Public History, Public Religion, Public X?

From our “Wilde 13” section.


Public History is an “asset for the humanities. Many of the concepts and tools of Public History seem like they could be easily applied to other subjects. For instance, instead of speaking about “past-related identity discourses”[1] one could talk about “Judaism-related identity discourses”. However, while Public History, Public Religion – really, Public X – could be basically the same thing, just with a different subject matter, they aren’t. Looking to other Public X’s can improve both sides.

What’s the Public in Public X?

Some Public X have a few things in common. For instance, both Public History and Public Theology are interdisciplinary.[2] They can be done alone or together with others (professionals or not). Both convey their subject to audiences outside the world of universities [3]. In both Public History and Public Judaism, identities play an important role.[4] But beyond that, the concept of ‘public’ seems to be quite different.

For Public History, it’s a lot about all forms of consuming and producing history in public: service, media or place; expert- or user-created; formal or unintended. What are their narratives, meanings, attached emotions, perceptions, uses, impacts, relations?[5] Public History experts want to meet their audiences’ needs while being “academically defensible.”[6]

For Public Theology, it’s about how faith, with its values and meanings, is being related to and shaping public issues, views, decisions and policies. How do these views spread and change? How can religion add to justice and a good society, e.g. by helping the powerless?[7] In this field, there are many Christians that want to introduce their views.  For them, it’s also about being a ‘witness’ and showing that a Christian faith is ‘reasonable’.[8]

For Public Judaism it’s about how Jewish history, tradition, values and law are voiced in the public, its issues and policies.[9] It wants to build a just social vision “based on Biblical and Rabbinic sources.”[10] It deals both with “responsibilities toward other Jews”[11] and improving the world at large[12].

Extending the Concept – Improving its Marketing

Besides making working together across fields easier, how could both sides be improved if the different Public X would have a more shared understanding of what the Public in their name means?

Public Christianity and Public Judaism could benefit from using Public History’s concepts and tools, for instance in studying how people consume and produce their religion in the public. Moreover, it seems that while aspects of that are already studied quite frequently, it is often not connected to the concept of Public Judaism. For instance, ‘Jewish identity’ is an important part of research in Jewish studies and Jewish education, as its 91,200 hits on Google Scholar attest. However, it is rarely connected to the term ‘Public Judaism’ (124 hits). Similarly, Judaism in the media has 141,000 hits – combined with ‘Public Judaism’, that drops to only 59. Public Judaism needs much better marketing, even within the fields of Jewish studies and Jewish education.

Already now, Public History has been described as “one way for academic historians to demonstrate community engagement and outreach impact.”[13] Public History could benefit by more strongly marketing the application of its results to improving current society as one of its key elements.

Moreover, the work on topics of common interest to both fields (e.g. Holocaust education) might benefit by ‘Public Judaism’ and ‘Public History’ entering into a dialogue. Until now, that seems to be virtually non-existent – there are only two hits on Google Scholar for a search that includes both terms.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Demantowsky, Marko. “What is Public History.” In Public History and School. International Perspectives, edited by Marko Demantowsky, 1-38. Boston, Berlin: De Gruyter, 2018.
  • Unger, Abraham. A Jewish Public Theology: God and the Global City. Lanham: Lexington Books, 2019.

Web Resources

_____________________

 [1] Marko Demantowsky, “What is Public History,” in Public History and School. International Perspectives, ed. Marko Demantowsky (Berlin: De Gruyter, 2018), 1-38, here 31.
[2] Bspw. Demantowsky (2018) and Jayme Reaves, “What is Public Theology?”, http://www.jaymereaves.com/blog/2016/10/22/what-is-public-theology (last access 23. September 2019).
[3] Bspw. Tim O’Grady, “What is Public History and Why Does it Matter,” https://sites.google.com/site/timogradypublichistorian/what-is-public-history-and-why-does-it-matter, (last access 23. September 2019) und Nick Sacco, “What is Public History?,” https://pastexplore.wordpress.com/2013/01/02/what-is-public-history/ (last access 23. September 2019). Also Serge Noiret, “Internationalizing Public History,” Public History Weekly 2 2013 34, https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/2-2014-34/internationalizing-public-history/ (last access 23. September 2019) und Callid, “What is Public Theology?,” http://theimageoffish.com/2017/04/25/what-is-public-theology/ (last access 23. September 2019).
[4] Demantowsky (2018) und Charles S. Liebman, “Jewish Survival, Antisemitism, and Negotiation with the Tradition,” in The Americanization of the Jews, ed. Robert M. Seitzer and Norman J. Cohen (New York: New York University Press, 2018), 436-450.
[5] Daisy Martin, “Public History in Schools? Why and How?,” in Public History Weekly 6 2018 19, https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/6-2018-19/public-history-in-schools/ (last access 23. September 2019), und Noiret (2014).
[6] Tim O’Grady, “What is Public History and Why Does it Matter,” https://sites.google.com/site/timogradypublichistorian/what-is-public-history-and-why-does-it-matter, (last access 23. September 2019).
[7] Reaves (2016), Nukhet Ahu Sandal, “The Clash of Public Theologies? Rethinking the Concept of Religion in Global Politics,” in Alternatives: Global, Local, Political 37 2012 (1), 66-83. Also Kyle Roberts, “Calling For Public Theology (A Brief Convocation Address),” https://www.patheos.com/blogs/cultivare/2014/10/calling-for-public-theology-a-brief-convocation-address/ (last access 23. September 2019).
[8] Z.B. Roberts (2014), Stephen Lakkis, “What is Public Theology?,” http://www.taiwancpt.org/about/about.html (last access 23. September 2019) and James Bishop, “Working Towards a Definition of Public Theology,” https://jamesbishopblog.com/2016/06/06/working-towards-a-definition-of-public-theology/ (last access 23. September 2019).
[9] Abraham Unger, A Jewish Public Theology: God and the Global City. (Lanham: Lexington Books, 2019). Liebman (1995); Jill Jacobs,“Op-Ed: Embracing public Judaism,” https://www.jta.org/2009/06/30/opinion/op-ed-embracing-public-judaism (last access 23. September 2019).
[10] Unger (2019), xi.
[11] Liebman (1995), 443.
[12] Unger (2019) and Joanne Palmer, “Jewish public theology,” in Jewish Standard February 28 2019, https://jewishstandard.timesofisrael.com/jewish-public-theology/ (last access 23. September 2019).
[13] Thomas Cauvin, “The Rise of Public History: An International Perspective,” Historia Crítica (68):3-26. doi: 10.7440/histcrit68.2018.01, 18.

_____________________

Image Credits

Man holding out hand © 2019 rawpixel via pexels.

Recommended Citation

Viehrig, Kathrin: Public History, Public Religion, Public X? In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 27, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-14219.

Editorial Responsibility

Moritz Hoffmann / Marko Demantowsky (Team Basel)

Public History sei ein “Gewinn für die Geisteswissenschaften”. Viele der Konzepte und Werkzeuge von Public History scheinen so, als könnten sie einfach auf andere Fächer angewendet werden. Zum Beispiel, statt von “Vergangenheits-bezogenen Identitäts-Diskursen”[1] zu sprechen, könnte man über “Judentums-bezogene Identitäts-Diskurse” reden. Allerdings: während Public History, Public Religion – tatsächlich Public X – grundlegend das Gleiche, nur mit einem anderen Gegenstand, sein könnten, sind sie das nicht. Andere Public X’s anzuschauen kann beide Seiten verbessern.

Was ist Public bei Public X?

Einige Public X haben ein paar Sachen gemeinsam. Zum Beispiel sind sowohl Public History als auch Public Theology interdisziplinär [2]. Sie können allein oder gemeinsam mit anderen (ob Fachleute oder nicht) ‘getan’ werden. Beide vermitteln ihren Gegenstand an ein Publikum ausserhalb der Welt der Universitäten [3]. Sowohl in Public History als auch Public Judaism spielen Identitäten eine wichtige Rolle [4]. Aber darüber hinaus scheint das Konzept von ‘Public’ (Öffentlich) ziemlich unterschiedlich zu sein.

Für Public History geht es viel um alle Formen des Konsums und der Produktion von Geschichte in der Öffentlichkeit: Dienstleistung, Medium oder Ort; Expert*innen- und benutzer*innen-generiert; formell oder unbeabsichtigt. Was sind ihre Narrative, Bedeutungen, verbundenen Emotionen, Wahrnehmungen, Nutzungen, Auswirkungen, Beziehungen?[5] Public History-Expert*innen möchten die Bedürfnisse ihres Publikums befriedigen und dabei “akademisch verteidigbar” sein.[6]

Für Public Theology geht es darum, wie Glaube, mit seinen Werten und Bedeutungen, mit öffentlichen Fragen, Sichtweisen, Entscheidungen und politischen Grundsätzen in Beziehung gesetzt wird und diese prägt. Wie verbreiten und ändern sich diese Sichtweisen? Wie kann Religion zu Gerechtigkeit und einer guten Gesellschaft beitragen, z.B. indem sie den Machtlosen hilft?[7] In diesem Feld gibt es viele Christ*innen, die ihre Sichtweise einführen möchten. Für sie geht es auch darum, ‘Zeug*in’ zu sein und zu zeigen, dass der christliche Glaube ‘vernünftig’ ist.[8]

Für Public Judaism geht es darum, wie Jüdische Geschichte, Tradition, Werte und Gesetz in der Öffentlichkeit, deren Fragen und politischen Grundsätzen zur Sprache kommen.[9] Es möchte eine gerechte soziale Vision aufbauen, “basierend auf biblischen und rabbinischen Quellen”.[10] Es beschäftigt sich sowohl mit den “Verantwortlichkeiten gegenüber anderen Juden”[11] als auch mit der Verbesserung der Welt im Allgemeinen.[12]

Das Konzept erweitern – sein Marketing verbessern

Abgesehen von der Vereinfachung der Zusammenarbeit über Fachgrenzen hinaus: Wie könnten die Anliegen der Beteiligten besser zur Geltung gebracht werden, wenn die verschiedenen Public X ein stärker geteiltes Verständnis davon hätten, was das ‘Public’ in ihrem Namen bedeutet?

Public Christianity und Public Judaism könnten von Public-History-Konzepten und -Methoden profitieren, z.B. bei der Untersuchung, wie Menschen ihre Religion in der Öffentlichkeit konsumieren und produzieren. Darüber hinaus hat es den Anschein, dass während Aspekte davon schon ziemlich häufig untersucht werden, dies oft nicht mit dem Konzept von Public Judaism in Verbindung gebracht wird. Zum Beispiel ist ‘Jüdische Identität’ ein wichtiger Teil der Forschung in den Bereichen Jüdische Studien und Jüdischer Bildung, wie die 91.200 Treffer auf Google Scholar zeigen (dies bezieht sich auf die entsprechenden englischen Suchbegriffe, auch in den folgenden Beispielen). Jedoch wird es kaum mit dem Begriff ‘Public Judaism’ verbunden (124 Treffer). In ähnlicher Weise hat Judentum in den Medien 141.000 Treffer – wenn man es mit ‘Public Judaism’ kombiniert fällt diese Zahl auf nur 59. Public Judaism braucht ein viel besseres Marketing, sogar innerhalb der Fachgebiete Jüdische Studien und Jüdische Bildung.

Schon jetzt wurde Public History als ein Weg beschrieben, “wie wissenschaftliche Historiker Engagement in Öffentlichkeitsarbeit und Wirkung demonstrieren” können.[13] Public History könnte davon profitieren, die Anwendung ihrer Ergebnisse auf die Verbesserung der gegenwärtigen Gesellschaft stärker als eines ihrer Schlüsselelemente zu vermarkten.

Darüber hinaus könnte die Arbeit an Themen, die für beide Fachgebiete von Interesse sind (z.B. Holocaustbildung), davon profitieren, dass ‘Public Judaism’ und ‘Public History’ in einen Dialog eintreten. Bis jetzt scheint dies so gut wie nicht zu existieren – es gibt nur zwei Treffer auf Google Scholar für eine Suche, die beide Begriffe beinhaltet.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Demantowsky, Marko. “What is Public History.” In Public History and School. International Perspectives, edited by Marko Demantowsky, 1-38. Boston, Berlin: De Gruyter, 2018.
  • Unger, Abraham. A Jewish Public Theology: God and the Global City. Lanham: Lexington Books, 2019.

Webressourcen

_____________________

 [1] Marko Demantowsky, “What is Public History,” in Public History and School. International Perspectives, ed. Marko Demantowsky (Berlin: De Gruyter, 2018), 1-38, here 31.
[2] For example Demantowsky (2018) and Jayme Reaves, “What is Public Theology?”, http://www.jaymereaves.com/blog/2016/10/22/what-is-public-theology (letzter Zugriff 23. September 2019).
[3] e.g. Tim O’Grady, “What is Public History and Why Does it Matter,” https://sites.google.com/site/timogradypublichistorian/what-is-public-history-and-why-does-it-matter, (letzter Zugriff 23. September 2019) and Nick Sacco, “What is Public History?,” https://pastexplore.wordpress.com/2013/01/02/what-is-public-history/ (letzter Zugriff 23. September 2019). Also Serge Noiret, “Internationalizing Public History,” Public History Weekly 2 2013 34, https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/2-2014-34/internationalizing-public-history/ (letzter Zugriff 23. September 2019) and Callid, “What is Public Theology?,” http://theimageoffish.com/2017/04/25/what-is-public-theology/ (letzter Zugriff 23. September 2019).
[4] Demantowsky (2018) and Charles S. Liebman, “Jewish Survival, Antisemitism, and Negotiation with the Tradition,” in The Americanization of the Jews, ed. Robert M. Seitzer and Norman J. Cohen (New York: New York University Press, 2018), 436-450.
[5] Daisy Martin, “Public History in Schools? Why and How?,” in Public History Weekly 6 2018 19, https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/6-2018-19/public-history-in-schools/ (letzter Zugriff 23. September 2019), and Noiret (2014).
[6] Tim O’Grady, “What is Public History and Why Does it Matter,” https://sites.google.com/site/timogradypublichistorian/what-is-public-history-and-why-does-it-matter, (letzter Zugriff 23. September 2019).
[7] Reaves (2016), Nukhet Ahu Sandal, “The Clash of Public Theologies? Rethinking the Concept of Religion in Global Politics,” in Alternatives: Global, Local, Political 37 2012 (1), 66-83. Also Kyle Roberts, “Calling For Public Theology (A Brief Convocation Address),” https://www.patheos.com/blogs/cultivare/2014/10/calling-for-public-theology-a-brief-convocation-address/ (letzter Zugriff 23 September 2019).
[8] e.g. Roberts (2014), Stephen Lakkis, “What is Public Theology?,” http://www.taiwancpt.org/about/about.html (letzter Zugriff 23 September 2019) and James Bishop, “Working Towards a Definition of Public Theology,” https://jamesbishopblog.com/2016/06/06/working-towards-a-definition-of-public-theology/ (letzter Zugriff 23 September 2019).
[9] Abraham Unger, A Jewish Public Theology: God and the Global City. (Lanham: Lexington Books, 2019). Liebman (1995); Jill Jacobs,“Op-Ed: Embracing public Judaism,” https://www.jta.org/2009/06/30/opinion/op-ed-embracing-public-judaism (letzter Zugriff 23. September 2019).
[10] Unger (2019), xi.
[11] Liebman (1995), 443.
[12] Unger (2019) and Joanne Palmer, “Jewish public theology,” in Jewish Standard February 28 2019, https://jewishstandard.timesofisrael.com/jewish-public-theology/ (letzter Zugriff 23. September 2019).
[13] Thomas Cauvin, “The Rise of Public History: An International Perspective,” Historia Crítica (68):3-26. doi: 10.7440/histcrit68.2018.01, 18.

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Man holding out hand © 2019 rawpixel via pexels.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Viehrig, Kathrin: Public History, Public Religion, Public X? In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 27, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-14219.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Moritz Hoffmann / Marko Demantowsky (Team Basel)

Copyright (c) 2019 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 7 (2019) 27
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-14219

Tags: , , , ,

Pin It on Pinterest