Science Slams: Entertaining Research

Science Slams: Unterhaltsame Forschung

 

Abstract: In addition to classical lectures and poster presentations, the German Historians’ Day in 2014 established the opportunity to present one’s own research project in the form of a science slam, i.e. as a short stage show. Science Slams have become part of the evening cultural programs in many cities. It is striking though that contributions from the fields of history or other humanities are the exception. This article reflects on the reasons for this phenomenon: Is it more difficult for historians to transfer their contents into the new format and how do the slammers solve these challenges?
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-14755
Languages: English, German


In addition to classical lectures and poster presentations, the German Historians’ Day in 2014 established the opportunity to present one’s own research project in the form of a science slam, i.e. as a short stage show. Science Slams have become part of the evening cultural programs in many cities. It is striking though that contributions from the fields of history or other humanities are the exception. Why ist that: Is it more difficult for historians to transfer their contents into the new format and how do the slammers solve these challenges?

Competition to Activate

In a science slam several scientists – usually from four to six – compete against each other trying to entertain and inform the audience within ten-minute lectures about their current research project. In contrast to poetry slams, any tool is permitted, from the common projection technologies to – less common – demonstration experiments. It is imperative, however, that the participants conduct their own research instead of just presenting knowledge they have acquired. The winner is chosen by the audience, the scoreboards or the volume of the applause. Short pauses for discussion after each performance or the opportunity to ask questions to the presenters can additionally stimulate discussion of the topics.[1]

Preserved Live Performances

Although science slams are designed as live events, some organizers also record the presentations and post the videos on the Internet. For researchers interested in science slams, these videos serve as an alternative to participating observation. It must be noted, though, that the activities of the audience are largely ignored here and that successful slammers mostly release their recordings for this purpose. These videos are therefore not representative, but they are potential role models and thus style-forming. Numerous questions are worth analyzing in this regard: which stylistic devices are used? What image of science and research do the slammers present? What is the relationship between entertainment and science, or more polemically formulated: is science trivialized?[2]

Why do contributions from the MINT spectrum predominate, especially from physics and medicine?[3] Is there a greater skepticism in the humanities towards popular forms of science communication, or is it more difficult to prepare their topics and research questions as a science slam?[4]

Tell Chronologically…

For papers and posters in the MINT subjects there is a standard structure of theory – method – results. This structure also seems to be adapted for slams: After a general introduction to the discipline, one’s own research question and its relevance is explained. This is often loosened up by playing with technical clichés or a catchy metaphor to illustrate natural processes. This is followed by descriptions of the procedure and previous results.

Larger deviations from this basic pattern are not only possible, but also common. Individual ones of these steps may be missing or form the majority of the slam. Despite its variability, this structure does not seem to be suitable for research in the humanities. Methodical questions have a different weight here, and the research result usually consists of a longer narrative instead of a list of results.

… or Explain with Anecdotes?

Such narratives – the symbolic linking of different points in time – can often be found in historical slams, but, at least, equally successful is another strategy: In their slams many historians decide to present a larger number of short case studies of an anecdotal nature which can irritate and thus amuse. At the same time, irritation represents a problem as for the consequential need for explanation, which, at best, is resolved by the slammer by contextualizing the anecdote historically or by creating understanding for thinking at that time. The audience, in turn, experiences that historical science goes beyond the collection of facts. Although this approach offers the advantage of being transferable to other humanities – slammers from philosophy, linguistics, and art history proceed in a similar way – it is unclear whether broader historical developments can also be conveyed in this way, or whether they have to be narrated for this purpose.

While narrativity does not seem to be the guiding principle in historical slams, the frequency, diversity, and clarity of references to contemporary events is surprising, although they are far more often related to meaning than to cause.[5] The irritation caused by the historical case studies result from their comparatively implicit contradiction to the expectations of the audience. However, the slammers also make explicit comparisons  in order to create an aid to comprehend the importance of a topic or historical event, or to show that what is supposedly past is still present today.[6] In addition, there is the use of contemporary references to motivate and justify the research topic, since unlike in most of the MINT subjects people might think that there is no direct practical benefit as there is no direct application. Moreover, the mere reference to gaps in research as a motivation would presuppose that the public is informed about the state of research on the topic.

Another Picture of the Humanities

The science slam format forces us to rethink: strict time constraints force us to be brief and concise, we can only, to a very limited extent, rely on previous knowledge on the side of the audience and relevance should not be justified solely on disciplinary grounds. At the same time, however, these guidelines lead historians back to the principle of relevance in the present and the realization that even seemingly odd topics can be presented in an entertaining and understandable way, even for those who are not familiar with the subject.

Science slams offer the public the opportunity to experience science as a process, which is certainly a more important insight than merely the one into the specific findings of the individual projects. Since it is usually current projects that are presented, science appears as something unfinished and provisional, not as the presentation of a complete theory. This might be important to all subjects, but it is particularly important to the humanities, since their representatives often appear more as scholars and “managers” of knowledge than as explorers and researchers.[7] For this reason, humanities scholars and historians, in particular, should make use of this opportunity to present their research as an activity and not merely as a result.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Hill, Miira. “Die Versinnbildlichung von Gesellschaftswissenschaften. Herausforderungen Science Slam.” In Öffentliche Gesellschaftswissenschaften, edited by Stefan Selke and Annette Treibel, 169-186. Wiesbaden: Springer, 2018.
  • Eisenbarth, Britta and Markus Weißkopf. “Science Slam: Wettbewerb für junge Wissenschaftler.” In Handbuch Wissenschaftskommunikation, edited by Beatrice Dernbach and Christian Kleinert, 155-163. Wiesbaden: Springer, 2012.

Web Resources

_____________________
[1] André Lampe, “Science Slam als Bereicherung einer Tagung oder Konferenz,” in Neue Konzepte für einprägsame Events. Partizipation statt Langeweile – vom Teilnehmer zum Akteur, ed. Thorsten Knoll (Wiesbaden: Springer 2016), 109-124. Here: 110-111. The term “Science Slam” is not protected, therefore it can also be used for events with different rules, which is criticized within the scene, see Scienceslam.de: Aus aktuellem Anlass: Science Slam: Was das ist – und was nicht, Science Blogs, 1. April 2016, http://scienceblogs.de/scienceslam/2016/04/01/aus-aktuellem-anlass-science-slam-was-das-ist-und-was-nicht/ (last accessed 7 August 2019).
[2] Trivialisation and the associated commercialisation of science is a widespread accusation and relates in particular to the competitive character. Magnus Klaue, “Die Wanderbühne der Wissenschaft,” Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, April 22, 2015, https://www.faz.net/aktuell/feuilleton/forschung-und-lehre/die-wanderbuehne-der-wissenschaft-was-science-slams-ueber-die-wissenschaft-verraten-13549279.html (last accessed 17. Juli 2019). This is also discussed within the scene: Cornelius Courts: Quo vadis, Science Slam, Scienceblogs, März 19, 2015 https://scienceblogs.de/bloodnacid/2015/03/19/quo-vadis-science-slam/ (last accessed 17. Juli 2019).
[3] The 50 videos of the best-of playlists for the years 2013-2016 on https://www.youtube.com/user/ScienceSlam, the largest channel on this topic, contain 43 slams from the MINT area, but only five from the humanities and social sciences and two from economics. For 2017 and 2018, the ratio has balanced out somewhat: 24 MINT videos are juxtaposed with 14 slams from the humanities and social sciences.
[4] Miira Hill, “Die Versinnbildlichung von Gesellschaftswissenschaften. Herausforderungen Science Slam,” in: Öffentliche Gesellschaftswissenschaften., ed. Stefan Selke and Annette Treibel (Wiesbaden: Spinger), 2018, 169-186. Here: 175-177.
[5] Klaus Bergmann, “Gegenwarts- und Zukunftsbezug,” in Methoden im Geschichtsunterricht, ed. Ulrich Mayer, Hans-Jürgen Pandel and Gerhard Schneider (Schwalbach/Ts.: Wochenschau, 2004) 91-112.
[6] As an example of irritation through alterity: Sebastian Hunke: Warum Tieren im Mittelalter der Prozess gemacht wurde, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IEqxsZm2D1A, Gegenwartsbezüge als Verständnishilfen in Jens Notroff: Sesshaft dank Bier, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IFHDkqgaGOY, und Kontinuitäten historischer Phänomene in Elisabeth Ruffert: Was Geschenke bei Hofe bedeuten, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JBQIdbnwyfo&feature=youtu.be (last accessed am 17. Juli 2019).
[7] Andreas M. Scheu and Anna-Maria Volpers, “Sozial- und Geisteswissenschaften im öffentlichen Diskurs,” in Forschungsfeld Wissenschaftskommunikation, ed. Heinz Bonfadelli (Wiesbaden: Springer, 2017) 391-404. Hier: 400.

_____________________

Image Credits

Science Slam Historikertag 2018 © Alex Hofmann

Recommended Citation

Münch, Daniel: Science Slams: Entertaining Research. In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 30, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-14755.

Editorial Responsibility

Christian Bunnenberg / Peter Gautschi (Team Lucerne)

Neben klassischen Fachvorträgen und Posterpräsentationen bietet der Deutsche Historikertag seit 2014 auch die Möglichkeit, das eigene Forschungsprojekt im Rahmen eines Science Slams vorzustellen, also als kurze Bühnenshow. Science Slams sind in vielen Städten inzwischen Teil des abendlichen Kulturprogramms. Beiträge aus der Geschichtswissenschaft oder anderen geisteswissenschaftlichen Fächern bilden dabei die Ausnahme. Lassen sich deren Inhalte schwerer in das neue Format überführen und wie lösen die Slammer*innen diese Herausforderungen?

Wettbewerb um das Publikum zu aktivieren

Zu einem Science Slam treten mehrere Wissenschaftler*innen – meist vier bis sechs – gegeneinander an und versuchen, das Publikum mit zehnminütigen Vorträgen über das eigene Forschungsprojekt zu informieren und zu unterhalten. Anders als bei Poetry Slams sind jegliche Hilfsmittel erlaubt, was zumeist Beamerpräsentationen, gelegentlich aber auch Vorführexperimente umfasst. Zwingend erforderlich ist jedoch, dass es sich um eigene Forschung statt nur angelesenes Wissen handelt. Über den Sieg entscheidet das Publikum, Abstimmungen erfolgen über Punktetafeln oder die Lautstärke des Applauses. Durch kurze Pausen zum Diskutieren nach jedem Auftritt oder der Möglichkeit, Fragen an die Vortragenden zu stellen, kann zusätzlich zur Auseinandersetzung mit den Themen angeregt werden.[1]

Mitschnitte konservieren Live-Auftritte

Obwohl Science Slams als Live-Veranstaltungen konzipiert sind, zeichnen manche Veranstalter*innen die Vorträge auch auf und stellen die Videos ins Internet. Für Forscher*innen stellen diese eine methodische Alternative zur teilnehmenden Beobachtung dar, wenngleich die Aktivitäten des Publikums größtenteils aus den Blick geraten und auch eher erfolgreiche Slammer*innen ihre Mitschnitte dafür freigeben. Die Videos sind daher nicht repräsentativ, aber potentielle Vorbilder und damit stilbildend. Zahlreiche Fragen lohnen eine Analyse: Welche Stilmittel werden verwendet? Welches Bild von Wissenschaft und Forschung präsentieren die Slammer*innen? In welchem Verhältnis stehen Unterhaltsamkeit und Wissenschaftlichkeit oder polemischer formuliert: wird Wissenschaft trivialisiert?[2]

Ausgehend von der Dominanz bestimmter Fächer lässt sich aber auch die Fachspezifik des Formats untersuchen. Wieso überwiegen Beiträge aus dem MINT-Spektrum, insbesondere aus Physik und Medizin?[3] Gibt es in den Geisteswissenschaften eine größere Skepsis gegenüber populären Formen der Wissenschaftskommunikation oder lassen sich deren Themen schwerer als Science Slam aufbereiten?[4]

Chronologisch erzählen…

Für Paper und Poster hat sich in den MINT-Fächern ein Standardaufbau aus Theorie – Methode – Ergebnisse etabliert. Dies scheint auch für Slams adaptiert zu werden: Nach einer allgemeinen Einführung in die Disziplin wird die eigene Forschungsfrage und deren Relevanz erläutert. Oft aufgelockert durch das Spiel mit Fachklischees oder einer eingängigen Metapher, um natürliche Prozesse zu veranschaulichen. Es folgen Darstellungen des Vorgehens und bisheriger Ergebnisse.

Größere Abweichungen von diesem Grundmuster sind nicht nur möglich, sondern auch üblich: Einzelne dieser Schritte können fehlen oder den Großteil des Slams bilden. Für die geisteswissenschaftliche Forschung scheint dieser Aufbau trotz seiner Variablität wenig geeignet. Methodische Fragen haben ein anderes Gewicht und das Forschungsergebnis besteht meist aus einer längeren Erzählung statt aus auflistbaren Resultaten.

… oder mit Anekdoten erläutern?

Solche Erzählungen – also die sinnbildende Verknüpfung verschiedener Zeitpunkte – finden sich in den historischen Slams, mindestens genauso erfolgreich ist aber eine andere Strategie: Mehrere Historiker*innen präsentieren in ihren Slams eine Vielzahl kurzer Fallbeispiele anekdotischer Art, die irritieren und dadurch erheitern können. Die Irritation stellt gleichzeitig ein erklärungsbedürftiges Problem dar, das im besten Falle durch den oder die Slammer*in aufgelöst wird, indem sie oder er kontextualisiert oder Verständnis für damaliges Denken schafft. Das Publikum erlebt wiederum, dass Geschichtswissenschaft über das Zusammentragen von Fakten hinausgeht. Dieses Vorgehen bietet zwar den Vorteil, sich auch auf andere Geisteswissenschaften übertragen zu lassen – Slammer*innen aus Philosophie, Sprachwissenschaft und Kunstgeschichte gehen ähnlich vor – unklar ist aber, ob sich somit auch Entwicklungen vermitteln lassen, oder hierfür doch erzählt werden muss.

Während Narrativität kein Leitprinzip historischer Slams zu scheint, überrascht die Häufigkeit, Vielfalt und Deutlichkeit der Gegenwartsbezüge, wobei es sich weitaus häufiger um Sinn- als Ursachenzusammenhänge handelt.[5] Die Irritation durch die historischen Fallbeispiele ergibt sich aus deren vergleichsweise impliziten Widerspruch zu den gegenwartsgeprägten Erwartungen des Publikums. Die Slammer*innen führen aber auch explizite Vergleiche an, um Verständnishilfen zu schaffen oder zu zeigen, dass vermeintlich Überwundenes auch heute noch präsent ist.[6] Hinzu tritt der Einsatz des Gegenwartsbezuges zur Motivation und Begründung des Forschungsthemas, da anders als in den meisten MINT-Fächern kein unmittelbarer praktischer Nutzen besteht und Verweise auf Forschungslücken voraussetzen würden, dass das Publikum über den Forschungsstand zum Thema informiert wäre.

Ein anderes Bild von (Geistes-)Wissenschaft

Das Format Science Slam zwingt zum Umdenken: strikte Zeitvorgaben zwingen zu Kürze und Prägnanz, es kann sich nur sehr begrenzt auf Vorwissen verlassen werden und Relevanz sollte nicht allein fachlich begründet werden. Gleichzeitig führen diese Vorgaben aber Historiker*innen zurück zum Prinzip des Gegenwartsbezuges und der Erkenntnis, dass sich damit selbst scheinbar seltsame Themen auch für Fachfremde unterhaltsam und verständlich präsentieren lassen.

Dem Publikum bietet sich auf Science Slams die Gelegenheit, Wissenschaft als Prozess zu erleben, sicherlich ein wichtigerer Einblick als jener in die speziellen Befunde der einzelnen Projekte. Da vorzugsweise laufende Projekte vorgestellt werden, erscheint Wissenschaft als etwas unfertiges und vorläufiges, nicht als vollendetes Theoriegebäude. Diese Darstellung dürfte allen Fächern wichtig sein, ist für die Geisteswissenschaften aber besonders bedeutsam, erscheinen ihre Vertreter*innen doch häufig eher als Gelehrte und Wissensverwalter*innen denn als Forscher*innen und Entdecker*innen.[7] Deshalb sollten gerade Geisteswissenschaftler*innen und speziell Historiker*innen diese Möglichkeit nutzen, ihre Forschung als Tätigkeit und nicht bloß als Ergebnis zu präsentieren.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Hill, Miira. “Die Versinnbildlichung von Gesellschaftswissenschaften. Herausforderungen Science Slam.” In Öffentliche Gesellschaftswissenschaften., edited by Stefan Selke and Annette Treibel, 169-186. Wiesbaden: Springer, 2018.
  • Eisenbarth, Britta and Markus Weißkopf. “Science Slam: Wettbewerb für junge Wissenschaftler.” In Handbuch Wissenschaftskommunikation, edited by Beatrice Dernbach and Christian Kleinert, 155-163. Wiesbaden: Springer, 2012.

Webressourcen

_____________________
[1] André Lampe, “Science Slam als Bereicherung einer Tagung oder Konferenz,” in Neue Konzepte für einprägsame Events. Partizipation statt Langeweile – vom Teilnehmer zum Akteur, ed. Thorsten Knoll (Wiesbaden: Springer 2016), 109-124. Hier: 110-111. Der Begriff „Science Slam“ ist nicht geschützt, kann also auch für Veranstaltungen mit abweichenden Regeln genutzt werden, was innerhalb der Szene kritisiert wird, vgl. Scienceslam.de: Aus aktuellem Anlass: Science Slam: Was das ist – und was nicht, Science Blogs, 1. April 2016, http://scienceblogs.de/scienceslam/2016/04/01/aus-aktuellem-anlass-science-slam-was-das-ist-und-was-nicht/ (letzter Zugriff 7. August 2019).
[2] Trivialisierung und damit zusammenhängend die Kommerzialisierung von Wissenschaft ist ein verbreiteter Vorwurf und bezieht sich insbesondere auf den Wettbewerbscharakter. Magnus Klaue, “Die Wanderbühne der Wissenschaft,” Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, April 22, 2015, https://www.faz.net/aktuell/feuilleton/forschung-und-lehre/die-wanderbuehne-der-wissenschaft-was-science-slams-ueber-die-wissenschaft-verraten-13549279.html (letzter Zugriff 17. Juli 2019). Dies wird auch innerhalb der Szene diskutiert: Cornelius Courts: Quo vadis, Science Slam, Scienceblogs, März 19, 2015 https://scienceblogs.de/bloodnacid/2015/03/19/quo-vadis-science-slam/ (letzter Zugriff 17. Juli 2019).
[3] Die 50 Videos der best-of-Playlisten für die Jahre 2013-2016 auf https://www.youtube.com/user/ScienceSlam, dem größten Kanal zu diesem Thema, enthalten 43 Slams aus dem MINT-Bereich, aber nur fünf geistes- bzw. sozialwissenschaftliche, sowie zwei aus den Wirtschaftswissenschaften. Für 2017 und 2018 hat sich das Verhältnis etwas ausgeglichen: 24 MINT-Videos stehen hier 14 geistes- und sozialwissenschaftliche Slams gegenüber.
[4] Miira Hill, “Die Versinnbildlichung von Gesellschaftswissenschaften. Herausforderungen Science Slam,” in: Öffentliche Gesellschaftswissenschaften., ed. Stefan Selke and Annette Treibel (Wiesbaden: Spinger), 2018, 169-186. Hier: 175-177.
[5] Klaus Bergmann, “Gegenwarts- und Zukunftsbezug,” in Methoden im Geschichtsunterricht, ed. Ulrich Mayer, Hans-Jürgen Pandel and Gerhard Schneider (Schwalbach/Ts.: Wochenschau, 2004) 91-112.
[6] Als Beispiel für Irritation durch Alterität: Sebastian Hunke: Warum Tieren im Mittelalter der Prozess gemacht wurde, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IEqxsZm2D1A, Gegenwartsbezüge als Verständnishilfen in Jens Notroff: Sesshaft dank Bier, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IFHDkqgaGOY, und Kontinuitäten historischer Phänomene in Elisabeth Ruffert: Was Geschenke bei Hofe bedeuten, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JBQIdbnwyfo&feature=youtu.be (letzter Zugriff am 17. Juli 2019).
[7] Andreas M. Scheu and Anna-Maria Volpers, “Sozial- und Geisteswissenschaften im öffentlichen Diskurs,” in Forschungsfeld Wissenschaftskommunikation, ed. Heinz Bonfadelli (Wiesbaden: Springer, 2017) 391-404. Hier: 400.

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Science Slam Historikertag 2018 © Alex Hofmann

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Münch, Daniel: Science Slams: Unterhaltsame Forschung. In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 30, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-14755.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Christian Bunnenberg / Peter Gautschi (Team Lucerne)

Copyright (c) 2019 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 7 (2019) 30
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-14755

Tags: , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

I accept that my given data and my IP address is sent to a server in the USA only for the purpose of spam prevention through the Akismet program.More information on Akismet and GDPR.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest