Once the Statues are out of Sight?

Was, sobald die Statuen außer Sicht sind?

 

from our “Wilde 13” section

Abstract:
Over the last weeks, activists in Europe and the United States attacked statues of historical figures perceived to be representations of colonialism, imperialism, and racism. Such symbolic acts inspired similar protests across a wide variety of national communities – those involved citing a need for immediate justice and reparations for historical wrongdoings. But will the removal and destruction of monuments result in necessary structural and systemic changes? This piece argues that underlying inequalities will remain despite the erasure of monuments, and perhaps even by virtue of such erasure. Reforms of social, punitive, and economic policy are necessary if we are to transform removal into something more than a Pyrrhic victory. The application of restorative justice that permeates all systems is required.
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-17098.
Languages: English, German


A monumental movement is sweeping the world. Sparked by the death of George Floyd and propelled by widespread public outrage at systemic racism and police brutality, statues that blended into the scenery for the average person have been vandalized, toppled, stomped on, and – in the case of Bristol’s Colston statue – dragged through the streets and dumped into the harbour.[1] These acts appear to have brought years of debate about these statues to an abrupt conclusion – they must fall. But is this the most effective measure to achieve the aims protesters are seeking?

 

You’re Next!

Soon after the removal of Colston, a protester left a sign on the doors of Oxford’s Oriel College that read “Rhodes, You’re Next”.[2] Thousands of protesters have demanded its fall, similar to the fate of his statue at the University of Cape Town in South Africa, in 2015.[3] In Virginia, we witnessed the statue of Columbus set alight and thrown into a lake.[4] The transnational nature and broad applicability of the movement’s message are clear. Related protests have touched numerous countries with a history of racism, imperialism, and colonialism – Cecil Rhodes in South Africa, James Cook in Australia, Leopold II in Belgium, Columbus in Argentina, and Confederate monuments in the United States, to name just a few.[5]

Many of these figures glorified in stone were heralded for their heroic actions, philanthropy, or other accomplishments without acknowledgment of the human rights violations committed in achieving these deeds. Erected to honour the conquests and wealth that brought their countries and themselves fame, the injustices these “heroes” committed remained for most of their tenure camouflaged, but not for everyone. For many, these statues symbolize the deep systemic and structural inequalities rooted in historical legacies of slavery, racism, colonialism, and imperialism.

Historical Remedies

Of all the measures that can be taken to protest controversial statues, removal and destruction are the most extreme. There are other remedies that facilitate important educational discussions and contribute to awareness raising of historical wrongdoings. Placarding, additive elements, or counter monuments can serve to contextualize historical legacies, fostering debate and discussion. The statue of Josephine Bonaparte in Martinique, erected in 1859 to honour the French empress in her native land, has been decapitated several times over the last decades for her alleged actions to convince Napoleon to re-instate slavery. She now remains headless and splattered with red paint as a symbol of  France’s culpability in the slave-trade.[6] In 1956, during a revolution in Hungary, 100,000+ protesters destroyed a famous statue of Joseph Stalin, leaving only his giant boots. A monument to these empty boots now stands in the Memento Statue Park in Budapest as a reminder of the Soviet era.[7] In Paraguay, a statue of Alfredo Stroessner, whose vicious reign of terror lasted from 1954 to 1989, has been crushed into a huge block, face and hands visible, and reinstalled in the Square of the Disappeared as a reminder of the crimes he committed.[8] Additional remedies have been scholarly explored on a case-by-case basis, and they include moving statues to museums and including protest signs, images, and videos for display in an exhibition.

Such measures, however, may not feel sufficient for those outraged by extrajudicial killing, police brutality, and systemic racism against Black people. What is the destruction of stone when compared to destruction of life? The removal of a statue may appear to be the only act that does justice to the severity of the situation.

There are also those not part of the movement who have chosen to remove statues pre-emptively. Violating Alabama state law intended to protect memorials, the cities of Mobile and Birmingham have taken down Confederate monuments. The University of Alabama has removed plaques honouring students who served in the Confederate Army and released a statement saying they “will be placed at a more appropriate historical setting”.[9]

Other policy makers have chosen not to make ad-hoc decisions and opted for research and consultations on how to deal with contentious monuments. We applaud Mayor Sadiq Khan in London and the authorities in England, Scotland, and Wales who decided to form commissions to appraise monuments in their cities or regions. A consultative process with a clear mandate that includes representatives from aggrieved groups can contribute to greater social cohesiveness.[10]

Accomplishments

In the long-term, the question remains: what does the removal or erasure of a statue or monument accomplish? It does not alleviate the underlying grievances dividing a society. Without structural changes in justice, policing, social, and educational systems, removal will be a Pyrrhic victory, a purely symbolic act. When the statue is gone, how will we remind the public of past injustices and the connected, pervasive issues that remain? In contrast to the statues that were partially removed, there is nothing to remind people who visit the University of Cape Town of the issues raised by the #RhodesMustFall movement. Whenever a statue is removed, the question should be asked, what should be put in its place?

We are monitoring  more than 80 cases in Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and the Americas of contested histories related to the legacy of colonialism, imperialism, slavery, and racism and an equal number that deal with the legacies of fascism, communism, genocide, human rights violations, sectarian violence, and authoritarian regimes.

Those who suffered from egregious wrongs and their descendants are calling for restorative justice. When their voices remain unheard, they will protest and direct their pain towards the symbolic representations of their trauma – the figures we have placed on pedestals. The fact that these protesters were joined by allies outside their communities this week, gives hope that more sustainable change can be achieved.

Responsibilities

Educators, civil society activists, and community leaders each have a responsibility to raise awareness and facilitate open discussion and public debate about contested historical legacies. We, as educators, know that history is not confined to classrooms. Current events provide us with a valuable opportunity to show our students that history and the way we choose to remember it is not about memorizing dates and names, rather it is an evolving process that impacts our lives in ways that truly matter. Failing to teach the past in a multiperspective and inclusive manner will contribute to the silencing of invaluable voices, foment unrest, and leave marginalized members of the public feeling their only recourse is to remove tangible manifestations of whitewashed history. We need qualified and competent teachers and a sufficient time in the school curriculum to address these controversies. We cannot continue on in this way.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Burch-Brown, Joanna. “Is it wrong to topple statues and rename statues?” Journal of Political Theory and Philosophy 1, 59-88.
  • Mitchell, Katharyne. “Monuments, Memorials, and the Politics of Memory.” Urban Geography 24, no. 5 (2003): 442-59. doi:10.2747/0272-3638.24.5.442.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] Landler, Mark. “In an English City, an Early Benefactor Is Now ‘a Toxic Brand’.” The New York Times. June 14, 2020. https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/14/world/europe/Bristol-Colston-statue-slavery.html.
[2] Cecil Rhodes: How Black Lives Matter and Bristolian Vandalism Renewed Hope That Oxford’s Imperialist Benefactor Could Fall. MSN. https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/uknews/cecil-rhodes-how-black-lives-matter-and-bristolian-vandalism-renewed-hope-that-oxford-s-imperialist-benefactor-could-fall/ar-BB15g0zU?li=BBoPRmx&srcref=rss.
[3] In this case a student threw human excrement at the statue of Cecil Rhodes in protest to the systemic racism on campus.  See Britta Timm Knudsen & Casper Andersen (2019) Affective politics and colonial heritage, Rhodes Must Fall at UCT and Oxford, International Journal of Heritage Studies, 25:3, 239-258, DOI: 10.1080/13527258.2018.1481134
[4] Newsroom, NBC12. “Christopher Columbus Statue Torn Down, Thrown in Lake by Protesters.” June 10, 2020. https://www.nbc12.com/2020/06/09/christopher-columbus-statue-torn-down-thrown-lake-by-protesters/.
[5] The examples mentioned here have been researched as part of the Contested Histories Project, developed by the Institute for Historical Justice and Reconciliation, a research centre at EuroClio, the European Association of History Educators. To date, the project has conducted research on more than 160 cases in over 60 countries around the world, finding examples of
[6] Lambert, Léopold. ”The guillotined statue of Empress Joséphine in Martinique: the incarnation of an anti-colonial narrative.” Accessed June 24, 2020. https://thefunambulist.net/history/history-the-guillotined-statue-empress-josephine-in-martinique
[7] Walker, Jennifer. “Budapest’s Memento Park: Where communist statues are laid to rest.” CNN, June 7, 2018. https://edition.cnn.com/travel/article/memento-park-budapest-hungary/index.html
[8] Colmán Gutiérrez, Andrés. “El día en que Stroessner fue derribado del cerro Lambaré.” Última Hora, Mayo 19, 2016. https://www.ultimahora.com/el-dia-que-stroessner-fue-derribado-del-cerro-lambare-n992614.html
[9] Jacksin, Lily. “University of Alabama to Remove 3 Confederate Plaques from Campus.” Al. June 08, 2020. https://www.al.com/news/2020/06/university-of-alabama-in-first-step-to-remove-three-confederate-plaques-from-campus.html.
[10] This has been the approach taken by cities like London and New York. In June 2020, the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, established the Commission for Diversity in the Public Realm, with the aim of ensuring that the “capital’s landmarks suitably reflect London’s achievements and diversity.” Likewise, New York City has had a Mayoral Advisory Commission on City Art, Monuments and Markers since September 2017. After conducting “extensive engagement with the public” through hearings and surveys, the Commission released a report in January 2018 regarding next steps for several controversial monuments in the metropolis. “Mayor Unveils Commission to Review Diversity of London’s Public Realm.” London City Hall. June 09, 2020. https://www.london.gov.uk/press-releases/mayoral/mayor-unveils-commission-to-review-diversity#:~:text=Mayor unveils commission to review diversity of London’s public realm,-09 June 2020&text=The Mayor of London, Sadiq,reflect London’s achievements and diversity. “Mayor De Blasio Releases Monuments Commission’s Report, Announces Decisions on Controversial Monumen.” The Official Website of the City of New York. January 12, 2018. https://www1.nyc.gov/office-of-the-mayor/news/030-18/mayor-de-blasio-releases-monuments-commission-s-report-decisions-controversial

_____________________

Image Credits

Stalin’s Boots © 2009 Ben, CC BY-ND 2.0 via flickr.

Recommended Citation

Stegers, Steven, and Marie-Louise Jansen: Once the Statues are out of Sight? In: Public History Weekly 8 (2020) 7, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-17098.

Editorial Responsibility

Moritz Hoffmann / Marko Demantowsky (Team Basel)

Eine monumentale Bewegung erobert die Welt. Ausgelöst durch den Tod von George Floyd und angetrieben durch die weit verbreitete öffentliche Empörung über systemischen Rassismus und Polizeibrutalität wurden Statuen, die sich im Alltag in die Landschaft einfügten, zerstört, gestürzt, mit Füßen getreten und – im Fall der Colston-Statue von Bristol – durch die Straßen geschleppt und in den Hafen geworfen.[1] Diese Handlungen scheinen jahrelange Debatten über diese Statuen zu einem abrupten Abschluss gebracht zu haben – sie müssen fallen. Aber ist dies die effektivste Maßnahme, um die von den Demonstrant*innen angestrebten Ziele zu erreichen?

Du bist der Nächste!

Kurz nach der Entfernung von Colston hinterließ ein Demonstrant an den Türen des Oxford Oriel College ein Schild mit der Aufschrift “Rhodes, You’re Next” (“Rhodes, du bist der Nächste!”).[2] Tausende Demonstrant*innen forderten ihren Sturz, ähnlich wie das Schicksal einer Statue an der Universität von Kapstadt in Südafrika im Jahr 2015.[3] In Virginia sahen wir, wie die Statue von Kolumbus angezündet und in einen See geworfen wurde.[4] Der transnationale Charakter und die breite Anwendbarkeit der Botschaft der Bewegung sind klar. Ähnliche Proteste haben zahlreiche Länder mit einer Geschichte von Rassismus, Imperialismus und Kolonialismus berührt – Cecil Rhodes in Südafrika, James Cook in Australien, Leopold II. in Belgien, Kolumbus in Argentinien und Denkmäler der Konföderierten in den Vereinigten Staaten, um nur einige zu nennen.[5]

Viele dieser glorifizierten in Stein gemeißelten Figuren wurden für ihre Heldentaten, ihre Philanthropie oder andere Leistungen gelobt, ohne die Menschenrechtsverletzungen anzuerkennen, die bei der Erreichung dieser Taten begangen wurden. Errichtet, um die Eroberungen und den Reichtum zu ehren, die ihre Länder und sie selbst berühmt gemacht haben, blieben die Ungerechtigkeiten, die diese ”Held*innen” begangen haben, für den größten Teil ihrer Amtszeit unausgesprochen, aber nicht für alle. Für viele Menschen symbolisieren diese Statuen die tiefen systemischen und strukturellen Ungleichheiten, die auf historischen Hinterlassenschaften von Sklaverei, Rassismus, Kolonialismus und Imperialismus beruhen.

Historische Heilmittel

Von allen Maßnahmen, die ergriffen werden können, um gegen umstrittene Statuen zu protestieren, sind Entfernung und Zerstörung die extremsten. Es gibt örtliche Abhilfemaßnahmen, die wichtige Bildungsdiskussionen erleichtern und zur Sensibilisierung für historisches Fehlverhalten beitragen. Plakate, hinzugefügte Elemente oder Gegendenkmäler können dazu dienen, historische Hinterlassenschaften zu kontextualisieren und Debatten und Diskussionen zu fördern. Die Statue von Josephine Bonaparte in Martinique, die 1859 zu Ehren der französischen Kaiserin in ihrer Heimat errichtet wurde, wurde in den letzten Jahrzehnten mehrmals enthauptet, weil sie Napoleon angeblich davon überzeugt hatte, die Sklaverei wieder aufzunehmen. Sie bleibt jetzt kopflos und mit roter Farbe bespritzt, als Symbol für Frankreichs Schuld am Sklavenhandel.[6] Während der Revolution in Ungarn im Jahr 1956 zerstörten mehr als 100.000 Demonstrant*innen eine berühmte Statue von Joseph Stalin und ließen nur seine riesigen Stiefel zurück.[7] Ein Denkmal für diese leeren Stiefel steht heute im Memento-Statue-Park in Budapest als Erinnerung an die sowjetische Besatzung. In Paraguay wurde eine Statue von Alfredo Stroessner, dessen bösartige Terrorherrschaft von 1954 bis 1989 andauerte, in einen riesigen Block zerquetscht – Gesicht und Hände sichtbar und an der Stelle an der das Original einst als Erinnerung an die von ihm begangenen Verbrechen stand, wieder ausgestellt.[8] Weitere Abhilfemaßnahmen sind der Umzug von Statuen in Museen sowie Protestschilder, Bilder und Videos zum Ausstellen in einer Ausstellung.

Solche Maßnahmen sind jedoch möglicherweise nicht ausreichend für diejenigen, die über außergerichtliche Tötung, Polizeibrutalität und systemischen Rassismus gegen Schwarze empört sind. Was ist die Zerstörung von Stein im Vergleich zur Zerstörung von Leben? Die Entfernung einer Statue scheint die einzige Handlung zu sein, die der Schwere der Situation gerecht wird.

Es gibt auch diejenigen, die nicht Teil der Bewegung sind und sich dafür entschieden haben, Statuen präventiv zu entfernen. Die Städte Mobile und Birmingham haben gegen den Denkmalschutz des Bundesstaates Alabama verstoßen und Denkmäler der Konföderierten abgerissen. Die Universität von Alabama hat Plaketten entfernt, auf denen Studierende geehrt werden, die in der Konföderierten Armee gedient haben und eine Erklärung veröffentlicht, in der sie sagen, dass sie “an einem angemesseneren historischen Ort platziert werden”.[9]

Andere politische Entscheidungsträger*innen haben beschlossen, keine Ad-hoc-Entscheidungen zu treffen, und sich für Untersuchungen, Nachforschungen und Konsultationen im Umgang mit umstrittenen Denkmälern entschieden. Wir anerkennen den Beschluss des Bürgermeisters Sadiq Khan in London und der Behörden in England, Schottland und Wales, wonach Kommissionen zur Bewertung von Denkmälern in ihren Städten oder Regionen gebildet werden sollen. Ein Konsultationsprozess mit einem klaren Mandat, an dem Vertreter*innen geschädigter Gruppen beteiligt sind, kann zu einem größeren sozialen Zusammenhalt beitragen.[10]

Auswirkungen

Langfristig bleibt die Frage: Was bewirkt das Entfernen einer Statue oder eines Denkmals? Es lindert nicht die zugrunde liegenden Missstände, die eine Gesellschaft spalten. Ohne strukturelle Veränderungen in den Bereichen Justiz, Polizei, Soziales und Bildung wird die Entfernung ein Pyrrhussieg sein, ein rein symbolischer Akt. Wie werden wir die Öffentlichkeit an vergangene Ungerechtigkeiten und die damit verbundenen, allgegenwärtigen Probleme erinnern, wenn die Statue verschwunden ist? Im Gegensatz zu den Statuen, die teilweise entfernt wurden, gibt es nichts, was Menschen, die die Universität von Kapstadt besuchen, an die Probleme erinnert, die von der #RhodesMustFall-Bewegung aufgeworfen wurden. Wann immer eine Statue entfernt wird, sollte die Frage gestellt werden, was an ihre Stelle gesetzt werden soll.

In Europa, Afrika, Asien, Australien und Amerika gibt es mehr als 80 Fälle von umstrittenen Geschichten, die sich auf das Erbe von Kolonialismus, Imperialismus, Sklaverei und Rassismus beziehen und eine gleiche Anzahl, die sich mit den Hinterlassenschaften von Faschismus, Kommunismus, Völkermord, Menschenrechtsverletzungen, sektiererischer Gewalt und autoritären Regimen befassen.

Diejenigen, die unter ungeheuerlichen Fehlern gelitten haben und ihre Nachkomm*innen fordern restaurative Gerechtigkeit. Wenn ihre Stimmen ungehört bleiben, werden sie protestieren und ihren Schmerz auf die symbolischen Darstellungen ihres Traumas richten – die Figuren, die wir auf Podeste gestellt haben. Die Tatsache, dass diese Demonstrant*innen diese Woche von Verbündeten außerhalb ihrer Gemeinden unterstützt wurden, gibt Hoffnung, dass nachhaltigere Veränderungen erreicht werden können.

Verantwortung

Pädagog*innen, Aktivist*innen der Zivilgesellschaft und Gemeindevorsteher*innen haben jeweils die Verantwortung, das Bewusstsein zu schärfen und eine offene Diskussion und öffentliche Debatte über umstrittene historische Hinterlassenschaften zu ermöglichen. Wir als Pädagog*innen wissen, dass die Geschichte nicht auf das Klassenzimmer beschränkt ist. Aktuelle Ereignisse bieten uns eine wertvolle Gelegenheit, unseren Schüler*innen zu zeigen, dass es bei der Geschichte und der Art und Weise, wie wir uns daran erinnern, nicht darum geht, Daten und Namen auswendig zu lernen, sondern um einen sich entwickelnden Prozess, der unser Leben auf eine Weise beeinflusst, die wirklich wichtig ist. Wenn die Vergangenheit nicht in einer multiperspektivischen Art und Weise gelehrt wird, wird dies dazu beitragen, unschätzbare Stimmen zum Schweigen zu bringen, Unruhe zu stiften und marginalisierten Mitgliedern der Öffentlichkeit das Gefühl zu geben, dass ihre einzige Möglichkeit darin besteht, greifbare Manifestationen der weiß getünchten Geschichte zu entfernen. Wir brauchen qualifizierte und kompetente Lehrer*innen und ausreichend Zeit im Lehrplan, um diese Kontroversen anzugehen. Wir können so nicht weitermachen.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Burch-Brown, Joanna. “Is it wrong to topple statues and rename statues?” Journal of Political Theory and Philosophy 1, 59-88.
  • Mitchell, Katharyne. “Monuments, Memorials, and the Politics of Memory.” Urban Geography 24, no. 5 (2003): 442-59. doi:10.2747/0272-3638.24.5.442.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] Landler, Mark. “In an English City, an Early Benefactor Is Now ‘a Toxic Brand’.” The New York Times. June 14, 2020. https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/14/world/europe/Bristol-Colston-statue-slavery.html.
[2] Cecil Rhodes: How Black Lives Matter and Bristolian Vandalism Renewed Hope That Oxford’s Imperialist Benefactor Could Fall. MSN. https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/uknews/cecil-rhodes-how-black-lives-matter-and-bristolian-vandalism-renewed-hope-that-oxford-s-imperialist-benefactor-could-fall/ar-BB15g0zU?li=BBoPRmx&srcref=rss.
[3] In diesem Fall warf ein Student aus Protest gegen den systemischen Rassismus auf dem Campus menschliche Exkremente auf die Statue von Cecil Rhodes. Britta Timm Knudsen & Casper Andersen (2019) Affective politics and colonial heritage, Rhodes Must Fall at UCT and Oxford, International Journal of Heritage Studies, 25:3, 239-258, DOI: 10.1080/13527258.2018.1481134
[4] Newsroom, NBC12. “Christopher Columbus Statue Torn Down, Thrown in Lake by Protesters.” June 10, 2020. https://www.nbc12.com/2020/06/09/christopher-columbus-statue-torn-down-thrown-lake-by-protesters/.
[5] Die hier genannten Beispiele wurden im Rahmen des Contested Histories Project untersucht, das vom Institut für historische Gerechtigkeit und Versöhnung, einem Forschungszentrum bei EuroClio, der Europäischen Vereinigung der Geschichtslehrer, entwickelt wurde. Bis heute hat das Projekt mehr als 160 Fälle in über 60 Ländern weltweit untersucht und Beispiele dafür gefunden.
[6] Lambert, Léopold. ”The guillotined statue of Empress Joséphine in Martinique: the incarnation of an anti-colonial narrative.” Accessed June 24, 2020. https://thefunambulist.net/history/history-the-guillotined-statue-empress-josephine-in-martinique
[7] Walker, Jennifer. “Budapest’s Memento Park: Where communist statues are laid to rest.” CNN, June 7, 2018. https://edition.cnn.com/travel/article/memento-park-budapest-hungary/index.html
[8] Colmán Gutiérrez, Andrés. “El día en que Stroessner fue derribado del cerro Lambaré.” Última Hora, Mayo 19, 2016. https://www.ultimahora.com/el-dia-que-stroessner-fue-derribado-del-cerro-lambare-n992614.html
[9] Jacksin, Lily. “University of Alabama to Remove 3 Confederate Plaques from Campus.” Al. June 08, 2020. https://www.al.com/news/2020/06/university-of-alabama-in-first-step-to-remove-three-confederate-plaques-from-campus.html.
[10] Dies war der verfolgte Ansatz von Städten wie London und New York. Im Juni 2020 richtete der Bürgermeister von London, Sadiq Khan, die Kommission für Vielfalt im öffentlichen Raum ein, um sicherzustellen, dass die „Wahrzeichen der Hauptstadt die Errungenschaften und die Vielfalt Londons angemessen widerspiegeln“. Ebenso hat New York City seit September 2017 eine Bürgermeisterberatungskommission für Kunst, Denkmäler und Markierungen in der Stadt. Nachdem die Kommission durch Anhörungen und Umfragen ein „umfassendes Engagement für die Öffentlichkeit“ durchgeführt hatte, veröffentlichte sie im Januar 2018 einen Bericht über die nächsten Schritte für mehrere kontroverse Maßnahmen Denkmäler in der Metropole. “Mayor Unveils Commission to Review Diversity of London’s Public Realm.” London City Hall. June 09, 2020. https://www.london.gov.uk/press-releases/mayoral/mayor-unveils-commission-to-review-diversity#:~:text=Mayor unveils commission to review diversity of London’s public realm,-09 June 2020&text=The Mayor of London, Sadiq,reflect London’s achievements and diversity. “Mayor De Blasio Releases Monuments Commission’s Report, Announces Decisions on Controversial Monumen.” The Official Website of the City of New York. January 12, 2018. https://www1.nyc.gov/office-of-the-mayor/news/030-18/mayor-de-blasio-releases-monuments-commission-s-report-decisions-controversial. 

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Stalin’s Boots © 2009 Ben, CC BY-ND 2.0 via flickr.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Stegers, Steven, and Marie-Louise Jansen: Was, sobald die Statuen außer Sicht sind? In: Public History Weekly 8 (2020) 7, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-17098.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Moritz Hoffmann / Marko Demantowsky (Team Basel)

Copyright (c) 2020 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 8 (2020) 7
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-17098

Tags: , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

I accept that my given data and my IP address is sent to a server in the USA only for the purpose of spam prevention through the Akismet program.More information on Akismet and GDPR.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest