Once again: Curricula

Noch einmal: Curricula

 

 


In a contribution recently published here, Holger Thünemann called for a more intensive discussion of curricula. The drafting of a new curriculum in Berlin/Brandenburg has sparked a lively debate. To my mind, it seems quite characteristic that curricula discussions are only temporary, that is, arise on particular occasions. But we should also reflect on the construction principles of curricula in a more fundamental manner.

 

 

Roads to curricula

Traditionally, the dual “chronological passage” forms the backbone of history curricula. It is also referred to as the “genetic principle”: history is supposed to be understood in the context of its development. Theoretically, curricula may be constructed quite differently: Competences, historical culture, or historical categories could serve as starting points. With regard to the first approach, the selected topics would have to be arranged in such a way that pupils could study and practise the defined competences very effectively. On the one hand, this would certainly require a very sophisticated and well-conceived competency model; on the other hand, there would be a risk of thematic fragmentation. No such approach exists so far. Whereas existing curricula define – with greater or indeed less reference to history didactics – the fields of competences and competences, they fail to define precise intersections with the topics to be taught.
With regard to the model of historical culture, history lessons should imperatively strive to enable pupils to acquire the competences needed to adequately deal with that culture. It is to be examined how history is displayed, received, and functionalized in certain contexts, and what specific argumentation patterns and presentation formats look like. With regard to the selection of topics, their present-day relevance would have priority: Which historical topics are important today? Such a construction principle would also imply profound changes of our history lessons. It would, of course, be much simpler to implement the conventional approach, namely, to add historical culture-related aspects to the classic chronological curriculum. Whereas most curricula usually contain appropriate introductory remarks, only very few include definite thematic standards or suggestions. Throughout Germany, the most innovative curriculum is, to my mind, Lower Saxony’s upper secondary one. Each semester has a framework topic. One of these is “Historical Culture and Memory Culture,” which has to be taught on an obligatory basis and examined in the “Abitur” (upper secondary school-leaving examination). With regard to a stronger implementation of historical culture in history lessons, this is most certainly a significant step up the ladder.

Categories as a starting point?

A third option would be an orientation towards selected categories. This has the advantage that central aspects of history can be taken into consideration in a criteria-oriented and comparative manner over a long period of time – often with an explicit reference to the present. It not infrequently happens that curricula with a chronological approach try to structure their topics by adding a category pattern. The authors of the new curriculum concept of Rhineland-Palatinate adopted a more fundamental approach. Although their model is based on chronology, it does not develop along steadily progressive, epochal lines, but instead includes “epochal focuses” that are revisited several times in terms of certain pre-defined categories. For example, “Ancient Cultures in the Mediterranean World” are dealt with in terms of society, sovereignty, economy, and interpretations of the world. Thereby, an epochal cross-section becomes a bundle of longitudinally arranged topics. This makes the categorical approach more binding and also more focused. Of course, it will still be necessary to examine whether single categories – such as in the case of Egypt – can be separated meaningfully and how such a division might be implemented in teaching practice.
The current draft curriculum for grades seven and eight in Berlin/Brandenburg is completely committed to a categorizing-longitudinal approach. Its compulsory elective topics (sovereignty and participation/conflict resolution and peacekeeping, encounter with the other, participation and equal living conditions, worldviews and social ideas, environment and economy, migration and population, poverty and wealth) are supposed to be implemented in two to three longitudinal subtopics. Still, a few fundamental questions cannot be denied: How can a link between single longitudinal sections be established (see also Rhineland-Palatinate)? How can the respective time-specific contexts be taken into adequate consideration? How can one avoid the risk of following a linear pattern of progress? Let me conclude by “coming out”: Personally, I prefer some kind of patchwork-curriculum for lower secondary schools, one based on chronologically arranged (and hence reduced) topics, which are subsequently “verified” in the upper grades (especially in upper secondary school) through a categorical-longitudinal approach, and that specifically incorporates topics related to historical culture (as in some textbooks).

Explanations, discussions, and explorations

How can a broader discussion be initiated?

  1. There are now more different concepts on the “curriculum market” than ever before. Yet these should not simply be decreed, but much rather be substantiated (it is, of course, debatable to which extent this is possible within the curriculum as a genre). Currently, history didactic positions, terms, and publications are referred to merely eclectically and allusively – and can be understand only if one already knows them. How about adopting a more detailed, stringent, or even footnote-based argumentation?
  2. With regard to the efficiency and viability of their standards, curricula are situated on the level of suggestions, assertions, and hopes. Why are curricula not put to broader practical testing, which may not necessarily lead to saturated empirical evidence, but could at least create an experiential basis?
  3. There appears to be no exchange between curriculum commissions across state boundaries, and supposedly not even a systematic perusal of other concepts. Both would be highly desirable – as much as a more general discussion between history teachers, their union, or rather their state associations, and history didactics.

_______________

Literature

  • Handro, Saskia / Schönemann, Bernd (Eds.), Geschichtsdidaktische Lehrplanforschung. Methoden – Analysen – Perspektiven, Münster 2004.
  • Pandel, Hans-Jürgen, Strategien geschichtsdidaktischer Richtlinienmodernisierung. Reduktion – Strukturierung – Konstruktion, in: Keuffer, Josef (Hrsg.), Modernisierung von Rahmenrichtlinien, Weinheim 1997, pp. 106-133.
  • Schönemann, Bernd, Lehrpläne und Richtlinien, in: Günther-Arndt, Hilke (Eds.), Geschichts-Didaktik. Praxishandbuch für die Sekundarstufe I und II, Berlin 4. Ed. 2009, pp. 48-62.

External Links

_______________

Image Credits
© Boereck. Highschool “Halepaghen-Schule” Buxtehude quad and building D. Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain.

Recommended Citation
Sauer, Michael: Once again: Curricula. In: Public History Weekly 3 (2015) 16, DOI:  dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2015-3994.

Copyright (c) 2015 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

Vor kurzem hat Holger Thünemann an dieser Stelle eine intensivere Curriculumdiskussion eingefordert. Nun ist anhand eines Falles, des aktuellen Lehrplanentwurfs für Berlin/Brandenburg, eine ziemlich erregte Debatte entbrannt. Dass Curricula immer nur anlassbezogen zum Thema werden, scheint mir typisch zu sein. Wir sollten aber auch grundsätzlicher über die Konstruktionsprinzipien von Curricula nachdenken.

Wege zum Curriculum

Traditionell bildet der doppelte “chronologische Durchgang” das Rückgrat der Geschichtscurricula. Die Rede ist auch vom “genetischen Prinzip” – Geschichte soll in ihren Entwicklungszusammenhängen verfolgt werden. Theoretisch jedoch könnte man Curricula auch ganz anders konstruieren: Man könnte Kompetenzen, die Geschichtskultur oder Kategorien als Ausgangspunkt nehmen. Beim ersten Ansatz müsste man ausgewählte Themen so arrangieren, dass die SchülerInnen an ihnen jeweils definierte Kompetenzen besonders gut erlernen oder trainieren können. Das setzt freilich zum einen ein sehr differenziertes und durchkomponiertes Kompetenzmodell voraus, zum anderen bestünde die Gefahr einer thematischen Fragmentierung. Bislang existiert kein derartiger Versuch. Die Curricula definieren zwar – mit mehr oder weniger Bezug auf die Geschichtsdidaktik – Kompetenzbereiche und Kompetenzen, eine genauere Verschränkung mit Themen gibt es jedoch nicht.
Bei der Variante Geschichtskultur wäre das vornehmste Ziel des Geschichtsunterrichts, den SchülerInnen die notwendige Kompetenz für einen adäquaten Umgang damit zu vermitteln. Zu untersuchen wäre, wie Geschichte in bestimmten Kontexten dargestellt, rezipiert und funktionalisiert wird und wie spezifische Argumentationsmuster und Präsentationsformate aussehen. Bei der Themenwahl würde die Gegenwartsrelevanz im Vordergrund stehen: Welche historischen Themen spielen heutzutage in der Öffentlichkeit eine besondere Rolle? Ein solches Konstruktionsprinzip würde ebenfalls eine tiefgreifende Veränderung unseres Geschichtsunterrichts bedeuten. Einfacher zu realisieren ist sicherlich der konventionellere Weg, nämlich ein klassisch chronologisch entwickeltes Curriculum mit geschichtskulturellen Aspekten anzureichern. In den Curricula finden sich dazu meist einschlägige Vorbemerkungen, allerdings kaum konkrete thematische Vorgaben oder Anregungen. Bundesweit am innovativsten ist hier, soweit ich sehe, das Curriculum für die Sekundarstufe II in Niedersachsen. Dort gibt es für jedes Halbjahr ein Rahmenthema. Eines davon ist „Geschichts- und Erinnerungskultur“ – das Thema muss also verpflichtend unterrichtet werden und wird auch im Abitur zum Gegenstand. Im Hinblick auf eine stärkere Implementierung von Geschichtskultur im Geschichtsunterricht ist dies sicher ein großer Schritt nach vorne.

Kategorien als Ausgangspunkt?

Eine dritte Möglichkeit wäre eine Orientierung an ausgewählten Kategorien. Diese hat den Vorteil, dass zentrale Aspekte der Geschichte über einen längeren Zeitraum hinweg kriterienorientiert und vergleichend, häufig mit explizitem Gegenwartsbezug, in den Blick genommen werden können. Nicht selten versuchen Curricula mit chronologischem Ansatz ihre Themen durch ein Kategorienraster ergänzend zu strukturieren. Grundsätzlicher sind die Verfasser des neuen Lehrplankonzepts in Rheinland-Pfalz verfahren. Sie legen ihrem Modell zwar gleichfalls die Chronologie zugrunde. Jedoch entwickeln sie diese nicht wie üblich gewissermaßen ganzheitlich-epochal fortschreitend, sondern nehmen jeden “Epochalen Schwerpunkt” unter den von ihnen bestimmten Kategorien mehrmals nacheinander separat in den Blick. Die “Antiken Kulturen im Mittelmeerraum” sind also jeweils einmal unter den Kategorien Gesellschaft, Herrschaft, Wirtschaft und Weltdeutungen zu behandeln. So wird aus einem Epochenquerschnitt eine Art Längsschnittbündel. Der kategoriale Zugriff wird auf diese Weise verbindlicher und fokussierter. Freilich wird man fragen müssen, ob sich die einzelnen Kategorien – etwa beim Thema Ägypten – wirklich sinnvoll voneinander separieren lassen und wie dies eigentlich in der Unterrichtspraxis zu realisieren ist.
Der aktuelle Lehrplanentwurf für Berlin und Brandenburg ist nun in den Klassenstufen 7 und 8 komplett einem kategorial-längsschnittlichen Ansatz verpflichtet. Dessen wahlobligatorische Oberthemen (Herrschaft und Partizipation/Konfliktlösung und Friedenssicherung, Begegnung mit dem Anderen, Teilhabe und gleichwertige Lebensverhältnisse, Weltbilder und soziale Ideen, Umwelt und Wirtschaft, Migration und Bevölkerung, Armut und Reichtum) sollen in jeweils zwei bis drei Längsschnitt-Unterthemen umgesetzt werden. Die Vorteile des Ansatzes wurden schon genannt; allerdings kann man auch einige grundsätzliche Fragen nicht von der Hand weisen: Wie lassen sich einzelne Längsschnitte miteinander verknüpfen (siehe auch Rheinland-Pfalz)? Wie kann man die jeweiligen zeitspezifischen Kontexte angemessen berücksichtigen? Wie entgeht man der Gefahr eines allzu schlichten Fortschrittsmodells? Um mich zu outen: Persönlich würde ich für die Sekundarstufe I momentan eine Art Patchworkcurriculum bevorzugen, das zwar von einer chronologischen Anordnung von (reduzierten) Themen ausgeht, diese aber vor allem in den höheren Klassenstufen, insbesondere in der Sekundarstufe II, kategorial-längsschnittlich “gegenliest” und gezielt geschichtskulturelle Themen einbaut (wie es auch Schulbücher zum Teil schon tun).

Begründungen, Diskussionen und Erprobungen gefragt

Wie lässt sich die Diskussion auf eine breitere Basis stellen?

  1. Es gibt mehr als früher unterschiedliche Konzepte auf dem “Curriculummarkt”. Diese sollten nicht einfach dekretiert, sondern argumentativ begründet werden (wobei man gewiss darüber streiten kann, wie weit dies innerhalb der Textsorte Curriculum möglich ist). Auf geschichtsdidaktische Positionen, Begriffe und Publikationen wird im Moment lediglich eklektisch und anspielungshaft Bezug genommen – nur wenn man sie schon kennt, kann man das nachvollziehen. Warum nicht einmal eine etwas detailliertere, stringentere, ev. auch fußnotengestützte Argumentation?
  2. Im Hinblick auf die Wirksamkeit und Realisierbarkeit ihrer Vorgaben bewegen sich die Curricula auf der Ebene von Vermutungen, Behauptungen oder Hoffnungen. Warum gibt es keine breiteren Praxiserprobungen, die nicht unbedingt zu einer gesättigten Empirie führen, aber wenigstens eine Erfahrungsbasis schaffen können?
  3. Einen Austausch zwischen Curriculum-Kommissionen über Bundesländergrenzen hinweg scheint es nicht zu geben, vermutlich nicht einmal eine systematische Kenntnisnahme anderer Konzepte. Beides wäre sehr zu wünschen – und natürlich darüber hinaus eine allgemeinere Diskussion zwischen Geschichtslehrkräften, deren Verband bzw. den Landesverbänden sowie der Geschichtsdidaktik.

_______________

Literatur

  • Handro, Saskia / Schönemann, Bernd (Hrsg.): Geschichtsdidaktische Lehrplanforschung. Methoden – Analysen – Perspektiven, Münster 2004.
  • Pandel, Hans-Jürgen, Strategien geschichtsdidaktischer Richtlinienmodernisierung. Reduktion – Strukturierung – Konstruktion, in: Keuffer, Josef (Hrsg.): Modernisierung von Rahmenrichtlinien, Weinheim 1997, S. 106-133.
  • Schönemann, Bernd: Lehrpläne und Richtlinien, in: Günther-Arndt, Hilke (Hrsg.): Geschichts-Didaktik. Praxishandbuch für die Sekundarstufe I und II, Berlin 4. Aufl. 2009, S. 48-62.

Externe Links

_______________

Abbildungsnachweis
© Boereck. “Halepaghen-Schule” in Buxtehude, Schulhof und Gebäude D. Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain.

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Sauer, Michael: Noch einmal: Curricula. In: Public History Weekly 3 (2015) 16, DOI:  dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2015-3994.

Copyright (c) 2015 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.


Categories: 3 (2015) 16
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2015-3994

Tags: , ,

Pin It on Pinterest