Hegemonic Masculinity: On the Functionalization of Sexuality

Hegemoniale Männlichkeit. Zur Funktionalisierung der Sexualität

 

Abstract: During the Enlightenment, different gender roles were designed within civil society, and were argued to be natural. In the beginning, these were not misogynistic, but functional: Both men and women were supposed to contribute to the functioning of society by taking on different tasks. In the 19th century, however, this division of roles led to the development of a hegemonic model of masculinity. To be a woman was defined in relation to masculinity. This article uses the example of France to show how this is reflected in the definition of female and male sexuality, which was also subjected to social functionalization.
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-15174
Languages: English, German


The bourgeois model of society was established in the nineteenth century and defined different gender roles, which were argued to be natural. Originally, these were not necessarily misogynistic, but were rather meant to symbolize mutual support: Both men and women were supposed to fulfil a certain function in society. Ultimately, this led to the development of a “hegemonic model of masculinity” in which “women’s roles and femininity […] were defined in relation to masculinity”.[1] This male hegemony also influenced the definition of female and male sexuality and its social functionalization. The example of France will serve as an illustration.

Functionalization of Sexuality

In 19th-century bourgeois society, sexual instincts were not considered to be fundamentally bad. However, generous concessions were made to men exclusively. It was assumed that the male sexual instinct, this dynamic, could also be used constructively for society. Marriage was an important instrument for achieving this benefit. It was functionalized through sexuality. Thus, the relationship of the woman to the man was defined by her function for the man: Because of her supposed sensual disposition, the woman could discharge the man’s excessive sexual urges. In this way, she was supposed to help the husband to transform the remaining, but now controllable sexual dynamic into public activities that were regarded as meaningful by bourgeois society.[2] The “sinful sex” of Christianity was reinterpreted “for economic purposes”: “work instead of pleasure, reproduction of power instead of pure expenditure of energy”.[3]

Hidden Satisfaction of Sexual Instincts

But how could the celibate male citizen steer his sexual instincts into useful directions? Prostitution seemed quite suitable in bringing the “betrayal of the penis”, the madness of sexual urges, under control. Now however, streetwalkers were working in the shadows of the night, which contradicted bourgeois society and its need for rationalism.[4] In the darkness, the overview was lost; things and people were hardly visible and were thus prone to imagination. The nocturnal world did not permit a rational approach, which instead slipped away from the mind. In order to maintain control, street prostitution was therefore temporally regulated: Prostitutes were only allowed to work between 7pm and 11pm.[5]

In contrast, the prostitutes in the brothels, which were often only open during the day, presented themselves in a bourgeois atmosphere. In the luxurious “maisons de tolérance” (houses of tolerance), run by ladies of impeccable reputation, the “grandes horizontales”, who were dressed like respectable bourgeois women, received their clients in a bourgeois salon, often posed as wives seeking adventure, and performed coitus in a room that imitated a bourgeois bedroom. However, even the less luxurious brothels increasingly offered their clients a bourgeois atmosphere so that they could more easily forget the “betrayal of the penis”, the uncontrollable and complex urge.[6] Loss of control was only permitted in secret because it threatened bourgeois society.

Inequality through Functionalization

Although the Enlightenment and civil society postulated “equality”, this was above all a matter of “fraternity”. Women, on the other hand, were accepted in their social functions, which were different from those of men. They were responsible for the private sphere, for example, and contributed to the regeneration of men to whom the public sphere was reserved. This acceptance, however, subsequently resulted in inequality through the functionalization of femininity, to which the functionalization of sexuality also belongs. Masculinity was transformed into a “hegemonic masculinity”, which required the disciplining of women through role specifications and regulations.[7]

This can be seen in France in the example of the “bals blancs”, the “white balls”, at which marriageable girls were presented in little white dresses, as if at a marketplace, to get married. The unregulated sexual desires of young men were now to be guided into final, regulated paths, wrested from the darkness of the night. For the young women, this ultimately meant serving only the needs of the men.[8]

Another form of bringing about discipline was the bureaucratization of prostitution. The irrational had to be rationalized. The law defined two official categories of prostitution: “prostitution tolérée” (tolerated prostitution) and “prostitution clandestine” (illegal or hidden prostitution). Tolerated prostitution differed according to whether it took place in brothels behind closed doors or on the street. Streetwalkers were given what resembled a “trade card” and were therefore called “filles en carte” (card girls), while prostitutes in brothels were registered in brothel lists and were themselves named “filles à numéro” (number girls). The official rules for the legal practice of prostitution were extremely strict. For example, prostitutes were not allowed to form groups on the street. They were also not allowed to dress conspicuously and provocatively or to stay in any public places.[9] This clearly shows how the hegemonic model of masculinity led to gender hierarchies, which are still effective in various forms in the present day.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Berlière, Jean-Marc. La police des mœurs. Paris: Tempus, 2016.
  • Hellmuth, Thomas. Frankreich im 19. Jahrhundert. Eine Kulturgeschichte. Wien/Köln/Weimar: Böhlau, forthcoming.

Web Resources

_____________________
[1] Wolfgang Schmale, Geschichte der Männlichkeit in Europa (1450-2000) (Vienna/Cologne/Weimar: Böhlau, 2003), 154.
[2] Isabell V. Hull, Sexuality, State, and Civil Society in Germany, 1700-1815 (Ithaca/London: Cornell University Press, 1996); Alain Corbin, Les Filles de Noce: misère sexuelle et prostitution aux XIXe et XXe siècles (Paris: Aubier, 1978).
[3] Michel Foucault, Dispositive der Macht. Über Sexualität, Wissen und Wahrheit (Berlin: Merve Verlag, 1978).
[4] Jean-Paul Aron, and Roger Kempf, Der sittliche Verfall. Bourgeoisie und Sexualität in Frankreich (Frankfurt a. M.: Suhrkamp, 1983), 123.
[5] Alain Corbin, “L’arithmétique des jours au XIXe siècle,” in Le Temps, le désir et l’horreur. Essais sur le XIXe siècle, ed. Alain Corbin (Paris: Aubier, 1991), 16. “[…] elle ne dispose, pour s’exhiber, que du court intervalle qui respecte l’horaire de travail des ses éventuels clients.”
[6] Alain Corbin, “Kulissen,” in Geschichte des privaten Lebens, Bd. 4. Von der Revolution zum Großen Krieg, ed. Michelle Perrot (Frankfurt a. M.: Fischer, 1992), 574.
[7] Thomas Hellmuth, Frankreich im 19. Jahrhundert. Eine Kulturgeschichte (Vienna/Cologne/Weimar: Böhlau, forthcoming).
[8] Anne Martin-Fugier, La Bourgeoise: Femme au temps de Paul Bourget (Paris: B. Grasset, 1983), 22.
[9] Jean-Marc Berlière, La police de mœurs (Paris: Tempus, 2016), 20-24.

_____________________

Image Credits

Sex. © 2011 Kevin Dooley CC-BY 2.0 via Flickr.

Recommended Citation

Hellmuth, Thomas: Hegemonic Masculinity: On the Functionalization of Sexuality. In: Public History Weekly 8 (2020) 3, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-15174.

Editorial Responsibility

Judith Breitfuß / Thomas Hellmuth (Team Vienna)

Das bürgerliche Gesellschaftsmodell, das während des 19. Jahrhunderts seinen Siegeszug antrat, sah unterschiedliche Geschlechterrollen vor, die als naturgegeben argumentiert wurden. Zunächst waren diese zwar nicht unbedingt frauenfeindlich, sondern vielmehr funktional gedacht: Sowohl der Mann als auch die Frau sollten im gesellschaftlichen Gefüge eine bestimmte Funktion erfüllen. Letztlich führte dies zur Herausbildung eines “hegemonialen Männlichkeitsmodells”, in dem “Frauenrollen und Weiblichkeit […] in Relation zur Männlichkeit definiert” wurden.[1] Diese männliche Hegemonie sollte sich auch in der Definition der weiblichen und männlichen Sexualität zeigen. Damit verbunden war auch eine gesellschaftliche Funktionalisierung von Sexualität. Das Beispiel Frankreich soll zur Illustration dienen.

Funktionalisierung der Sexualität

In der bürgerlichen Gesellschaft des 19. Jahrhunderts galten Triebhaftigkeit und Trieberfüllung nicht grundsätzlich als verwerflich, wobei jedoch lediglich dem Mann großzügige Zugeständnisse gemacht wurden. Angeblich verfügte er nämlich über eine Dynamik, die zwar ungezügelte sexuelle Triebhaftigkeit zur Folge haben konnte, zugleich aber auch für die Gesellschaft konstruktiv nutzbar war. Um diesen Nutzen zu erreichen, bildete die Ehe ein wichtiges Instrumentarium und wurde somit über die Sexualität funktionalisiert. Die Beziehung der Frau zum Mann wurde durch ihre Funktion für den Mann definiert: Die Frau könne aufgrund ihrer vermeintlichen sinnlichen Veranlagung die überschüssigen sexuellen Triebe des Mannes entladen. Damit sollte sie dem Ehegatten helfen, die verbleibende, aber nun kontrollierbar sexuelle Dynamik in der Öffentlichkeit in Tätigkeiten umzuwandeln, die von der bürgerlichen Gesellschaft als sinnvoll erachtet wurden.[2] Die bürgerliche Gesellschaft deutete den vom Christentum übernommenen “Sünden-Sex” “zu ökonomischen Zwecken” um: “Arbeit statt Lust, Reproduktion der Kraft statt pure Verausgabung von Energie.”[3]

Versteckte Triebabfuhr

Wie konnte aber der ehelose Bürger seine Triebe bändigen oder besser: in nützliche Bahnen lenken? Die Prostitution schien dafür ein durchaus geeignetes Mittel, um den ständig drohenden “Verrat des Penis”, den Wahn der Triebe, unter Kontrolle zu bringen. Nun bewegten sich Straßendirnen aber in den Schatten der Nacht, die das Unbürgerliche symbolisierten.[4] In der Dunkelheit ging die Übersicht verloren, Dinge und Menschen waren nur noch zu erahnen und somit dem Gefühl und der Einbildung ausgeliefert. Die nächtliche Welt entzog sich der rationalen Betrachtungsweise, entglitt dem Verstand. Um Kontrolle zu wahren, wurde daher die Straßenprostitution zeitlich geregelt: Nur zwischen sieben und elf Uhr abends durfte um Freier geworben werden.[5]

In den Bordellen, die oftmals nur tagsüber geöffnet hatten, wurden dagegen die Prostituierten gleichsam “verbürgerlicht”. In den luxuriösen “maisons de tolérance”, die in eleganten Mietshäusern von Damen mit untadeligem Ruf geleitet wurden, empfingen die “grandes horizontales”, die wie wohlanständige Bürgerinnen gekleidet waren, ihre Kunden in einem bürgerlichen Salon, gaben sich nicht selten als Ehegattinnen aus, die selbst das Abenteuer suchten, und erfüllten den Liebesakt in einem Raum, der dem ehelichen Schlafzimmer nachempfunden war. Aber auch die weniger luxuriösen Bordelle boten den Freiern zunehmend eine bürgerliche Atmosphäre, damit diese den “Verrat des Penis”, den unkontrollierten und nicht in gerade Bahnen gelenkten Trieb, leichter verdrängen konnten.[6] Kontrollverlust war nur im Verborgenen gestattet, weil er unweigerlich die Gefährdung der bürgerlichen Gesellschaft bedeutete.

Ungleichheit durch Funktionalisierung

Zwar schrieben die Aufklärung und die bürgerliche Gesellschaft die “Gleichheit” auf ihre Fahnen, diese galt aber vor allem im Sinne der “Brüderlichkeit”. Frauen wurden dagegen gemäß ihren Funktionen als gleichwertig betrachtet: gemäß ihren Funktionen in der privaten Sphäre, etwa wenn sie zur Regeneration des Mannes für die Öffentlichkeit beitrugen. Diese Gleichwertigkeit schlug durch die Funktionalisierung der Weiblichkeit, zu der auch die Funktionalisierung der Sexualität gehört, in Ungleichheit um. Männlichkeit transformierte sich in eine “hegemoniale Männlichkeit”, die über Rollenvorgaben und Vorschriften eine Disziplinierung der Frau bedingte.[7]

In Frankreich zeigt sich dies am Beispiel der “bals blancs”, der “weißen Bälle”, auf denen die heiratsfähigen Mädchen in weißen Kleidchen wie auf einem Markt zur Heirat zur Schau gestellt wurden. Die notwendige Triebabfuhr der jungen Männer sollte nun in endgültige geregelte Bahnen geleitet, dem Dunkel der Nacht entwunden werden. Für die betroffenen jungen Frauen bedeutete dies letztlich, vor allem den Bedürfnissen der Männer zu dienen.[8]

Eine andere Form der Disziplinierung, die aber ebenfalls an den männlichen Bedürfnissen orientiert war und damit letztlich nur die andere Seite der Medaille darstellte, war die Bürokratisierung der Prostitution. Das Irrationale musste rationalisiert werden. Dabei legte das Gesetz zwei behördliche Kategorien von Prostitution fest: die “prostitution tolérée” und die illegale bzw. versteckte Prostitution, die “prostitution clandestine”. Die “tolerierte Prostitution” unterschied sich danach, ob sie in Bordelle hinter verschlossenen Türen oder auf der Straße ausgeübt wurde. Prostituierte auf der Strasse erhielten eine Art “Gewerbekarte” und wurden daher als “filles en carte” (Kartenmädchen) bezeichnet, während jene in Bordellen in Bordelllisten registriert wurden und daher die Bezeichnung “filles à numéro” (Nummernmädchen) erhielten. Die behördlichen Regeln zur legalen Ausübung der Prostitution waren äußerst streng. So war es Prosituierten etwa nicht erlaubt, auf der Straße in Gruppen aufzutreten. Sie durften sich nicht auffällig und provokant kleiden und sich in keinen öffentlichen Einrichtungen aufhalten.[9] Deutlich zeigt sich hier, wie das hegemoniale Männlichkeitsmodell geschlechtliche Hierarchien erzeugte, die auch noch in der Gegenwart in unterschiedlichen Formen wirksam sind.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Berlière, Jean-Marc. La police des mœurs. Paris: Tempus, 2016.
  • Hellmuth, Thomas. Frankreich im 19. Jahrhundert. Eine Kulturgeschichte. Wien/Köln/Weimar: Böhlau, erscheint im September 2020.

Webressourcen

_____________________
[1] Wolfgang Schmale, Geschichte der Männlichkeit in Europa (1450-2000) (Vienna/Cologne/Weimar: Böhlau, 2003), 154.
[2] Isabell V. Hull, Sexuality, State, and Civil Society in Germany, 1700-1815 (Ithaca/London: Cornell University Press, 1996); Alain Corbin, Les Filles de Noce: misère sexuelle et prostitution aux XIXe et XXe siècles (Paris: Aubier, 1978).
[3] Michel Foucault, Dispositive der Macht. Über Sexualität, Wissen und Wahrheit (Berlin: Merve Verlag, 1978).
[4] Jean-Paul Aron, and Roger Kempf, Der sittliche Verfall. Bourgeoisie und Sexualität in Frankreich (Frankfurt a. M.: Suhrkamp, 1983), 123.
[5] Alain Corbin, “L’arithmétique des jours au XIXe siècle,” in Le Temps, le désir et l’horreur. Essais sur le XIXe siècle, ed. Alain Corbin (Paris: Aubier, 1991), 16. “[…] elle ne dispose, pour s’exhiber, que du court intervalle qui respecte l’horaire de travail des ses éventuels clients.”
[6] Alain Corbin, “Kulissen,” in Geschichte des privaten Lebens, Bd. 4. Von der Revolution zum Großen Krieg, ed. Michelle Perrot (Frankfurt a. M.: Fischer, 1992), 574.
[7] Thomas Hellmuth, Frankreich im 19. Jahrhundert. Eine Kulturgeschichte (Vienna/Cologne/Weimar: Böhlau, erscheint im September 2020).
[8] Anne Martin-Fugier, La Bourgeoise: Femme au temps de Paul Bourget (Paris: B. Grasset, 1983), 22.
[9] Jean-Marc Berlière, La police de mœurs (Paris: Tempus, 2016), 20-24.

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Sex. © 2011 Kevin Dooley CC-BY 2.0 via Flickr.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Hellmuth, Thomas: Hegemoniale Männlichkeit. Zur Funktionalisierung der Sexualität. In: Public History Weekly 8 (2020) 3, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-15174.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Judith Breitfuß / Thomas Hellmuth (Team Vienna)

Copyright (c) 2020 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 8 (2020) 3
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-15174

Tags: ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

I accept that my given data and my IP address is sent to a server in the USA only for the purpose of spam prevention through the Akismet program.More information on Akismet and GDPR.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest