Kant – a Racist?

Kant – ein Rassist?

Abstract:
The question of whether Immanuel Kant is a racist or even the founder of European racism is subject to ongoing debate in philosophical research and has only recently sparked intense and controversial discussions. This contribution seeks to clarify the battlelines by placing passages that are repeatedly cited as evidence of Kant’s racism in their historical and argumentative context. While Kant may be said to express himself in a discriminatory manner, his racist premises are more likely those of his interlocutors, to whom he addresses his counter-arguments. Kant, in contrast, argues in favor of the unity of humanity.
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-17156
Languages: English, German

 


From time to time, ideas and statements ghost through virtual space that Kant already expressed in his lectures on geography and in other texts about non-European people. The “blacks,” he states, have “by nature no feeling that rises above the ridiculous.” [1] He observes that the native American population is “incapable of all culture.”[2] Such statements (and others) have served as a starting point for the repeated allegations that Kant was a racist, indeed that he helped lay — or even laid — the theoretical foundations of European racism. He does, after all, speak explicitly about “race,” even about classifying people into different races based on racial differences.[3]

Kant, a racist! No! Yes! No!

One case in point that Kant was a racist occurs in a conversation with Michael Zeuske, a Bonn-based historian and specialist for the history of slavery, on Deutschlandfunk (a German public radio station) on June 13, 2020: “If one seriously intends to enlighten people about racism and the toppling of monuments,” to paraphrase Zeuske, “one must also take such great minds as the philosopher Immanuel Kant […] into account.” Why? Well, because, as Zeuske puts it, Kant’s “anthropological writings helped to establish European racism.”[4]

One month later, two forms of hermeneutics clashed in the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung. Marcus Willaschek, a Kant scholar based in Frankfurt, tried to substantiate the claim that Kant is a racist by citing a passage from Kant’s Physical Geography: “Humanity have achieved its greatest perfection in the white race. The yellow Indians already have lesser talent. The Negroes stand far lower, and the peoples of America are lowest.”[5] In his reply, Michael Wolff, a philosopher based in Bielefeld, pointed out that the passage in question is an excerpt, in which Kant is citing the French naturalist Georges-Louis Leclerc de Buffon.[6] Willaschek maintains that the passage calls Kant’s intention into question. Countering Wolff, he cites several parallel passages as undeniable evidence of Kant’s intention, as Wolff’s contextualizing procedure points to the difficulty of inferring intentions from lecture notes.

Can the dispute be settled?

In the context of the anti-racism movement, which is gaining momentum, Zeuske’s suggestion to closely examine Kant’s statements seems highly appropriate. In doing so, three issues ought to be considered: First, history appears problematic in many respects if the present is taken as a yardstick. Second, the existence of structural racism is no excuse for accusing people wholesale of racism or of a lack of reflection. Third, the question is not whether Kant voices discriminatory views. He does. The question, instead, is why and in which context.

The first and most trivial problem with passing judgment along the lines of “Kant says XY, therefore he is a racist” is that such verdicts mostly confuse matters, assuming that Kant’s writings are protocols of his convictions. Such a one-dimensional understanding often leads judgment astray, as it does here.

These writings concern a debate that Kant conducts in various publications and lectures with both concrete and contradictory positions common at the time. This public debate took place on a different playing field than today. For instance, what is meant by “race” (Rasse) today was termed “species” (Arten) in Kant’s time. Both terms bring into view the central point of a debate that goes back 234 years: Kant decidedly contradicts the philosopher David Hume and the natural scientist Georg Forster, who argued that because humans have different appearances, different human species also need to be assumed. He might have also refuted Voltaire in this respect.[7] In essence, Kant’s objection is based on the systematics of his critical philosophy, which he was steadily developing in parallel to his anthropological writings.

At the time, debates were conducted more latently — over months — than they are today on Twitter or elsewhere in Digitalistan. They resembled correspondence chess, and were characterized by the well-considered use of rhetoric and – at best — tactical argumentation. Both are evident in Kant.

Kant’s position — first move

Kant pits the term “race” against Hume’s and Forster’s assertion of different human “species.” Contrary to the biologically narrower “variety” (Varietät), “race” refers to determining a specific group’s heritable traits. [8] Kant links these traits to different climatic conditions (e.g., more sun, darker skin). This classification rests explicitly on empirical foundations and is therefore subject to hypothetical reservations.

In the debate referred to above, while Kant agrees with Hume and Forster that differences not only exist but can also be described, he objects that they result in a classification of human species. He instead advances a simple biological argument to posit the unity of humankind: Human plus human equals human, regardless of origin or appearance. The passages that we call discriminatory today are, as it were, Kant’s bargaining chip and tactical moves in this debate: Do the great differences in appearance and culture not mean that several “species” must be assumed? Does the laziness or sheer otherness of the “blacks” not suggest that they are a species in their own right?

Kant refutes this idea, also because all humans have the same potential, yet realize it differently.[9] However, cultural — rather than biological and discriminatory — peculiarities give rise to differences, which Kant also disparages in accordance with the discourse of his time. The passage just mentioned, however, makes such discrimination seem rhetorical: How are people to conform to European habits when they have others? These statements must be weighed in terms of their logical alternatives. What Kant can be accused of is a rhetorical opportunism of sorts — in the matter in hand, however, he argues against essentialist postulates.[10]

Remarks from the sidelines

As soon as we regard Kant’s writings as contributions to a debate that unfolded within a specific historical context, we no longer need to wrench his statements out of this context or read them as immediate convictions, even if the mediality of current cultural conflicts supports this practice. Along these lines, we can also distinguish paraphrases, mediation efforts (e.g. with Forster), and argumentations. Various statements, as we have seen, illustrate the discursive dynamics of this debate, which are disconcerting today: “by nature [the blacks have] no feeling that rises above the ridiculous” or the native populations are “incapable of culture.” Kant uses this rather academic argument to refute Forster’s objection to his claim about the climate.

The debate is not academic for no reason: Neither Forster nor Kant base their arguments on their own views, but cite travelogues instead: Forster because he wanted to, Kant because he could not do otherwise. The widely travelled natural scientist Forster does not refrain from scoffing at the philosopher Kant, who never left Königsberg, for critically questioning these descriptions, while Forster accepts them as fact [11].

Second move (Forster)

In Kant’s paraphrase of Forster’s argument, the latter defends a “color scale of the skin” (Farbenleiter der Haut),”[12] in which the mixing of “two original tribes[s]” is supposed to manifest itself. [13] Forster criticizes Kant for assuming that “races” are formed according to climatic conditions and for therefore rejecting the notion of “species.” Mockingly, he adds that perhaps “precisely those people whose disposition is suitable for this or that climate were born here or there by a wise act of providence.”[14] This providence, however, is rather inefficient, he observes, as its fails to think of a “second transplantation” (zweite Verpflanzung) [15] in order to increase adaptability.

Third move (Kant)

In his reply, Kant argues by reversing the argument that Forster had previously overturned. He maintains that Forster’s criticism of the geographical claim concerns not the weakness but precisely the strength of his argument, as this claim can “[resolve] difficulties against which no other theory can muster anything.”[16] Kant now refers to the Indians to refute Forster’s claim of a second black “species,” the Forsterian “subhuman” (Untermensch) [17], who proves to be removed from the European in terms of culture and natural adaptation.

Kant hypothetically assumes, by way of a thought experiment, a genesis in which this group of Indians interrupted its climatic adaptation by moving north, not permitting any adaptation there either by migrating even further. “Now, a race would thus be established which, as it moves southwards, would always be the same for all climates, to which no one would be properly suited […].”[18] This passage is followed by a reference to the Spanish explorer Antonio de Ulloa, whose travelogue was intended to support the claim that “this is how the persistent state of this group of people was established.” [19] The hypothetized climatic maladjustment thus reaffirms the European prejudice that — adopted from such reports — turns Forster’s practice of turning these reports into evidence against himself. [20]

Why does Kant do this? Well, merely to make the point, argumentatively, that the Indian is thus “still stands very much beneath the Negro himself, who, after all” — according to Forster! — “occupies the lowest of all other levels.” [21] Since, according to Kant’s premise, human dispositions originally belonged together and only manifest differently over time, and as a result of geographical dispersion, Forster’s “color scale” (Farbenleiter) and sequence of stages, with which he intends to prove the diversity of the human species, is confused (he compares them with “cattle” and “bison”). This leads Forster’s argument ad absurdum —  or unmasks its circular reasoning, in that the difference of the “species” must already be assumed to prove exactly this difference.

Fourth move (Forster)

Forster, of course, also arms himself against overly evident objections with a rhetorical question: “But by separating the Negroes as an originally different tribe from the white man, are we not severing the last thread by which this maltreated people was connected to us and found some protection and grace from European cruelty? Let me rather ask whether the thought that blacks are our brothers has ever once caused the whip of the slave driver to drop?”[22]

Even if one removes one or two species, humans are cruel either way. Forster therefore prefers to rely on acknowledging difference, a straightforward ethnopluralist argument: “perhaps the idea of a second human species was presented to the highest mind as a powerful means of developing thoughts and feelings worthy of a rational earthly creature, and thereby interweaving that being itself even more firmly into the overall plan”[23].

234 years ago: What is the human being?

Equality despite biological difference versus describing differences while acknowledging equality in difference. These are the coordinates of this debate. It is therefore not without a sense of irony that Forster, who de facto advocates the racist claim, is repeatedly cited as a positive example on account of his moralizing rhetoric, whereas Kant, who contradicts this claim, is treated as a racist because he refers to Buffon, Hume, and Forster’s argumentation.

This debate is very foreign to us today. Its abridged version goes like this: Hume holds that “their difference, etc., is proof of a different species.” Forster states that “non-white and white are related species: major differences, also human, yet not: our species.” Kant contradicts both positions: “Differences… as reported (and what we have all read) result from geographical and climatic conditions. One species, because human + human = human. They are simply less developed, ‘ridicuolus,’ lazy because it is hot there, have another cultures and, assuming our own as a standard: underdeveloped (as reported, as known).” Kant argues against dehumanization by discriminating.

This is quite counterintuitive. And yet, let us recall that it is the end of the 18th century rather than the beginning of the 21st century. The question of what the human being is governs hearts and minds and is associated with ignorance and centuries-long prejudice, even among the great philosophers of the Enlightenment.

In Kant, the differences between human beings appear to be partly cultural, partly geographical and climatic (much sun, darker skin, etc.). He deploys the prejudices according to the importance attached to them by Hume and Forster. He, Kant, has no more to offer either; except the pejoratively tainted evaluative reports of shipmasters and explorers. This is the bargaining chip — with which he argues, against the zeitgeist, for the unity of humanity.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Kleingeld, Pauline. “Kant’s second thoughts on race.” Philosophical Quarterly 57 (2007), 573–592.
  • Godel, Rainer, and Gideon Stiening (eds.). Klopffechtereien – Missverständnisse – Widersprüche? Methodische und methodologische Perspektiven auf die Kant-Forster-Kontroverse. München: Fink, 2011.
  • Sandford, Stella. “Kant, race, and natural history.” Philosophy and Social Criticism 44 (2018), 950–977.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] Kant, Observations on the Feeling of the Beautiful and Sublime, eds. Patrick Frierson and Paul Guyer (Cambridge University Press, 2011), 58 (AA II, 253). This lecture belongs to aesthetics, yet its second part mostly amounts to a scurrilous anthropology in which Kant gathers diverse prejudices — about human appearance, the sexes — into a phenomenology of humankind. In particular, note AA II, 243 plainly establishes that keiner Nation an Gemüthsarten fehle, welche die vortrefflichste Eigenschaften von dieser Art vereinbaren. Um deswillen kann der Tadel, der gelegentlich auf ein Volk fallen möchte, keinen beleidigen, wie er denn von solcher Natur ist, daß ein jeglicher ihn wie einen Ball auf seinen Nachbar schlagen kann (“no nation is lacking in the types of mind that combine the most excellent characteristics of this species. For the sake of that, the rebuke that occasionally falls upon a nation cannot offend any one, as he is of such a nature that any one can strike it like a ball at his neighbor” — Trans.).
[2] Kant, On the use of teleological principles in philosophy (1788), AA VIII, 176.
[3] Kant, Determination of the concept of a human race (1785). — Here, Kant sets out to clarify the term “race,” which is meant to explain die Mannigfaltigkeiten in der Menschengattung (“the manifoldness of the human species”): Es wird viel von den verschiedenen Menschenracen gesprochen. Einige verstehen darunter wohl gar verschiedene Arten von Menschen; andere […] scheinen […] diesen Unterschied nicht viel erheblicher zu finden, als den, welchen Menschen dadurch unter sich machen, daß sie sich bemalen oder bekleiden. Meine Absicht ist jetzt nur, diesen Begriff einer Race, wenn [!] es deren in der [!] Menschengattung giebt, genau zu bestimmen […] (“There is much talk about the different races of men. Some probably even understand them as different kinds of people; others […] seem to find this difference […] not much more significant than that which people make among themselves by painting themselves or by dressing. My intention now is only to define precisely this concept of a race, if [!] any exist in the [!] human species […]”). Kants refers to the notorious alleged “four races,” which he later distinguishes, as “classes,” all of which are characterized by geographical and climatic, i.e., empirical features. Since he neither reduces people to characteristics nor devaluates them with respect to these characteristics, but simply describes them, this text does not serve as proof of Kant’s racism. Moreover, the term “class” is eine blos logische Absonderung aus, die die Vernunft unter ihren Begriffen zum Behuf der bloßen Vergleichung macht (“a purely logical distinction that makes reason, under its terms, the domain of mere comparison”); cf. Kant, On the use of teleological principles in philosophy, AA VIII, note 163.
[4] “Auch der Philosoph Immanuel Kant steht zur Debatte. Michael Zeuske im Gespräch mit Gaby Wuttke,” Deutschlandfunk Kultur July 13, 2020, https://www.deutschlandfunkkultur.de/antirassistischer-denkmalsturm-auch-der-philosoph-immanuel.1013.de.html?dram%3Aarticle_id=478593 (last accessed August 17, 2020).
[5] Marcus Willaschek’s contributions: a) “Ein Kind seiner Zeit,” Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung June 24, 2020; b) “Kant war sehr wohl ein Rassist,” Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung July 15, 2020. The original passage in Kant’s Physical Geography reads: “Die Menschheit ist in ihrer größten Vollkommenheit in der Race der Weißen. Die gelben Indianer haben schon ein geringeres Talent. Die Neger sind weit tiefer, und am tiefsten steht ein Theil der amerikanischen Völkerschaften.” — Trans.
[6] Michael Wolff’s contributions: a) “Kant war ein Anti-Rassist,” Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung July 9, 2020; b) “Antirassist aus Prinzip,” Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung July 30, 2020.
[7] Die Philosophie der Geschichte des verstorbenen Herrn Abtes Bazin übersetzt und mit Anmerkungen begleitet von Johann Jakob Harder (Leipzig: Johann Friedrich Hartknoch, 1768): 7–11.
[8] Cf. Kant, On the use of teleological principles in philosophy (1788), AA VIII, notes 163–164: Der Charakter der Race kann […] hinreichen, um Geschöpfe darnach zu classificiren, aber nicht um eine besondere Species daraus zu machen […] (“The character of the race may […] suffice to classify creatures thereafter, but not to make a particular species out of them […]”). Kant cautiously introduces the term as a descriptive addition to a “natural history.” It denotes a radicale Eigenthümlichkeit, die auf einen gemeinschaftlichen Abstamm anzeige giebt und zugleich mehrere solche beharrliche forterbende Charaktere nicht allein derselben Thiergattung, sondern auch desselben Stammes zuläßt […] (“radical peculiarity that points to a common ancestry and at the same time allows for several such persistent bequeathing characters not only of the same animal species but also of the same tribe […])” (163). The “race” should thus make it possible to think simultaneously of differences and — overarching — similarities: wie die größte Mannigfaltigkeit in der Zeugung mit der größten Einheit der Abstammung von der Vernunft zu vereinigen sei (“ how the greatest diversity in procreation shall be united with the greatest unity of descent from reason”). The main criterion throughout is “observation.”
[9] Cf. Kant, Critique of Judgment (1790), AA V, 234.
[10] On the rejection of the “species” and on unity in diversity, see Kant, Of the Different Human Races (1775), AA II, 429–430 =. On the significance of climate and location for the formation of differences, see Kant, Physical Geography, AA IX, 314.
[11] Cf. Forster, “Noch etwas über die Menschenrassen” (1786), in: Forsters Werke in zwei Bänden. Erster Band: Kleine Schriften und Reden (Berlin / Weimar: Aufbau, 1968): 7. See also note 20 below.
[12] Kant, On the use of teleological principles in philosophy, AA VIII, 170 Cf. Forster, “Noch etwas über die Menschenrassen,” 12. On the implication, although not clearly expressed, of two different kinds of human species, see 17. Forster repeatedly implies the comparison of black and white people with different animal species, but rejects the criterion that determines whether “species” or only “races” are concerned. It is precisely this fuzziness that Kant uses to argue for the latter term and thus for a uniform human species.
[13] Kant, On the use of teleological principles in philosophy, AA VIII, 169.
[14] Kant, Ibid., AA VIII, 172. The original passage reads: “gerade diejenigen Menschen, deren Anlage sich für dieses oder jenes Klima paßt, da oder dort durch eine weise Fügung der Vorsehung geboren würden.” — Trans.
[15] Ibid. – Cf. Forster, “Noch etwas über die Menschenrassen,” 26–27. Forster summarizes his argument as follows: [W]ar es in einem Falle möglich, dass in verschiedenen Weltgegenden Menschen einerlei Stammes sich allmählich ganz veränderten und so verschiedene Charaktere annahmen, wie wir jetzt an ihnen kennen (“If it was possible in one case that in different parts of the world people of one tribe gradually changed completely and took on such different characters as we now know them to possess”) — as Kant claims — so lässt sich die Unmöglichkeit einer neuen Veränderung nicht nur a priori nicht dartun, sondern auch, wo sie stattfindet, macht sie den Schluss auf einen gemeinschaftlichen Ursprung höchst verdächtig (“then not only can the impossibility of a new change not be demonstrated a priori, nor where it occurs, which makes the conclusion of a collective origin highly suspect”).
[16] Kant, On the use of teleological principles in philosophy, AA VIII, 175. The original passage reads: “Schwierigkeiten [lösen], wider die keine andere Theorie etwas vermag.”
[17] Forster’s “subhuman” is a polemic of mine; it refers to the poisoned natural romanticism of the black noble savage, for whom, in contrast to the blacks, the whites “represent fatherhood in him, and […] develop the holy spark of reason […] in him,” “to accomplish the work of ennoblement.” Thus, the white man should elevate to his level the black man, who is biologically different from him and who dwells in the “childhood stage” of reason and needs the white man’s “care.” A true hero of equality. Cf. Forster, “Noch etwas über die Menschenrassen,” 33.
[18] Kant, On the use of teleological principles in philosophy, AA VIII, 175. The original passage reads: “Nun wäre also eine Race gegründet, die bei ihrem Fortrücken nach Süden für alle Klimaten immer einerlei, in der That also keinem gehörig angemessen ist […].” — Trans.
[19] Ibid. The original passage reads: “so der beharrliche Zustand dieses Menschenhaufens gegründet worden.” — Trans.
[20] Forster and Kant both cite travelogues, yet Forster’s argumentation is somewhat special: He could, of course, only report his own empirical work (1772–1775) on the South Sea islanders, whom he had observed himself. Argumentatively, however, he does not leave matters at that and refers instead to other authorities. Although all of them, including himself, entertained different notions of “the black man,” he states that they all established “blackness.” He turns this into evidence. As as rhetorical figure, Forster’s production of evidence is somewhat ad populum. If five different people refer to something in the same way, then it should be correctly described. It is, as such, a vulgar variant of a consensual theoretical concept of truth. Of course, Kant’s public objection must be particularly disturbing in the face of such a well-founded justification, because it shatters the fundamental consensus for Forster’s position. However, this consensus is only imputed, because important, even if only some few voices at the time argued like Kant for the unity of humankind, and thus defended an anti-racist stance. Here are two cases in point:  a) William Penn, Letter from William Penn to the Kings of the Indians in Pennsylvania (1681), Historical Society of Pennsylvania, https://hsp.org/education/primary-sources/letter-from-william-penn-to-the-king-of-the-indians (last accessed August 18, 2020); b) August Ludwig von Schlözer, Vorbereitung zur WeltGeschichte für Kinder, 1779 (Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2011), 53–67, 124–5.
[21] Kant, On the use of teleological principles in philosophy, AA VIII, 176. The original passage reads: “noch tief unter dem Neger selbst steht, welcher doch die niedrigste unter allen übrigen Stufen einnimmt.” — Trans. Kant’s argument is actually a reductio ad absurdum: If Forster does not want to accept the Indians as a third “species,” he has no choice but to assert that no black human “species” has developed in America because the climate there is too cold or the continent is too new. The former argument, according to Kant, is refuted by the climate in America — and the latter would be mere speculation about an unverifiable future in “a few millennia.”
[22] Forster, “Noch etwas über die Menschenrassen,” 31–32. The original passage reads: “Doch indem wir die Neger als einen ursprünglich verschiedenen Stamm vom weissen Menschen trennen, zerschneiden wir nicht da den letzten Faden, durch welchen dieses gemishandelte Volk mit uns zusammenhieng, und vor europäischer Grausamkeit noch einigen Schutz und einige Gnade fand? Lassen Sie mich lieber fragen, ob der Gedanke, daß Schwarze unsere Brüder sind, schon irgendwo ein einzigesmal die aufgehobene Peitsche des Sklaventreibers sinken hieß?” — Trans.
[23] Ibid., 32–33. The original passage reads: “vielleicht [stellte sich] dem höchsten Verstande die Idee einer zwoten Menschengattung als ein kräftiges Mittel dar, Gedanken und Gefühle zu entwickeln, die eines vernünftigen Erdwesens würdig sind, und dadurch dieses Wesen selbst um so viel fester in den Plan des Ganzen zu verweben.” — Trans.

_____________________

Image Credits

By Benjamin West – Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=817244

Recommended Citation

Zorn, Daniel-Pascal: Kant – a Racist? In: Public History Weekly 8 (2020) 8, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-17156

Tranlsation from German by Dr Mark Kyburz (http://www.englishprojects.ch/about)

Editorial Responsibility

Marko Demantowsky

Immer mal wieder geistern Sätze durch den virtuellen Raum, die Kant in seinen Vorlesungen zur Geographie und in anderen Texten über nichteuropäische Menschen geäußert hat. Die “Schwarzen”, heißt es da, hätten “von der Natur kein Gefühl, welches über das Läppische stiege”. [1] Den amerikanischen Ureinwohnern bescheinigt er, sie seien “unfähig zu aller Cultur”.[2] Solche und andere Sätze sind Ausgangspunkt immer wieder erhobener Vorwürfe, Kant sei ein Rassist, ja der Mitbegründer – oder sogar Begründer – der theoretischen Fundierung des europäischen Rassismus. Schließlich ist bei ihm explizit von “Rasse” oder “Race” die Rede, ja sogar von einer Einteilung der Menschen in verschiedene Rassen, begründet über Rassenunterschiede.[3]

Kant ein Rassist! Nein! Doch! Nein!

Ein Beispiel dafür ist ein Gespräch mit dem Bonner Historiker und Spezialisten für die Geschichte der Sklaverei, Michael Zeuske, im Deutschlandfunk vom 13. Juni 2020:

“Wenn man es aber ernst meine mit der Aufklärung von Rassismus und dem Stürzen von Denkmälern”, so wird Zeuske paraphrasiert, “müsse man auch solche Geistesgrößen wie den Philosophen Immanuel Kant […] in den Blick nehmen.” Der Grund: “Er habe in seinen anthropologischen Schriften den europäischen Rassismus mitbegründet.”[4]

Einen Monat später konnte man einen Schlagabtausch zwischen zwei Formen von Hermeneutik in der Frankfurter Allgemeinen Zeitung beobachten. Der Frankfurter Kant-Forscher Marcus Willaschek versuchte dort die These, Kant sei Rassist, mit mit einer Stelle aus Kants Physischer Geographie zu belegen:

“Die Menschheit ist in ihrer größten Vollkommenheit in der Race der Weißen. Die gelben Indianer haben schon ein geringeres Talent. Die Neger sind weit tiefer, und am tiefsten steht ein Theil der amerikanischen Völkerschaften.”[5]

Der Bielefelder Philosoph Michael Wolff verwies in seiner Antwort darauf, dass es sich bei diesem Zitat um ein Exzerpt handelt. Kant zitiere darin den französischen Naturforscher Georges-Louis Leclerc de Buffon.[6] Willaschek konnte darin nur die Infragestellung von Kants Absicht sehen und konterte mit Parallelstellen, die diese Absicht zweifelsfrei erweisen sollten. Ein quantitatives Verfahren, das letztlich eine intentionale Lektüre belegen soll – und ein kontextualisierendes Verfahren, das auf die Schwierigkeit verweist, Intentionen aus Vorlesungsnotizen herauszulesen.

Lässt sich der Streit entscheiden?

Auch im Kontext der immer weiter Fahrt aufnehmenden Anti-Rassismus-Bewegung erscheint es dringend angebracht, das zu tun, was Zeuske vorschlägt, nämlich Kants Äußerungen genauer in den Blick zu nehmen. Dabei ist Folgendes zu bedenken: Erstens erscheint die Geschichte in vielen Hinsichten als problematisch, wenn man die Gegenwart als Maßstab nimmt. Zweitens bedeutet die Existenz von strukturellem Rassismus keinen Freibrief, Menschen pauschal Rassismus oder dessen Nichtreflexion zu unterstellen. Drittens geht es hier nicht darum, dass Kant sich nicht diskriminierend äußert. Das tut er. Die Frage, ist vielmehr, warum und in welchem Kontext er das tut.

Das erste und trivialste Problem bei Urteilen der Form “Kant sagt XY, also ist er ein Rassist”, ist: Sie verwechseln in den meisten Fällen Kants Texte mit Protokollen dessen, wovon Kant überzeugt ist. Ein solches eindimensionales Textverständnis führt häufig in die Irre, so auch in diesem Fall.

Es geht in diesen Texten nämlich um eine Debatte, die Kant in Veröffentlichungen und in Vorlesungen mit ebenso konkreten wie konträren Positionen seiner Gegenwart führt. Diese öffentliche Auseinandersetzung findet auf einem anders abgesteckten Spielfeld statt als heutige. Was man, nur um ein Beispiel zu geben, heute unter “Rasse” versteht, nannte man seinerzeit “Arten”.

Damit ist man auch schon beim zentralen Punkt der Debatte vor mehr als 234 Jahren: Kant widerspricht dem Philosophen David Hume und dem Naturforscher Georg Forster entschieden darin, dass wegen der unterschiedlichen Erscheinungsweise der Menschen auch unterschiedliche Arten von Menschen angenommen werden müssten. Auch einem Voltaire hätte er darin widersprechen können.[7] Dieser Einspruch erfolgt grundlegend aus der Systematik der – zeitlich parallel von Kant gerade sukzessive entwickelten – Kritischen Philosophie.

Debatten seinerzeit vollzogen sich in grösserer Latenz – über Monate – als heute auf Twitter oder anderswo in Digitalisthan, eher vergleichbar einem Fernschachspiel, geprägt von gut überlegten rhetorischen Einsätzen und – bestenfalls – von taktischer Argumentation. Beides kann man bei Kant und Forster beobachten.

Kants Position – erster Zug

Gegen die Behauptung unterschiedlicher Menschen-“Arten” bei Hume und Forster setzt Kant den Begriff der “Race” oder “Rasse”. Anders als die biologisch enger gefasste “Varietät” bezeichnet der Begriff “Race” die Bestimmung vererbbarer Eigenschaften einer bestimmten Gruppe.[8] Diese Eigenschaften bindet Kant an unterschiedliche klimatische Bedingungen, der Art: mehr Sonne, dunklere Haut. Die Einteilung basiert explizit auf empirischen Grundlagen und steht entsprechend unter hypothetischem Vorbehalt.

In der bereits angeführten Diskussion nun stimmt Kant seinen Zeitgenossen Hume und Forster zu, dass es beschreibbare Unterschiede gibt, widerspricht ihnen aber darin, dass daraus eine Einteilung in Menschenarten folgt. Vielmehr argumentiert Kant mit einem simplen biologischen Argument für eine Einheit der Menschen: Mensch und Mensch ergibt Mensch, egal, woher sie kommen und wie sie aussehen. Die Passagen, die wir als diskriminierend bezeichnen, sind gleichsam Verhandlungsmasse, taktische Züge, in dieser Debatte: Bedeutet nicht die große Entfernung in Aussehen und Kultur, dass man von mehreren “Arten” ausgehen muss? Spricht nicht die Faulheit oder die schiere Andersheit der Schwarzen dafür, dass sie eine eigene Art sind?

Kant verneint das, auch weil alle Menschen dasselbe Potenzial haben, es aber unterschiedlich verwirklichen.[9] Aus den kulturellen – und eben nicht aus biologisch-diskriminierenden – Eigenheiten ergeben sich allerdings Unterschiede, die Kant in Übereinstimmung mit dem Diskurs, in dem er sich bewegt, auch abwertend darstellt. Die gerade genannte Stelle lässt solche Diskriminierungen allerdings rhetorisch erscheinen, denn wie sollen Menschen europäischen Gewohnheiten gehorchen, wenn sie andere haben? Diese Aussagen sind in ihren logischen Alternativen zu wägen. Was man Kant hier also vorwerfen kann, ist eine Art rhetorischer Opportunismus – in der Sache argumentiert er aber gegen essentialistische Setzungen.[10]

Bemerkungen vom Spielfeldrand

Sobald man Kants Texte als Debattenbeiträge im historischen Kontext wahrnimmt, ist es möglich und weiterführend, ihre Aussagen nicht aus diesem Kontext zu reissen oder als unmittelbare Überzeugungen lesen, obwohl solche Praktiken von der Medialität gegenwärtiger kultureller Konflikte unterstützt werden. In eins damit wird es möglich, zwischen Paraphrasen, Vermittlungsversuchen (z. B. mit Forster) und Argumentation zu unterscheiden. Die heute befremdende diskursive Dynamik dieser Debatte kann man an den Beispielen des “Läppische[n]” und den zur “Cultur” unfähigen Ureinwohner*innen, die eingangs zitiert wurden, gut zeigen. Dabei handelt es sich um ein recht akademisches Argument, mit dem Kant dem Einwand Georg Forsters gegen seine klimatische These widerspricht.

Die Debatte ist nicht ohne Grund akademischer Natur: Weder Forster noch Kant stützen sich in ihrer Argumentation wesentlich auf die eigene Anschauung. Sie zitieren beide aus Reiseberichten: Forster, weil er so wollte, Kant, weil er nicht anders konnte. Der weitgereiste Naturforscher Forster unterlässt es dabei nicht, sich über den daheimgebliebenen Philosophen Kant lustig zu machen, weil der diese Beschreibungen kritisch hinterfragt, während Forster sie als Fakt nimmt.[11]

Zweiter Zug (Forster)

Forster verteidigt, so Kant in seiner Paraphrase des Forster’schen Arguments, eine “Farbenleiter der Haut”,[12] in der sich die Vermischung von “zwei ursprüngliche[n] Stämme[n]” zeigen soll.[13] Er kritisiert Kant darin, dass dieser eine Ausbildung von “Racen” nach klimatischen Bedingungen annehme und daher die “Arten” zurückweise.

Und er spottet, dass vielleicht “gerade diejenigen Menschen, deren Anlage sich für dieses oder jenes Klima paßt, da oder dort durch eine weise Fügung der Vorsehung geboren würden.”[14] Aber das sei doch eine recht ineffiziente Vorsehung, die nicht an eine “zweite Verpflanzung” [15] denke, um die Anpassungsfähigkeit zu erhöhen.

Dritter Zug (Kant)

Kant argumentiert in seiner Antwort so, dass er das von Forster auf ihn umgekehrte Argument abermals umkehrt. Forsters Kritik an der geographischen These, so Kant, betreffe nicht die Schwäche, sondern gerade die Stärke seines Arguments, denn diese These kann “Schwierigkeiten [lösen], wider die keine andere Theorie etwas vermag.”[16] An dieser Stelle verweist Kant nun auf die Indianer, um Forsters These von einer zweiten schwarzen “Art”, dem Forster’schen “Untermensch”, [17] der sich durch die Entfernung vom Europäer in Kultur und natürlicher Anpassung ausweist, zu widersprechen.

Kant nimmt hypothetisch, als Gedankenexperiment, eine Genese an, in der diese Gruppe von “Indianern” ihre klimatische Anpassung durch einen Zug nach Norden unterbricht und auch dort durch weitere Wanderungen keine Anpassung zulässt. “Nun wäre also eine Race gegründet, die bei ihrem Fortrücken nach Süden für alle Klimaten immer einerlei, in der That also keinem gehörig angemessen ist […].”[18] Es folgt ein Verweis auf den Bericht des spanischen Entdeckers Antonio de Ulloa, der die These untermauern soll, dass “so der beharrliche Zustand dieses Menschenhaufens gegründet worden”.[19] Die hypothetisch angenommene klimatische Fehlanpassung bestätigt also das europäische Vorurteil, das – aus Berichten übernommen – Forsters eigene Praxis, aus diesen Berichten Belege zu machen, gegen ihn wendet.[20]

Und warum unternimmt Kant das alles? Nur um argumentativ den Punkt zu machen, dass der “Indianer” damit “noch tief unter dem Neger selbst steht, welcher doch” – nach Forster! – “die niedrigste unter allen übrigen Stufen einnimmt.”[21] Weil nach Kants Prämisse die Anlagen des Menschen ursprünglich zusammengehörten und sich erst über die Zeit und die geographische Zerstreuung unterschiedlich äußern, verwirrt sich Forsters “Farbleiter” und Stufenfolge, mit der dieser die Verschiedenheit der Menschenarten beweisen will (er vergleicht sie mit “Rindern” und “Bisons”).

Und damit wird Forsters Argument ad absurdum geführt – oder eben auf den Zirkelschluss verwiesen, dass die Unterschiedenheit der “Arten” schon angenommen sein muss, um eben diese Unterschiedenheit zu beweisen.

Vierter Zug (Forster)

Natürlich wappnet sich auch Forster gegen allzu offensichtliche Einwände, mit einer rhetorischen Frage:

“Doch indem wir die Neger als einen ursprünglich verschiedenen Stamm vom weissen Menschen trennen, zerschneiden wir nicht da den letzten Faden, durch welchen dieses gemishandelte Volk mit uns zusammenhieng, und vor europäischer Grausamkeit noch einigen Schutz und einige Gnade fand? Lassen Sie mich lieber fragen, ob der Gedanke, daß Schwarze unsere Brüder sind, schon irgendwo ein einzigesmal die aufgehobene Peitsche des Sklaventreibers sinken hieß?”[22]

Ob man nun eine oder zwei Menschenarten abnimmt, Menschen seien so oder so grausam. Forster setzt daher lieber auf Anerkennung im Unterschied, ein geradewegs ethnopluralistisches Argument:

“…vielleicht [stellte sich] dem höchsten Verstande die Idee einer zwoten Menschengattung als ein kräftiges Mittel dar, Gedanken und Gefühle zu entwickeln, die eines vernünftigen Erdwesens würdig sind, und dadurch dieses Wesen selbst um so viel fester in den Plan des Ganzen zu verweben.”[23]

Vor 234 Jahren: Was ist der Mensch?

Gleichberechtigung im biologischen Unterschied versus Beschreibung von Unterschieden bei Anerkennung des Gleichen im Verschiedenen. Das sind die Koordinaten dieser Debatte. Es ist von daher nicht ohne Ironie, dass Forster, der de facto die rassistische These vertritt, wegen seiner moralisierenden Rhetorik immer wieder als Positivbeispiel genannt wird, während Kant, der dieser These widerspricht, wegen seiner Referenzen auf Buffon, Hume und Forsters eigene Argumentation als Rassist gehandelt wird.

Diese Debatte erscheint uns heute sehr fremd. In der Kurzfassung geht sie so:

Hume sagt: “weil sie anders etc. sind, ist das der Beweis für eine andere Art”. Forster sagt: “nicht-weiße und weiße sind verwandte Arten: große Unterschiede, auch Menschen, aber eben nicht: unsere Art”.

Kant widerspricht beiden. Er sagt: “Unterschiede … wie berichtet (was wir alle gelesen haben) resultieren aus geographischen und klimatischen Bedingungen. Eine Art, denn Mensch + Mensch = Mensch. Sind halt nur weniger entwickelt, ‘läppisch’, faul, weil es dort heiß ist, haben andere Kultur; und bei Voraussetzung unserer als Maßstab: unterentwickelt (wie berichtet, wie bekannt).” Kant argumentiert unter Beizug von Diskriminierungen gegen Entmenschlichung.

Das ist ziemlich kontraintuitiv. Aber es ist eben auch das Ende des 18. und nicht der Beginn des 21. Jahrhunderts. Die Frage, was der Mensch eigentlich sei, beherrscht die Gemüter und verbindet sich mit Unwissen und jahrhundertelangem Vorurteil, auch bei den großen Philosophen der Aufklärung.

Die Differenzen zwischen den Menschen erscheinen bei Kant als teils kulturelle, teils geographisch-klimatisch bedingte Unterschiede (viel Sonne, dunklere Haut usw.). Dabei benutzt er die Vorurteile bemessen nach der Wichtigkeit, die ihnen Hume und Forster beimessen. Mehr hat er auch nicht, der Kant; nur die abwertend gefärbten Berichte der Kapitäne und Forscher. Das ist die Verhandlungsmasse – mit der Kant dann, gegen den Zeitgeist, für die Einheit des Menschengeschlechts argumentiert.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Kleingeld, Pauline. “Kant’s second thoughts on race.” Philosophical Quarterly 57 (2007), 573–592.
  • Godel, Rainer, and Gideon Stiening (eds.). Klopffechtereien – Missverständnisse – Widersprüche? Methodische und methodologische Perspektiven auf die Kant-Forster-Kontroverse. München: Fink, 2011.
  • Sandford, Stella. “Kant, race, and natural history.” Philosophy and Social Criticism 44 (2018), 950–977.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] Kant: Beobachtungen über das Gefühl des Schönen und Erhabenen (1764), AA II, 253. – Die Vorlesung gehört in den Bereich der Ästhetik, ist aber im zweiten Teil vor allem eine Art zotige Anthropologie, in der Kant Vorurteile aller Art – bezogen auf menschliche Erscheinung, Geschlechter – miteinander zu einer Erscheinungslehre des Menschen verbindet. Insbesondere die Anmerkung AA II, 243 macht deutlich, dass es „keiner Nation an Gemüthsarten fehle, welche die vortrefflichste Eigenschaften von dieser Art vereinbaren. Um deswillen kann der Tadel, der gelegentlich auf ein Volk fallen möchte, keinen beleidigen, wie er denn von solcher Natur ist, daß ein jeglicher ihn wie einen Ball auf seinen Nachbar schlagen kann.“
[2] Kant: Ueber den Gebrauch teleologischer Prinzipien in der Philosophie (1788), AA VIII, 176.
[3] Kant: Bestimmung des Begriffs einer Menschenraße (1785). – Kant geht es hier um eine Klärung des Begriffs der „Race“, der „die Mannigfaltigkeiten in der Menschengattung“ erklären soll: „ Es wird viel von den verschiedenen Menschenracen gesprochen. Einige verstehen darunter wohl gar verschiedene Arten von Menschen; andere […] scheinen […] diesen Unterschied nicht viel erheblicher zu finden, als den, welchen Menschen dadurch unter sich machen, daß sie sich bemalen oder bekleiden. Meine Absicht ist jetzt nur, diesen Begriff einer Race, wenn [!] es deren in der [!] Menschengattung giebt, genau zu bestimmen […].“ Die berüchtigten angeblichen „vier Rassen“, die Kant im weiteren Verlauf unterscheidet, nennt er „Klassen“, die sich allesamt durch geographische und klimatische, also empirische Merkmale auszeichnen. Da Kant hier weder Menschen auf Merkmale reduziert, noch sie bezüglich dieser Merkmale abwertet, sondern schlicht beschreibt, eignet sich dieser Text gerade nicht für den Nachweis von Kants Rassimus. Der Begriff „Klasse“ ist zudem „eine blos logische Absonderung aus, die die Vernunft unter ihren Begriffen zum Behuf der bloßen Vergleichung macht“, vgl. Kant: Ueber den Gebrauch…, AA VIII, Anm. 163.
[4] “Auch der Philosoph Immanuel Kant steht zur Debatte. Michael Zeuske im Gespräch mit Gaby Wuttke”, Deutschlandfunk Kultur 13. Juli 2020, https://www.deutschlandfunkkultur.de/antirassistischer-denkmalsturm-auch-der-philosoph-immanuel.1013.de.html?dram%3Aarticle_id=478593 (last accessed 17. August 2020).
[5] Die beiden Beiträge Marcus Willascheks: a) “Ein Kind seiner Zeit”, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung 24 Juni 2020, b) “Kant war sehr wohl ein Rassist”, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung 15. Juli 2020.
[6] Die beiden Beiträge Michael Wolffs: a) “Kant war ein Anti-Rassist”, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung 9. Juli 2020, b) “Antirassist aus Prinzip”, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung 30. Juli 2020.
[7] Die Philosophie der Geschichte des verstorbenen Herrn Abtes Bazin übersetzt und mit Anmerkungen begleitet von Johann Jakob Harder. (Leipzig: Johann Friedrich Hartknoch, 1768): 7-11.
[8] Vgl. Kant: Ueber den Gebrauch…, AA VIII, Anm. 163-164: „Der Charakter der Race kann […] hinreichen, um Geschöpfe darnach zu classificiren, aber nicht um eine besondere Species daraus zu machen […].“ Kant führt den Begriff vorsichtig als deskriptive Ergänzung einer „Naturgeschichte“ ein. Er bezeichnet eine „radicale Eigenthümlichkeit, die auf einen gemeinschaftlichen Abstamm anzeige giebt und zugleich mehrere solche beharrliche forterbende Charaktere nicht allein derselben Thiergattung, sondern auch desselben Stammes zuläßt […].“ (163) Die „Race“ soll es also ermöglichen, das Zugleich von Unterschieden und – übergreifenden – Gemeinsamkeiten zu denken, so Kant wörtlich: „wie die größte Mannigfaltigkeit in der Zeugung mit der größten Einheit der Abstammung von der Vernunft zu vereinigen sei.“ Kriterium ist bei alldem die „Beobachtun[g]“.
[9] Vgl. Kant: Kritik der Urteilskraft (1790), AA V, 234.
[10] Zur Zurückweisung der „Arten“ und zur Einheit in der Verschiedenheit vgl. Kant: Von den verschiedenen Racen der Menschen (1775), AA II, 429-430. Zur Bedeutung von Klima und Lage für die Ausbildung von Unterschieden vgl. Kant: Physische Geographie, AA IX, 314.
[11] Vgl. Forster: “Noch etwas über die Menschenrassen” (1786), in: Forsters Werke in zwei Bänden. Erster Band: Kleine Schriften und Reden (Berlin / Weimar: Aufbau, 1968): 7. Siehe auch Anmerkung 20.
[12] Kant: Ueber den Gebrauch…, AA VIII, 170. Vgl. Forster: Noch etwas über die Menschenrassen, 12. Zur Implikation, wenngleich nicht deutlich ausgesprochen, von zweierlei Menschenarten, vgl. 17. Auch im weiteren Verlauf impliziert Forster immer wieder den Vergleich von schwarzen und weißen Menschen mit unterschiedlichen Tierarten, verweigert aber das Kriterium, das entscheidet, ob es sich nun um „Arten“ oder doch nur um „Racen“ handelt. Genau diese Unschärfe nutzt Kant, um für Letzteres und damit eine einheitliche Menschengattung zu argumentieren.
[13] Kant: Ueber den Gebrauch…, AA VIII, 169.
[14] Kant: Ueber den Gebrauch…, AA VIII, 172.
[15] Ebd. – Vgl. Forster: Noch etwas über die Menschenrassen, S. 26-27. Forster fasst sein Argument dort wie folgt zusammen: „[W]ar es in einem Falle möglich, dass in verschiedenen Weltgegenden Menschen einerlei Stammes sich allmählich ganz veränderten und so verschiedene Charaktere annahmen, wie wir jetzt an ihnen kennen“ – das behauptet Kant –, „so lässt sich die Unmöglichkeit einer neuen Veränderung nicht nur a priori nicht dartun, sondern auch, wo sie stattfindet, macht sie den Schluss auf einen gemeinschaftlichen Ursprung höchst verdächtig.“
[16] Kant: Ueber den Gebrauch…, AA VIII, 175.
[17] Der Forster’sche „Untermensch“ ist eine Polemik von mir; sie bezieht sich auf die vergiftete Naturromantik des schwarzen edlen Wilden bei Forster, für den die Weißen gegenüber dem Schwarzen „Vaterstelle an ihm vertreten, und […] den heiligen Funken der Vernunft […] in ihm“ entwickeln, „das Werk der Veredlung vollbringen“ sollen. Der Weiße soll also den biologisch von ihm unterschiedenen Schwarzen zu sich aufheben, der auf der „Kindheitsstufe“ der Vernunft verweilt und der „Pflege“ des weißen Mannes bedarf. Ein echter Held der Gleichberechtigung. Vgl. Forster: Noch etwas über die Menschenrassen, 33.
[18] Kant: Ueber den Gebrauch…, AA VIII, 175.
[19] Ebd.
[20] Forster und Kant zitieren beide Reiseberichte, das Argument von Forster läuft etwas speziell: Er könnte natürlich auch nur von seiner eigenen Empirie 1772-75 über die Südseebewohner*innen berichten, er hat sie schliesslich selbst beobachtet, er belässt es aber argumentativ dabei nicht und beruft sich vielmehr auf weitere Gewährsmänner. Bei all denen und ihm mögen unterschiedliche Begriffe “des Schwarzen” existiert haben, alle aber stellten “schwarz” fest, so Forster. Er stellt daraus Evidenz her. Diese Evidenzherstellung Forsters trägt als rhetorische Figur einen Ad-populum-Charakter. Wenn fünf verschiedene Leute etwas auf gleiche Weise bezeichnen, dann sei es doch wohl richtig bezeichnet. Wenn man so will, handelt es sich um eine vulgäre Variante des konsenstheoretischen Wahrheitsbegriffes. Gegenüber einer auf solche Weise fundierten Begründung muss Kants öffentlicher Einspruch natürlich ganz besonders stören, denn er bricht den fundierenden Konsens für Forsters Position.
Dieser Konsens wird allerdings auch nur unterstellt, denn wichtige, wenn auch offenbar nur einzelne Stimmen der damaligen Zeit argumentierten wie Kant für die Einheit der Menschheit und damit antirassistisch. Dafür hier zwei Beispiele: a) William Penn, Letter from William Penn to the Kings of the Indians in Pennsylvania (1681), Historical Society of Pennsylvania, https://hsp.org/education/primary-sources/letter-from-william-penn-to-the-king-of-the-indians (last accessed 18 August 2020). b) August Ludwig von Schlözer, Vorbereitung zur WeltGeschichte für Kinder, 1779 (Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2011): 53-67, 124-5.
[21] Kant: Ueber den Gebrauch…, AA VIII, 176. – Kants Argument ist eigentlich eine reductio ad absurdum: Wenn Forster die Indianer nicht als dritte „Art“ annehmen will, bleibt ihm nur übrig, zu behaupten, dass sich in Amerika keine schwarze Menschen-„Art“ herausgebildet hat, weil das Klima dort zu kalt oder der Kontinent zu neu ist. Ersteres ist, so Kant, durch das Klima in Amerika widerlegt – und letzteres wäre eine bloße Spekulation zu einer unüberprüfbaren Zukunft in „einige[n] Jahrtausende[n]“.
[22] Forster: Noch etwas über die Menschenrassen, 31-32.
[23] Forster: Noch etwas über die Menschenrassen, 32-33.

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

By Benjamin West – Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=817244

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Zorn, Daniel-Pascal: Kant – ein Rassist? In: Public History Weekly 8 (2020) 8, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-17156.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Marko Demantowsky

Copyright (c) 2020 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 8 (2020) 8
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-17156

Tags: , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

I accept that my given data and my IP address is sent to a server in the USA only for the purpose of spam prevention through the Akismet program.More information on Akismet and GDPR.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest