have searched for answers to central questions of their existence: How have we become what we are? What has changed in what way and why? What can I do today and in the future? – Dealing with the past thus contributes to education. History explains the present. Whoever wants to lead a self-determined life, has to see the bigger picture to recognize the scopes of action, to see the things that have developed, to escape the dangers and to take advantage of opportunities. We live in a vast field of history which, each and every day, becomes bigger. Much of this lies and remains in the dark.

Digital Innovation Boost

For centuries texts and pictures have been available to bring light into the dark. Audiovisual media gave an important innovation boost for history, history teaching and public history. Suddenly one could closely follow or retrace important moments by means of audio and film recordings. As the past was still far away with text and picture, the people now gain the impression that they come closer to the past thanks to the excellent visualization provided by films. We fetch the Middle Ages into our living room and the Holocaust contemporary witnesses onto our mobile phones by means of apps.

Now we experience again another innovation boost where the boundaries between past and present seemingly start to dissolve. We are dealing with mixed reality. As soon as we put on 3D glasses, we can travel into the past and, for example, visit a Stasi prison or closely accompany General Dufour in the Sonderbund War of 1848. Or as gamers we are on the road in the year 1943, we are fleeing together with a girl across Europe and can take influence on the events – that at least in the virtual space.[2]

What this new mixed reality means for historical learning and thus for users of history stagings must still be investigated. But, also without more detailed knowledge of the effects, exhibition organizers, museum mediators, teachers, scenographers or city guides euphorically use digital elements when they impart history. Objects are contextualized, narratives staged in digital space, the past enlivened.

Everything Changes

Digitalization is often understood as a social process and thus fits in well with public history. The cultural theorist Dirk Baecker provides a general working definition:

“Digitalization in the narrower sense of the word means converting analogue values into digital formats which can be read by computers and further processed.”[3] And he adds: “Digitalization in the broader sense of the word – digitalization of society by society – means working out and testing countable and calculable data in the medium of analogue inconsistency for the purposes of the communication of and with machines.[…] The so-called digital transformation (of society) is recursive and nontrivial.”[4]

Digitalization apparently leads to the fact that more and more people take part in cultural processes, “and social actions will increasingly be embedded in more complex technologies without which these processes would hardly be conceivable and even much less achievable.”[5] Today in view of the Corona crisis this shows more clearly than ever before. Our private rooms become home offices, therefore transparent and public. It becomes increasingly more difficult to determine the rules of communication and discourse. The right to forget we can forget. Everything changes. It seems to come true what Harald Welzer was frightened of: The self-control of people is reduced.[6] – Or is it exactly the other way around?

Produsing as a Characteristic

Digitalization actually also emancipates the users from the offerings of the mediation of history. In a short time I am able to verify in the internet whether the city guide has explained the bridge construction in the 16th century correctly, what film extracts the scenographers have cut out, what controversial materials the teacher has not presented, what model the exhibition maker should rather have chosen to explain the general strike of 1918 in Switzerland.

Digital public history opens up new perspectives in dealing with the past and history for the providers / the producers as well as for the users. And it leads to the blurring and merging of both the aspects of offering and use. Users post their view of history and become providers; providers become users of the posted narratives.[7] It leads to a circle of offering and use which, in the most favorable case, productively implements swarm intelligence – in the most unfavorable case, however, also causes confusion, produces chaos, brings fake news into circulation and spreads lies.

Especially in our times of corona crisis, a number of exciting “produsing” projects are emerging. A particularly successful example is undoubtedly the Coronarchiv[8]. Under the motto “Sharing is caring – become a part of history!” the archive collects experiences, thoughts, media and memories of the “Corona crisis”. With this, the contributors should capture the present through their documentaries and preserve it for history. This shows that digital public history can be implemented in Citizen Science on a daily basis and simultaneously with a historical dimension.

Design Experiments as a Silver Bullet

This makes it clear that the digitalization of public history without doubt creates new opportunities as a new discipline. Digital public history is also “Science of Design”[9] which in a circular process of research, theory and practice develops, reflects on and actively implements new knowledge. (Digital) public history could, above all, certainly benefit much from “design as a knowledge culture”[10] if they use digitalization to carry out “design experiments”.[11]

“Design experiments” build bridges between public and history and link, as Shulman notices, different disciplines: “A design experiment is typically a marriage of experiment and ethnography, of adaptive experimentation and thick ethnographic description”[12].

This makes clear: In order to conduct digital public history successfully, inter-disciplinarily composed teams are needed.

And they exist! Digital public history lives! This is demonstrated by all the contributions of this theme month. We can see a number of design experiments, but also theoretical considerations on the topic and, not least, also episodes which show that, besides the great opportunities lying in digital public history, considerable dangers are, however, concealed as well.

Joanna Wojdon opens up the theme month and presents a contribution on videogames. The fact that we begin the theme month with videogames, is no accident, of course, given that this genre has developed into a huge economic sector over the last few years which affects the spare time of many, especially young people. Videogames are judged in different ways in our society: Whereas, on the one hand, the gamers, independent of the game genres, consider the conveyed medial contents to be trustworthy and reliable, many historians criticize the historical inaccuracy or the falsification of history, at the level of the concrete event as well as in the context in general. Only a very few historians or history didactics go beyond empiricism and theory and take part themselves in the development of games. This surely has to do with the fact as well that game developers, in the first place, try to entertain people, and not to impress them with their scholarship. This then leads Joanna Wojdon to the question as to whether these game developers can thus not also be called public historians, even then when they openly reject this role?

⇒ Read here

In the second contribution our anonymous author of this month writes about digital public history on WhatsApp and shows how there inciting, primarily right-wing extremist or even Holocaust-denying memes are sent out. On the example of narratives about Anne Frank it becomes clear that the social acceptance of individual historical narratives can form a precarious relationship to empirical and normative plausibility – in other words: Historical lies are spread. The author thus, amongst other things, demands that public history and history didactics more vehemently opposes the dissemination of National Socialist ideology than has been the case up to now. Should we not do this, then the learners and the broad public will be ideologically influenced by the consumption of National Socialist and right-wing extremist propaganda material spread by peer groups in social networks. Whoever these days openly pleas for resistance against National Socialism and right-wing extremism in public, possibly and potentially lives dangerously and is intimidated with death threats. This happened to our anonymous author, and therefore only the editors know the name and the address of the author.

⇒ Read here

In the third contribution of this theme month Steffi de Jong pursues the question as to whether memory culture changes through the use of digital media. On the basis of concrete examples of virtual reality offerings and holograms of Holocaust survivors she formulates the thesis that through immersive media a change in memorial culture towards a digital-somatic phase may be expected, since new formats will be implemented in addition to the established models of testimony, in particular in relation to the Holocaust. Given that, other than the conversation with the survivor witnesses who give account about the crimes suffered with their own body, the documentary video testimony has also already existed for years, thus virtual witnesses currently allow the simulation of always new conversations, because the computer programs underlying the holograms (can) react to questions with a set of stored answers. The possibility of being able to virtually “travel” to former concentration- and extermination camps – the ethical boundaries of these simulations are also pointed out – opens up new dimensions when dealing with the things seen and experienced. Thus, the question here arises: Will the users become survivor witnesses themselves in the future?

⇒ Read here

In the fourth contribution Astrid Schwabe deals with the Corona crisis which has severely deteriorated in Central Europe in March 2020. Unthinkable only a few weeks ago, whole states are now placed in self-imposed quarantine, one of whose characteristics is a nationwide school closure. At almost exactly the same time a debate started aimed at relocating school teaching into the digital space. The implementation had to be carried out without lead time. Astrid Schwabe in her contribution deals with digital public history in teaching-learning contexts in schools with a focus on a specific aspect of historical distance learning. As regards the offerings for “knowledge transfer”, different providers actually compete with experts from the scientific and pedagogical field. Correspondingly broad is the range of quality. Astrid Schwabe therefore pleas for a digital public history with a historical-didactic orientation which through formulating quality criteria ensures that teachers have tools at hand for assessing the offerings. The author, above all, raises numerous questions as to how, despite distance learning, individual dealing as well as joint reflection can, under digital conditions, be successfully achieved in history teaching.

⇒ Read here

We live in challenging times: Much that was unthinkable yesterday is reality today, and much that is planned for tomorrow cannot be realized – but we will do some things that we have no idea about today. This also applies to this theme month of Public History Weekly. We are confident that we will publish at least two more contributions to the topic in addition to the texts presented here. So we are looking forward to the article by Eleni Apostolidou on the topic “Types of Public History, Digital Media and the Web”.

⇒ Read here

As well we look forward to a contribution by Marko Demantowsky and Gerhard Lauer.

⇒ Read here

With this theme month the archives of Public History Weekly will once more substantially be enriched with relevant texts. Already up to now over thirty contributions can be found on the keyword “digital change“. Particularly in the light of the new posts, consider reading one or the other of the already published texts about digital public history again. It is worth it!

_____________________

[1] Hans-Jürgen Pandel, Quelleninterpretation. Die schriftliche Quelle im Geschichtsunterricht (Schwalbach/Ts.: Wochenschau Verlag, 2000), 126.
[2] The described game is called “When we disappear” and is being developed by Inlusio Interactive together with the Institut für Geschichtsdidaktik und Erinnerungskulturen at the Pädagogische Hochschule Luzern: https://www.inlusio.com/wwd (last accessed 25 March 2020).
[3] Dirk Baecker, 4.0 oder die Lücke, die der Rechner lässt (Merve-Verlag: Leipzig, 2018), 59.
[4] Ibid., 61.
[5] Felix Stalder, Kultur der Digitalität. Berlin (2016), zit. nach Andreas Broszio, Digitalisierung oder Digitalität, https://andreasbroszio.wordpress.com/2018/03/03/digitalisierung-oder-digitalitaet (last accessed 24 March 2020).
[6] Harald Welzer, Alles könnte anders sein. Eine Gesellschaftsutopie für freie Menschen (S.Fischer: Frankfurt/M., 2019), 271. Vgl. auch Claus Leggewie/Harald Welzer, Das Ende der Welt, wie wir sie kannten. Klima, Zukunft und die Chancen der Demokratie (S.Fischer: Frankfurt/M., 2009).
[7] Elisabeth S. Bird, “Are we all produsers now?,” Cultural Studies 25, 4-5 (2011), 502-516.
[8] www.coronarchiv.de (last accessed 27.03.2020)
[9] Herbert A Simon, The Sciences of the Artificial (MIT-Press: Cambridge, 1996), 138.
[10] Claudia Mareis, Design als Wissenskultur. Interferenzen zwischen Design- und Wissensdiskursen seit 1960 (transcript Verlag: Bielefeld, 2011).
[11] Peter Gautschi, “Fachdidaktik als Design-Science. Videobasierte Unterrichts- und Lehrmittelforschung zum Lehren und Lernen von Geschichte,” transfer Forschung ↔ Schule, Heft 2: Visible Didactics – Fachdidaktische Forschung trifft Praxis, herausgegeben von Christa Juen-Kretschmer et al. (Bad Heilbrunn, 2016), 53–66.
[12] Lee S. Shulman, Lee, The Wisdom of Practice: Essays on Teaching, Learning, and Learning to Teach (Jossey-Bass San Francisco, 2004), 300.

_____________________

Image Credits

Bourbaki Panorama Luzern: Museumsbesuch mit Tablet und App “My Bourbaki Panorama” © Natalie Boo / AURA.

Recommended Citation

Gautschi, Peter, and Christian Bunnenberg: Digital Public History. Editorial for April 2020. In: Public History Weekly 8 (2020) 4, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-15675.

Translated by Kurt Brügger swissamericanlanguageexpert https://www.swissamericanlanguageexpert.ch/

Geschichte lehren und vermitteln ist ein anspruchsvolles Vorhaben. Wie können wir den Lernenden in der Schule und dem Publikum in der Öffentlichkeit etwas nahebringen und verständlich machen, das nicht mehr da ist, das vergangen ist? Die Digitalisierung bietet ganz neue Möglichkeiten zur Vergegenwärtigung von Vergangenem, birgt aber auch neue Gefahren. So oder so: Public History und damit das Verhältnis zwischen den Menschen heute und dem Universum des Historischen wird durch die Digitalisierung grundlegend beeinflusst.

Geschichte erklärt Gegenwart

Seit über 2500 Jahren denken Menschen historisch[1] und lernen aus der Geschichte. Sie suchen nach Antworten auf zentrale Fragen zu ihrem Dasein: Wie sind wir zu dem geworden, was wir sind? Was hat sich wie und wieso verändert? Was kann ich heute und in Zukunft tun? – Der Umgang mit Vergangenheit trägt also zur Bildung bei. Geschichte erklärt die Gegenwart. Wer ein selbstbestimmtes Leben führen will, braucht einen grösseren Blick fürs Ganze, um die Handlungsspielräume zu erkennen, um die Gewordenheit zu sehen, um Gefahren zu entgehen und um Chancen nutzen zu können. Wir leben in einem riesigen Universum des Historischen, das jeden Tag grösser wird. Vieles davon liegt und bleibt im Dunkeln.

Digitaler Innovationsschub

Um das Dunkel zu erhellen, standen während Jahrhunderten Texte und Bilder zur Verfügung. Ein wichtiger Innovationsschub für Geschichte, Geschichtsunterricht und Public History ergab sich durch audiovisuelle Medien. Plötzlich konnte man wichtige Momente mit Ton- und Filmaufnahmen mit- oder nachverfolgen. War mit Text und Bild die Vergangenheit noch weit entfernt, bekommen Menschen mit Filmen dank hervorragenden Veranschaulichungen den Eindruck, näher an die Vergangenheit heranzurücken. Wir holen uns das Mittelalter mit Filmen in die Stube und Holocaust-Zeitzeuginnen mit Apps auf unser Mobiltelefon.

Und jetzt erleben wir einen weiteren Innovationsschub, bei dem sich die Grenzen zwischen Vergangenheit und Gegenwart scheinbar aufzulösen beginnen. Wir haben es mit Mixed Reality zu tun. Sobald wir uns eine 3D-Brille aufsetzen, können wir in die Vergangenheit reisen und zum Beispiel ein Stasi-Gefängnis besuchen oder General Dufour im Sonderbundskrieg 1848 von nah begleiten. Oder wir sind als Gamer*in unterwegs im Jahr 1943, fliehen zusammen mit einem Mädchen quer durch Europa und können auf diese Geschehnisse – zumindest im virtuellen Raum – Einfluss nehmen.[2]

Was diese neue Mixed Reality für historisches Lernen und damit für Nutzer*innen von Geschichtsinszenierungen bedeutet, muss erst noch erforscht werden. Aber auch ohne genaueres Wissen zu den Wirkungen setzen Ausstellungsmacher*innen, Museumsvermittler*innen, Lehrer*innen, Szenografinnen oder Stadtführer digitale Elemente in ihrer Geschichtsvermittlung euphorisch ein. Objekte werden kontextualisiert, Narrative im digitalen Raum inszeniert, Vergangenheit belebt.

Alles wird anders

Digitalisierung wird häufig als ein gesellschaftlicher Prozess verstanden und passt also gut zu Public History. Der Kulturtheoretiker Dirk Baecker liefert eine allgemeine Arbeitsdefinition:

“Digitalisierung im engeren Sinne des Wortes ist die Umwandlung analoger Werte in digitale Formate, die von Rechnern gelesen und weiterverarbeitet werden können.”[3] Und er ergänzt: “Digitalisierung im weiteren Sinne des Wortes – Digitalisierung der Gesellschaft durch die Gesellschaft – ist die Erarbeitung und Erprobung abzählbarer und berechenbarer Daten im Medium analoger Widersprüchlichkeit für die Zwecke der Kommunikation von und mit Maschinen.[…] Die sogenannte digitale Transformation (der Gesellschaft) ist rekursiv und nicht trivial.”[4]

Digitalisierung führt offenbar dazu, dass sich immer mehr Menschen an kulturellen Prozessen beteiligen, “und soziales Handeln wird in zunehmend komplexere Technologien eingebettet, ohne die diese Prozesse kaum zu denken und schon gar nicht zu bewerkstelligen wären.”[5] Dies zeigt sich heute angesichts der Corona-Krise deutlicher denn je. Unsere privaten Räume werden zu Home-Offices, damit transparent und öffentlich. Es wird zunehmend schwieriger, die Regeln der Kommunikation und des Diskurses zu bestimmen. Das Recht auf Vergessen können wir vergessen. Alles wird anders. Es scheint das einzutreffen, was Harald Welzer befürchtete: Die Selbststeuerung der Menschen wird reduziert.[6] – Oder ist es gerade umgekehrt?

Produsing als Merkmal

Die Digitalisierung emanzipiert nämlich auch die Nutzer*innen von Angeboten zur Geschichtsvermittlung. Innert Kürze kann ich im Internet nachprüfen, ob der Stadtführer den Brückenbau im 16. Jahrhundert richtig erklärt hat, welche Filmausschnitte die Szenografinnen herausgeschnitten haben, welche kontroversen Materialien der Lehrer nicht präsentiert hat, welches Modell die Ausstellungsmacherin besser ausgewählt hätte, um den Schweizer Landesstreik zu erklären.

Digital Public History eröffnet also sowohl den Anbieter*innen (den Producer*innen) als auch den Nutzer*innen (den User*innen) neue Perspektiven im Umgang mit Vergangenheit und Geschichte. Und es führt auch zum Verwischen beziehungsweise zur Verschmelzung der beiden Aspekte von Angebot und Nutzung. Es kommt zum “Produsing”: Nutzer*innen posten ihre Sicht der Geschichte und werden zu Anbietern; Anbieter*innen werden zu Nutzer*innen der geposteten Narrative.[7] Es kommt zu einem Kreislauf von Angebot und Nutzung, der im günstigen Fall Schwarmintelligenz produktiv umsetzt – im ungünstigen Fall allerdings auch Verwirrung stiftet, ein Durcheinander produziert, Fake News in die Welt setzt und Lügen verbreitet.

Gerade in unseren Zeiten der Corona-Krise entsteht eine Reihe von spannenden Produsing-Projekten. Ein besonders gelungenes Beispiel ist zweifellos das Coronarchiv.[8] Unter dem Motto “Sharing is caring – become a part of history!” sammelt das Archiv Erlebnisse, Gedanken, Medien und Erinnerungen zur Corona-Krise. Damit sollen die Beiträger*innen durch ihre Dokumentationen die Gegenwart einfangen und für die Nachwelt erhalten. Hier zeigt sich, dass Digital Public History tagesaktuell und gleichzeitig mit einer historischen Dimension Citizen Science umsetzen kann.

Design-Experimente als Königsweg

Dies macht deutlich, dass die Digitalisierung der Public History zweifellos auch neue Chancen als wissenschaftliche Disziplin eröffnet. Digital Public History ist auch “Science of Design”[9], die in einem zirkulären Prozess von Forschung, Theorie und Praxis neues Wissen entwickelt, reflektiert und handelnd umsetzt. Überhaupt könnte (Digital) Public History wohl viel von “Design als Wissenskultur”[10] profitieren, wenn sie die Digitalisierung nutzt, um “design experiments” durchzuführen.[11]

“Design experiments” bauen Brücken zwischen Public und History und verbinden, wie Shulman feststellt, verschiedene Disziplinen: “A design experiment is typically a marriage of experiment and ethnography, of adaptive experimentation and thick ethnographic description”[12].

Dies macht deutlich: Um erfolgreich Digital Public History zu betreiben, sind interdisziplinär zusammengesetzte Teams notwendig.

Und die gibt es! Digital Public History lebt! Das zeigt sich in all den Beiträgen dieses Themenmonats. Wir begegnen einer Reihe von Design Experiments, aber auch theoretischen Überlegungen zum Thema und nicht zuletzt auch Episoden, die zeigen, dass neben den grossen Chancen in der Digital Public History auch erhebliche Gefahren stecken.

Joanna Wojdon eröffnet den Themenmonat und präsentiert einen Beitrag zu Videogames. Dass wir den Themenmonat mit Videogames beginnen, ist natürlich kein Zufall, hat sich doch diese Gattung im Verlauf der letzten Jahre zu einem riesigen Wirtschaftsbereich entwickelt, der die Freizeit vieler, besonders jüngerer, Menschen prägt. Videogames werden in der Gesellschaft widersprüchlich beurteilt: Während auf der einen Seite die Gamer*innen die vermittelten medialen Inhalte unabhängig von den Gamegenres als glaubwürdig und zuverlässig ansehen, kritisieren viele Historiker*innen die historische Ungenauigkeit oder die Verfälschung von Geschichte, sowohl auf der konkreten Ereignisebene als auch im Kontext generell. Nur die wenigsten Historiker*innen oder Geschichtsdidaktiker*innen gehen über Empirie und Theorie hinaus und beteiligen sich selber an der Entwicklung von Games. Das hat sicher auch damit zu tun, dass Gameentwickler*innen in erster Linie die Menschen unterhalten und nicht mit ihrer Wissenschaftlichkeit beeindrucken wollen. Dies führt dann Joanna Wojdon zur Frage, ob denn diese Gameentwickler*innen nicht auch Public Historians seien, selbst dann, wenn sie diese Rolle ganz offen verweigern.

⇒ Read here

Unser anonymer Autor dieses Monats berichtet im zweiten Beitrag von Digital Public History auf WhatsApp und zeigt, wie dort volksverhetzende, vorrangig rechtsextreme oder gar holocaustleugnende Memes versendet werden. Am Beispiel von Narrativen zu Anne Frank wird klar, dass die soziale Akzeptanz individueller historischer Erzählungen in ein prekäres Verhältnis zur empirischen und normativen Plausibiltät kommen kann – anders gesagt: es werden historische Lügen verbreitet. Der Autor fordert deshalb unter anderem, dass Public History und Geschichtsdidaktik sich vehementer als bisher der Verbreitung nationalsozialistischen Gedankenguts entgegenstellen muss. Tun wir das nicht, werden Lernende und eine breite Öffentlichkeit durch den Konsum von nationalsozialistischem und rechtsextremem Propaganda-Material durch Peer-Groups in sozialen Netzwerken ideologisch geprägt. Wer heute solche Forderungen nach Widerstand gegen Nationalsozialismus oder Rechtsextremismus öffentlich äussert, lebt unter Umständen gefährlich und bekommt Morddrohungen. Dies ist unserem anonymen Verfasser passiert, und deshalb bleibt der Name und die Anschrift des Autors dieses Beitrags nur der Redaktion bekannt.

⇒ Read here

Im dritten Beitrag dieses Themenmonats geht Steffi de Jong der Frage nach, ob sich die Erinnerungskultur durch die Nutzung digitaler Medien verändert? Anhand konkreter Beispiele von Virtual Reality-Angeboten und Hologrammen von Holocaust-Überlebenden formuliert sie die These, dass durch immersive Medien ein Wandel der Erinnerungskultur hin zu einer digital-somatischen Phase zu erwarten sei, da den etablierten Modellen der Zeugenschaft, insbesondere im Zusammenhang mit dem Holocaust, neue Formate beiseitegestellt werden. Stand neben dem Gespräch mit den Überlebenszeugen, die Auskunft über das am eigenen Leib erlittene Verbrechen geben, bereits seit Jahren auch das dokumentarische Videozeugnis, so ermöglichen gegenwärtig virtuelle Zeitzeug*innen die Simulation immer neuer Gespräche, da die hinter den Hologrammen liegenden Computerprogramme auf Fragen mit einem Set an abgespeicherten Antworten reagieren (können). Die Möglichkeit virtuell in ehemalige Konzentrations- und Vernichtungslager – auf die ethischen Grenzen dieser Simulationen wird ebenfalls hingewiesen – “reisen” zu können, eröffnet aber auch neue Dimensionen bei der Auseinandersetzung mit dem Gesehenen und Erlebten. So stellt sich hier die Frage: Werden die Nutzer*innen zukünftig selber zu Überlebenszeug*innen?

⇒ Read here

Astrid Schwabe beschäftigt sich im vierten Beitrag mit der Corona-Krise, die sich in Mitteleuropa im März 2020 enorm zugespitzt hat. Vor wenigen Wochen noch undenkbar, gehen jetzt ganze Staaten in eine selbstauferlegte Quarantäne, von denen ein Wesensmerkmal eine flächendeckende Schulschliessung ist. Fast zeitgleich setzte eine Diskussion um die Verlagerung des schulischen Unterrichts in den digitalen Raum ein. Die Umsetzung hatte ohne Vorlaufzeit zu erfolgen. Astrid Schwabe nimmt sich in ihrem Beitrag der Digital Public History in schulischen Lehr-Lern-Kontexte an, mit einem Fokus auf einem spezifischen Aspekt des historischen Distance Learning. Denn bei den Angeboten zur “Wissensvermittlung” konkurrieren verschiedenste Anbieter mit Experten aus dem wissenschaftlichen und pädagogischen Bereich. Entsprechend breit ist auch die qualitative Streuung. Astrid Schwabe plädiert daher für eine Digital Public History mit geschichtsdidaktischer Ausrichtung, die durch die Formulierung von Gütekriterien Lehrer*innen Instrumente zur Beurteilung der Angebote an die Hand gibt. Vor allem wirft die Autorin zahlreiche Fragen auf, wie trotz Distance Learning sowohl eine individuelle Auseinandersetzung als auch eine gemeinsame Reflexion im Geschichtsunterricht unter digitalen Bedingungen gelingen kann.

⇒ Read here

Wir leben in herausfordernden Zeiten: Vieles, was gestern undenkbar war, ist heute Realität, und vieles, was für morgen geplant ist, kann nicht realisiert werden – dafür werden wir einiges machen, von dem wir heute noch keine Ahnung haben. Das trifft auch auf diesen Themenmonat von Public History Weekly zu. Wir sind zuversichtlich, dass wir zusätzlich zu den hier anmoderierten Texten noch mindestens zwei weitere Beiträge zum Thema veröffentlichen werden. So freuen wir uns auf den Artikel von Eleni Apostolidou zum Thema “Types of Public History, Digital Media and the Web”.

⇒ Read here

Wir freuen uns auch auf einen Beitrag von Marko Demantowsky und Gerhard Lauer.

⇒ Read here

Mit diesem Themenmonat wird das Archiv von Public History Weekly mit relevanten Texten einmal mehr substanziell angereichert. Schon bisher fanden sich zum Stichwort «Digital Change» über dreissig Beiträge. Gerade auch im Licht der neuen Posts bietet es sich jedenfalls an, den einen oder anderen schon publizierten Text zu Digital Public History wieder zu lesen. Es lohnt sich!

_____________________

[1] Hans-Jürgen Pandel, Quelleninterpretation. Die schriftliche Quelle im Geschichtsunterricht (Schwalbach/Ts.: Wochenschau Verlag, 2000), 126.
[2] Das hier beschriebene Spiel heißt “When we disappear” und wird von Inlusio Interactive zusammen mit dem Institut für Geschichtsdidaktik und Erinnerungskulturen der Pädagogischen Hochschule Luzern entwickelt: https://www.inlusio.com/wwd (last accessed 25.03.2020).
[3] Dirk Baecker, 4.0 oder die Lücke, die der Rechner lässt (Merve-Verlag: Leipzig, 2018), 59.
[4] Ibid., 61.
[5] Felix Stalder, Kultur der Digitalität. Berlin (2016), zit. nach Andreas Broszio, Digitalisierung oder Digitalität, https://andreasbroszio.wordpress.com/2018/03/03/digitalisierung-oder-digitalitaet (last accessed 24.03.2020).
[6] Harald Welzer, Alles könnte anders sein. Eine Gesellschaftsutopie für freie Menschen (S.Fischer: Frankfurt/M., 2019), 271. Vgl. auch Claus Leggewie/Harald Welzer, Das Ende der Welt, wie wir sie kannten. Klima, Zukunft und die Chancen der Demokratie (S.Fischer: Frankfurt/M., 2009).
[7] Elisabeth S. Bird, “Are we all produsers now?,” Cultural Studies 25, 4-5 (2011), 502-516.
[8] www.coronarchiv.de (last accessed 27.03.2020)
[9] Herbert A Simon, The Sciences of the Artificial (MIT-Press: Cambridge, 1996), 138.
[10] Claudia Mareis, Design als Wissenskultur. Interferenzen zwischen Design- und Wissensdiskursen seit 1960 (transcript Verlag: Bielefeld, 2011).
[11] Peter Gautschi, “Fachdidaktik als Design-Science. Videobasierte Unterrichts- und Lehrmittelforschung zum Lehren und Lernen von Geschichte,” transfer Forschung ↔ Schule, Heft 2: Visible Didactics – Fachdidaktische Forschung trifft Praxis, herausgegeben von Christa Juen-Kretschmer et al. (Bad Heilbrunn, 2016), 53–66.
[12] Lee S. Shulman, Lee, The Wisdom of Practice: Essays on Teaching, Learning, and Learning to Teach (Jossey-Bass San Francisco, 2004), 300.

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Bourbaki Panorama Luzern: Museumsbesuch mit Tablet und App “My Bourbaki Panorama” © Natalie Boo / AURA.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Gautschi, Peter, and Christian Bunnenberg: Digital Public History. Einführung in den Monat April 2020. In: Public History Weekly 8 (2020) 4, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-15675.

Copyright (c) 2020 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 8 (2020) 4
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-15675

Tags: , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

I accept that my given data and my IP address is sent to a server in the USA only for the purpose of spam prevention through the Akismet program.More information on Akismet and GDPR.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest