Public History in Schools? Why and How?

Public History an Schulen? Wozu und in welcher Form?


States that have an annual “Confederate Memorial” holiday on their calendars, cities that have appointed commissions to deliberate the future of Confederate monuments in their prized public spaces, new museums that document and teach the horrors of slavery and Jim Crow America—all of these have been recent topics in public discourse in the US.[1] Whether the public visibility of these topics signal a long overdue reckoning with an ugly past, a response to outright racist rhetoric and actions, a changing media landscape, or other factors, is not clear. But what is certain is that students encounter these topics and debates as they scroll down their social media feeds and consume media.

Two Models

Teenagers encounter history outside schools in varied forms and related to a multitude of topics. But teaching with representations of the past that are not academic or scholarly and concomitant ideas such as public memory and memorialization, is largely absent from state guidelines for history teaching in K-12 classrooms. That is unfortunate as public history offers valuable teaching and thinking opportunities for the secondary school classroom.[2] These come in at least two modes: curricula that puts the students in the role of consumer of public history, and curricula that situates the student as creator of public history.

Students as Consumer of Public History

Imagine a classroom where students are examining a graph that shows the number of Confederate monuments built between 1865 and 2016.[3] As they look at the graph, they generate observations and questions: “Look at the number during the 1920s—what is going on?” – “What’s happening in the 1960s? Why are so many built then?” This source analysis has been preceded by activities such as reading about the current debate over what to do with the Confederate monument in their Western town and will be followed by activities designed to make the distinction between “memory” and “history” clear and explicit for the students.[4]

Learning activities like this one acknowledge that students encounter accounts and representations of the past outside the classroom and use that fact to teach valuable lessons about the discipline. Students take on the role of skeptical consumer as they grapple with what they think they know about the past and how they know it. Situating a public representation of the past as an account to be interrogated allows students to learn about the materials, evidentiary requirements, and complexity of the discipline—similar to lessons focused on “what is history.”[5] Students must consider questions like: What is the purpose of the account? What evidence supports or contests this representation? What argument is being made about this past and its significance? They work with secondary sources–interpretations of the past—and get more guided practice in thinking through such accounts’ purposes and fidelity to the facts. Ultimately, teaching students how to question and consider public representations of the past can prepare students to be more informed and skeptical participants in the public sphere once they leave the classroom.

Students as Producer of Public History

Likewise, putting students in the role of producer of public history offers worthwhile teaching and learning opportunities.

Imagine a classroom where students are circulating around the space, stopping to survey different displays that memorialize the Reconstruction era.[6] With clipboards in hand, they are answering questions about their peers’ displays, noting the sources that are highlighted, the narrative (or lack thereof), the methods for engaging observers, and key takeaways for the intended audience. The displays (or mini memorial projects) are the culmination of a weeks-long unit where students have been immersed in studying Reconstruction and have been constructing memorials to the era or a sub-topic for a specified location or audience.

Producing these memorials required that students do thinking similar to what they do in a consumer role (e.g., analyze multiple sources, harness background information); but, it also requires that students make the necessary choices involved in creating historical interpretations and narratives for a real purpose and audience. And while the audience in this case was their classmates, public history projects in the classroom can require that students create products that will be viewed in public spaces such as the web or a local historic site.[7] Students then have to consider engaging, educating, and even provoking multiple audiences. They have to clarify the purposes of the memorial or representation and consider if specific interpretive choices further or hinder those purposes.[8] Questions related to the concept of scale, such as “what is the significance of this history for local, regional, and national audiences?” become important. And it’s likely that students will need to grapple with the emotional ties and attachments that different audiences bring to a particular event or account.

Wiser Consumers of the Representations of the Past

Creating public exhibits explicitly engages students in considering the social and political implications of representations of the past. The fact that partnerships between schools and local historical organizations often facilitate these projects and that students can work on a product with public value make these projects even more worthwhile.

Bringing public history into the secondary classroom offers opportunities to connect the student’s worlds inside and outside of school. It allows teachers to make visible how history works as a discipline and draw distinctions between memory or heritage and history. And it prepares students to be wiser consumers of the many representations of the past that they will encounter in their futures.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Cajani, Luigi: “Schools Facing Public History”, Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 16, dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-11922 (last accessed 14 May 2018).
  • Demantowsky, Marko (Ed.). Public History and School. International Perspectives. Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter Oldenbourg 2018 (in print).
  • Lucas, Robert M. People Need to Know: Confronting History in the Heartland. Washington D.C.: Peter Lang Publishing, 2016.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confederate_Memorial_Day (last accessed 14 May 2018) regarding Confederate Memorial Day. For an example of a commission and a new museum, respectively, see https://www.monumentavenuecommission.org (last accessed 14 May 2018), and the Legacy Museum from Enslavement to Mass Incarceration at https://eji.org/legacy-museum (last accessed 14 May 2018).
[2] Here, I use a broad definition of public history — one consistent with Serge Noiret’s 2014 identification of it as a “global discipline, which considers the presence of the past—and the construction of history outside academic settings” and where “public historians . . . interpret the past with and for the public.” Serge Noiret, “Internationalizing Public History”, Public History Weekly 2 (2014) 34, dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2014-2647 (last accessed 14 May 2018).
[3] “Whose Heritage? Public Symbols of the Confederacy,” Southern Poverty Law Center, April 21, 2016, https://www.splcenter.org/20160421/whose-heritage-public-symbols-confederacy (last accessed 14 May 2018).
[4] See David Lowenthal, “Fabricating Heritage,” History and Memory 10, 1 (1998), 5-24; Peter Seixas, “A History/Memory Matrix for History Education,” Public History Weekly 4 (2016) 6 dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-11398 (last accessed 14 May 2018).
[5] For examples of these kinds of lessons, see Denis Shemilt, 13-16 Project Evaluation (Edinburgh: Holmes McDougall, 1980); Robert B. Bain, “Into the Breach,” in, Knowing, Teaching and Learning History: National and International Perspectives N. Stearns, Peter Seixas, & Sam Wineburg (eds.) (New York: New York University Press, 2000), 331-352; Sam Wineburg, Daisy Martin, and Chauncey Monte-Sano, Reading Like a Historian: Teaching Literacy in Middle and High School Classrooms (New York: Teachers College Press, 2013), 1-16.
[6] Daisy Martin: “The Case of the Missing and Misunderstood Era”, Public History Weekly 5 (2017) 22, dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2017-9444 (last accessed 14 May 2018).
[7] For examples of this kind of curricula, see Robert M. Lucas, People Need to Know: Confronting History in the Heartland (Washington D.C.: Peter Lang Publishing, 2016); Linda Sargent Wood, “Hooked on Inquiry: History Labs in the Methods Course,” History Teacher 45, 4 (August 1, 2012): 549-567; and “Make Reconstruction History Visible,” Zinn Education Initiative, April 1, 2018,
https://zinnedproject.org/2018/04/make-reconstruction-history-visible/ (last accessed 14 May 2018).
[8] Robert B. Bain and Lauren McArthur Harris, Preface to This Fleeting World: A Short History of Humanity by David Christian (Massachusetts: Berkshire Publishing Group, LLC, 2008), ix-xv.

_____________________

Image Credits

Children in a school visit sorrounding the Lely’s Venus. British Museum, London, UK © Jorge Royan 2010, https://commons.m.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:London_-_British_Museum_-_2411.jpg (last accessed 15 May 2016).

Recommended Citation

Martin, Daisy: Public History at School. How and Why? In: Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 19, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-12061 .

Editorial Responsibility

Dominika Uczkiewicz / Krzysztof Ruchniewicz

Copyright (c) 2018 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

Bundesstaaten, die jährlich einen “Confederate Memorial“ Feiertag begehen, Städte, die Kommissionen berufen haben, um über die Zukunft der Konföderierten Denkmäler zu beraten, die in ihrem wertvollen öffentlichen Raum aufgestellt sind, neue Museen, die die Schrecken der Sklaverei dokumentieren und vermitteln, und Jim Crow America – all dies sind Themen, die in der jüngsten Zeit den öffentlichen Diskurs der USA geprägt haben.[1] Es lässt sich nicht sicher bestimmen, ob die öffentliche Debatte dieser Themen Ausdruck einer lange überfälligen Abrechnung mit einer dunklen Vergangenheit oder einer sich wandelnden Medienlandschaft ist, eine Reaktion auf geradezu rassistische Aussagen und Übergriffe oder auf andere Faktoren darstellt. Sicher ist aber, das Schülerinnen und Schüler auf diese Themen und Debatten stoßen, während sie durch ihre Social Media Feeds scrollen und Medien konsumieren.

Zwei methodische Ansätze

Außerhalb der Schule begegnen Jugendliche der Vergangenheit in unterschiedlichsten Formen und Themen. Dennoch sehen Richtlinien für den US-amerikanischen Geschichtsunterricht der Einzelstaaten im Grund- und Sekundarbereich weder vor, mit Vergangenheitsrepräsentationen zu arbeiten, die außerhalb der akademischen und wissenschaftlichen Welt entstanden sind, noch das öffentliche Gedächtnis und Gedenken zu thematisieren. Dies ist zu bedauern, da die Public History ja wertvolle Lehr- und Lernangebote für den Sekundarbereich bietet.[2] Diese ermöglicht mindestens zwei methodische Ansätze: einen Unterrichtsaufbau, der der Schülerschaft die Rolle von RezipientInnen einer Public History zuschreibt oder ein Unterricht, der sie als ihre Gestalter sieht.

SchülerInnen als RezipientInnen der Public History

Man stelle sich einen Klassenraum vor, in dem die SchülerInnen ein Diagramm analysieren, das die Anzahl der zwischen 1865 und 2016 errichteten Konföderierten Denkmäler darstellt.[3] Es fallen Anmerkungen und Fragen wie “Schaut mal auf die Zahlen in den 1920ern – was war da los?“ und “Was passierte in den 1960ern? Warum wurden da so viele gebaut?“. Zuvor hatte man sich mit der gegenwärtigen Debatte über das Konföderierten-Denkmal in ihrer westamerikanischen Stadt auseinandergesetzt und anschließend würden Übungen folgen, die den SchülerInnen den Unterschied zwischen “Erinnerung“ und “Vergangenheit“ verdeutlichen.[4] Solche Lerneinheiten nutzen die Tatsache, dass SchülerInnen auch außerhalb der Schule mit Vergangenheitserzählungen und -repräsentationen in Berührung kommen, um ihnen wertvolles Wissen über die Geschichtswissenschaft zu vermitteln. Die SchülerInnen  nehmen die Rolle kritischer RezipientInnen ein, während sie sich damit auseinandersetzen, was und woher sie etwas über die Vergangenheit wissen. Indem eine öffentliche Darstellung der Vergangenheit als eine Narration präsentiert wird, die hinterfragt werden kann, ermöglicht man SchülerInnen, die Quellen, Beweisanforderungen und die Komplexität der Disziplin kennenzulernen – ähnlich den Unterrichtsstunden, die sich der Frage nach der Natur der Geschichte widmen.[5] Die SchülerInnen setzen sich mit Fragen nach dem Sinn und Zweck dieser Narration auseinander, mit der Frage, welche Quellen diese Vergangenheitsvorstellung stützen und welche sie widerlegen, und welche Auseinandersetzungen um diese Vergangenheit und ihre Bedeutung(en) geführt wird. Sie arbeiten mit Sekundärliteratur – Interpretationen der Vergangenheit – und üben unter Anleitung die Ziele dieser Vergangenheitsvorstellungen kritisch zu hinterfragen und ihre Quellentreue zu analysieren. Indem SchülerInnen beigebracht wird, den öffentlichen Umgang mit der Vergangenheit zu hinterfragen, bereitet man sie auf eine aktive und kritische Teilhabe am öffentlichen Leben nach Verlassen der Schule vor.

SchülerInnen als Gestalter der Public History

Es lassen sich ebenso wertvolle Lehr- und Lernsituationen schaffen, wenn man SchülerInnen in die Rolle von GestalterInnen einer Public History versetzt: In einem Klassenzimmer bewegen sich SchülerInnen frei durch den Raum, um Schautafeln mit verschiedenen Darstellungen der Reconstruction-Ära zu begutachten.[6] Mit Klemmbrettern in der Hand beantworten sie Fragen über die Arbeit ihrer SchulkollegInnen, notieren die Quellen, die diese hervorgehoben haben, die (fehlende) Narration, die Strategien, mit denen die BetrachterInnen angesprochen werden sollen, und die Schlüsselmomente, die das avisierte Publikum verinnerlichen soll. Diese Schautafeln (bzw. Mini-Gedenkprojekte) stellen den Abschluss einer Projektwoche dar, während der die SchülerInnen sich selbstständig mit der Reconstruction-Ära beschäftigt haben und daraufhin Denkmäler für eine bestimmte Empfängergruppe oder Region konzipiert haben. Um diese Denkmäler zu entwerfen, mussten sich die SchülerInnen nicht nur in die übliche Rolle des RezipientInnen versetzen (u.a. verschiedene Quellen analysieren, Hintergrundinformationen nutzen), sondern auch die für die Schaffung einer historischen Narration und Interpretation für ein bestimmtes Publikum notwendige Auswahl treffen. Während in diesem Fall das Publikum ihre KlassenkameradInnen waren, können schulische Public-History-Projekte zu Ergebnissen führen, die einer breiteren Öffentlichkeit mittels des Internets oder im örtlichen Geschichtsmuseum präsentiert werden.[7] Die SchülerInnen müssen es in so einem Fall schaffen, ein vielfältiges Publikum anzusprechen, ihm Inhalte zu vermitteln und es sogar zu provozieren. Sie müssen den Zweck des Denkmals oder der Repräsentation bestimmen und entscheiden, ob bestimmte interpretative Lösungen diesen Absichten dienen oder ihnen widersprechen.[8] Fragen der Gewichtung, wie die Frage nach der Bedeutung eines Ereignisses für die lokale, regionale oder nationale Gemeinschaft, rücken in den Fokus. Womöglich werden SchülerInnen mit Emotionen umgehen müssen, die die jeweilige Gruppe mit einem bestimmten Ereignis oder einer Narration verbindet.

Bewusste RezipientInnen

Indem SchülerInnen an die Öffentlichkeit gerichtete Ausstellungen konzipieren, lernen sie die sozialen und politischen Implikationen von Vergangenheitsdarstellungen zu reflektieren. Derartige Projekte gewinnen, wenn sie in Kooperation zwischen Schulen und örtlichen historischen Organisationen entstehen und SchülerInnen Produkte von allgemeinem Interesse schaffen können.

Die Integration der Public History in den Unterricht der Sekundarstufe eröffnet die Möglichkeit, die Lebenswelten der SchülerInnen in und außerhalb der Schule zu verbinden. Sie ermöglicht es den LehrerInnen, das Funktionieren der Geschichtswissenschaft zu zeigen und zwischen Erinnerung bzw. Tradition und Geschichte zu differenzieren. Schließlich bereitet es die SchülerInnen darauf vor, bewusstere RezipientInnen der vielfältigen Vergangenheitsrepräsentationen, auf die sie treffen werden, zu sein.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Cajani, Luigi: “Schools Facing Public History”, Public History Weekly 6 (2018)16, dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-11922 (last accessed 14 May 2018).
  • Demantowsky, Marko (Ed.). Public History and School. International Perspectives. Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter Oldenbourg 2018 (in print).
  • Lucas, Robert M. People Need to Know: Confronting History in the Heartland. Washington D.C.: Peter Lang Publishing, 2016.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] Siehe https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confederate_Memorial_Day (letzter Zugriff am 14. Mai 2018) zum Gedenktag der Konföderierten. Beispiele solcher Kommissionen bzw. neuer Museen finden sich unter https://www.monumentavenuecommission.org (letzter Zugriff am 14. Mai 2018) und Informationen über das „Vermächtnis-Museum von der Versklavung bis zur Masseninhaftierung (Legacy Museum from Enslavement to Mass Incarceration)“ unter https://eji.org/legacy-museum (letzter Zugriff am 14. Mai 2018).
[2] Ich verwende eine weit gefasste Definition der Public History – eine die im Einklang steht mit Serge Noirets Verständnis als einer „globalen Disziplin, die die Präsenz der Vergangenheit – und die Konstruktion der Vergangenheit – außerhalb der akademischen Welt berücksichtigt“ und in der „öffentliche Historiker […] die Vergangenheit mit und für die Öffentlichkeit interpretieren.“ Serge Noiret, „Internationalizing Public History“ Public History Weekly, 2 (2014) 34, dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2014-2647 (letzter Zugriff am 14. Mai 2018).
[3] „Wessen Erbe? Öffentliche Symbole der Konföderierten [Whose Heritage? Public Symbols oft he Confederacy]”, Southern Poverty Law Center, 21. April 2016, https://www.splcenter.org/20160421/whose-heritage-public-symbols-confederacy (letzter Zugriff am 14. Mai 2018).
4] Siehe David Lowenthal, „Fabricating Heritage“, History and Memory 10, 1, (1998), S. 5-24; Peter Seixas, „A History/Memory Matrix for History Education“, Public History Weekly 4 (2016) 6 dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-11398 (letzter Zugriff am 14. Mai 2018).
[5] Für beispielhafte Unterrichtsstunden siehe Denis Shemilt, 13-16 Project Evaluation. (Edinburgh: Holmes McDougall, 1980); Robert B. Bain, „Into the Breach“, in N. Stearns, Peter Seixas und Sam Wineburg (Hrsg.): Knowing, Teaching and Learning History: National and International Perspectives (New York: New York University Press, 2000), S. 331-352; Sam Wineburg, Daisy Martin und Chauncey Monte-Sano: Reading Like a Historian: Teaching Literacy in Middle and High School Classrooms (New York: Teachers College Press, 2013), S. 1-16.
[6] Daisy Martin: „Der Fall der vergessenen und missverstandenen Ära“, Public History Weekly 5 (2017) 22, dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2017-9444 (letzter Zugriff am 14. Mai 2018).
[7] Beispiele für diese Art von Unterrichtsstunden finden Sie unter Robert M. Lucas, People Need to Know: Confronting History in the Heartland (Washington D.C.: Peter Lang Publishing, 2016); Linda Sargent Wood, „Hooked on Inquiry: History Labs in the Methods Course“, History Teacher 45, 4 (1. August 2012), S. 549-567; und „Make Reconstruction History Visible“, Zinn Education Initiative, 1. April 2018, https://zinnedproject.org/2018/04/make-reconstruction-history-visible/ (letzter Zugriff am 14. Mai 2018).
[8] Robert B. Bain und Lauren McArthur Harris: Preface to This Fleeting World: A Short History of Humanity von David Christian (Massachusetts: Berkshire Publishing Group, LLC, 2008),S. ix-xv.

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Children in a school visit sorrounding the Lely’s Venus. British Museum, London, UK © Jorge Royan 2010, https://commons.m.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:London_-_British_Museum_-_2411.jpg (letzter Zugriff am 16. Mai 2018).

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Martin, Daisy: Public History at School. How and Why? In: Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 19, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-12061 .

Translated by Maria Albers (mariaalbers /at/ hotmail. de)

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Dominika Uczkiewicz / Krzysztof Ruchniewicz

Copyright (c) 2018 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.


Categories: 6 (2018) 19
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-12061

Tags: , , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest