Politicizing AP U.S. History? (APUSH)

Politisierung des Unterrichts zur US-Geschichte?

 

 


In February, Oklahoma state legislators considered a bill declaring an “emergency” in the U.S. history curriculum. Seeing an immediate threat to “the preservation of the public peace, health and safety,” the proposed law prohibited state funds supporting the delivery of the revised Advanced Placement U.S. History course and called for a replacement course.[1] – An emergency! That threatened public health and safety! What was all this about?

A new course on U.S. history

Advanced Placement U.S. History[2]—a course overseen by the College Board[3] and known as APUSH—is intended to offer high school students a college-level experience with history and is one of 30 plus tests offered in the subject-areas across the nation. Students can take a test administered by the College Board at the end of the course and, with a high score, are often eligible for college credits when they enroll in universities.

APUSH was recently revised and 2014-2015 is the first year that teachers are teaching the new course and that students will take the revised test. The revision process took more than four years and notably, historians and APUSH teachers led the redesign of the course.

What are the changes?

Historical thinking concepts (i.e., contextualization, crafting historical arguments from historical evidence) lead the course description,[4] heralding a new focus on teaching the skills and processes integral to the discipline. This new focus is also seen in the test where the multiple choice questions now use stimuli such as primary sources to challenge students to reason “in tandem” with knowledge, rather than merely to recall.[5] The document tells of how the authors intentionally created a framework with no list of specifics and no “particular political position or interpretation of history,” but one that “reflects current scholarship and advances in the discipline.”[6]

Responses

Not surprisingly, almost as soon as the course was finalized, conservatives criticized it.[7] Indeed, in August, 2014, The Republican National Committee [RNC] adopted a resolution[8] that included calling for a delay in implementing the course, investigation by state legislatures, and withholding any federal funding for the College Board until a new framework that allowed students to learn the “true history of their country” was developed. They claimed that the framework was “a biased and inaccurate view of many important events” and a “radically revisionist approach” that emphasized “negative aspects” of the country’s past.[9] The RNC pledged that all Republican legislators and state offices would receive a copy of this resolution, effectively canvasing the land with its stand against the new framework.

So when Oklahoma legislators called this a public health emergency, they were on that bandwagon. Prior to February, there were similar efforts in other states (e.g., Georgia, Texas) to scuttle the course. In Colorado, a local school board protested the course and I heard from one colleague (an Army veteran) that he had been called unpatriotic, given that he was teaching APUSH.

The response to these attacks on the new course has also been swift. The College Board opened a forum for public comment, released a sample test to show the criticisms as unfounded, and the framework’s main authors responded in a letter calling the criticisms “uninformed.” [10] The President of the American Historical Association spoke out in the national press[11] and students walked out of their classrooms in Jefferson County, Colorado, to protest the censoring of the curriculum.

What’s this argument about?

Proponents and advocates are not thinking about the discipline in the same way, nor do they agree on the nature of the civic purposes for studying history. Critics lament the loss of a narrative of American exceptionalism and list people and events that should be mentioned in the APUSH document. Authors and advocates call the document a “framework,” intentionally start it with historical thinking concepts and, don’t embrace a single particular narrative (e.g., the course calls for the study of periodization as an interpretive tool that helps shape the narratives we tell about the American past).

One might generously see the differences between the sides as reflective of a gap between “school history” and academic history. When critics call for one “true history” and critique revisionism maybe they are just showing that they haven’t learned the disciplinary methods that are used to know the past? Or that historical narratives can change with new evidence, lenses, and questions?

But I don’t think so. Conservatives assert that the framework “politicizes” history,[12] but it seems the attack rather than the course that is political. The RNC took a stand on a voluntary academic course that is designed to represent the discipline as scholars understand it, and asked state legislatures to scrutinize it. When politicians bemoan the loss of the story of American exceptionalism, a story that glorifies the nation, and call contrary content overly negative, it is hard not to see this fight as one between what David Lowenthal called “heritage” and “history.”[13]

These attacks are also likely about more than this APUSH course. Among other things, they reflect ongoing national struggles over federal and state powers in education and conservative claims that modern college environments silence their views.[14]

Historical Thinking Needed

Whatever they’re about, this recent version of the “history wars” demonstrates that the APUSH framework is on target with its focus on historical thinking skills.

If we teach history as one unimpeachable story in our schools, then students are unprepared for making sense of the arguments over the past that routinely happen in the public arena. Whether it be this dispute or another, students will become adults who will confront contested narratives. History education needs to prepare students to navigate, interrogate, and understand those narratives.

Teaching for historical thinking helps prepare students for their public lives and civic participation, but it rests on an assumption that we need independently thinking citizens, who ask questions of narratives, demand evidence, seek out multiple perspectives, and contextualize events and issues in both what came before and what is happening now. This view of citizen may, indeed, be where the deep differences lie in this debate over APUSH—what the sides think a prepared citizen looks like.

____________________

Literature

External links

____________________


[1] State of Oklahoma, Committee Substitute for House Bill No.1380, 55th Legislature, 1st sess. (February 7, 2015), Section 4, http://webserver1.lsb.state.ok.us/cf_pdf/2015-16%20FLR/HFLR/HB1380%20HFLR.PDF (last accessed 7.5.2015).
[2] https://advancesinap.collegeboard.org/english-history-and-social-science/us-history (last accessed 7.5.2015).
[3] https://www.collegeboard.org (last accessed 7.5.2015)
[4] http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-us-history-course-and-exam-description.pdf (last accessed 7.5.2015).
[5] The College Board. AP US History Course and Exam Description Including the Curriculum Framework Effective Fall 2014, (2014,) 83, http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-us-history-course-and-exam-description.pdf (last accessed 7.5.2015).
[6] Ibid., 9, 10, 2.
[7] e.g., Jane, Robbins. “New Advanced Placement Framework Distorts America’s History,” Heartland, March 26, 2014,
http://news.heartland.org/newspaper-article/2014/03/26/new-advanced-placement-framework-distorts-americas-history (last accessed 7.5.2015).
Curricular or policy changes to the K-12 U.S. history curriculum frequently erupt into controversy. cf. Gary B. Nash, Charlotte Crabtree, and Ross E. Dunn, History on Trial: Culture Wars and the Teaching of the Past. (New York, NY: A.A. Knopf, 1997); Katherine Mangan, “Ignoring Experts’ Please: Texas Approves Controversial Curriculum Standards,” The Chronicle of Higher Education, May 23, 2010.
[8] http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/curriculum/RNC.JPG (last accessed 7.5.2015).
[9] Republican National Committee, “Resolution Concerning Advanced Placement U.S. History.” EdWeek. http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/curriculum/RNC.JPG (last accessed 7.5.2015).
[10] Kevin B. Byrne, et. al, “An Open Letter from the Authors of the AP United States History Curriculum Framework,” http://www.edweek.org/media/letter-us-history.pdf (last accessed 7.5.2015).
[11] James Grossman, “The New History Wars,” The New York Times, September 1, 2014, http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/02/opinion/the-new-history-wars.html?_r=0 (last accessed 7.5.2015).
[12] e.g., Stanley Kurtz, “How the College Board Politicized U.S. History,” National Review, August 25, 2014, http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/386202/how-college-board-politicized-us-history-stanley-kurtz (last accessed 7.5.2015).
[13] David Lowenthal, “Fabricating Heritage,” History and Memory 10, no. 1, (1998).
[14] e.g., Peter Wood, “The New AP History: A Preliminary Report,” National Association of Scholars, July 1, 2014. http://www.nas.org/articles/the_new_ap_history_a_preliminary_report (last accessed 7.5.2015).

____________________

Image Credits
This image was created in May 2015 by Daisy Martin with Wordle (http://www.wordle.net) and the text from the Introduction to the new APUSH course.

Recommended Citation
Martin, Daisy: Politicizing AP U.S. History? In: Public History Weekly 3 (2015) 17, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2015-4059.

Copyright (c) 2015 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

Im Februar 2015 beriet das Parlament des Staates Oklahoma ein Gesetz, das einen “Ausnahmezustand“ im Lehrplan für US-amerikanische Geschichte ausrufen wollte. Weil eine unmittelbare Bedrohung für die “Erhaltung von Frieden, Gesundheit und Sicherheit der Öffentlichkeit“ bestehe, wollte das vorgeschlagene Gesetz untersagen, dass staatliche Gelder für die Ausbringung des revidierten “Advanced Placement U.S. History course“ eingesetzt werden[1]. – Ein Ausnahmezustand, der Gesundheit und Sicherheit der Öffentlichkeit gefährde! Worum ging es da eigentlich?

Ein neuer Lehrgang in Geschichte der USA

Der Kurs “Advanced Placement U.S. History“ [2], der vom amerikanischen “College Board“[3] verantwortet wird und auch unter dem Kürzel APUSH bekannt ist, soll High-School-SchülerInnen eine Auseinandersetzung mit Geschichte auf College-Niveau ermöglichen. Er ist einer von über 30 Tests, die in diesem Themenfeld überall in den USA angeboten werden. Die SchülerInnen können am Ende einen Test absolvieren, der vom College Board organisiert wird. Wer einen hohen Wert erreicht, kann sich beim Einschreiben an einer Universität Kredit-Punkte gutschreiben zu lassen.

APUSH wurde kürzlich überarbeitet, und das Schuljahr 2014-1015 ist das erste, in dem LehrerInnen den Kurs unterrichten und Studierende entsprechende Tests ablegen können. Bei der mehr als vier Jahre dauernden Überarbeitung waren HistorikerInnen und Lehrpersonen, die den Lehrgang APUSH unterrichteten, massgeblich beteiligt.

Was hat sich verändert?

Am Anfang der Kursbeschreibung[4] werden Konzepte des Historischen Denkens (z.B. Kontextualisierung, auf der Basis von historischen Indizien historische Argumente entwickeln) eingeführt, womit eine neuer Schwerpunkt auf das Unterrichten von Fähigkeiten und Prozessen gelegt wird, die das Wesen der Disziplin ausmachen. Diese Schwerpunktsetzung ist auch in den Tests zu erkennen. Dort verwenden die Fragen im Multiple-Choice-Format neuerdings Quellen als Impulse, um SchülerInnen dazu herauszufordern, unter Berücksichtigung von Wissen Schlussfolgerungen zu ziehen, anstatt sich lediglich an Informationen zu erinnern.[5] In der Kursbeschreibung erläutern die AutorInnen, wie sie bewusst die Gestaltung einer Grundstruktur ohne Aufzählung von Details und ohne “einzelne politische Positionen oder Interpretationen von Geschichte“ ins Auge fassten. Stattdessen sollte der Kurs “den gegenwärtigen Stand wissenschaftlicher Forschung und die Fortschritte der Disziplin wiedergeben.“[6]

Reaktionen

Wenig überraschend brachten konservative Kreise Kritik vor, kurz nachdem das Kurskonzept fertiggestellt worden war.[7] Tatsächlich verabschiedete das “Republican National Committee“ (RNC; das Leitungsgremium der republikanischen Partei) im August 2014 eine Resolution,[8] die unter anderem einen Aufschub bei der Einführung des Kurses, eine Untersuchung durch die gesetzgebenden Körperschaften sowie die Einbehaltung jeglicher Bundesmittel für das “College Board“ verlangte, bis eine neue Grundstruktur erarbeitet worden sei, die den SchülerInnen erlaube, die “wahre Geschichte ihres Landes“ zu erlernen. Sie behaupteten, die Grundstruktur sei “eine voreingenommene und ungenaue Sicht auf zahlreiche wichtige Ereignisse“ und “ein radikal revisionistischer Ansatz“, der die “negativen Aspekte“ in der Vergangenheit des Landes betone.[9] Das RNC gelobte, alle republikanischen Parlamentarier und zuständigen Ämter in den Staaten mit einer Kopie ihrer Resolution zu versorgen, was am Ende zu einem Zupflastern des Landes mit der RNC-Position gegen die neue Grundstruktur geriet.

Als die Parlamentarier in Oklahoma einen Notstand für die öffentliche Gesundheit ausriefen, sprangen sie folglich nur auf diesen Zug auf. Vor Februar gab es in anderen Staaten (z.B. in Georgia und Texas) ähnliche Anstrengungen, den eingeschlagenen Kurs zu torpedieren. In Colorado protestierte eine lokale Schulbehörde gegen den Kurs. Von einem Kollegen (einem Veteran der US-Armee) hörte ich, dass er als unpatriotisch bezeichnet wurde, weil er den Kurs APUSH unterrichtete.

Die Reaktionen auf diese Angriffe gegen den neuen Kurs erfolgten ebenso rasch. Das College Board eröffnete ein Internet-Forum für Kommentare der interessierten Öffentlichkeit und veröffentlichte einen Muster-Test, um zu zeigen, wie unbegründet die Kritik daran sei. Die Haupt-AutorInnen der Grundstruktur reagierten in einem offenen Brief, in dem sie die Kritiken als “uninformiert“ bezeichneten.[10] Der Präsident der “American Historical Association“ meldete sich in der nationalen Presse zu Wort[11] und SchülerInnen in Jefferson County, Colorado, verliessen ihre Klassenzimmer, um gegen die Zensur des Lehrplans zu protestieren.

Worum geht es bei diesem Streit?

BefürworterInnen und VerfechterInnen haben bezüglich der Disziplin selbst und der Natur des staatsbürgerlichen Nutzens, sich mit Geschichte zu befassen, ein anderes Verständnis. Die KritikerInnen beklagen den Verlust eines Narrativs über die amerikanische Aussergewöhnlichkeit [exceptionalism] und von Auflistungen mit Personen und Ereignissen, die in der APUSH-Kursbeschreibung Erwähnung finden sollten. Die AutorInnen und BefürworterInnen bezeichnen die Beschreibung des Kurses als Grundstruktur, die mit Bedacht Konzepte des historischen Denkens an den Anfang stellt und des Weiteren darauf verzichtet, sich ein einziges Narrativ zu Eigen zu machen (so fordert der Kurs dazu auf, die Periodisierung als Mittel der Interpretation zu verstehen, das hilft, die Narrative auszuformen, mit denen wir die Vergangenheit Amerikas darstellen).

Man könnte nun großzügig die Unterschiede zwischen den beiden Seiten als eine Ausprägung des Grabens zwischen “Schulgeschichte“ und Geschichtswissenschaften verstehen. Wenn die KritikerInnen die eine “wahre Geschichte“ verlangen und Revisionismus kritisieren, zeigen sie dann vielleicht lediglich, dass sie die disziplinären Methoden nicht erlernt haben, die zur Erkundung der Vergangenheit benutzt werden? Oder dass sich historische Darstellungen mit neuen Indizien, Quellen, Fragen und Untersuchungsperspektiven verändern können?

Doch dieser Ansicht bin ich nicht. Die Konservativen behaupten, dass die Grundstruktur des Kurses Geschichte “politisiere“.[12] Doch mir scheint, dass eher der Angriff als der Kurs politisch motiviert ist. Das RNC bezieht Stellung zu einem freiwilligen akademischen Kurs, dessen Konzept vorsieht, die Disziplin nach wissenschaftlichen Gesichtspunkten darzulegen, und verlangt eine eingehende Prüfung durch die gesetzgebenden Körperschaften. Wenn PolitikerInnen den Verlust einer Geschichte von amerikanischer Aussergewöhnlichkeit bedauern, die die Nation glorifiziert, und gegenteilige Fakten oder Inhalte als übermässig negativ bezeichnen, fällt es schwer, dies nicht als Kampf zwischen – wie es David Loewenthal nannte – “Erbe“ (“heritage“) und “Geschichte“ (“history“) zu verstehen.[13]

Bei diesen Angriffen geht es folglich um mehr als diesen APUSH-Kurs. Unter anderem widerspiegeln sie eine andauernde nationale Auseinandersetzung über Zuständigkeiten der Bundes- oder Staatsbehörden in der Bildungspolitik und die Behauptungen von konservativer Seite, dass die heutigen Rahmenbedingungen an den Colleges ihre Sichtweisen unterdrückten.[14]

Historisches Denken wird benötigt

Worum es auch immer geht – die gegenwärtige Version der “history wars“ zeigt, dass die APUSH-Grundstruktur mit ihrer Schwerpunktsetzung auf die Fähigkeiten des historischen Denkens auf dem richtigen Kurs liegt.

Wenn wir Geschichte als unanfechtbare Erzählung in unseren Schulen unterrichten, dann sind die SchülerInnen nicht vorbereitet darauf, sich einen Reim auf die Auseinandersetzungen über die Vergangenheit zu machen, wie sie regelmäßig in der Öffentlichkeit ausgetragen werden. Ob es sich nun um diesen Streit handelt oder einen anderen: SchülerInnen werden zu Erwachsenen, die sich mit umstrittenen Narrativen konfrontiert sehen. Der Geschichtsunterricht muss die SchülerInnen dazu befähigen, sich in diesen Narrativen zurechtzufinden, sie zu befragen und sie zu verstehen.

Historisches Denken zu unterrichten hilft SchülerInnen, sich auf ihr Leben als StaatsbürgerIn und Mitglied der Öffentlichkeit vorzubereiten. Allerdings beruht dies auf der Annahme, dass wir unabhängig denkende BürgerInnen benötigen, die Narrative hinterfragen, Beweise und Belege einfordern, nach unterschiedlichen Perspektiven suchen und Ereignisse und Probleme sowohl mit Geschehnissen der Vergangenheit wie der Gegenwart in ihren Kontext setzen. Diese Sicht auf StaatsbürgerInnen mag in der Tat der wesentliche Unterschied in der Debatte um den APUSH-Kurs sein: was die jeweiligen Seiten für eine Vorstellung davon haben, wie ein vorbereiteter Staatsbürger beschaffen sein soll.

____________________

Literatur

Externe Links

____________________

[1] State of Oklahoma, Committee Substitute for House Bill No.1380, 55th Legislature, 1st sess. (February 7, 2015), Section 4, http://webserver1.lsb.state.ok.us/cf_pdf/2015-16%20FLR/HFLR/HB1380%20HFLR.PDF (Letzter Zugriff 7.5.2015).
[2] https://advancesinap.collegeboard.org/english-history-and-social-science/us-history (letzter Zugriff 7.5.2015)
[3] https://www.collegeboard.org (letzter Zugriff 7.5.2015).
[4] http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-us-history-course-and-exam-description.pdf (letzter Zugriff 7.5.2015).
[5] The College Board. AP US History Course and Exam Description Including the Curriculum Framework Effective Fall 2014, (2014,) 83, http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-us-history-course-and-exam-description.pdf (letzter Zugriff 7.5.2015).
[6] Ibid., 9, 10, 2.
[7] e.g., Jane, Robbins. “New Advanced Placement Framework Distorts America’s History,” Heartland, March 26, 2014,
http://news.heartland.org/newspaper-article/2014/03/26/new-advanced-placement-framework-distorts-americas-history (letzter Zugriff 7.5.2015).
Eingriffe in den Lehrplan der Geschichte in der Schule (K-12) führen regelmässig zu Ausbrüchen von Kontroversen. Vgl. Gary B. Nash, Charlotte Crabtree, and Ross E. Dunn, History on Trial: Culture Wars and the Teaching of the Past. (New York, NY: A.A. Knopf, 1997); Katherine Mangan, “Ignoring Experts’ Please: Texas Approves Controversial Curriculum Standards,” The Chronicle of Higher Education, May 23, 2010.
[8] http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/curriculum/RNC.JPG (letzter Zugriff 7.5.2015).
[9] Republican National Committee, “Resolution Concerning Advanced Placement U.S. History.” EdWeek. http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/curriculum/RNC.JPG (letzter Zugriff 7.5.2015).
[10] Kevin B. Byrne, et. al, “An Open Letter from the Authors of the AP United States History Curriculum Framework,” http://www.edweek.org/media/letter-us-history.pdf (letzter Zugriff 7.5.2015).
[11] James Grossman, “The New History Wars,” The New York Times, September 1, 2014, http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/02/opinion/the-new-history-wars.html?_r=0 (letzter Zugriff 7.5.2015).
[12] e.g., Stanley Kurtz, “How the College Board Politicized U.S. History,” National Review, August 25, 2014, http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/386202/how-college-board-politicized-us-history-stanley-kurtz (letzter Zugriff 7.5.2015).
[13] David Lowenthal, “Fabricating Heritage,” History and Memory 10, no. 1, (1998).
[14] e.g., Peter Wood, “The New AP History: A Preliminary Report,” National Association of Scholars, July 1, 2014. http://www.nas.org/articles/the_new_ap_history_a_preliminary_report (letzter Zugriff 7.5.2015).

____________________

Abbildungsnachweis
Dieses Bild wurde im Mai 2015 von Daisy Martin mit Wordle (http://www.wordle.net) und dem Text aus der Einführung in den APUSH-Kurs erstellt.

Übersetzung aus dem Englischen
von Jan Hodel

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Martin, Daisy: Politisierung des Unterrichts zur US-Geschichte? In: Public History Weekly 3 (2015) 17, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2015-4059.

Copyright (c) 2015 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.


Categories: 3 (2015) 17
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2015-4059

Tags: , ,

Pin It on Pinterest