Monuments: Disputed, Transient, increasingly Utopian?

Denkmal: Umstritten, vergänglich, zunehmend utopisch?


The Monument for Historical Change at Berlin’s Rosa-Luxemburg-Platz is a collection of fragments from historical monuments. They originate from diverse historical periods and political systems and they refer to signs of material and immaterial deterioration in historical interpretations that have been cast in bronze and chiselled in stone. However, the ensuing question about modern forms of monuments that are appropriate for the 21st century has seldom been addressed in history teaching.

The Anti-Memorial

The eye-catcher of the Monument for Historical Change is the statue of Friedrich Wilhelm I. The Prussian king is conspicuously located at the monument’s edge. Opposite him there is an enlarged copy of a commemorative stone honoring Herbert Baum’s antifascist resistance group. The stone was erected in 1981 in the GDR and its inscription was modified in 2000. The center of the monument is occupied by the pedestal of The Caller [Der Rufer], a political monument. This sculpture was installed on the Straße des 17. Juni (Street of June 17), facing eastwards, in the spring of 1989.

Now, however, the pedestal is empty, representing criticism of the accounts of the superiority of the West. The steps that lead to the top of the pedestal are reproductions from the Memorial for Members of the International Brigades in the Spanish Civil War. This was erected in East Berlin in 1968 and is, today, just like the stone commemorating Herbert Baum’s anti-Nazi group, an example of the antifascist myth surrounding the establishment of the GDR. The ensemble is enclosed in a wall that was originally built, in 1913, for a Märchenbrunnen (fountain of fairy tales). Two traffic bollards make the whole thing appear even more trite, and thereby as a kind of anti-monument.[1]

Analyzing Monuments in History Classes

A learning objective of engaging with monuments in history classes in Germany is the realization that their disambiguating and simple statements about political history rarely cope adequately with the underlying complex historical relationships. In addition, students learn to distinguish between what was considered commemorable in the past and what is considered to be so today.[3]

They identify dominant historical interpretations and deal with the transition of historical models that were placed on pedestals and then toppled from them. An installation like the Monument for Historical Change in Berlin could be located in many places. During the last 200 years, cities and states have been recipients of numerous traditional presentations and are, today, their own museums. Historical representations of past epochs, as monuments, can be found everywhere.[4]

It would also be possible to gain general insights about a monument as a “non-discursive, homogenizing, mono-perspective medium”[5] (Volkhard Knigge) out of this either/or constellation. In learning tasks, a monument’s inherent characteristics – requiring consent and identification – are, however, only rarely related to the design of monuments in a pluralistic and open society. The design should prevent surprises, caused by compulsive pathos and simple messages, as well the flight into historical vagueness and into the non-binding nature of offers for historical-political orientation.

The Monument, a Thing of the Past?

Creating a balance in a monument between preservation and actualization, between orientation and reflection, is a challenging demand. It was not fulfilled for either the recently cancelled monument for unity and freedom at Berlin’s Schlossplatz[6] or for the Luther monument in front of Berlin’s St Mary’s Church, which, despite the Reformation jubilee, is still very tentative.[7] In the face of idea contests that do not yield results and yearlong disputes, setting up such monuments seems to be becoming increasingly utopian.

If students are to classify and evaluate all of this, they need an expanded concept for the term “monument”. This cannot only be aligned to 19th century tradition; instead, it has to be developed from today’s perspective. In pluralistic and open societies, one of the prerequisites for monuments to become a motor for societal debates, and not their capstone, is their orientation towards the recipients and innovative form.[8] It is therefore worth considering whether, in the face of society’s ongoing need to locate itself historically, participatory and uncomplicated projects, such as, for instance, laying Stolpersteine[9] in pavements, are not more appropriate, today, than large-scale projects and monumental constructions.[10]

From the perspective of a society that accepts competition and transformation of historical viewpoints and lives consciously with them, it is possible to discuss the idea of whether it would be better, right from the outset of planning, not to assume that monuments are eternal.
_____________________

Further Reading

  • Veen, H.-J., Knigge, V., eds. (2014). Denkmäler demokratischer Umbrüche nach 1945, Cologne: Böhlau.
  • Wegner, D. (1996). Denkmal. Erinnerung – Mahnung – Ärgernis. Schülerwettbewerb deutsche Geschichte um den Preis des Bundespräsidenten. Katalog der preisgekrönten Arbeiten, Hamburg: Körber-Stiftung.
  • Zerwas, M. (2015). Lernort Deutsches Eck. Zur Variabilität geschichtskultureller Deutungsmuster, Berlin: Logos.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] James E. Young, an American specialist in Jewish studies, coined the term “anti-memorial”. He draws attention to a change in memorial art that started in the 1980s. It moved away from ritualizations, such as mourning and reverential ceremonies, and targeted, instead, reflection and discourse. This art is more concerned with forms of memorials that are irritating and/or stimulate thoughtfulness, rather than being confirmatory. Young, James E.: The Texture of Memory. Holocaust Memorials and Meaning. New Haven/London 1993. German translation: ibid.: Formen des Erinnerns. Wien 1997.
[2] Clegg, Michael, Guttmann, Martin: Monument for Historical Change and Other Social Sculptures, Community Portraits and Other Social Sculptures 1990-2005. Vienna 2005, pp. 19-27.
[3] As an example of admiration for Bismarck in the German Empire, see Seele, Sieglinde, Lexikon der Bismarck-Denkmäler. Türme, Standbilder, Büsten, Gedenksteine und andere Ehrungen. Eine Bestandsaufnahme in Wort und Bild. Petersberg 2005.
[4] Denk Mal! Denkmäler untersuchen. segu Geschichte. Lernplattform für offenen Geschichtsunterricht http://segu-geschichte.de/methodenschwerpunkt-denkmal/ (last accessed 9 November 2016).
[5] Leppert, Manuel, “Braucht die Demokratie Denkmäler? Bericht zur Abschlussdiskussion des 12. Internationalen Symposiums der Stiftung Ettersberg” in: Denkmäler demokratischer Umbrüche nach 1945, eds.:Veen, Hans-Joachim,Knigge, Volkhard. Köln-Weimar-Wien 2014, p. 267-276, zit. p. 272.
[6] Deutsche Gesellschaft e.V.: Freiheits- und Einheitsdenkmal http://www.freiheits-und-einheitsdenkmal.de (last accessed 9 November 2016); Jens Bisky: Es wippt einfach nicht http://www.sueddeutsche.de/stil/einheitsdenkmal-es-wippt-einfach-nicht-1.2670360 (last accessed 9 November 2016).
[7] Probst, Carsten: Streit um ein schillerndes Luther-Denkmal. http://www.deutschlandfunk.de/berlin-streit-um-ein-schillerndes-luther-denkmal.691.de.html?dram:article_id=362728 (last accessed 9 November 2016).
[8] Leppert, Manuel, “Abschlussdiskussion”, p. 273.
[9] Memminger, Josef: Gutes oder schlechtes Gedenken? Keine Stolpersteine in München https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/4-2016-7/good-remembrance-bad-remembrance-no-stolpersteine-in-munich/ (last accessed 9 November 2016).
[10] Thünemann, Holger,  “Mehr Denkmäler – weniger Gedenken?” https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/1-2013-8/denkmaeler-ohne-gedenken/ (last accessed 9 November 2016).

_____________________

Image Credits
The Monument for Historical Change at Berlin © Anke John

Recommended Citation
John, Anke: Monuments: Disputed, Transient, increasingly Utopian? In: Public History Weekly 4 (2016) 40, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-7808. 

Translated from German by Jana Kaiser (kaiser at academic-texts.de)

Editorial Responsibility
Krzysztof Ruchniewicz / Dominika Uczkiewicz

Copyright (c) 2016 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

Das “Monument for Historical Change“ am Berliner Rosa-Luxemburg-Platz ist eine Sammlung von Fragmenten historischer Denkmäler. Aus diversen historischen Perioden und politischen Systemen stammend, verweisen sie auf die ideellen und materiellen Verfallserscheinungen in Bronze gegossener und in Stein gemeißelter Geschichtsinterpretationen. Die daran anschließende Frage nach zeitgemäßen Denkmalsformen für das 21. Jahrhundert wird im Geschichtsunterricht jedoch nur selten gestellt.

Das Gegendenkmal

Blickfang des “Monument for Historical Change”[1] ist das Standbild Friedrich Wilhelm I. Der preußische König ist auffällig an den Rand gesetzt. Ihm gegenüber ist eine vergrößerte Kopie des in der DDR 1981 errichteten Gedenksteins für die antifaschistische Widerstandsgruppe um Herbert Baum angeordnet, dessen Inschrift im Jahr 2000 korrigiert wurde. Im Zentrum befindet sich der Sockel des politischen Denkmals “Der Rufer”. Die Skulptur war noch im Frühjahr 1989 mit Blick gen Osten auf der Straße des 17. Juni in Stellung gebracht worden. Hier bleibt der Sockel als Kritik an der Erzählung vom überlegenen Westen allerdings leer. Zu ihm hinauf führen die nachgebildeten Stufen der “Gedenkstätte für die Interbrigadisten im Spanischen Bürgerkrieg”. Diese wurde 1968 in Ostberlin errichtet und ist heute wie der Gedenkstein an die NS-Widerstandsgruppe um Herbert Baum ein Beispiel für den antifaschistischen Gründungsmythos der DDR. Die Collage wird von der Mauer eines 1913 angelegten Märchenbrunnens eingefasst. Zwei Verkehrspoller lassen das Ganze noch banaler wirken und damit als eine Art Gegendenkmal erscheinen.[2]

Denkmalsanalysen im Geschichtsunterricht

Eine Installation wie das Berliner “Monument for Historical Change” ist vielerorts denkbar. Städte und Länder sind in den vergangenen 200 Jahren mit Traditionsinszenierungen reichlich bedacht worden und heute ein Museum ihrer selbst. In Denkmälern durchgesetzte Geschichtsbilder vergangener Epochen lassen sich so allerorten finden.[3]

Ein Lernziel der Beschäftigung mit Denkmälern im deutschen Geschichtsunterricht ist die Erkenntnis, dass ihre vereindeutigenden und schlichten geschichtspolitischen Aussagen selten den komplexen historischen Zusammenhängen gerecht geworden sind. SchülerInnen lernen darüber hinaus zu unterscheiden, was früher und heute als denkwürdig angesehen wurde bzw. angesehen wird. Sie identifizieren dominierende Narrative und setzen sich mit dem Wandel historischer Vorbilder auseinander, die auf den Sockel gehoben und wieder vom Sockel gestürzt worden sind.[4]

Aus diesem Entweder-Oder wären dabei auch allgemeine Einsichten über das Denkmal als ein prinzipiell “adiskursives, homogenisierendes, monoperspektivisches Medium”[5] (Volkhard Knigge) zu gewinnen. Die ihm eigenen Charakteristika der verlangten Zustimmung und Identifikation werden in Lernaufgaben allerdings nur selten auf die Denkmalsgestaltung in einer pluralen und offenen Gesellschaft bezogen. Diese sollte eine Überrumplung durch zwanghaftes Pathos und einfache Botschaften ebenso vermeiden wie die Flucht ins historisch Unkonkrete und in die Unverbindlichkeit des historisch-politischen Orientierungsangebotes.

Das Denkmal, ein Ding von gestern?

Eine Balance zwischen Bewahrung und Aktualisierung, Orientierung und Reflexion im Denkmal herzustellen, ist dabei ein hoher Anspruch. Er ist zuletzt weder für das gecancelte Berliner “Freiheits- und Einheitsdenkmal” auf dem Schlossplatz zu erfüllen gewesen[6] noch für ein Martin-Luther-Denkmal vor der Berliner Marienkirche, das trotz des Reformationsjubiläums auf der Kippe steht.[7] Angesichts ergebnisloser Ideenwettbewerbe und jahrelanger Dispute scheinen solche Denkmalsetzungen utopisch zu werden.

Damit SchülerInnen dies einordnen und bewerten können, benötigen sie einen erweiterten Denkmalsbegriff. Dieser wird sich nicht nur an der Tradition des 19. Jahrhunderts ausrichten, sondern von heutiger Warte zu entwickeln sein. Orientierung auf die Rezipienten und innovative Formen sind in pluralen und offenen Gesellschaften eine Voraussetzung dafür, dass Denkmäler gesellschaftliche Debatten anstoßen und nicht zum Schlussstein werden.[8]

Zu durchdenken ist daher, ob angesichts des anhaltenden Bedürfnisses, sich historisch zu verorten, nicht partizipative und schlichte Projekte wie das Verlegen von Stolpersteinen[9] zeitgemäßer sind als Großprojekte und Monumentalbauten.[10] Aus der Perspektive einer Gesellschaft, die Konkurrenz und Wandel von Geschichtsbildern zulässt und bewusst lebt, kann zudem die Idee diskutiert werden, ob es nicht besser wäre, schon bei der Planung von temporären, nicht auf die Ewigkeit gestellten Denkmälern auszugehen.

_____________________

Literaturhinweis

  • Hans-Joachim Veen / Volkhard Knigge (Hrsg): Denkmäler demokratischer Umbrüche nach 1945. Köln u.a. 2014.
  • Dirk Wegner: Denkmal. Erinnerung – Mahnung – Ärgernis. Schülerwettbewerb deutsche Geschichte um den Preis des Bundespräsidenten. Katalog der preisgekrönten Arbeiten. Hamburg 1996.
  • Marco Zerwas: Lernort Deutsches Eck. Zur Variabilität geschichtskultureller Deutungsmuster. Berlin 2015.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] Michael Clegg, Martin Guttmann: Monument for Historical Change and Other Social Sculptures, Community Portraits and Other Social Sculptures 1990-2005. Wien 2005, S. 19-27.
[2] Den Begriff “Gegendenkmal” (Gegen-Monument) prägte der amerikanische Judaist James E. Young. Er macht auf eine seit den 1980er Jahren veränderte Denkmalskunst aufmerksam, die sich von Ritualisierungen wie Trauer- und Ehrerbietungszeremonien abwandte und stattdessen auf Nachdenklichkeit und Diskurs zielte. Ihr geht es eher um irritierende, reflektierende als um bestätigende Denkmalformen. James E. Young: The Texture of Memory. Holocaust Memorials and Meaning, New Haven, London 1993. In der deutschen Übersetzung: Ders.: Formen des Erinnerns, Wien 1997.
[3] Exemplarisch für die Bismarckverehrung im Deutschen Kaiserreich – Seele, Sieglinde: Lexikon der Bismarck-Denkmäler. Türme, Standbilder, Büsten, Gedenksteine und andere Ehrungen. Eine Bestandsaufnahme in Wort und Bild, Petersberg 2005.
[4] Denk Mal! Denkmäler untersuchen. segu Geschichte. Lernplattform für offenen Geschichtsunterricht http://segu-geschichte.de/methodenschwerpunkt-denkmal/ (letzter Zugriff 09.11.2016)
[5] Leppert, Manuel: Braucht die Demokratie Denkmäler? Bericht zur Abschlussdiskussion des 12. Internationalen Symposiums der Stiftung Ettersberg. In: Veen, Hans-Joachim / Knigge, Volkhard (Hrsg.): Denkmäler demokratischer Umbrüche nach 1945, Köln/Weimar/Wien 2014, S. 267-276, zit. S. 272.
[6] Deutsche Gesellschaft e.V.: Freiheits- und Einheitsdenkmal http://www.freiheits-und-einheitsdenkmal.de (letzter Zugriff 09.11.2016); Jens Bisky: Es wippt einfach nicht http://www.sueddeutsche.de/stil/einheitsdenkmal-es-wippt-einfach-nicht-1.2670360 (letzter Zugriff 09.11.2016).
[7] Probst, Carsten: Streit um ein schillerndes Luther-Denkmal. http://www.deutschlandfunk.de/berlin-streit-um-ein-schillerndes-luther-denkmal.691.de.html?dram:article_id=362728 (letzter Zugriff 09.11.2016).
[8] Leppert, Manuel: Abschlussdiskussion, S. 273.
[9] Memminger, Josef: Gutes oder schlechtes Gedenken? Keine Stolpersteine in München https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/4-2016-7/good-remembrance-bad-remembrance-no-stolpersteine-in-munich/ (letzter Zugriff 09.11.2016).
[10] Thünemann, Holger: Mehr Denkmäler – weniger Gedenken? https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/1-2013-8/denkmaeler-ohne-gedenken/ (letzter Zugriff 09.11.2016).

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis
Monument for Historical Change. Rosa-Luxemburg Platz, Berlin-Mitte © Anke John

Empfohlene Zitierweise
John, Anke: Denkmal: Umstritten, vergänglich, zunehmend utopisch? In: Public History Weekly 4 (2016) 40, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-7808. 

Redaktionelle Verantwortung
Krzysztof Ruchniewicz / Dominika Uczkiewicz

Copyright (c) 2016 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.


Categories: 4 (2016) 40
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-7808

Tags: ,

2 replies »

  1. [For an English version please scroll down].

    Zum Denkmalbegriff der Gegenwart und seiner Relevanz für historisches Lernen: Anmerkungen zu Anke John

    Mit dem “Monument for Historical Change” am Berliner Rosa-Luxemburg-Platz weist Anke John auf ein bemerkenswertes Beispiel gegenwärtiger Memorialkunst hin, das den konventionellen Denkmalbegriff des 19. und 20. Jahrhunderts in einer Weise aus den Angeln hebt, die für historisches Lernen durchaus produktiv sein könnte. Könnte! Denn soweit ich sehe, spielen Denkmäler wie dieses im Geschichtsunterricht kaum eine Rolle. Ganz im Gegenteil. Es gibt immer noch Indizien dafür, dass Denkmäler allenfalls oberflächlich analysiert werden, dass sie “Aufschluss” geben sollen “über ein bestimmtes historisches Thema”, einen historischen Gegenstand oder eine historische Persönlichkeit. Als ob beispielsweise das Hermannsdenkmal im Teutoburger Wald Aufschluss geben könnte über die Varusschlacht oder ein Kaiser-Wilhelm-Denkmal über die Persönlichkeit Wilhelms I.[1]

    Insofern erschließt sich nicht ganz, warum Anke John schreibt,

    “Lernziel der Beschäftigung mit Denkmälern im deutschen Geschichtsunterricht” sei “die Erkenntnis, dass ihre vereindeutigenden und schlichten geschichtspolitischen Aussagen selten den komplexen historischen Zusammenhängen gerecht geworden sind. SchülerInnen lernen darüber hinaus zu unterscheiden, was früher und heute als denkwürdig angesehen wurde bzw. angesehen wird. Sie identifizieren dominierende Narrative und setzen sich mit dem Wandel historischer Vorbilder auseinander, die auf den Sockel gehoben und wieder vom Sockel gestürzt worden sind.”

    Weitreichende Einschätzungen wie diese müssten durch Lehrplan-, Schulbuch- oder Unterrichtsanalysen dringend empirisch überprüft werden. Anderenfalls bleiben wir auch in Zukunft im Unklaren darüber, wie groß die Kluft zwischen dem normativ Wünschenswerten und dem empirisch Belegbaren eigentlich ist.

    Folgt man Anke John weiter, dann sollte dringend durchdacht werden,

    „ob angesichts des anhaltenden Bedürfnisses, sich historisch zu verorten, nicht partizipative und schlichte Projekte wie das Verlegen von Stolpersteinen zeitgemäßer sind als Großprojekte und Monumentalbauten. Aus der Perspektive einer Gesellschaft, die Konkurrenz und Wandel von Geschichtsbildern zulässt und bewusst lebt, kann zudem die Idee diskutiert werden, ob es nicht besser wäre, schon bei der Planung von temporären, nicht auf die Ewigkeit gestellten Denkmälern auszugehen.“

    Mit diesen Anregungen greift Anke John auf den Forschungsstand des ausgehenden 20. Jahrhunderts zurück. Bereits 1975 plädierte Willibald Sauerländer für eine “Erweiterung des Denkmalbegriffs”, für einen “sozialbewußten und urbanen, auf die Zukunft der Bürger und der Res publica gerichteten Denkmalbegriff”, der das konventionelle Denkmalkonzept schleifen und die in den 1970er Jahren virulente Denkmalkrise überwinden sollte.[2] Seitdem erleben wir ‒ inspiriert durch eine in den 1980er Jahren an Dynamik gewinnende Debatte über “Kunst im öffentlichen Raum”[3] ‒ eine regelrechte Renaissance des Denkmals, eine Pluralisierung seiner gesellschaftspolitischen Funktionen und ästhetischen Formen. Michael Diers etwa publizierte vor knapp 25 Jahren einen vielbeachteten Sammelband zu “Formen und Funktionen ephemerer Denkmäler”.[4]

    Um nur das bekannteste vieler erfolgreicher Beispiele für die diskursive Kraft ephemerer Denkmäler anzuführen, sei das von Jochen Gerz und Esther Shalev-Gerz 1986 realisierte Konzept des Hamburger “Mahnmals gegen Faschismus” erwähnt, bei dem die Bandbreite gesellschaftlichen Geschichtsbewusstseins gerade nicht eingeebnet, sondern in Form eines diskursiven Psychogramms sichtbar gemacht wurde. [5] Denkmäler wie dieses setzten neue Maßstäbe.

    Wer diese Entwicklungen, die inzwischen ihrerseits eine mindestens drei Jahrzehnte lange Tradition haben, kennt und eingehend würdigt, wird zögern, Denkmäler als “prinzipiell” adiskursive, homogenisierende und monoperspektivische Medien zu bezeichnen. Das sind sie ‒ zumindest im ‘Westen’ ‒ wohl schon lange nicht mehr, allenfalls noch in totalitären Systemen.

    Anmerkungen
    [1] Vgl. dazu mit Nachweisen Holger Thünemann: Denkmäler als Orte historischen Lernens im Geschichtsunterricht ‒ Herausforderungen und Chancen. In: Saskia Handro/Bernd Schönemann (Hrsg.): Orte historischen Lernens. Berlin 2008 (Zeitgeschichte ‒ Zeitverständnis, Bd. 18), S. 197‒208, hier S. 197ff.
    [2] Vgl. Helmut Scharf: Kleine Kunstgeschichte des deutschen Denkmals. Darmstadt 1984, hier S. 19. Dort findet sich auch das Zitat von Willibald Sauerländer.
    [3] Volker Plagemann (Hrsg.): Kunst im öffentlichen Raum. Anstöße der 80er Jahre. Köln 1989.
    [4] Michael Diers (Hrsg.): Mo(nu)mente. Formen und Funktionen ephemerer Denkmäler. Berlin 1993 (Artefact, Bd. 5).
    [5] Vgl. James E. Young: Formen des Erinnerns. Gedenkstätten des Holocaust. Wien 1997, S. 58‒70, dem Anke John eine Fußnote widmet. Hätte sie ihre Argumentation um seine Publikation herum aufgebaut, wäre das vielleicht zielführender gewesen; vgl. auch Holger Thünemann: Holocaust-Rezeption und Geschichtskultur. Zentrale Holocaust-Denkmäler in der Kontroverse. Idstein 2005 (Schriften zur Geschichtsdidaktik, Bd. 17), hier S. 30 und S. 139 mit Anm. 327.

    ——————————————————

    On the present concept of “monuments” and its relevance for learning history: A few remarks on Anke John

    By mentioning the “Monument for Historical Change” on the Rosa-Luxemburg-Platz in Berlin, Anke John points out a remarkable example of current artistic memorial expressions. This example subverts conventional notions of a memorial, which date back to the 19th and 20th centuries, and could well be used productively for historical learning. Could! Because as far as I can see, memorials such as this one are virtually nonexistent in history education. Quite the opposite: Some indications point to the fact that memorials, if they are at all discussed, are generally analyzed in a superficial manner. Frequently, they are supposed to allow “insights into a certain historical topic” or a historical individual – as if the Herrmann memorial in the Teutoburg Forest allowed insights into the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest or a Kaiser Wilhelm memorial offered a view into the personality of Wilhelm I.[1]

    In the light of this, I cannot quite see why Anke John states that a

    “learning objective of engaging with monuments in history classes in Germany” was “the realization that their disambiguating and simple statements about political history rarely cope adequately with the underlying complex historical relationships. In addition, students learn to distinguish between what was considered commemorable in the past and what is considered to be so today.”

    Far-reaching claims such as this one need to be substantiated by empirical research and the analysis of curricula, textbooks and history lessons. Otherwise, it remains unclear how far normative goals and empirical facts are apart.

    Following Anke John further,

    it is “worth considering whether, in the face of society’s ongoing need to locate itself historically, participatory and uncomplicated projects, such as, for instance, laying Stolpersteine in pavements, are not more appropriate, today, than large-scale projects and monumental constructions. From the perspective of a society that accepts competition and transformation of historical viewpoints and lives consciously with them, it is possible to discuss the idea of whether it would be better, right from the outset of planning, not to assume that monuments are eternal.”

    With these suggestions, Anke John reaches back to the state of research of the late 20th century. As early as in 1975, Willibald Sauerländer advocated a “wider concept of memorials”, a “socially conscious and urban concept aimed at the citizens and the res publica” that was supposed to raze the conventional notion of memorials and overcome the monuments crisis of the 1970s. [2] Since then, we have witnessed a veritable Renaissance of memorials, a pluralization of its social functions and its aesthetic forms, inspired by the debate on “public art” of the 1980s and beyond. It was almost 25 years ago that Michael Diers published his widely received volume on “Forms and Functions of Ephemeral Monuments”.[4]

    To mention only the best-known of numerous successful examples of ephemeral monuments, consider Jochen Gerz and Esther Shalev-Gerz’s concept for Hamburg’s “monument against facism”, which was realized in 1986. Instead of homogenizing different views on history found in society, this memorial presents them in the form of a discursive psychographic profile. [5] Memorials such as this one set new standards.

    In the light of these developments, which now look back on a tradition of 30 years themselves, it seems rather far-fetched to claim that monuments generally are a “non-discursive, homogenizing, mono-perspective medium”. They have long ceased to be that – at least in “Western” societies. In totalitarian systems, however, this may still be the case.

    References
    [1] For this point and further references cf. Holger Thünemann: Denkmäler als Orte historischen Lernens im Geschichtsunterricht ‒ Herausforderungen und Chancen. In: Saskia Handro/Bernd Schönemann (eds.): Orte historischen Lernens. Berlin 2008 (Zeitgeschichte ‒ Zeitverständnis, vol. 18), p. 197‒208, particularly p. 197ff.
    [2] Cf. Helmut Scharf: Kleine Kunstgeschichte des deutschen Denkmals. Darmstadt 1984, p. 19. The original German language version of Willibald Sauerländer’s quote was taken from there.
    [3] Volker Plagemann (ed.): Kunst im öffentlichen Raum. Anstöße der 80er Jahre. Köln 1989.
    [4] Michael Diers (ed.): Mo(nu)mente. Formen und Funktionen ephemerer Denkmäler. Berlin 1993 (Artefact, vol. 5).
    [5] Cf. James E. Young: Formen des Erinnerns. Gedenkstätten des Holocaust. Vienna 1997, pp. 58‒70 [original edition: James E. Young, The Texture of Memory. Holocaust Memorials and Meaning, New Haven/London 1993], a volume that receives a mention in a footnote. If Anke John had based her argument on this 25 year-old publication, it would have been more productive. Cf. Holger Thünemann: Holocaust-Rezeption und Geschichtskultur. Zentrale Holocaust-Denkmäler in der Kontroverse. Idstein 2005 (Schriften zur Geschichtsdidaktik, vol. 17), particularly p. 30 and p. 139 with footnote 327.

  2. [For a German version please scroll down.]

    Author’s Reply: For an extended notion of historical monuments in history lessons

    A critical notion of historical monument has a long history, which since the 1980s has led to an intensive discussion about art in public space. Already a hundred years ago in the German Empire, the ordinariness and conventionality of sculpture, the glorious speeches held everywhere, and the bombastic initiation ceremonies were not without contradiction. Hermann Obrist anticipated the coming alternatives in 1903: “The question of the monument is very acute in our German lands. The whole empire is so much covered with war memorials and Kaiser Wilhelm monuments of the conventional type, which looks as if it were invented solely for the taste of a fire-fighter, so that neither the citizen nor the prince can imagine that there could be many others types, are not yet born.”[1]

    The director of the Bauhaus Walter Gropius designed a few years later a non-figurative tomb, which should remind the contemporaries of the victims of the general strike against the Kapp-Lüttwitz-Putsch in Weimar. The shape of a crystal Gropius understood as a symbol of the spirit of freedom against all powers and at all times. His sculpture of 1920 stands today for a new type of monuments that prevailed in the twentieth century, which in terms of content and aesthetics was distinguished from the conventional. (In the local history culture of Weimar, however, the monument named “Denkmal an die Märzgefallenen” hardly plays a role.)

    My plea for the discussion and placement of a differentiated notion of historical monuments in history lessons is not least due to the American language scientist and Judaist James E. Young. Young coined the term “Counter-Monument” in 1992, thus marking the break with usual forms of the installation of a prototype figure or of a stele with reliefs and plaques, as well as a new expression of emancipatory and utopian ideas.

    Of course, ephemeral and discursive monuments have a long tradition. However, in the ubiquitous coexistence of traditional monuments and counter-monuments, the desire for permanence has also been asserted. Who is attentive, can observe that the demand for simple signs and popular forms breaks again and again. The planned idea of freedom and unity in the city of Berlin comes as a “hideous specimen” of state art and event management. The criticism of the draft does not detract, because its simple effects and “Emonstrous banality” inflame passions.[2]

    The simple comparison of monuments in the “West” and “totalitarian systems” is therefore too brief. It is not only the enlightenment intention and the aesthetic form, but pluralist societies also are characterized by the fact that they can continually dispute the need, content, and the configuration of monuments. This is also being the case in the 2016 permanent exhibition “Unveiled. Berlin and its monuments”.

    PS: There is much evidence for both superficial and profound analyses in history lessons. Depending on the impulses and tasks that pupils receive, the gap between learning objectives and learning outcomes appears to be greater, sometimes smaller and, in the best case, to be bridged. Perhaps one can no longer describe what is possible and learnable in the classroom without causing an empirical avalanche? The “Monument for Historical Change” opens up unconventional perspectives. As an impulse of problem-oriented teaching, this counter-monument is transferable to many places and can thus be made fructify for historical learning. If “memorials such as this one are virtually nonexistent in history education”, then there is no empirical research helpful, but at least is it a sensitization to the relevance and potential of an extended notion of historical monuments also in history lessons.

    _____________________

    [1] Hermann Obrist, Neue Möglichkeiten in der bildenden Kunst. Essays. (Leipzig: Eugen Dietrich, 1903), 131-168.
    [2] Marc Reichwein, “Haste ma’ ne Wippe?,” Welt am Sonntag, February 19, 2017, 58.
    [3] Zitadelle – Berlin: http://www.zitadelle-berlin.de/museengalerien/enthullt/, 21.2.2017. (last accessed 23 February 2017).

    ————————————

    Replik: Für einen differenzierten Denkmalbegriff im Geschichtsunterricht

    Fraglos haben Denkmalskritik und Denkmalsbegriff eine lange Geschichte, die seit den 1980er Jahren in eine intensive Auseinandersetzung über Kunst im öffentlichen Raum mündete. Bereits im konstitutionellen Kaiserreich blieben die Durchschnittlichkeit und Konventionalität der Bildhauerkunst, die allerorten stattfindenden Ruhmesreden und die bombastischen Einweihungsfeiern nicht unwidersprochen. Hermann Obrist antizipierte 1903 die kommenden Alternativen:

    “Die Denkmalsfrage ist in unseren deutschen Landen eine sehr akute. Das ganze Reich ist derartig bedeckt mit Kriegerdenkmälern und Kaiser Wilhelm-Denkmälern desselben konventionellen Typs, der aussieht, als wäre er ausschließlich für den Geschmack etwa eines Feuerwehrmannes erfunden worden, daß sich weder der Bürger noch der Fürst vorstellen kann, daß es noch viele andere, noch gar nicht geborene Typen geben könnte.”[1]

    Der Direktor des Bauhauses Walter Gropius entwarf wenige Jahre später ein nonfiguratives Grabmal, das die Zeitgenossen an die Opfer des Generalstreiks gegen den Kapp-Lüttwitz-Putsch in Weimar erinnern sollte. Die Form eines Kristalls verstand Gropius als Symbol für den Geist der Freiheit gegen alle Mächte und zu jeder Zeit. Seine Plastik von 1920 steht heute für eine neue Denkmalauffassung, die sich im 20. Jahrhundert durchsetzte und die sich inhaltlich und ästhetisch vom Konventionellen abgrenzte. (In der lokalen Geschichtskultur Weimars spielt das Denkmal für die Märzgefallenen allerdings kaum noch eine Rolle.)

    Mein Plädoyer für die Diskussion und Vermittlung eines differenzierten Denkmalbegriffs im Geschichtsunterricht knüpft nicht zuletzt an den US-amerikanischen Sprachwissenschaftler und Judaisten James E. Young an. Young prägte 1992 den Begriff “Gegendenkmal” und kennzeichnete so den Bruch mit den üblichen Formen der Aufsockelung einer prototypischen Figur bzw. einer Stele mit Reliefs und Schrifttafeln sowie einen neuen Ausdruck emanzipatorischer und utopischer Ideen.

    Natürlich haben ephemere und diskursiv angelegte Denkmäler inzwischen eine längere Tradition. Doch in der allgegenwärtigen Koexistenz von traditionellen Denkmälern und Gegendenkmälern hat sich freilich auch der Wunsch nach Beständigem behauptet. Wer aufmerksam ist, kann beobachten, dass sich das Bedürfnis nach einfachen Zeichen und Popularformen immer wieder Bahn bricht. Das geplante Berliner Freiheits- und Einheitsdenkmal etwa kommt als “scheußliches Exemplar” von Staatskunst und Eventmanagement daher. Die Kritik am Entwurf reißt nicht ab, weil dessen schlichte Effekte und “monströse Banalität” die Gemüter erhitzen.[2]

    Die schlichte Gegenüberstellung von Denkmälern im “Westen” und in “totalitären Systemen” ist daher zu kurz gedacht. Es kommt auch nicht allein auf die aufklärerische Absicht und ästhetische Form an, sondern darüber hinaus zeichnen sich pluralistische Gesellschaften dadurch aus, dass in ihnen über Bedarf, Inhalt und die Gestaltung von Denkmälern und Gegendenkmälern fortlaufend gestritten werden kann. Das wird nun auch in der 2016 in Berlin eröffneten Dauerausstellung “Enthüllt. Berlin und seine Denkmäler” sichtbar gemacht.[3]

    PS: Belege sowohl für oberflächliche als auch tiefgründige Denkmalsanalysen im Geschichtsunterricht ließen sich viele anführen. Auch abhängig davon, welche Impulse und Aufgaben Schülerinnen und Schülern erhalten, erscheint die Kluft zwischen Lernzielen und Lernergebnissen mal größer, mal kleiner zu sein und im besten Fall gelingt es, sie zu überbrücken.

    Vielleicht kann man ja nicht mehr beschreiben, was im Unterricht möglich und lernwürdig ist, ohne damit gleich eine empirische Lawine auszulösen? Das “Monument for Historical Change” jedenfalls eröffnet ungewohnte Perspektiven. Als Impuls eines problemorientierten Unterrichts ist die denkmalkritische Installation auf viele Orte übertragbar und kann so für historisches Lernen fruchtbar gemacht werden. Wenn “Denkmäler wie dieses im Unterricht keine Rolle spielen”, dann hilft auch keine empirische Untersuchung, sondern allenfalls eine Sensibilisierung für die Relevanz und das Potenzial eines erweiterten Denkmalbegriffs auch im Geschichtsunterricht.

    _____________________

    [1] Hermann Obrist: Neue Möglichkeiten in der bildenden Kunst. Essays. Leipzig, S. 131-168.
    [2] Marc Reichwein: Haste ma’ ne Wippe? In: Welt am Sonntag vom 19.2.2017, S. 58.
    [3] Zitadelle – Berlin: http://www.zitadelle-berlin.de/museengalerien/enthullt/, 21.2.2017. (letzter Zugriff: 23.02.2017).

Pin It on Pinterest