The Subject of/(in) History

Das Subjekt (in) der Geschichte

 

Abstract:
This essay introduces ‘historical consciousness’ as one of the core concepts of historical learning. A comprehensive typology is needed in order to compare systematically the core concepts in an intercultural perspective. Such typology will be sketched out on the example of the comparison between three different approaches to the concept of ‘historical consciousness’: It will be asked (1) how the subject of the historically conscious ‘human being(s)’ is conceptualized in the various approaches and (2) how the modus operandi of developing and/or constructing ‘historical consciousness’ is conceptualized. a) The first type to be introduced refers to Hans-Georg Gadamer’s concept of historical consciousness which is constituted in a dialectic process between self-reflection and the hermeneutic interpretation of historical sources against the universal horizon of history. Complementary, two types of historical sense-making as developed by Jörn Rüsen will be discussed: b) the four modi of historical sense-making by narrating history, where narration is introduced as an indispensable mental operation by which human experience is being interpreted in [the course of] time; c) historical consciousness as a social construction in the communicative process, where historical consciousness develops in the ‘here and now’ of interaction between several persons involved in the process of negotiating cogent/plausible historical narratives.
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-14836
Languages: English, German


When working on the core concepts of history didactics/historical education, such as “historical consciousness”, “historical thinking” or “historical culture” in an intercultural perspective, a comprehensive typology is needed in order to compare the concepts systematically. In this essay, the elaboration of such a typology will be sketched out by the use of examples for two aspects of the core concept of “historical consciousness” by focusing on two questions: (1) How is the subject of historically conscious “human being(s)” conceptualized in the various approaches? and (2) How is the modus operandi of developing and/or constructing “historical consciousness” conceptualized?

“Historical Self-reflection’[1]

In a paper first published 2017, Peter Seixas worked on the actual challenges for historical education and compared different regional approaches to the core concepts.[2] We take the occasion to resume this debate on the core concepts, aiming to further elaborate the discussion and at making the discourse of history didactics more robust in a transnational and intercultural perspective. At the Center for Didactics of History, Social Studies and Citizenship Education at the University of Graz, we will organize a conference for this purpose on the topic of “Historical Consciousness ­ Historical Thinking – Historical Culture. Core Concepts of History Didactics/Historical Education in an Intercultural Perspective.” The conference will take place from 20 to 23 April 2020.[3]

Peter Seixas starts his discussion by referring to the term “historical consciousness” as developed by Hans-Georg Gadamer.[4] Gadamer linked the idea of “historical consciousness” to the concept of the historically thinking “man of modernity”, an idea which had been elaborated by Reinhart Koselleck[5] as follows: In experiencing the dynamics of industrial society and the profound revolutions of a rapidly changing world, the man of modernity struggles for awareness of his existence – and detects the historicity of everything present, including the historicity of himself.

Gadamer’s conception of historical consciousness as arising from the radical discontinuity between past, present and future requires a special hermeneutic approach to “history”. Building on the analytical philosophy of Martin Heidegger[6] and his way of “understanding”,

for Gadamer history “is not the resigning ideal of life experience when the human mind has nearly come to its end, like Dilthey would say, […] but the genuine form of human being, [the condition of] being [present] in the World.”[7]

Having insight into one’s own historicity becomes irrefutable when the self tries to understand the individual scope of action. Every human existence, every form of human action, every human experience is embedded in the process of history: “In fact history does not belong to us but rather we to it.”[8]

For Gadamer, the modus operandi to conceptualize the development of “historical consciousness” bears a strong relation to the “philosophy of life” of Wilhelm Dilthey, who understood historical consciousness as an act of becoming-conscious-of-oneself:

“Since historical consciousness has emerged and won the day we face a new situation. From now on this kind of consciousness is not any more the unthinking expression of real life. It ceases to measure everything that is transmitted to him, following the order of his own understanding of life, and in this way guaranteeing the continuity of tradition. Rather, this historical consciousness is aware of a reflective relationship to both, i.e. to the self and to the tradition. It understands itself by means of its own history. Historical consciousness is a mode of self-knowledge and self-reflection”.[9]

Historical Sense-making

In contrast to Gadamer’s “philosophical hermeneutics” and to the conception of a man of modernity who develops historical consciousness by understanding and reflecting upon his own historicity, we can notice a paradigmatic shift to the concept of human beings who develop historical consciousness by narrating history and by dealing with historical narrations.

Arthur Danto (1965) argued[10] that narration constitutes the basic structure of every historical explanation; consequently, following Danto, whenever we think historically, we think in narrative logic and structures. Jörn Rüsen developed his concept of historical sense-making following the thesis of Danto and the narratology of Haydn White.[11] The modi of historical sense-making, as proposed by Rüsen, are related to four modi of historiographic narration: traditional, exemplary, critical, and genetic.[12]

For Rüsen, the basic operation which constitutes historical consciousness is the modus of narration. At the very moment when human consciousness appeals to something – such as to an experience – in the form of a narration, then human consciousness is constituted as historical consciousness. This process is not restricted to professional historians but is “a phenomenon in every living environment where acting and suffering human beings search for orientation in time. […] Narration is an indispensable cultural activity; it is an elementary and general linguistic act, by which human experience is being interpreted in [the course of] time; this means it is related consciously to prior aspects in the organization of the praxis of human life. The result of such interpretation is a senseful structure, called ‘history’. Narration is [a mode of] making sense of experience [over the course] of time“.[13]

In contrast to narration in general, the specific characteristics of historical narration and of “history” as a subject of “historical thinking” consist of three qualities of making sense of experience [over the course] of time:

– Ontologically, the act of narration is connected to the medium of remembrance;
– the act of making sense of experience [over the course] of time develops “in form of an imagination of continuity, where continuity means a course of time which encompasses past, present and future”; and
– “the images of continuity have to fulfill the function of ensuring the human identity against the changes of time”.[14]

A Communicative Process

Jörn Rüsen conceptualized the model of the four types of narration alongside his work on historiographic texts. However, when following his theoretical reflections on historical learning,[15] we discover a more communicative – and socio-constructivist – model of narrative logic. In this second approach, Rüsen no longer understands the subjectivity of human beings as an interplay in the dialectic between the self and the universe of the past, termed “history”,[16] but as an interaction between social subjects who give accounts of the processes of the becoming, developing and changing realities of the world in form of narrations. Rüsen describes this form of historical sense-making as a communicative process: “the self-reference of individuals or groups […] never emerges isolated from oneself; it is always expressed in interaction with others – narration is always a communicative process”.[17]

In this approach, historical consciousness is conceptualized as a form of social construction: it develops in the “here and now” of communication with others.

“Historical narration is a communicative act of making sense of experience [over the course] of time. Its necessity results from the human life praxis which provides the experience of permanent pressure of change over time; this experience has to be worked through by the persons affected in a communicative process, which empowers them to find a senseful orientation for their activities, especially when they perform in social interactions. Hence, the origin of historical consciousness of human beings emerges from their experience in the present…“.[18]

The idea of “historical consciousness” which is constituted in the here and now of communication and interaction goes beyond the description of a “historical consciousness” which is understood as “a mental operation of single individuals processing historical knowledge.”[19] Rather, the development of historical consciousness in the communicative process can be described as a co-construction emerging from the interaction between the social subjects involved – the social subjects interpret the present situation by bringing in diverse individual experiences and interests, relating the debate to historical analysis with the intention of acquire scope for their future actions.

Consequently, when taking into account the communicative process in the here and now, “historical thinking” has to be conceptualized as “historio-political thinking”. Historical consciousness in a communicative situation develops as a dynamic construct, constituted by negotiation(s) about historical narration(s) with regard to the challenges of the present and expectations for the future.

This modus of historical sense-making in the communicative process is in principle open to all forms of historical culture. Nonetheless it seems as if the second communicative conception in the work of Jörn Rüsen, which can be applied to both a situation in the here and now of the history classroom as well as to any historio-political debate in the public sphere, has not gained much space in the discourse of history didactics/historical education so far.

Concluding his paper, Peter Seixas asks whether historical consciousness is already “a thing of the past”, no longer adequate to the dynamics of historical learning in the postmodern society. The history educators in the Anglophone sphere seem to be glued to the idea of historical reconstruction, while the “Continental history didacticians following Rüsen have posited a tolerant ‘genetic’ historical consciousness that recognizes, accepts, and learns from profound change over time as the ultimate goal of history education.”[20]

In any case, the challenges for further developing an up-to-date theory and terminology and a meaningful orientation for historical education remain vast and require cooperation between researchers and practitioners.

The Graz Conference 2020 invites all interested persons to discuss and debate examples of the core concepts of history didactics/historical education. In view of the accelerated pace of cultural change, now seems to be the right moment to revise and renew this debate. The conference aims to take essential steps forward in this direction by putting more emphasis on the intercultural, transnational, and global dimensions of this discourse.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Seixas, Peter. “Historical Consciousness and Historical Thinking.” In Palgrave Handbook of Research in Historical Culture and Education, edited by Mario Carretero et. al., 59-72. London: Palgrave MacMillan, 2017.

Web Resources

_____________________
[1] Wilhelm Dilthey, Gesammelte Schriften, Bd. V,  339, cit. after: Hans-Georg Gadamer, Das Problem des historischen Bewußtseins. Vorlesung 2: Reichweite und Grenzen des Werkes von Wilhelm Dilthey, aus dem Französischen rückübersetzt von Tobias Nikolaus Klass, (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck 2001), 21.
[2] Peter Seixas worked on the difference between “historical consciousness” and “historical thinking”
. He discerned different conceptions of these core concepts in the English, Anglo-Canadian and German speaking communities. See: Peter Seixas,  “Historical Consciousness and Historical Thinking”, in: Palgrave Handbook of Research in Historical Culture and Education Carretero, ed. Carretero Mario, S. and M.  Grever (London: Palgrave MacMillan, 2017), 59-72.
[3] We cordially invite you to join this event. Please find more information on the “Graz Conference 2020” and to the actual Call for Papers under: https://grazconference2020.uni-graz.at (last accessed 5 January 2020) https://grazconference2020.uni-graz.at/de/registrierung/?esraSoftIdva=301068 (last accessed: 5 January 2020). The deadline for submission of abstracts is 14th February 2020. For further information about the “Graz Conference 2020″ please contact the organization committee:  grazconference2020@uni-graz.at.
[4] Hans-Georg Gadamer, Wahrheit und Methode. Grundzüge einer philosophischen Hermeneutik, 4. Aufl. ( Tübingen: J.C.B. Mohr 1975), 254.
[5] Reinhart Koselleck,  Vergangene Zukunft. Zur Semantik geschichtlicher Zeiten (Frankfurt/M.: Suhrkamp Vlg. 1979), 260.
[6] See: Reinhart Koselleck, “Historik und Hermeneutik” in: Sprache und Hermeneutik. Eine Rede und eine Antwort. Mit einem Nachwort hg. v. H.-P. Schütt, (eds.) Reinhard Koselleck Hans-Georg und Gadamer (Heidelberg: Manutius Vlg.), 2000, 11.
[7] Gadamer, Wahrheit und Methode, 254.
[8] Gadamer, Wahrheit und Methode,. 261.
[9] Hans-Georg Gadamer, Das Problem des historischen Bewußtseins, aus dem Französischen rückübersetzt von Tobias Nikolaus Klass, (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck 2001), 19.
[10] Arthur Danto, Analytical Philosophy of History (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press 1965).
[11] White, Haydn. The Question of Narrative in Contemporary Historical Theory, In: History and Theory, Vol 23, No. 1 (Feb 1984), pp. 1-33
[12] Jörn Rüsen, History. Narration, Interpretation, Orientation (New York, Oxford: Berghahn 2005), 27-34.
[13] Jörn Rüsen, Historisches Lernen, 30.
[14] Jörn Rüsen, Historisches Lernen, 32.
[15] Jörn Rüsen, Historisches Lernen, 70-114.
[16] Reinhart Kosellek, Vergangene Zukunft, 266.
[17] Jörn Rüsen, Historisches Lernen, 88.
[18] Jörn Rüsen  Historisches Lernen, 75.
[19] Hans-Jürgen Pandel, “Geschichtsbewusstsein“, in: Wörterbuch Geschichtsdidaktik, (eds.) Ulrich Mayer,  Hans-Jürgen Pandel, Gerhard Schneider, and Bernd Schönemann (Schwalbach/Ts.: Wochenschau Vlg.) 2014, 80.
[20] Peter Seixas,  Historical Consciousness and Historical Thinking, 2017, 69.

_____________________

Image Credits

Amerika Haus in Graz © 1952 National Archives, Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Recommended Citation

Ecker, Alois: The Subject of/(in) History. In: Public History Weekly 8 (2020) Issue, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-14836.

Editorial Responsibility

Dominika Uczkiewicz / Krzysztof Ruchniewicz (Team Wrocław)

Will man die Schlüsselkonzepte in der Geschichtsdidaktik im transnationalen Vergleich diskutieren, so bedarf es einer Typologie, nach der die Konzepte systematisch verglichen werden können. Am Beispiel unterschiedlicher Vorstellungen zum Konzept des “Geschichtsbewusstseins” sei dies im Folgenden skizzenhaft versucht: Gefragt wird, wie das Subjekt des historisch Denkenden im jeweiligen Konzept eingeführt wird und wie der Modus konzipiert wird, in welchem Geschichtsbewusstsein aufgebaut bzw. konstruiert wird. 

“Historische Selbstbesinnung“[1]

Peter Seixas vergleichender Zugang zu den aktuellen Herausforderungen der Geschichtsdidaktik[2] gibt Anlass, die Frage nach den Schlüsselkonzepten in transnationaler und interkultureller Perspektive aufzunehmen und in Hinblick auf einen robusteren globalen Diskurs in der Geschichtsdidaktik weiterzuführen. Vom Fachdidaktikzentrum Geschichte, Sozialkunde und Politische Bildung an der Universität Graz werden wir zum Thema “Historical Consciousness ­ Historical Thinking – Historical Culture. Core Concepts of History Didactics/Historical Education in Intercultural Perspective” vom 20. – 23. April 2020 eine Konferenz veranstalten.[3]

Peter Seixas bezieht sich zunächst auf Hans-Georg Gadamers Begriff des “historischen Bewusstseins“[4] und verknüpft dessen Auffassung vom “historischen Bewusstsein” mit dem Geschichtsverständnis des Menschen der Moderne, wie es von Reinhart Koselleck[5] herausgearbeitet wurde: Der Mensch der Moderne sieht sich in die Dynamik der Industriegesellschaft hineingeworfen und ringt – im Strudel einer sich rasch wandelnden Welt – um sein Da-Sein. Die Einsicht in die Abhängigkeit des eigenen Seins vom strukturellen Ganzen des historischen Wandels wird zur Notwendigkeit des Menschen in der Moderne.

Gadamers hermeneutischer Zugriff auf das Verstehen von Geschichte ist mit der Vorstellung vom sich selbst im Wandel der Geschichte erkennenden Menschen verknüpft. Er baut dabei auf der existenziellen Analyse Martin Heideggers auf.[6]

“Verstehen” ist für Gadamer “nicht ein Resignationsideal der menschlichen Lebenserfahrung im Greisenalter des Geistes, wie bei Dilthey, … sondern … die ursprüngliche Vollzugsform des Daseins, das In-der Weltseins“.[7]

Das Erkennen der eigenen Historizität wird eine Bedingung, um den Handlungsspielraum des Selbst ausloten zu können. Jede menschliche Existenz, jeder Akt des menschlichen Handelns und jede menschliche Erfahrung sieht Gadamer diesem historischen Prozess unterworfen: “In Wahrheit gehört die Geschichte nicht uns, sondern wir gehören ihr.[8]

Geschichtsbewusstsein wird, der Lebensphilosophie bei Wilhelm Dilthey folgend, zu einem Modus des Selbst-Bewusst-Seins und der Selbst-Besinnung:

“Seit dem Aufkommen des historischen Bewusstseins und dessen Sieg steht man einer neuen Situation gegenüber. Von nun an ist dieses Bewusstsein nicht mehr einfach der unreflektierte Ausdruck des realen Lebens. Es hört auf, alles, was ihm übermittelt wird, mit dem Maß des eigenen Lebensverständnisses zu messen und so die Kontinuität der Tradition zu verbürgen. Dieses historische Bewusstsein weiß vielmehr sich zu sich selbst und zur Tradition in einem reflektierten Verhältnis. Es versteht sich selbst durch seine eigene Geschichte. Historisches Bewusstsein ist eine Weise der Selbsterkenntnis.”[9]

Historische Sinnbildung

Dem Konzept des verstehenden und seine Historizität reflektierenden Menschen der Moderne, wie es Gadamer in der “universalen Hermeneutik” vorgeschlagen hat, wurde mit dem Paradigmenwechsel zur Narrativität ein Konzept vom Menschen gegenübergestellt, welcher sein Geschichtsbewusstsein im Modus des Erzählens entwickelt.

Arthur Danto hat in seiner “Analytischen Philosophie der Geschichte” [10] die These entwickelt, dass das Erzählen die Grundstruktur jeder historischen Erklärung bildet, und dass wir demnach, wenn wir historisch denken, stets in erzählenden Logiken denken. Daran anknüpfend hat Jörn Rüsen mit Bezug zu Arthur Danto und zur Narratologie bei Haydn White[11] ein Konzept der historischen Sinnbildung entworfen, welches er an vier Modi des historiographischen Erzählens knüpft: Er unterscheidet zwischen traditionaler, exemplarischer, kritischer und genetischer Sinnbildung.[12]

Im Modus des Erzählens konstituiert sich grundsätzlich das Geschichtsbewusstsein. Wenn das menschliche Bewusstsein etwas als Geschichte in der Form einer Erzählung an- und ausspricht, konstituiert sich das menschliche Bewusstsein als Geschichtsbewusstsein. Dieser Vorgang ist keineswegs auf die professionellen Historikerinnen und Historiker beschränkt, sondern, laut Rüsen, ein “lebensweltliches Phänomen der Orientierung handelnder und leidender Menschen in der Zeit. … Erzählen ist eine lebensnotwendige kulturelle Leistung; es ist eine elementare und allgemeine Sprachhandlung, durch die Zeiterfahrung gedeutet, d.h. auf oberste Gesichtspunkte der bewussten Organisation der menschlichen Lebenspraxis bezogen werden. Das Resultat einer solchen Deutung ist das Sinngebilde einer ‘Geschichte’. Erzählen ist Sinnbildung über Zeiterfahrung und gehört damit zu dem elementaren und allgemeinen Phänomen kultureller Daseinsbewältigung, die die Menschen als Gattung definieren.“[13]

Als “Besonderheit des historischen Erzählens im Unterschied zum Erzählen überhaupt und damit auch die Besonderheit von ‘Geschichte’ als Gegenstandsbereich des historischen Denkens” beschreibt Rüsen drei Eigenschaften einer Sinnbildung über Zeiterfahrung:

– Das Erzählen ist ontologisch gebunden an das Medium der Erinnerung;
– die Sinndeutung über Zeiterfahrung erfolgt “in der Form einer ‘Kontinuitäts’-Vorstellung”, wobei Kontinuität “eine Vergangenheit, Gegenwart und Zukunft umgreifende Zeitverlaufsvorstellung” meint,
– “die Absicht der Erzählenden und ihrer Zuhörer, durch die erzählten Geschichten ihre eigene Identität in den zeitlichen Veränderungen ihrer selbst und ihrer Welt zu sichern: Die Kontinuitätsvorstellungen müssen die Funktion einer Vergewisserung menschlicher Identität im Wandel der Zeit erfüllen können.“[14]

Kommunikativer Prozess

Jörn Rüsen hat seine Erzähltypen zunächst entlang der Arbeit an historiographischen Texten gedacht. Folgt man jedoch seinen theoretischen Skizzen zum Historischen Lernen,[15] so wird – in Anlehnung an die Lebenspraxis – eine kommunikative bzw. eine sozialkonstruktivistische Konzeption der narrativen Logik sichtbar. Die Subjektivität des erkennenden Menschen wird bei Rüsen nicht mehr (vorrangig) als Spannungsfeld zwischen dem Selbst und dem universalen Kosmos des Vergangenen, “der Geschichte”,[16] gedacht, sondern als Interaktion zwischen den sozialen Subjekten, die über den Prozess des Werdens, des Gewordenseins und der Veränderbarkeit von Welt und Wirklichkeit erzählend berichten. „Der Selbstbezug von Individuen oder Gruppen“, schreibt Rüsen über diese Form der geschichtlichen Sinnbildung, “… tritt natürlich nie isoliert für sich auf, sondern ist immer vermittelt durch Interaktionen mit anderen – Erzählen ist immer ein kommunikativer Prozess“.[17]

Geschichtsbewusstsein wird hier als eine Form der sozialen Konstruktion gedacht, welche durch Kommunikation mit anderen in der jeweiligen Gegenwart gebildet wird.

“Historisches Erzählen ist ein kommunikativer Akt von Sinnbildung über Zeiterfahrung. Seine Notwendigkeit ergibt sich daraus, dass die menschliche Lebenspraxis dauernd dem Erfahrungsdruck eines zeitlichen Wandels ausgesetzt ist, der von den Betroffenen kommunikativ so weit aufgearbeitet werden muss, dass sie in diesem Wandel ihr Handeln sinnhaft orientieren können, und zwar auch und gerade dort, wo es sich in sozialer Interaktion vollzieht. Am Ursprung des menschlichen Geschichtsbewusstseins steht also eine Gegenwartserfahrung, diejenige nämlich, dass sich die Bedingungen, unter denen jeweils gehandelt werden muss und kann, in einer von den Handelnden nicht direkt beabsichtigten Weise ändern. Diese Gegenwartserfahrung muss nun von den Betroffenen gedeutet werden; sie müssen sie in den Orientierungsrahmen ihrer Lebenspraxis sinnhaft so einarbeiten, dass sie handlungsleitenden Sinnkriterien genügt.“[18]

Wird Geschichtsbewusstsein kommunikativ im Hier und Jetzt konstituiert, dann ist Geschichtsbewusstsein mehr als ein “psychischer Verarbeitungsprozess historischen Wissens” vereinzelter Individuen.[19] Es ist eine Ko-konstruktion interagierender sozialer Subjekte, die aus ihrer jeweiligen historischen Erfahrung heraus – und den davon abgeleiteten Interessen – Gegenwart deuten, um Zukunft zu gewinnen.

Historisches Denken wird damit notwendigerweise historisch-politisches Denken. Geschichtsbewusstsein wird zu einem dynamischen Konstrukt, das die Herausforderungen der Gegenwart unter Einbeziehung der historischen Erfahrung kommunikativ verhandelt. Der Modus kommunikativer historischer Sinnbildung ist grundsätzlich für alle Formen der Geschichtskultur offen.

Es hat den Anschein, als wäre dieser theoretische Vorschlag Jörn Rüsens, der ja auf die kommunikative Situation des Historischen Lernens im Hier und Jetzt des Geschichtsunterrichts genauso passt, wie für eine politische Debatte im öffentlichen Diskurs, von der Geschichtsdidaktik bisher wenig rezipiert worden.

In der Schlussreflexion seines Artikels stellt Peter Seixas die Frage, ob “Geschichtsbewusstsein” ein veralteter Begriff geworden ist, der dem Historischen Lernen in der Dynamik einer postmodernen Gesellschaft nicht mehr genügt. Die Geschichtsdidaktiker*innen der anglophonen Welt scheinen ihm zu starr an den Zielen der historischen Rekonstruktion, wie sie die akademische Geschichtswissenschaft nach wie vor lebt, festzukleben. Die Geschichtsdidaktiker*innen auf dem europäischen Kontinent haben zwar das “genetische Geschichtsbewusstsein, welches die radikalen Veränderungen in der Zeiterfahrung erkennt, akzeptiert und daraus lernt“[20], als Ziel des Historischen Lernens adoptiert, aber die Herausforderungen für die Weiterentwicklung des Historischen Lernens, und die Entwicklung einer adäquaten Begrifflichkeit dazu, sind groß.

Die Graz Conference 2020 lädt zur aktuellen Diskussion zentraler Schlüsselbegriffe der Geschichtsdidaktik ein. Diese sollen im Interesse eines globalen Diskurses zum Historischen Lernen entlang aktueller gesellschaftlicher Herausforderungen vergleichend diskutiert werden.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Seixas, Peter. “Historical Consciousness and Historical Thinking.” In Palgrave Handbook of Research in Historical Culture and Education, edited by Mario Carretero et. al., 59-72. London: Palgrave MacMillan, 2017.

Webressourcen

_____________________
[1] Wilhelm Dilthey, Gesammelte Schriften, Bd. V,  339, cit. after: Hans-Georg Gadamer, Das Problem des historischen Bewußtseins. Vorlesung 2: Reichweite und Grenzen des Werkes von Wilhelm Dilthey, aus dem Französischen rückübersetzt von Tobias Nikolaus Klass, (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck 2001), 21.
[2] In seinem Aufsatz “Historical Consciousness and Historical Thinking” aus dem Jahr 2017 arbeitete Peter Seixas an der Differenz von zwei Schlüsselkonzepten des Historischen Lernens. Peter Seixas verglich verschiedene regionale Konzeptionen dieser Schlüsselbegriffe, wie sie seiner Auffassung nach in der englischen, in der anglo-kanadischen sowie in der deutschsprachigen ‚community‘ der Geschichtsdidaktik Anwendung finden.  Siehe: Peter Seixas,  “Historical Consciousness and Historical Thinking”, in: Palgrave Handbook of Research in Historical Culture and Education Carretero, ed. Carretero Mario, S. and M.  Grever (London: Palgrave MacMillan, 2017), 59-72.
[3] Wir laden schon heute herzlich dazu ein. Nähere Informationen zur “Graz Conference 2020“ und zum aktuellen Call for Papers finden Sie unter: https://grazconference2020.uni-graz.at (letzter Zugriff 30.12.2019) https://grazconference2020.uni-graz.at/de/registrierung/?esraSoftIdva=301068 (letzter Zugriff: 30.12. 2019). Deadline für die Einreichung von Abstracts ist der 14. Februar 2020. Für Rückfragen steht Ihnen das Organisationsteam unter grazconference2020@uni-graz.at gerne zur Verfügung.
[4] Hans-Georg Gadamer, Wahrheit und Methode. Grundzüge einer philosophischen Hermeneutik, 4. Aufl. ( Tübingen: J.C.B. Mohr 1975), 254.
[5] Reinhart Koselleck,  Vergangene Zukunft. Zur Semantik geschichtlicher Zeiten (Frankfurt/M.: Suhrkamp Vlg. 1979), 260.
[6] See: Reinhart Koselleck, “Historik und Hermeneutik” in: Sprache und Hermeneutik. Eine Rede und eine Antwort. Mit einem Nachwort hg. v. H.-P. Schütt, (eds.) Reinhard Koselleck Hans-Georg und Gadamer (Heidelberg: Manutius Vlg.), 2000, 11.
[7] Gadamer, Wahrheit und Methode, 254.
[8] Gadamer, Wahrheit und Methode,. 261.
[9] Hans-Georg Gadamer, Das Problem des historischen Bewußtseins, aus dem Französischen rückübersetzt von Tobias Nikolaus Klass, (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck 2001), 19.
[10] Arthur Danto, Analytical Philosophy of History (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press 1965).
[11] White, Haydn. The Question of Narrative in Contemporary Historical Theory, In: History and Theory, Vol 23, No. 1 (Feb 1984), pp. 1-33
[12] Jörn Rüsen, History. Narration, Interpretation, Orientation (New York, Oxford: Berghahn 2005), 27-34.
[12] Jörn Rüsen, Historisches Lernen, 30.
[14] Jörn Rüsen, Historisches Lernen, 32.
[15] Jörn Rüsen, Historisches Lernen, 70-114.
[16] Reinhart Koselleck, Vergangene Zukunft, 266.
[17] Jörn Rüsen, Historisches Lernen, 88.
[18] Jörn Rüsen  Historisches Lernen, 75.
[19] Hans-Jürgen Pandel, “Geschichtsbewusstsein“, in: Wörterbuch Geschichtsdidaktik, (eds.) Ulrich Mayer,  Hans-Jürgen Pandel, Gerhard Schneider, and Bernd Schönemann (Schwalbach/Ts.: Wochenschau Vlg.) 2014, 80.
[20] Peter Seixas,  Historical Consciousness and Historical Thinking, 2017, 69.

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Amerika Haus in Graz © 1952 National Archives, Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Ecker, Alois: The Subject of/(in) History. In: Public History Weekly 8 (2020) Issue, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-14836.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Dominika Uczkiewicz / Krzysztof Ruchniewicz (Team Wrocław)

Copyright (c) 2020 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 8 (2020) 1
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-14836

Tags: , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

I accept that my given data and my IP address is sent to a server in the USA only for the purpose of spam prevention through the Akismet program.More information on Akismet and GDPR.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest