Let’s talk about… History Podcasts

Reden wir über… Geschichts-Podcasts

 

Abstract:
Looking at the development of the media formats used to represent and convey history over the past three to four decades, several phenomena can be observed: History is often staged emotionally and visually. What is offered differentiates itself and increasingly relies on multimedia. Cutting sequences and product lengths are oriented towards an economy of attention. But a format seems like a counter-draft to these observations: History is told in  podcasts on history. In detail and slowly. And many listeners enthusiastically listen to them. But why?
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-14754
Languages: English, German


Looking at the development of the media formats used to represent and convey history over the past three to four decades, several phenomena can be observed: History is often staged emotionally and visually. What is offered differentiates itself and increasingly relies on multimedia. Cutting sequences and product lengths are oriented towards an economy of attention. But a format seems like a counter-draft to these observations: History is told in  podcasts on history. In detail and slowly. And many listeners enthusiastically listen to them. But why?

Audio Features as a “Parent Generation” 

Already in the first half of the 20th century the format of radio features developed in radio journalism. The term “feature” itself was coined in 1939 as part of the BBC series “Experimental Hour”.[1] Among radio journalists, the feature is regarded as a free form of narration; it is an entertaining audio format with a length usually ranging from a few minutes to almost an hour.[2] A definition and a concrete design form derived therefrom have been discussed for decades.[3] There is consensus, however, that the feature distinguishes itself from the fictional radio play through its documentary content and the associated claim to communication.

“Feature can be anything, any radio form suitable for conveying a theme: From reportage to radio play, from essay to poetic sound image. The feature encompasses all forms of presentation, it can make use of satire or analytical commentary, it can captivate the listener with gripping drama on the loudspeaker, it can develop its theme in long epic arcs, it can be a very simple, very personal report, a light, an entertaining feuilleton, a dead serious documentary, a highly artistic montage of sounds and noises or an exciting acoustic film”[4].

The focusing on a specific topic, the combination of descriptive and abstract design elements and the possibility of combining journalism and art in one and the same product, has made the radio feature a popular radio format to this day – among producers and consumers alike.

Radio Feature and History

The radio feature quickly established itself in Germany after 1945. This was encouraged by the Anglo-American influences in the Western occupation zones and the desire to restore confidence in the mass medium of radio which had been damaged by Nazi propaganda. While in the early years content design was initially marked by contemporary problems and in great demand among listeners, this format then came under pressure in the 1950s due to increasing competition from television. However, changed technical possibilities made it possible to reinvent the format with the “acoustic feature”. Radio journalists experimented with original sounds, archive material, music, sounds and voice quotes, thus replacing the classic journalistic word-feature and winning back listeners.[5]

But the radio stations also broke new ground in terms of content. At Westdeutscher Rundfunk (WDR) the editor Wolf Dieter Ruppel developed the idea for a series with historical themes at the end of the 1960s. Since April 4, 1972, the 15-minute “ZeitZeichen”, as well as the 4-minute “Stichtag”, which was added in 1997, have been presenting historical themes by female authors in the form of “acoustic collages”.[6] The contributions focus on a historical fact on the day of the broadcast (“today, five or ten or 25 or 500 years ago”).[7] While the “ZeitZeichen” reaches some 400,000 listeners every day, the “Stichtag” reaches around 1,500,000. In the media library of the radio station there are an additional 1,300,000 downloads every month.[8] Thus, the two historical radio features have a reach that other actors and institutions concerned with history can only dream of.[9]

Not Every Podcast is a Podcast

The fact that radio stations refer to the radio features that are available for download in their media libraries as podcasts suggests that they are just such. However, these offerings only have a few features of what podcasting is. The term “podcast” was introduced in 2004 by the British journalist Ben Hammersley and spread so quickly that it was declared “Word of the Year” by the New Oxford American Dictionary in 2005.[10] Podcasting describes the media trend of audio blogging that has been established since 2000. Podcasts – a portmanteau from broadcast and iPod – since then have described audio products which, by, apart from professional media institutes or providers, each man or each woman with comparatively simple technical means produced, are made available in the internet usually free of charge for downloading and which can be consumed by the listeners after the transmission on mostly mobile digital devices such as MP3 players or smartphones also offline at an individually selected time. Podcasts generally appear as series with, in some cases, fixed publication dates. They are distinguished from webcasts, streaming services and online radios by the possibility of offline use.

The specific conditions of production, distribution and consumption also distinguish podcasts from classic radio features. If, for example, in the case of “ZeitZeichen”, the topics are planned by an editorial team and assigned to a circle of authors, and if the features are professionally produced within a specified time frame and integrated into a linear radio program, then podcasting has no agenda setting through editorial decisions, no gate keepers or fixed program slots that determine authorship. Digitalization opens up the possibility of being both producer and consumer with a content of one’s own choice in a completely freely designable form. After the first podcast wave which culminated in the installation of Apple’s podcast application in 2005 the spread of smartphones and the availability of mobile Internet gave the impetus for the second wave.[11] The strong differentiation and expansion of the offering, currently perceived as the third wave, is, for the time being, the climax of podcast enthusiasm.

History in Podcasts

There are meanwhile podcasts on almost every topic. Beside the so-called free scene also newspaper publishing houses, cultural institutions, enterprises, associations or organizations provide podcasts as well. Media institutions also refer to their online broadcasts as podcasts. In the field of history also numerous successful podcasts in different languages could establish themselves. Lists of history podcasts show that there are podcasts on special topics such as “Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast about Early American History”, on epochal focal points or on changing times and topics.[12] Many of the professional history podcasts are produced by historians or people with a strong affinity to history. The podcasts usually follow a fixed structure, have an intro and outro, offer, where appropriate, further information on the website in the form of so-called show notes or commentary functions and appear at regular intervals. In their design, many historical podcasts are – very probably unconsciously – oriented towards the early forms of the radio feature. There are only few “acoustic features”, but much rather conversations or interviews with experts for the topics or an author podcast which provide history in a presentation form. The running times of the individual episodes also clearly exceed the usual radio formats of 5 to 60 minutes.

Recipe for Success

But why are history podcasts asked for by listeners*? A glance at the commentaries of one of the leading podcast offerings in Germany can provide some clues. On “Zeitsprung”, two historians have been telling “a story from history” every week for over four years now. Each episode is prepared by one of the two podcasters who tells “his” story to his uninformed vis-à-vis (and the equally uninformed listeners) in 30 to 60 minutes on the basis of a script.[13] The listeners find the topics “exciting and interesting”, praise the weekly surprise effect, the very profound research and the excellent presentation. The podcast is rated as entertaining but also “exciting, interesting and at the same time well-founded”, especially in contrast to school experiences. The podcast is listened to along with doing sport, while commuting or doing housework.[14]

Since the two podcasters, to wrap up their episodes, usually have a critical reflection on what has been told or heard and always orient themselves on research literature, sources and experts, one may be tempted to eventually ask the question as to what potentials for public history, but also for science communication, might lie in this comparatively slow, detailed and thematically specialized media format that it appeals to so many listeners. This is something that should be debated.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Etges, Andreas, and Sophie Perl. “Signs of the Times – A Historical Radio Feature.” International Public History 1, no. 2 (2018).
  • Hethmon, Hannah. Your Museum Needs a Podcast: A Step-By-Step-Guide to Podcasting on a Budget for Museums, History Organizations, and Cultural Nonprofits. London: Independent, 2018.
  • Picard, Nathalie, and Cassandra Marsillo, “In Podcasts We Trust? A Brief Survey of Canadian Historical Podcasts.” International Public History 1, no. 2 (2018).

Web Resources

_____________________
[1] Michele Hilmes, Only Connect. A Cutural History of Broadcasting in the United States (Bosten: Wadsworth), 112.
[2] Jens Jarisch, “Feature,”in Radio-Journalismus. Ein Handbuch für Ausbildung und Praxis im Hörfunk, eds. Walther von La Roche and Axel Buchholz (Wiesbaden: Springer, 2017), 307-314.
[3] As an example, a contribution from the early phase of the radio feature in Germany by Alfred Andersch, “Versuch über das Feature. Anlässlich einer neuen Arbeit Ernst Schnabels,” Rundfunk und Fernsehen 10, no. 1 (1953): 94–97.
[4] Klaus Lindemann, “Was ist Feature?”: http://yeya.de/dl/journaltexte/was-ist-feature.pdf, 1 (last accessed 12 December 2019).
[5] Klaus Lindemann, “Was ist Feature?”: http://yeya.de/dl/journaltexte/was-ist-feature.pdf, 2-4 (last accessed 12 December 2019).
[6] Andreas Etges and Sophie Perl, “Signs of the Times – A Historical Radio Feature,” International Public History 1, no. 2 (2018). Ronald Feisel, ed., Wie Dracula den Kopf verlor und Sissi die Lust. 21 unerhörte Geschichten aus der Geschichte (Köln: Kiepenheuer & Witsch, 2012). Sabine Gerasch, Geschichte vom Band. Die Sendereihe “ZeitZeichen” des Westdeutschen Rundfunks (Berlin: De Gruyter, 1997).
[7] Ronald Feisel, “Einleitung,”, in Wie Dracula den Kopf verlor und Sissi die Lust. 21 unerhörte Geschichten aus der Geschichte, ed. Ronald Feisel (Köln: Kiepenheuer & Witsch, 2012), 15. Thematic examples for the program “ZeitZeichen”: 12.12.2019 Gründung des UN-Ausschusses zur friedlichen Nutzung des Weltraums (12.12.1959); 13.12.2019 Gründung der Arbeiterwohlfahrt (13.12.1919); 14.12.2019 Todestag von Andrej Sacharow (14.12.1989); 15.12.2019 Beginn der Messung und Aufzeichung der Lufttemperatur (15.12.1654); 16.12.2019 Der “Volksbund” wird gegründet (16.12.1919).
[8] “ZeitZeichen” runs daily from 9.45 to 10.00 on WDR 5 and from 17.45 to 18.00 on WDR 3. The “Stichtag” runs daily at around 9.40 and is rebroadcast from Monday to Saturday at 18.40.
[9] There are other radio features on historical topics in Germany, but they do not reach the same number of listeners.
[10] https://languages.oup.com/word-of-the-year/ (last accessed 12 December 2019).
[11] https://www.apple.com/newsroom/2005/06/28Apple-Takes-Podcasting-Mainstream/ (last accessed 12 December 2019).
[12] Paul Bartow, “Podcast Review: Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast about Early American History,” The Public Historian 41, no. 3 (2019): 157-159.
[13] https://www.zeitsprung.fm/ueber-zeitsprung/ (last accessed 12 December 2019).
[14] https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/zeitsprung/id1044844618#see-all/reviews (last accessed 12 December 2019).

_____________________

Image Credits

Großmembran-Mikrophon mit Pop-Schutz © 2014 Tim Reckmann CC BY-2.0 via flickr 

Recommended Citation

Bunnenberg, Christian: Let’s talk about… History-Podcasts. In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 30, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-14754.

Editorial Responsibility

Christian Bunnenberg / Peter Gautschi (Team Lucerne)

Nimmt man die Entwicklung der zur Darstellung und Vermittlung von Geschichte genutzten medialen Formate in den vergangenen drei bis vier Dekaden in den Blick, lassen sich mehrere Phänomene beobachten: Geschichte wird häufig emotionalisierend und bildgewaltig inszeniert. Das Angebot differenziert sich aus und setzt zunehmend auf Multimedialität. Schnittfolgen und Produktlängen orientieren sich an dem vermeintlichen Diktat einer Ökonomie der Aufmerksamkeit. Ein Format aber wirkt wie ein Gegenentwurf zu diesen Beobachtungen: In Geschichts-Podcast wird Geschichte erzählt. Ausführlich und langsam. Und viele hören begeistert zu.

Audiofeatures als “Elterngeneration”

Bereits in der ersten Hälfte des 20. Jahrhunderts entwickelte sich im Radiojournalismus das Format des Radiofeatures. Der Begriff “Feature” selbst wurde 1939 im Rahmen der BBC-Sendereihe “Experimental Hour” geprägt.[1] Das Feature gilt unter Radiojournalisten als freie Form des Erzählens, es handelt sich um ein unterhaltsames Audioformat mit einer Länge von üblicherweise wenigen Minuten bis zu fast einer Stunde.[2] Über eine Definition und eine daraus abzuleitende konkrete Gestaltungsform wird seit Jahrzehnten diskutiert.[3] Konsens herrscht aber darüber, dass sich das Feature vom fiktionalen Hörspiel durch seinen dokumentarischen Inhalt und den damit verbundenen Vermittlungsanspruch abgrenzt.

“Feature kann alles sein, jede Radioform, die geeignet ist, ein Thema zu vermitteln: von der Reportage bis zum Hörspiel, vom Essay bis zum poetischen Tonbild. Das Feature umfasst alle Darstellungsarten, es kann sich der Satire bedienen oder des analysierenden Kommentars, es kann den Hörer durch packende Dramatik an den Lautsprecher fesseln, es kann sein Thema in langen epischen Bögen entwickeln, es kann ein ganz einfacher, ganz persönlicher Bericht sein, ein leichtes, unterhaltsames Feuilleton, eine bitterernste Dokumentation, eine höchst kunstvolle Klang- und Geräuschmontage oder ein spannender akustischer Film.”[4]

Die Fokussierung auf ein Sachthema, die Verknüpfung von anschaulichen und abstrahierenden Gestaltungselementen und die Möglichkeit Journalismus und Kunst in einem Produkt fast beliebig kombinieren zu können, macht das Radiofeature bis in die Gegenwart zu einem beliebten Radioformat – bei den Produzierenden und den Konsumierenden.

Radiofeature und Geschichte

In Deutschland konnte sich das Radiofeature nach 1945 schnell etablieren. Dies wurde durch die angloamerikanischen Einflüsse in den westlichen Besatzungszonen und den Wunsch nach der Wiederherstellung von Vertrauen in das durch die NS-Propaganda beschädigte Massenmedium Rundfunk begünstigt. Während in den Anfangsjahren die inhaltliche Gestaltung zunächst von Gegenwartsproblemen geprägt und bei den Hörer*innen stark nachgefragt war, geriet das Format in den 1950er Jahren durch die zunehmende Konkurrenz des Fernsehens unter Druck. Veränderte technische Möglichkeiten erlaubten mit dem “akustischen Feature” aber eine Neuerfindung des Formats. Radiojournalisten experimentierten mit O-Tönen, Archivmaterial, Musik, Geräuschen und Sprecherzitaten, lösten so das klassische journalistische Wort-Feature ab und gewannen Hörer*innen zurück.[5]

Aber auch inhaltlich betraten die Radiosender Neuland. Beim Westdeutschen Rundfunk (WDR) entwickelte der Redakteur Wolf Dieter Ruppel Ende der 1960er Jahre die Idee für eine Sendereihe mit historischen Themen. Im 15-minütigen “ZeitZeichen” werden seit dem 4. April 1972 ebenso wie in dem 1997 hinzugekommenen 4-minütigen “Stichtag” historische Themen von Autor*innen in Form von “akustischen Collagen” aufbereitet.[6] Die Beiträge fokussieren einen historischen Sachverhalt, der sich am Tag der Sendung jährt (“heute vor fünf oder zehn oder 25 oder 500 Jahren”).[7] Während das “ZeitZeichen” täglich etwas 400.000 Hörer*innen erreicht, sind es beim “Stichtag” um die 1.500.000. In der Mediathek des Rundfunksenders gibt es zusätzlich monatlich um die 1.300.000 Downloads.[8] Damit haben die beiden historischen Radiofeature eine Reichweite, von der andere mit Geschichte befassten Akteure und Institutionen nur träumen können.[9]

Nicht jeder Podcast ist ein Podcast

Dass Radiosender die zum Download in ihre Mediatheken eingestellten Radiofeature als Podcasts bezeichnen, legt die Vermutung nahe, dass es sich dabei um eben solche handelt. Diese Angebote weisen jedoch nur einige Merkmale des Podcastings auf. Der Begriff “Podcast” wurde 2004 von dem britischen Journalisten Ben Hammersley eingeführt und fand so schnell Verbreitung, dass es durch das New Oxford American Dictionary bereits 2005 zum “Word of the Year” erklärt wurde.[10] Podcasting beschreibt den sich seit 2000 etablierenden Medientrend des Audioblogging. Podcasts – ein Kofferwort aus Broadcast und iPod – bezeichnen seitdem Audioprodukte, die abseits von professionellen Medienanstalten oder -anbietern von jederman oder jederfrau mit vergleichsweise einfachen technischen Mitteln erstellt, im Internet üblicherweise kostenfrei zum Download bereitgestellt und von den Hörer*innen nach der Übertragung auf zumeist mobile digitale Abspielgeräte wie MP3-Player oder Smartphones auch offline zu einem individuell gewählten Zeitpunkt konsumiert werden können. Podcasts erscheinen in der Regel als Serienangebot mit zum Teil festen Publikationszeitpunkten. Von Webcast, Streamingdiensten und Onlineradios grenzen sie sich durch die Möglichkeit der Offline-Nutzung ab.

Die spezifischen Bedingungen von Produktion, Distribution und Konsumption unterscheiden Podcasts auch vom klassischen Radiofeature. Werden beispielsweise beim “ZeitZeichen” die Themen durch eine Redaktion geplant und an einen Kreis von Autor*innen vergeben, die Feature mit einem vorgegebenen zeitlichen Umfang professionell produziert und in ein lineares Rundfunkprogramm eingebunden, gibt es beim Podcasting kein Agendasetting durch Redaktionsentscheidungen, keine über die Autorenschaft entscheidenden Gate-Keeper oder feste Programmplätze. Die Digitalisierung eröffnet die Möglichkeit mit einem selbst gewählten Inhalt in einer völlig frei gestaltbaren Form gleichzeitig Produzent*in und Konsument*in von Audioinhalten zu sein. Nach der ersten Podcast-Welle, die 2005 in der Einrichtung der Podcast-Anwendung von Apple gipfelte, gaben die Verbreitung von Smartphones und die Verfügbarkeit von mobilem Internet den Anschub für die zweite Welle.[11] Die gegenwärtig als dritte Welle wahrgenommene starke Differenzierung und Ausweitung des Angebotes ist vorerst der Höhepunkt der Podcast-Begeisterung.

Geschichte im Podcast

Mittlerweile gibt es Podcasts zu fast jedem Thema. Neben der sogenannten freien Szene podcasten auch Zeitungsverlage, Kultureinrichtungen, Unternehmen, Verbände oder Organisationen. Medienanstalten bezeichnen ihre Sendungen im Online-Angebot ebenfalls als Podcasts. Auch im Bereich der Geschichte konnten sich zahlreiche erfolgreiche Podcasts in unterschiedlichen Sprachen etablieren. Listen zu Geschichtspodcasts zeigen, dass es Podcasts zu speziellen Themen wie beispielsweise “Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast about Early American History”, zu epochalen Schwerpunkten oder zu wechselnden Zeiten und Themen gibt.[12] Viele der professionellen Geschichtspodcasts werden von ausgebildeten Historiker*innen oder stark geschichtsaffinen Personen produziert. Die Podcasts folgen meistens einer festen Struktur, haben ein Intro und Outro, bieten auf dem Internetauftritt ggf. weiterführende Informationen in den sogenannten Shownotes oder Kommentarfunktionen und erscheinen in regelmäßigen Abständen. Bei der Gestaltung orientieren sich viele Geschichtspodcasts – sehr wahrscheinlich unbewusst – an den Frühformen des Radiofeatures. Es gibt wenige “akustische Feature”, sondern vielmehr Gespräche oder Interviews mit Expert*innen für die Themen oder einen Autor*innen-Podcast, die Geschichte in darbietender Form bereitstellen. Auch die Laufzeiten der einzelnen Episoden übertreffen deutlich die gängigen Radioformate von 5 bis 60 Minuten.

Erfolgsrezept

Aber warum werden Geschichtspodcasts von den Hörer*innen nachgefragt? Der Blick in die Kommentare eines der führenden Podcast-Angebote in Deutschland kann da Hinweise geben. Bei “Zeitsprung” erzählen zwei Historiker seit nunmehr über vier Jahren jede Woche “eine Geschichte aus der Geschichte”. Jede Folge wird von jeweils einem der beiden Podcaster vorbereitet, der “seine” Geschichte dem jeweils unwissendem anderen (und den ebenso unwissenden Hörer*innen) auf Grundlage eines Skriptes in 30 bis 60 Minuten erzählt.[13] Die Hörer*innen finden die Themen “spannend und interessant aufbereitet”, loben den wöchentlichen Überraschungseffekt, die sehr gute Recherche und die Darstellung. Der Podcast wird vor allem in Abgrenzung zu schulischen Erfahrungen als unterhaltsam aber auch “spannend, interessant und gleichzeitig fachlich fundiert” eingestuft. Gehört wird der Podcast beim Sport, beim Pendeln oder der Hausarbeit.[14]

Da die beiden Podcaster zumeist am Ende ihrer Episoden zu einer kritischen Reflexion über das Erzählte bzw. Gehörte ansetzen und sich immer an Forschungsliteratur, Quellen und Expert*innen orientieren, kann man abschließend schon die Frage stellen,  welche Potentiale für die Public History, aber auch die Wissenschaftskommunikation in diesem vergleichsweise langsamen, ausführlichen und thematisch spezialisierten Medienformat liegt, dass so viele Hörer*innen davon angesprochen werden. Darüber sollten man mal reden.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Etges, Andreas, and Sophie Perl. “Signs of the Times – A Historical Radio Feature.” International Public History 1, no. 2 (2018).
  • Hethmon, Hannah. Your Museum Needs a Podcast: A Step-By-Step-Guide to Podcasting on a Budget for Museums, History Organizations, and Cultural Nonprofits. London: Independent, 2018.
  • Picard, Nathalie, and Cassandra Marsillo, “In Podcasts We Trust? A Brief Survey of Canadian Historical Podcasts.” International Public History 1, no. 2 (2018).

Webressourcen

_____________________
[1] Michele Hilmes, Only Connect. A Cutural History of Broadcasting in the United States (Bosten: Wadsworth), 112.
[2] Jens Jarisch, “Feature,”in Radio-Journalismus. Ein Handbuch für Ausbildung und Praxis im Hörfunk, eds. Walther von La Roche and Axel Buchholz (Wiesbaden: Springer, 2017), 307-314.
[3] As an example, a contribution from the early phase of the radio feature in Germany by Alfred Andersch, “Versuch über das Feature. Anlässlich einer neuen Arbeit Ernst Schnabels,” Rundfunk und Fernsehen 10, no. 1 (1953): 94–97.
[4] Klaus Lindemann, “Was ist Feature?”: http://yeya.de/dl/journaltexte/was-ist-feature.pdf, 1 (letzter Zugriff 12. Dezember 2019).
[5] Klaus Lindemann, “Was ist Feature?”: http://yeya.de/dl/journaltexte/was-ist-feature.pdf, 2-4 (letzter Zugriff 12. Dezember 2019).
[6] Andreas Etges and Sophie Perl, “Signs of the Times – A Historical Radio Feature,” International Public History 1, no. 2 (2018). Ronald Feisel, ed., Wie Dracula den Kopf verlor und Sissi die Lust. 21 unerhörte Geschichten aus der Geschichte (Köln: Kiepenheuer & Witsch, 2012). Sabine Gerasch, Geschichte vom Band. Die Sendereihe “ZeitZeichen” des Westdeutschen Rundfunks (Berlin: De Gruyter, 1997).
[7] Ronald Feisel, “Einleitung,”, in Wie Dracula den Kopf verlor und Sissi die Lust. 21 unerhörte Geschichten aus der Geschichte, ed. Ronald Feisel (Köln: Kiepenheuer & Witsch, 2012), 15. Thematic examples for the program “ZeitZeichen”: 12.12.2019 Gründung des UN-Ausschusses zur friedlichen Nutzung des Weltraums (12.12.1959); 13.12.2019 Gründung der Arbeiterwohlfahrt (13.12.1919); 14.12.2019 Todestag von Andrej Sacharow (14.12.1989); 15.12.2019 Beginn der Messung und Aufzeichung der Lufttemperatur (15.12.1654); 16.12.2019 Der “Volksbund” wird gegründet (16.12.1919).
[8] “ZeitZeichen” runs daily from 9.45 to 10.00 on WDR 5 and from 17.45 to 18.00 on WDR 3. The “Stichtag” runs daily at around 9.40 and is rebroadcast from Monday to Saturday at 18.40.
[9] There are other radio features on historical topics in Germany, but they do not reach the same number of listeners.
[10] https://languages.oup.com/word-of-the-year/ (letzter Zugriff 12. Dezember 2019).
[11] https://www.apple.com/newsroom/2005/06/28Apple-Takes-Podcasting-Mainstream/ (letzter Zugriff 12. Dezember 2019).
[12] Paul Bartow, “Podcast Review: Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast about Early American History,” The Public Historian 41, no. 3 (2019): 157-159.
[13] https://www.zeitsprung.fm/ueber-zeitsprung/ (letzter Zugriff 12. Dezember 2019).
[14] https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/zeitsprung/id1044844618#see-all/reviews (letzter Zugriff 12. Dezember 2019).

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Großmembran-Mikrophon mit Pop-Schutz © 2014 Tim Reckmann CC BY-2.0 via flickr 

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Bunnenberg, Christian: Reden wir über… Geschichts-Podcasts In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 30, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-14754.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Christian Bunnenberg / Peter Gautschi (Team Lucerne)

Copyright (c) 2019 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 7 (2019) 30, 8 (2020) 8
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-14754

Tags: , , ,

Pin It on Pinterest