Good or bad remembrance? No Stolpersteine in Munich

Gutes oder schlechtes Gedenken? Keine Stolpersteine in München

 


No “Stolpersteine”? It has become a societal and political consensus to commemorate the Holocaust and the victims of the NS regime. However, the appropriate format is highly debated.[1] This is also the case in the debate about the Stolpersteine project in Munich. Nonetheless, there is a multifaceted remembrance culture in the capital of Bavaria.

Hier wohnte… [here lived…]

There will be white suitcases in front of several houses in Munich’s Maxvorstadt. They are installed in public as part of an art project (hier wohnte…), in order to commemorate the Jewish citizens who lived in this district of the capital of Bavaria and were deprived of their rights as well of their goods, who were deported and murdered. About a thousand Jewish men, women, and children were transported to Kaunas in November 1941 and were executed there.[2] In other districts of Munich, remembrance activities with interactive installations have already been developed by an artist, Wolfram P. Kastner, who has much experience with this kind of public art. Citizens are encouraged to contribute suitcases, which are painted in white, made weather-resistant with synthetic resin, and filled with heavy material. The last address of the Jewish citizens, the place and date of death are printed on name labels attached to the suitcases. [3] Now, at the very latest, some readers might be puzzled by the striking similarity to the project called Stolpersteine [stumbling stones], only that, here, the stones are replaced by suitcases…

Stolpersteine – a divisive issue

But: Stolpersteine are not allowed to be laid on public ground in Munich.[4] Gunter Demnig’s art project, with its concept of miniature memorials as paving stones with gleaming brass surfaces, with inscriptions, such as the date of birth and the person’s fate, has become a famous brand. In many cities, even beyond Germany, Stolpersteine are a natural part of the cityscape. Before their installation, all the benefits and drawbacks of these miniature memorials had to be considered: Is it a commemoration dignified if people mindlessly walk on the names of the victims? On the other hand, do many people actually stop (stumble) and pause for a moment? Do they ponder about the meaning of it, whom it is dedicated to, and which individual, personal fate is concealed behind the name? Are those many initiatives that have evolved from this project and are occurring in many places, not a good argument to approve these decentralized, miniature memorials?[5]

From the outset, the issue was a crucial one in Munich. The discussion already started to escalate in 2004.[6] The proponents and opponents of the project where not squeamish in their choice of words and argumentation, which had a lasting effect on the discussion atmosphere. The critics, who included Jewish citizens and property owners, as well as Munich’s art commission, were strictly against laying the paving stones for the Stolpersteine project. Charlotte Knobloch, the president of the Israelitische Kultusgemeinde München und Oberbayern, expressed herself quite vehemently.

For her, it would be unbearable if people were to trample on the names of the victims of the Nazi regime. After all, was it not the National Socialists who used their boots to humiliate and hurt? [7] Despite widespread sympathy in many parts of Munich’s population, the proponents of the Stolpersteine project, amongst them the Liberale Jüdische Gemeinde Beth Shalom, could not prevail. On 16 June 2004, the Munich city council decided, with an overwhelming majority, to prohibit the laying of Stolpersteine. As an immediate effect, two brass plaques that had already been laid, in keeping with the wishes of the relatives of the victims, were removed from the pavement.[8]

Historical Culture, a sensitive construct

About a decade later, because the project’s proponents did not tire to demand permission for laying these miniature memorials in Munich, the city’s Administration concerned itself again with the topic, with broad public participation. On 29 July 2015, the city council reconfirmed its refusal. It was decided that Munich would not condone further installations of the miniature Stolpersteine memorials.[9] The more than 80’000 signatures of the petition “Removal of the prohibition of Stolpersteine in Munich” did not alter this decision. Currently, there is a plan to install memorial plates or columns at the former houses of the NS victims.[10] Additionally, a central memorial with the names of all NS victims will be erected according to plans that are to be submitted by a jury. It was announced that the main reason for the rejection of Stolpersteine by the city council was the definite rejection by the Israelitische Kultusgemeinde in Munich.[11] Some of the people who wanted to install the Stolpersteine have, in the meantime, started to challenge the decision and are trying to enforce their demands through legal interventions.[12]

This proves, once more, that the “social system” of historical culture is a sensitive construct that is influenced by a variety of aspects.[13] Individual factors, such as the participating actors, may become quite powerful. The debate about the Stolpersteine memorial project demonstrates how the day-to-day political dimensions of historical culture overarches the cognitive and aesthetical dimensions.[14] Other cities, large and small, have proven that these memorial paving stones are easily accepted. It is hard to understand why the project cannot be realized in Munich. On the other hand, is it really that grave, or even scandalous, if a city decides, by democratic means, to choose different forms of commemoration? A more sober debate would be a precondition for a consensus here.

Different forms of remembrance in Munich

Munich had been hesitant and also quite late in reappraising history in the post-war era and to guarantee an appropriate form of commemoration. However, the efforts to do so have been increasing recently. The local diversity of commemoration and remembrance has been growing into a varied field in which projects develop in diverse and stunning formats: The most prominent example out of many was the opening of the NS-Dokumentationszentrum on 1 May 2015 at the place of the building that was formerly called ‘Braunes Haus’ [brown house]. Other examples are Michaela Meliàn’s Memory Loops project [15] or the documentation of Leerstellen der Erinnerung [empty spots of commemoration] in Munich and its surroundings, as developed by students at the LMU.[16] Last, but not least, there are the white suitcases from the hier wohnte project, which are an eye-catching contribution to such vivid forms of remembrance. [17] After all, it is also in Munich that one can stumble in order to commemorate, but not only with regard to the Stolpersteine.

__________________

Literature

  • Thurn, Nike: Stolpersteine. In: Thorben Fischer, Matthias N. Lorenz (Eds.): Lexikon der „Vergangenheitsbewältigung“ in Deutschland. Debatten- und Diskursgeschichte des Nationalsozialismus nach 1945. 3. überarbeitete und erweiterte Auflage, Bielefeld 2015, S. 358-360.
  • Girßmann, Imke: Sites that Matter: Current Developments of Urban Holocaust Commemoration in Berlin and Munich. In: Diana I. Popescu: Revisiting Holocaust Representation in the Post-Witnessing Era, Basingstoke u. a. 2015, S. 53-72.
  • München und der Nationalsozialismus. Katalog des NS-Dokumentationszentrums München. Herausgegeben von Winfried Nerdinger. München 2015.

External Links

__________________

[1] Cf. Harald Welzer: Für eine Modernisierung der Erinnerungs- und Gedenkkultur. In: Gedenkstättenrundbrief 162 (8/2011), p. 3-9. Online: http://www.gedenkstaettenforum.de/nc/gedenkstaetten-rundbrief/rundbrief/news/fuer_eine_modernisierung_der_erinnerungs_und_gedenkkultur/ (last accessed 03.01.16).
[2] Cf. the documentary: “…verzogen, unbekannt wohin” on the first deportation of Jews in November 1941. Edited by Stadtarchiv München. München 2000.
[3] Cf. the project webpage on the realization of the project in Neuhausen: http://www.weissekoffer.de/ (last accessed 03.01.16). In Maxvorstadt, the project will be realized again with Ingrid Reuther.
[4] There are numerous Stolpersteine on private property in the public space; cf. the website of the initiative ´Stolpersteine for München e.V.` on Munich´s efforts to permit Stolpersteine in general: http://www.Stolpersteine-muenchen.de/Stolpersteine/verlegt.php (last accessed 03.01.16).
[5] Ultimately, a large number of school classes have contributed to projects to enable the laying of the individual paving stones of the Stolpersteine project. Young people have become active protagonists within historical culture. But it is also necessary to reflect on the role of the initiator, Gunter Demnig: which role does the economic aspect of the Stolpersteine project play? Is he not sufficiently ready to compromise, when it comes to inscriptions and the critical examination by experts? Compare Nike Thurn, Stolpersteine (cf. bibliography p. 358f.) regarding the controversial discussions at the beginning of the project.
[6] The “Süddeutsche Zeitung”, a daily newspaper, proved to be a most precise chronicler; it never tired of publishing a vast number of articles on the topic of Stolpersteine. In its Letters to the Editor section, it provided a forum in which a wide range of opinions could be expressed. A reflection of the discussion is available here: http://www.sueddeutsche.de/muenchen/ihr-forum-Stolpersteine-ehrung-im-strassenschmutz-oder-angemessene-form-des-gedenkens-1.2254819 (last accessed 03.01.16).
[7] Cf. Nike Thurn, Stolpersteine (Cf. bibliography), p. 358.
[8] Cf. Nike Thurn (ibid.) However, in Dachau and Freising , there are installations of the Stolpersteine project. Here, the local authorities pushed the realization through, even though Charlotte Knobloch is the President of the Israeli Cultural Community which also includes the district of Upper Bavaria. Cf. Bernhard Schoßig: Lernen und Gedenken. Orte der Zeitgeschichte, in: Norbert Göttler (Eds.): Oberbayern. Vielfalt zwischen Donau und Alpen. Jenseits des Klischees. München 2014, pp. 122-129; here: p. 127.
[9] The city council debated the issue in an objective atmosphere, following the hearing in December 2014 that was quite heated and controversial. During that hearing, two (of the many) proponents presented their arguments in favor of the project: Terry Swartzberg, a representative of the Initiative Stolpersteine für München e.V., and Ernst Grube, a survivor of the Holocaust. The mayor, Dieter Reiter, read out a letter written by Charlotte Knobloch, in which she again affirmed her rejection of the project. For details on the circumstances, cf. the coverage at: http://www.sueddeutsche.de/muenchen/gedenken-an-opfer-des-holocausts-muenchen-streitet-ueber-Stolpersteine-1.2254630 (last accessed 03.01.16).
[10] The recent success of the Stolpersteine project in national and international contexts was not convincing; the compromise proposal of Munich´s cultural advisor was also not successful (the equal acceptance of commemorative plaques, columns, and Stolpersteine; laying of Stolpersteine only if the relatives of the victims expressly wanted this). Meanwhile, the number of proponents of the petition has increased to 100 000.
[11] Cf. http://www.sueddeutsche.de/muenchen/gedenken-an-ns-opfer-stadtrat-lehnt-Stolpersteine-ab-1.2586927 (last accessed 03.01.16).
[12] Cf. http://www.sueddeutsche.de/muenchen/gedenken-an-nazi-opfer-ich-will-dass-die-muenchner-ueber-den-namen-meiner-grossmutter-stolpern-1.2754776. (last accessed 03.01.16).
[13] For a summary of the development of his thoughts on historical culture as a “social system”, see Bernd Schönemann: Geschichtsdidaktik, Geschichtskultur, Geschichtswissenschaft. In: Hilke Günther-Arndt/Meik Zülsdorf-Kersting (Eds.): Geschichtsdidaktik. Praxishandbuch für die Sekundarstufe I und II, 6., überarbeitete Aufl., Berlin 2014, pp. 11-23, here: 18ff.
[14] Cf. Jörn Rüsen: Was ist Geschichtskultur?. Überlegungen zu einer neuen Art, über Geschichte nachzudenken. In: Jörn Rüsen/Theo Grütter/Klaus Füßmann (Eds.): Historische Faszination. Geschichtskultur heute. Köln u.a. 1994, S. 3-26.
[15] http://www.memoryloops.net (last accessed 03.01.16).
[16] http://www.muenchner-leerstellen.de/ (last accessed 03.01.16).
[17] Charlotte Knobloch was also a proponent of the “hier wohnte…” project in Munich´s Neuhausen district: http://www.weissekoffer.de/unterstuetzer/charlotte-knobloch/ (last accessed 03.01.16).

__________________

Image Credits
© Wolfram P. Kastner.

Recommended Citation
Memminger, Josef: Good or bad remembrance? No Stolpersteine in Munich. In: Public History Weekly 4 (2016) 7, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-5650.

Many thanks for support with the translation: Regina Bäck and Jackie Alexander.

Copyright (c) 2016 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

Keine Stolpersteine? Es ist gesellschaftlicher und politischer Konsens, an den Holocaust zu erinnern und der Opfer des NS-Regimes zu gedenken. Auf welche Art und in welchen Formen das geschehen soll, ist jedoch durchaus umstritten.[1] Das lässt sich an der Stolperstein-Debatte in München ablesen. Gleichwohl gibt es auch in der bayerischen Landeshauptstadt eine vielgestaltige Gedenkkultur.

 

 

“hier wohnte…”

In der Münchner Maxvorstadt werden ab Juni 2016 vor etlichen Gebäuden weiße Koffer zu sehen sein. Sie stehen dort im Rahmen eines Kunstprojektes (“hier wohnte …”) im öffentlichen Raum, um an die jüdischen MitbürgerInnen zu erinnern, die in dem Stadtviertel der bayerischen Landeshauptstadt lebten und von den Nationalsozialisten entrechtet, beraubt, deportiert und getötet wurden. Etwa tausend jüdische Frauen, Männer und Kinder wurden im November 1941 von München aus nach Kaunas verbracht und dort ermordet.[2] Erinnerungsaktionen dieser Art erprobte der Künstler Wolfram P. Kastner schon in anderen Stadtvierteln. BürgerInnen sind jeweils aufgefordert, Koffer beizusteuern, die weiß gestrichen, mit Kunstharz wetterfest gemacht und mit schwerem Material befüllt werden. Die letzte Adresse, das Todesdatum und der Todesort sind dann auf Namensanhängern an den Koffern zu lesen.[3] Spätestens hier werden einige LeserInnen gedanklich “stolpern”: Ähnelt das Konzept nicht dem der “Stolpersteine”?

Streitpunkt Stolpersteine

Nur: Stolpersteine dürfen in München auf städtischem Grund nicht verlegt werden.[4] Gunter Demnigs Kunstaktion mit den zum Gedenken eingesetzten Pflastersteinen, auf deren messingglänzender Oberseite ebenfalls Geburts- und Schicksalsdaten festgehalten sind, hat sich längst zu einer berühmten Marke entwickelt. In vielen Städten und sogar über Deutschland hinaus gehören Stolpersteine selbstverständlich zum Stadtbild, wobei vor der Verlegung überall Für- und Widerargumente abgewogen werden mussten: Ist es ein würdiges Erinnern, wenn über die Steine mit den Namen der Opfer gedankenlos “hinweggegangen” wird? Halten tatsächliche viele Menschen im Alltag inne und stolpern gedanklich? Um sich zu fragen, wofür dieser Stein steht, welchem Menschen er gilt und welches Schicksal sich hinter dem Namen verbirgt? Sind die zahlreichen Initiativen, die vielerorts entstanden sind, nicht ein gutes Argument, diese dezentralisierten Klein-Mahnmale zuzulassen?[5]

In München war die Sache von Anfang an kompliziert: Bereits 2004 eskalierte hier die Diskussion.[6] Die GegnerInnen und BefürworterInnen des Projektes waren in Argumentation und Wortwahl nicht zimperlich, was die Atmosphäre der Debatte nachhaltig beeinträchtigte. Die KritikerInnen, zu denen neben jüdischen BürgerInnen unter anderem ImmobilienbesitzerInnen oder auch die Kunstkommission München gehörten, waren strikt gegen eine Verlegung der Stolpersteine. Besonders vehement trat dabei Charlotte Knobloch auf, die Präsidentin der Israelitischen Kultusgemeinde München und Oberbayern.

Für sie sei es unerträglich, wenn mit Stiefeln und Schuhen auf den Namen der Opfer des Naziregimes herumgetreten werde. Schließlich hätten auch die Nationalsozialisten mit Stiefeln gedemütigt und verletzt.[7] Trotz des Wohlwollens in weiten Teilen der Münchner Bevölkerung konnten sich die BefürworterInnen von Stolpersteinen, unter anderem die Liberale Jüdische Gemeinde Beth Shalom, nicht durchsetzen. Am 16.06.2004 beschloss der Münchner Stadtrat mit überwältigender Mehrheit, dass keine Stolpersteine auf öffentlichem Grund der Stadt München verlegt werden dürfen. In unmittelbarer Folge wurden zwei bereits eingesetzte Steine, die im Einvernehmen mit den Angehörigen der Holocaust-Opfer angebracht worden waren, wieder aus dem Boden entfernt.[8]

Geschichtskultur: ein sensibles Gebilde

Etwa eine Dekade später beschäftigte sich München erneut intensiv und unter großer öffentlicher Anteilnahme mit der Thematik, weil die BefürworterInnen nicht müde wurden, die Zulassung dieser Klein-Mahnmale in München zu fordern. Am 29. Juli 2015 erneuerte der Stadtrat seine ablehnende Haltung. Es wurde entschieden, dass die Stadt München weiterhin keine Stolpersteine zulässt.[9] Die über 80’000 Unterschriften für eine Petition “Aufhebung des Verbots von Stolpersteinen in München” änderten daran nichts. Nun sind Tafeln oder Erinnerungs-Stelen an (bzw. bei) den früheren Wohnhäusern der NS-Opfer geplant.[10] Außerdem soll ein zentrales Denkmal mit den Namen aller NS-Opfer errichtet werden, für das eine Jury Pläne vorlegen wird. Als Hauptgrund für die Ablehnung von Stolpersteinen durch die schwarz-rote Stadtratsmehrheit wurde mitunter das klare Nein der Israelitischen Kultusgemeinde angegeben.[11] Einige Personen, die Stolpersteine verlegen wollen, haben mittlerweile juristische Schritte zur Durchsetzung ihres Anliegens eingeleitet.[12]

Es zeigt sich einmal mehr, dass das “soziale System” Geschichtskultur ein sensibles Gebilde ist, das durch unterschiedlichste Aspekte beeinflusst wird.[13] Einzelne Faktoren – wie z. B. beteiligte Akteure – können in ihm ein großes Gewicht bekommen. Bei der Stolpersteindebatte überwölbt die (tages-)politische Dimension der Geschichtskultur die kognitive und die ästhetische.[14] Beispiele anderer (Groß-)Städte zeigen, wie gut Stolpersteine angenommen werden können. Schwer nachvollziehbar, dass das in München nicht möglich ist. Andererseits: Ist es wirklich so gravierend oder gar skandalös, wenn eine Stadt in einer demokratischen Entscheidung ihrer gewählten Vertreter beschließt, in ihren Formen des Gedenkens andere Wege zu gehen? Eine Versachlichung der Debatte wäre die Grundlage für einen Konsens.

Vielfältiges Gedenken in München

München hat sich in der Nachkriegszeit der Aufgabe, seine mit dem Nationalsozialismus verbundene Geschichte angemessen aufzuarbeiten, nur zögerlich und verspätet gestellt. In jüngerer Zeit dynamisierten sich jedoch die Bemühungen. Die lokale Gedenk- und Erinnerungslandschaft ist mittlerweile sehr vielfältig und die Projekte treten in spannenden Formaten auf: Das am 1. Mai 2015 eröffnete NS-Dokumentationszentrum am Ort des ehemaligen “Braunen Hauses” ist hier nur das prominenteste Beispiel. Genauso ließen sich Michaela Meliáns “Memory Loops”[15] oder die von LMU-Studierenden erarbeiteten Dokumentationen von “Leerstellen” der Erinnerung nennen.[16] Nicht zuletzt die weißen Koffer sind ein auffälliger Beitrag lebendiger Erinnerung.[17] Auch in München kann man zum Gedenken vielfach stolpern – eben nur nicht über besagte Steine.

__________________

Literatur

  • Thurn, Nike: Stolpersteine. In: Thorben Fischer, Matthias N. Lorenz (Hg.): Lexikon der „Vergangenheitsbewältigung“ in Deutschland. Debatten- und Diskursgeschichte des Nationalsozialismus nach 1945. 3. überarbeitete und erweiterte Auflage, Bielefeld 2015, S. 358-360.
  • Girßmann, Imke: Sites that Matter: Current Developments of Urban Holocaust Commemoration in Berlin and Munich. In: Diana I. Popescu: Revisiting Holocaust Representation in the Post-Witnessing Era, Basingstoke u. a. 2015, S. 53-72.
  • München und der Nationalsozialismus. Katalog des NS-Dokumentationszentrums München. Herausgegeben von Winfried Nerdinger. München 2015.

Externe Links

__________________

[1] Vgl. Harald Welzer: Für eine Modernisierung der Erinnerungs- und Gedenkkultur. In: Gedenkstättenrundbrief 162 (8/2011), S. 3-9. Online abrufbar unter: http://www.gedenkstaettenforum.de/nc/gedenkstaetten-rundbrief/rundbrief/news/fuer_eine_modernisierung_der_erinnerungs_und_gedenkkultur/ (zuletzt am 03.01.16).
[2] Vgl. hierzu die Dokumentation: “…verzogen, unbekannt wohin” – Die erste Deportation von Münchner Juden im November 1941. Herausgegeben vom Stadtarchiv München. München 2000.
[3] Vgl. die Projekthomepage zur Realisierung der Idee im Stadtteil Neuhausen: http://www.weissekoffer.de/ (zuletzt am 03.01.16). In der Maxvorstadt wird das Vorhaben (erneut) gemeinsam mit Ingrid Reuther durchgeführt.
[4] Auf privaten Grundstücken im öffentlichen Raum gibt es in München hingegen durchaus etliche Stolpersteine. Vgl. zu den Münchner Bemühungen, Stolpersteine allgemein zuzulassen, die Homepage der Initiative Stolpersteine für München e.V.: http://www.stolpersteine-muenchen.de/stolpersteine/verlegt.php (zuletzt am 03.01.16).
[5] Schließlich wirkten unter anderem unzählige Schulklassen in Projekten mit, um die Verlegung von Stolpersteinen zu ermöglichen. Junge Menschen wurden so zu aktiven Protagonisten innerhalb der Geschichtskultur. Es muss aber auch die Rolle des Initiators Gunter Demnig reflektiert werden: Welche Rolle spielt die ökonomische Seite des Stolperstein-Projekts? Ist er zu wenig kompromissbereit, was Beschriftungen und kritische Prüfung durch Experten betrifft? Zu kontroversen Diskussionen in der Anfangsphase des Projekts vgl. Nike Thurn, Stolpersteine (siehe Literaturhinweise), S. 358f.
[6] Als unermüdliche und präzise Chronistin der Diskussion erwies sich die Süddeutsche Zeitung, die bis heute eine Fülle an Artikeln zum Thema Stolpersteine publizierte. Daneben schuf sie auf der Leserbriefseite ein Forum, über das vielfältige Meinungen artikuliert werden konnten. Auch hier spiegelt sich die Diskussion: http://www.sueddeutsche.de/muenchen/ihr-forum-stolpersteine-ehrung-im-strassenschmutz-oder-angemessene-form-des-gedenkens-1.2254819 (zuletzt am 03.01.16).
[7] Vgl. Nike Thurn, Stolpersteine (siehe Literaturhinweise), S. 358.
[8] Vgl. ebd.; in Dachau und Freising gibt es im Übrigen Stolpersteine. Hier setzten die Kommunen das durch, obwohl Charlotte Knobloch ja auch für Oberbayern die Präsidentin der Israelitischen Kultusgemeinde ist. Vgl. Bernhard Schoßig: Lernen und Gedenken. Orte der Zeitgeschichte, in: Norbert Göttler (Hrsg.): Oberbayern. Vielfalt zwischen Donau und Alpen. Jenseits des Klischees. München 2014, S. 122-129, hier: S. 127.
[9] Der Stadtrat debattierte in angemessener Form und in sachlicher Atmosphäre über die Angelegenheit, nachdem ein Hearing im Dezember 2014 sehr erhitzt und kontrovers verlaufen war. Dort trugen unter anderem Terry Swartzberg von der Initiative Stolpersteine für München e.V. und Ernst Grube, ein Holocaust-Überlebender, als zwei der BefürworterInnen ihre Argumente für das Projekt vor. Oberbürgermeister Dieter Reiter verlas einen Brief Charlotte Knoblochs, in dem sie ihre ablehnende Haltung erneut bekräftigte. Zu den Umständen, die beinahe zum Eklat geführt hätten, vgl. die Berichterstattung: http://www.sueddeutsche.de/muenchen/gedenken-an-opfer-des-holocausts-muenchen-streitet-ueber-stolpersteine-1.2254630 (zuletzt am 03.01.16).
[10] Der zwischenzeitliche “Erfolg” des Stolperstein-Projekts im nationalen und internationalen Kontext überzeugte nicht; auch der Kompromissvorschlag des Münchner Kulturreferenten hatte keinen Erfolg (gleichberechtigte Zulassung von Tafeln, Stelen und Stolpersteinen; eine Verlegung von Stolpersteinen nur, wenn die Angehörigen der Opfer dies ausdrücklich wünschen). Die Zahl der Unterstützer der Petition ist mittlerweile auf über 100’000 gestiegen.
[11] Vgl. http://www.sueddeutsche.de/muenchen/gedenken-an-ns-opfer-stadtrat-lehnt-stolpersteine-ab-1.2586927 (zuletzt am 03.01.16).
[12] Vgl. http://www.sueddeutsche.de/muenchen/gedenken-an-nazi-opfer-ich-will-dass-die-muenchner-ueber-den-namen-meiner-grossmutter-stolpern-1.2754776 (zuletzt am 03.01.16).
[13] Vgl. zur Entfaltung seines Gedankens von der Geschichtskultur als “sozialem System” zusammenfassend Bernd Schönemann: Geschichtsdidaktik, Geschichtskultur, Geschichtswissenschaft. In: Hilke Günther-Arndt/Meik Zülsdorf-Kersting (Hrsg.): Geschichtsdidaktik. Praxishandbuch für die Sekundarstufe I und II, 6., überarbeitete Aufl., Berlin 2014, S. 11-23, hier: 18ff.
[14] Zum Konzept der Geschichtskultur und ihrer Dimensionen vgl. Jörn Rüsen: Was ist Geschichtskultur?. Überlegungen zu einer neuen Art, über Geschichte nachzudenken. In: Jörn Rüsen/Theo Grütter/Klaus Füßmann (Hrsg.): Historische Faszination. Geschichtskultur heute. Köln u.a. 1994, S. 3-26.
[15] http://www.memoryloops.net (zuletzt am 03.01.16).
[16] http://www.muenchner-leerstellen.de/ (zuletzt am 03.01.16).
[17] Auch Charlotte Knobloch fungierte als Unterstützerin des “hier wohnte…”-Projekts in Neuhausen: http://www.weissekoffer.de/unterstuetzer/charlotte-knobloch/ (zuletzt am 03.01.16).

__________________

Abbildungsnachweis
© Wolfram P. Kastner.

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Memminger, Josef: Gutes oder schlechtes Gedenken? Keine Stolpersteine in München. In: Public History Weekly 4 (2016) 7, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-5650.

Copyright (c) 2016 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.


Categories: 4 (2016) 7
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-5650

Tags: , , ,

1 reply »

  1. “You only see, what you know”. Keeping this in mind raises the desire to create new mementoes in Munich. These mementoes inserted in the urban areas are especially for the victims of the National Socialism shall remind of its story. They differ from dealing with historical remembrance in the usual way, for example visiting the “Dokuzentrum”, which has its anniversary of the exhibition soon. G. Demnigs project “Stolpersteine” is controversial discussed, but it’s a blessing that his contribution analyses the debate of the political decision in the historical culture of 2004 and the continual debate. That’s what contributes the required objectification. Accordingly, contemporary history is always disputable and in my point of view that’s what practical democracy is all about.
    (Translated from German by Heike Epp)

    ——————————–

    “Man sieht nur, was man weiß.” Vor diesem Hintergrund ist das Anliegen, in München für Verfolgte und Opfer der NS-Gewaltherrschaft neuartige Erinnerungszeichen im Stadtgebiet zu setzen (statt nur auf das Dokuzentrum zu schauen, dessen Ausstellungseröffnung sich in Kürze jährt), mehr als begrüßenswert. Über das Pro und Contra zur Verlegung von G. Demnigs “Stolpersteinen” lässt sich sicherlich trefflich streiten – segensreich, dass der Beitrag die Genese der politischen Entscheidung von 2004 und der fortwährenden geschichtskulturellen Debatte analysiert, um zur geforderten Versachlichung beizutragen. Zeitgeschichte ist eben stets Streitgeschichte – und damit m.E. das Salz in der Suppe von gelebter Demokratie.

Pin It on Pinterest