The Downfall?! Can History Teaching Still Be Saved?

Der Untergang?! Ist der Geschichtsunterricht noch zu retten?

 


“When historical dates are meaningless in history lessons” – this is the headline of a polemic article “Die Welt” has recently published to argue against the new history curriculum in Saxony-Anhalt.[1] The article takes individual aspects of the curriculum out of context and describes them as being questionable in such an absurd way that readers who are interested but uninformed about history didactics have to ask themselves: How crazy and unworldly are those “experts” for history education in fact?

No Knowledge, Nowhere

The author asserts that pupils in year 10 had to gather all the information about the German reunification from the narrations of their parents and grandparents. The aim in the respective teaching context is to work out the perspectives of contemporary witnesses (not parents and grandparents!), but not the unreflective beliefs of subjectively remembered narrations, all of which is deliberately withheld by the author. Nor is there any trace of information to be found in the paragraph regarding the specification of “fundamental knowledge” that is to be gained in this subject area. This includes for example “repression and crisis in the GDR, opposition, mass flight and the fall of the Berlin Wall” or “reintegration and re-establishing of the state Saxony-Anhalt”.[2] It is only at the end of the article that those specifications are written off as succinct or somehow “negotiable”. It fits in the picture where additionally the so-called “knowledge” is played off against “competences”.[3] An eye-catching subheading proclaims: “Competence is more important to pupils than knowledge”. Didacticians may insist in mantra-like ways that you cannot nurture competences without thorough acquisition of knowledge – apparently it isto no avail. The message remains: Knowledge supposedly is not relevant anymore.

On the way to ruin?

It all matches a prevalent trend that can be observed at the moment. It is easy to react negatively to curriculum developments and reform efforts in history teaching, and it also earns points with the public. Martin Schulze Wessel, former chairman of the German Historical Association, during an Interview for FAZ gave also cause for the suspicion that historical education might be doomed. History lessons, he said, were in a sorry state, therein “de-professionalisation” took place and it was all the competence orientation’s fault.[4] In his opinion, the discord between experts of history didactics who threw inscrutable competence models on the market in rushing-ahead obedience had done the rest. In our recent educational discourse, it is normal that all the verve overcasts the fact that in this article a number of things are described very generally and undifferentiated in nature.[5]

The core of competence-oriented history teaching

Almost all history didactics experts of history didactics want to enable students to handle sources and representation of history in a methodical and conscious way (“interpretation competence”, “methodical competence”) through history education. They want them to be able to explain their own present better with the help of history and to evaluate the use of history in public critically (“historical orientation competence”, “historic-cultural competence”). And yes: “narrative competences” are also a welcome goal of history didactics. It means dealing with narratives, i.e. stories and interpretations, critically as well as creating your own narrations. This happens on a basis of profound knowledge, even if its elements are not listed one by one in the curriculum. From these results the construction of a reflected historical consciousness as an objective of history education. It is true, “in the past” there were more historical dates, “in the past” there were (still) more topics in historyteaching. “In the past”, more knowledge was taught directly by the teacher. What of history teaching “in the past” has been preserved and passed down? Little, very little. Several studies have drawn a less than flattering picture here.[6] Is this the state that is to be revived? Certainly not. History teaching today is not worse than it was “in the past”. If it iwas competence-oriented, it would emphasize other points, it would be more thought out in the sense described above. Nevertheless, it offers – as always – starting points for even more improvement and critical inspection.

Don’t just test and measure!

With sound arguments you can criticise a lot of proposals concerning competence orientation. A lot of experts of history didactics also take justifiable critical positions. Education policy, however, has chosen this path (by the way, there is also competence orientation at university, too, even if professors can ignore it easily). Guiding the path with constructive criticism would be the dictate of the moment, not just a polemic “no”. In my opinion, the fundamental problem with competence orientation does not lie in some (howsoever) defined competence areas, but in an overconcentration on the thought of an “output orientation”. Suddenly anything and everything has to be measured. Is the obvious desire for competent students really automatically linked to more standardisation, tests, and measuring? Or can you encourage competences without constantly testing and measuring in everyday school life? There could be lots of room for discussions on this topic. To make this happen, however, there should be more of a disposition to study the matter in more depth. Yet, many deem it unnecessary to concern themselves with history didactic concepts because, after all, everybody has something to say about history education.

The “quiet” opposition

With clattering polemics, one does not do any justice to experts of history didactics or curriculum developers who think about competence-oriented ways of learning, nor to a public which deserves more than being misinformed by selective culture-criticism. But where do you hear any contradiction? Why do so few defend the developments of recent years? Why does hardly anybody hear any opposition in the media? Does the opposition not get in touch or is it simply not worth mentioning in a media landscape that is tuned to spectacular or scandalous reports?[7]

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Kühberger, Christoph, ed. Historisches Wissen. Geschichtsdidaktische Erkundung zu Art, Tiefe und Umfang für das historische Lernen. (Schwalbach/Ts.: Wochenschau, 2012).
  • Gautschi, Peter. “Plausibilität der Theorie, Spuren der Empirie, Weisheit der Praxis. Zum Stand der geschichtsdidaktischen Kompetenzdiskussion.” Geschichte für heute 8, no. 3 (2016): 5-19.
  • Memminger, Josef. “Der gerade Weg zum guten Lehrer? Oder: Früher war alles besser! Die fachdidaktische Geschichtslehrerausbildung der ersten Phase in Bayern.” Geschichte in Wissenschaft und Unterricht 67, no. 3/4 (2016): 133-145.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] Vitzthum, Thomas. “Wenn im Geschichtsunterricht Jahreszahlen egal sind.” Die Welt, 22 August 2016. https://www.welt.de/Wenn-im-Geschichtsunterricht-Jahreszahlen-egal-sind (last accessed 21 November 2016).
[2] https://www.bildung-lsa.de/lehrplaene___rahmenrichtlinien (last accessed 21 November 2016).
[3] On the complexity of the term “knowledge”, see Kühberger, Christoph,  ed. Historisches Wissen. Geschichtsdidaktische Erkundung zu Art, Tiefe und Umfang für das historische Lernen. (Schwalbach/Ts.: Wochenschau, 2012).
[4] Martin Schulze Wessel: “Wie die Zeit aus der Geschichte verschwindet”. FAZ, 14 September 2016. Online: http://www.faz.net/geschichtsunterricht-wie-die-zeit-aus-der-geschichte-verschwindet(last accessed 21 November 2016).
[5] Some statements are simply not true, e.g. when Martin Schulze Wessel postulates: The Bavarian ministry of school is oriented towards the FUER-project. Cf. Josef Memminger recently on the Bavarian emphasis: “Der gerade Weg zum guten Lehrer? Oder: Früher war alles besser! Die fachdidaktische Geschichtslehrerausbildung der ersten Phase in Bayern.” Geschichte in Wissenschaft und Unterricht 67, no. 3/4 (2016): 133-145.
[6] This was enforced by Michele Barricelli in an article some time ago – yet, he does, most rightly, support the necessity of content: Barricelli, Michele. “Historisches Wissen? Ein unverbindliches Angebot”. Public History Weekly 4 (2016), DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-6358 (last accessed 21 November 2016).
[7] Here, two well-balanced contributions should not be disregarded. Both were published as reader´s comments in FAZ and obviously did not get as much publicity as compared to a main article: The chairman of the conference for history didactics, Thomas Sandkühler, dealt as well with this one-sided criticism 17 September 2016 in FAZ (S. 33) just as Holger Thünemann did in the same paper subsequently (FAZ, 05 October 2016, S. 25).

_____________________

Image Credits
© Lucie Klárová

Recommended Citation
Memminger, Josef: The Downfall?! Can History Teaching Still Be Saved?. In: Public History Weekly 4 (2016) 39, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-7764

Editorial Responsibility
Christian Bunnenberg / Peter Gautschi

Copyright (c) 2016 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

“Wenn im Geschichtsunterricht Jahreszahlen egal sind” – so übertitelte “Die Welt” vor einiger Zeit einen polemischen Artikel gegen den neuen Geschichtslehrplan in Sachsen-Anhalt.[1] Im Haupttext werden Einzelaspekte des Lehrplans aus dem Zusammenhang gerissen und in dermaßen absurder Weise als bedenklich vorgeführt, dass sich interessierte, aber geschichtsdidaktisch uninformierte LeserInnen fragen müssen: Wie verrückt und weltfremd sind eigentlich die “ExpertInnen” für Geschichtsunterricht?

Kein Wissen, nirgends?

Der Autor gibt vor, SchülerInnen würden sich die komplette Information über die Wiedervereinigung Deutschlands in der zehnten Klasse über die Erzählungen ihrer Eltern und Großeltern holen müssen. Dass es in dem konkreten Unterrichtszusammenhang um die Herausarbeitung der Perspektivität von ZeitzeugInnen gehen soll (Eltern und Großeltern sind als solche übrigens nicht benannt!) und nicht um das unreflektierte Glauben von subjektiv erinnerten Erzählungen, wird vom Autor geflissentlich verschwiegen. Ebenso wenig findet man in dem Absatz einen Hinweis auf die Angabe von “Grundlegenden Wissensbeständen”, die zu dem Themenbereich zu erwerben sind, wie z. B. “Repressionen und Krisen in der DDR, Opposition, Massenflucht und Mauerfall” oder “staatliche Einheit und Wiedereinrichtung des Landes Sachsen-Anhalt”.[2] Erst am Ende des Artikels werden diese Vorgaben als lapidar und gar irgendwie “verhandelbar” abgetan. Da passt es ins Bild, wenn darüber hinaus grundsätzlich das sogenannte “Wissen” gegen “Kompetenzen” ausgespielt wird.[3] Plakativ lautet eine Zwischenüberschrift: “Kompetenzen für Schüler wichtiger als Wissen.” Da können DidaktikerInnen noch so mantrahaft wiederholen, es gebe keine Kompetenzförderung ohne gründlichen Wissenserwerb, es nutzt anscheinend nichts. Die Botschaft bleibt: Wissen spielt angeblich keine Rolle mehr.

Auf dem Weg in den Abgrund?

Das Ganze passt in einen momentan zu beobachtenden Trend. Auf Curriculum-Entwicklungen wie Reformbestrebungen im Geschichtsunterricht ablehnend zu reagieren, ist leicht und bringt in der Öffentlichkeit Punkte. Auch Martin Schulze Wessel, bis vor Kurzem Vorsitzender des Deutschen Historikerverbandes, gab in einem Interview in der FAZ Anlass zur Vermutung, die historische Bildung sei dem Untergang geweiht. Der Geschichtsunterricht läge “im Argen”, es fände eine “Deprofessionalisierung” statt und schuld an allem sei die Kompetenzorientierung.[4] Die Uneinigkeit der GeschichtsdidaktikerInnen, die in “vorauseilendem Gehorsam” undurchschaubare Kompetenzmodelle auf den Markt geschmissen hätten, hätte ein Übriges getan. Wenn bei so viel Verve untergeht, dass in dem Artikel doch etliches arg pauschal und undifferenziert behauptet wird, ist das in unserem momentanen Bildungsdiskurs normal.[5]

Kompetenzorientierter Geschichtsunterricht

So gut wie alle GeschichtsdidaktikerInnen wollen, dass SchülerInnen über den Geschichtsunterricht befähigt werden, methodisch bewusst mit Quellen und Darstellungen umzugehen (“Interpretationskompetenz”, “Methodenkompetenz”), sich die Gegenwart über Geschichte ein Stück weit besser erklären zu können und den Gebrauch von Geschichte in der Öffentlichkeit kritisch einzuordnen (“Orientierungskompetenz”, “geschichtskulturelle Kompetenz”). Und ja: Auch “narrative Kompetenz” ist ein geschichtsdidaktisch begrüßenswertes Ziel. Das heißt: sich kritisch mit Narrativen, also Geschichten und Deutungen, auseinanderzusetzen sowie eigene Narrationen zu erstellen. Das geschieht auf der Basis von fundierten Kenntnissen, auch wenn diese in Lehrplänen nicht alle einzeln aufgeführt sind. Als Ziel von Geschichtsunterricht ergibt sich dann der Aufbau eines reflektierten Geschichtsbewusstseins. Es stimmt: “Früher” gab es mehr Jahreszahlen, “früher” gab es (noch) mehr Inhalte im Geschichtsunterricht. “Früher” wurde mehr Wissen von der Lehrkraft direkt vermittelt. Was hat sich vom Geschichtsunterricht “früher” dauerhaft erhalten und verankert? Sehr wenig. Verschiedene Studien zeichneten hier ein nicht gerade schmeichelhaftes Bild.[6] Ist das der Zustand, der wieder erreicht werden soll? Bestimmt nicht: Der Geschichtsunterricht ist heute nicht schlechter als “früher”. Wenn er kompetenzorientiert ist, setzt er andere Akzente, ist reflektierter in dem oben beschriebenen Sinne. Trotzdem bietet er – wie immer schon – Ansatzpunkte zu weiterer Verbesserung und zu kritischem Hinsehen.

Nicht nur testen und messen!

Viele Vorschläge zur Kompetenzorientierung kann man mit guten Argumenten kritisieren. Auch etliche GeschichtsdidaktikerInnen vertreten hier mit einigem Recht kritische Positionen. Aber die Bildungspolitik hat nun einmal diesen Weg eingeschlagen (übrigens gibt es Kompetenzorientierung an den Universitäten ebenso, auch wenn ProfessorInnen das leichter ausblenden können). Den Weg kritisch konstruktiv zu begleiten, wäre das Gebot der Stunde und nicht nur polemisches Nein-Sagen. Das Grundproblem von Kompetenzorientierung liegt meines Erachtens nicht in (wie auch immer) definierten Kompetenzbereichen, sondern in einer Übererfüllung des Gedankens einer “Output-Orientierung”. Plötzlich muss alles und jedes gemessen werden. Ist der naheliegende Wunsch nach kompetenten SchülerInnen tatsächlich automatisch und zwangsläufig mit einem Mehr an Standardisierung, Tests und Messungen verbunden? Oder kann man Kompetenzen fördern und im Schulalltag trotzdem nicht ständig testen, nicht immer gleich “Messen-Wollen”? Darüber ließe sich trefflich diskutieren. Dazu wäre aber etwas mehr Bereitschaft vonnöten, sich mit der Materie fundiert auseinanderzusetzen. Viele erachten jedoch eine Beschäftigung mit geschichtsdidaktischen Konzepten als überflüssig, weil zum Thema Geschichtsunterricht ja schließlich jeder etwas zu sagen weiß.

Die “leise” Gegenseite

Mit polternder Polemik wird man weder GeschichtsdidaktikerInnen respektive LehrplanmacherInnen gerecht, die sich Gedanken über kompetenzorientierte Lernwege machen, noch einer Öffentlichkeit, die mehr verdient hätte, als durch selektive Kulturkritik desinformiert zu werden. Aber wo hört man Widerspruch? Warum verteidigen so wenige die Entwicklungen der letzten Jahre? Warum hört in den Medien kaum jemand die Gegenseite? Meldet sie sich nicht oder ist sie – in einer auf die spektaktuläre oder skandalisierende Meldung hin ausgerichteten Medienwelt – einfach nicht der Rede wert?[7]

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Christoph Kühberger  (Hrsg.): Historisches Wissen. Geschichtsdidaktische Erkundung zu Art, Tiefe und Umfang für das historische Lernen. Schwalbach/Ts. 2012.
  • Peter Gautschi: Plausibilität der Theorie, Spuren der Empirie, Weisheit der Praxis. Zum Stand der geschichtsdidaktischen Kompetenzdiskussion. In: geschichte für heute 8 (2016) 3, S. 5-19.
  • Josef Memminger: Der gerade Weg zum guten Lehrer? Oder: Früher war alles besser! Die fachdidaktische Geschichtslehrerausbildung der ersten Phase in Bayern. In: GWU 67  (2016) 3/4, S. 133-145.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] Thomas Vitzthum: Wenn im Geschichtsunterricht Jahreszahlen egal sind. In : Die Welt vom 22.08. 2016. Online unter: https://www.welt.de/Wenn-im-Geschichtsunterricht-Jahreszahlen-egal-sind (letzter Zugriff 21.11.2016).
[2] https://www.bildung-lsa.de/lehrplaene___rahmenrichtlinien (letzter Zugriff 21.11.2016).
[3] Zur Komplexität des Terminus „Wissen“ vgl. Christoph Kühberger (Hrsg.): Historisches Wissen. Geschichtsdidaktische Erkundung zu Art, Tiefe und Umfang für das historische Lernen. Schwalbach/Ts. 2012.
[4] Martin Schulze Wessel „Wie die Zeit aus der Geschichte verschwindet“ von Martin Schulze Wessel. In: FAZ v. 14.9.2016. Online unter: http://www.faz.net/geschichtsunterricht-wie-die-zeit-aus-der-geschichte-verschwindet(letzter Zugriff 21.11.2016).
[5] Manches ist einfach nicht korrekt, z. B. wenn Martin Schulze Wessel konstatiert: „Das Schulministerium in Bayern orientiert sich am FUER-Projekt […].“ Vgl. zu den bayerischen Akzentsetzungen zuletzt: Josef Memminger: Der gerade Weg zum guten Lehrer? Oder: Früher war alles besser! Die fachdidaktische Geschichtslehrerausbildung der ersten Phase in Bayern. In: Geschichte in Wissenschaft und Unterricht 67, Heft 3/4 (2016), S. 133-145.
[6] Das hat auch Michele Barricelli in einem Artikel in PHW vor einiger Zeit bekräftigt, wenngleich er auch – zurecht – die Bedeutung der Inhalte betont: Michele Barricelli: Historisches Wissen? Ein unverbindliches Angebot. In: Public History Weekly 4 (2016), DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-6358 (letzter Zugriff 21.11.2016).
[7] Hier sollen zwei ausgewogene Reaktionen auf den Artikel Martin Schulze Wessels nicht verschwiegen werden. Beide erschienen als Leserbrief in der FAZ und hatten natürlich nicht die Publizität wie ein Hauptartikel: Der Vorsitzende der Konferenz für Geschichtsdidaktik, Thomas Sandkühler, setzte sich am 17.09.16 in der FAZ (S. 33) ebenso mit der undifferenzierten Pauschalkritik auseinander wie ein wenig später Holger Thünemann im gleichen Blatt (FAZ, 05.10.16, S. 25).

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis
© Lucie Klárová

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Memminger, Josef: Der Untergang?! Ist der Geschichtsunterricht noch zu retten? In: Public History Weekly 4 (2016) 39, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-7764

Übersetzung: Regina Bäck, Elisabeth Heistinger und Rosalie Esquivel, Sprachlektorat Kurt Brügger swiss american language expert

Redaktionelle Verantwortung
Christian Bunnenberg / Peter Gautschi

Copyright (c) 2016 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.


Categories: 4 (2016) 39
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-7764

Tags: , ,

2 replies »

  1. [For an English version, please, scroll down.]

    Ein Gespenst geht um in Deutschlands Medienwelt – das Gespenst vom selbstverschuldeten Untergang des Fachs Geschichte. Und zwar in Sachsen-Anhalt. Jawohl, ausgerechnet dort!

    In dem deutschen Bundesland, wo das Fach Geschichte – aus nachvollziehbaren historischen Gründen aus der Zeit vor 1989 – als verpflichtendes viertes Abiturfach eine wichtigere Rolle spielt als in den meisten anderen Bundesländern. Hat das Bundesland zuvor schon mit bedrückenden Wahlergebnissen bei der letzten Landtagswahl (25% AfD-Wähler) selbst für schlechte Presse gesorgt, so war es ausgerechnet der bis September amtierende Vorsitzende des deutschen HistorikerInnenverbandes (VHD), Martin Schulze Wessel (München),[1] der sich über die gerade in Erprobung befindlichen “kompetenzorientierten” Lehrpläne für Geschichte im Land Sachsen-Anhalt echauffiert und in seinem Zorn vor Pauschalurteilen nicht zurückschreckt.

    Schulze Wessel befürchtet, dass mit und durch die Kompetenzorientierung nicht nur das Wissen, sondern sogar die Zeit aus dem Geschichtsunterricht verschwinde und dass der Geschichtsunterricht zum Opfer einer “Betroffenheitspädagogik” werde. Keine Frage, der Herr Professor ist richtig aufgebracht. Aber, so möchte man fragen, wer hat ihn “gebrieft” – wer hat ihm in die Feder diktiert, dass GeschichtsdidaktikerInnen für all dieses verantwortlich sind? Für Lehrpläne sind normalerweise nicht Geschichtsdidaktiker verantwortlich, sondern Gremien der Bildungspolitik und letztlich, als beschlussfassendes Organ, die Landtage als Länderparlamente, da bekanntlich Bildungsfragen Länderangelegenheiten sind.

    In Sachsen-Anhalt war in der letzten, entscheidenden Phase kein einziger der im Bundesland tätigen Geschichtsdidaktiker mehr am Entwurf des Lehrplans beteiligt. Auch der Hallenser Emeritus, Hans-Jürgen Pandel, hatte sich längst aus der Mitarbeit in der Lehrplankommission zurückgezogen. Ist das Problem dann nur noch ein mediales “Barking up the wrong tree”? Nein, natürlich nicht. Das zeigen auch die Reaktionen von Thomas Sandkühler (HU Berlin)[2] und Josef Memminger (Regensburg): Hier geht es unter anderem darum, dass jeder Fachhistoriker meint, dass er bei geschichtsdidaktischen Fragen – quasi naturgemäß – mitdiskutieren könne und sich mal eben an der didaktischen Fachdebatte beteiligen könne.

    Der Beitrag von Thomas Sandkühler auf Facebook hat es überdeutlich gemacht: Kann er, kann sie nicht! Auch Josef Memminger hat in seinem Initialbeitrag recht, wenn er unterstreicht, dass ungeachtet der vielen, zum Teil leicht ineinander übersetzbaren, zu Teil aber auch grundsätzlich divergierenden Kompetenzmodelle, die Nichtdidaktiker so verwirren und erstaunen, in der Zunft Geschichtsdidaktik weitgehend Einigkeit über die Ziele herrscht:

    “So gut wie alle GeschichtsdidaktikerInnen wollen, dass Schülerinnen und Schüler über den Geschichtsunterricht befähigt werden, methodisch bewusst mit Quellen und Darstellungen umzugehen (‘Interpretationskompetenz’) sich die Gegenwart über Geschichte ein Stück weit besser erklären zu können und den Gebrauch von Geschichte in der Öffentlichkeit kritisch einzuordnen (‘geschichtskulturelle Kompetenz’). Und ja: Auch ‘narrative Kompetenz’ ist ein geschichtsdidaktisch begrüßenswertes Ziel. Das heißt: sich kritisch mit Narrativen, also Geschichten und Deutungen, auseinanderzusetzen sowie eigene Narrationen zu erstellen.”

    Das heißt also: Die Kakophonie der Kompetenzorientierung ist eher eine von außerhalb der Geschichtsdidaktik wahrgenommene, als eine intern vorhandene. Uneinigkeit in den Modellen, die übrigens alle noch nicht empirisch überprüft sind, bedeutet daher beileibe keine Uneinigkeit in den Zielsetzungen, der generellen Stoßrichtung.

    Zumindest das sollte die Geschichtswissenschaft freundlicherweise mal zur Kenntnis nehmen, anstatt die GeschichtsdidaktikerInnen darzustellen, wie eine Bande sich um einen Knochen balgender Hunde. Und was den angeblichen Konflikt zwischen Kompetenzen und Sachwissen betrifft: Wie sollen SchülerInnen historisch denken lernen ohne historische Inhalte? Das ist, um Hans-Jürgen Pandel zu zitieren, genauso “unsinnig, als wenn man den Schülern das Zählen ohne Zahlen beibringen wollte.” Es geht in der Debatte also nicht um ein “Entweder-oder”, sondern um ein “Sowohl als auch”. Entsprechend enthält der angeblich so inhaltsleere Lehrplan Geschichte in Sachsen-Anhalt zu jedem Thema, das nun als “Kompetenzschwerpunkt” bezeichnet wird, eine Sparte mit der Überschrift “Zentrale Wissensbestände”. Ob es sich dabei tatsächlich nur um Wissensbestände oder nicht zumindest teilweise auch um Geschichtsbilder handelt, die der Gesetzgeber gern im Geschichtsunterricht verbreitet sehen möchte, lassen wir an dieser Stelle einfach mal offen, denn die Frage stellt sich – soweit ich zu sehen vermag – bei fast allen Lehrplänen in allen Bundesländern.

    Fazit: Wie die anderen geschichtsdidaktischen Autoren in dieser Debatte komme ich zu dem Schluss, dass die Kritik Schulze Wessels mit viel Verve und großer Öffentlichkeitswirksamkeit vorgetragen worden ist, substantiell aus der Sicht eines Geschichtsdidaktikers aber wenig überzeugend ist. Zu beantworten wäre noch die Frage nach dem “cui bono” dieser ganzen Aktion. Welche Interessen verfolgt ein Verbandsvorsitzender, wenn er nicht etwa die dafür verantwortliche Politik, sondern – so dachte ich bisher wenigstens – die “Kollegen und Kolleginnen” aus der Geschichtsdidaktik angeht? Welche seiner ständischen (also professoralen) oder zünftischen Interessen sieht er durch die Kompetenzorientierung in einem solchen Ausmaß gefährdet, dass er sich dazu veranlasst sieht, so vom Leder zu ziehen? Welche Antworten Herr Schulze-Wessel darauf geben wird bleibt abzuwarten. In der Zwischenzeit bleibt zu hoffen, dass die Geschichtsdidaktik ihre bisherige Rolle als “zu leise”-Gegenseite ablegt: Auf diese Weise müssen wir nicht mit uns umgehen lassen.

    Anmerkungen
    [1] Mitteilung des VHD vom 20.9.2016: Mitgliederversammlung des Verbandes der Historiker und Historikerinnen Deutschlands wählt neuen Vorstand, http://www.historikerverband.de/mitteilungen/mitteilungs-details/article/mitgliederversammlung-des-verbandes-der-historiker-und-historikerinnen-deutschlands-waehlt-neuen-vor.html (zuletzt am 6.12.2016).
    [2] Thomas Sandkühler: Leserbrief zu Martin Schulze Wessel, “Wie die Zeit aus der Geschichte verschwindet“ (FAZ v. 14.9.2016, S. N 4). In FAZ v. 17.9.2016, S. 33 (online https://www.facebook.com/thomas.sandkuhler.5/posts/675921962572288, zuletzt am 6.12.16).

    —————————————————–

    A ghost is roaming around Germany’s media world – the ghost of the self-inflicted downfall of history as a subject. Moreover, rumour has it that this ghost lives in Saxony-Anhalt. Yes, there, indeed!

    In that German federal state where history as an obligatory fourth subject in the A-levels plays a more central role than in most other federal states. No doubt, the land has provided the public with bad news galore considering the recent results of the Saxon-Anhaltian regional elections (25 per cent of the electorate gave their votes to the notorious AfD), but now it is the president of the Association of German Historians, Martin Schulze Wessel from Munich,[1] who is seriously getting worked up about the “competence-orientated” curriculum for history in Saxony-Anhalt, which is still in the process of public testing Yet, that does not stop the professor in his rage, who does not refrain from verdicts across the board.

    Schulze Wessel is afraid, that the competence orientation will make not only knowledge, but, in fact, time itself disappear from history lessons and that teaching history will fall victim to what he calls the “pedagogics of dismay”. No doubt, the professor is really upset. However, one would like to ask him, whom he was briefed by, who dictated the message into his pen, that it has been didactics of history who are liable for all that makes him angry? Usually, curricula are based on the work of boards of education and, at the end of the day, on the decisions of the federal parliaments for as the saying goes, matters of education are matters of the federal states.

    As regards Saxony-Anhalt: During the last and decisive period of developing the history curriculum not a single one of the didactics of history active in the land was involved in the process. Even the emeritus from Halle, Professor Hans-Jürgen Pandel, quit his work on the curriculum commission. Does that mean, that we are faced with a serious case of “barking up the wrong tree”? No, of course not. This is also amplified by the reactions of Thomas Sandkühler (HU Berlin) and Joseph Memminger (Regensburg) respectively: This whole business is – among other things- about historians of epochs and special fields of interest feeling both ready and able to contribute in a meaningful way to discussions strictly concerned with special didactic matters.

    The essay of Thomas Sandkühler on Facebook[2] made it crystal-clear: They cannot! Josef Memminger in its Initial text, too, is right in emphasizing, that no matter how many both divergent and convergent models of competence exist in the didactics of history – a fact that causes serious consternation among non-didactics – there is a vast consensus among the members of the craft with regard to the general aims:

    „Almost all of the didacts of history want to enable pupils via their history lessons, to deal with both source material and textbook texts in a methodically conscious manner („competence of interpretation“), they aim at pupils being able to explain their present somewhat better by referring to the past, and they want pupils to critically assess the public use of history („historio-cultural competence“). Finally: „narrative competence“, too, is an aim which is largely welcomed by the craft. This means in a nutshell: Both critically dealing with historical narratives, i.e. with stories and interpretations, and producing narratives of their own.“

    To put matters short: The „cacophony of competence orientation“ is rather perceived from without the craft than really internally existent. Disagreement with regard to theoretical models (none of which, by the way, has been empirically checked so far!) does by no means translate into disunity with regard to the aims or the general direction of the debate.

    At least that should be friendly acknowledged by the science of history instead of representing didactics of history like a pack of dogs fighting over a bone. With regard to the so-called conflict between competences and knowledge: How are pupils to be expected to learn how to think historically without historical contents? To quote Hans-Jürgen Pandel: This kind of thinking is as „absurd as to teach children how to count without numbers.” Therefore, this debate is not a matter of „either- or“, but one of „as well as“. Accordingly, each topic of the history curriculum of Saxony-Anhalt, which has been falsely accused of being „free of contents“ contains a section with the title „central corpus of knowledge”. If these corpuses really contain nothing but knowledge or if there are also at least some representations of history, which the lawmakers want to see disseminated in history classes may be justifiably left open to discussion, for this question poses itself, as far as I can see, with regard to almost all curricula in all federal states.

    Conclusion: Like the other authors from the field of didactics of history in this debate, I come to the conclusion, that the criticism of Schulze Wessel, though it has been presented with both much spirit and great public effectiveness, is little substantial and not very convincing from the point of view of a history didactics. What remains to be answered is the question of “cui bono” in this whole affair. What are the interests of the president of an organisation such as the German Association of Historians if he does not hold politics (or politicians) responsible for this educational line of politics but rather attacks “his colleagues” (or so I used to think, anyway…) from the field of the didactics of history? Which of his professoral or guild interests does he fear to come under attack from the principle of „competence orientation“, that he feels impelled to launch an all-out offensive? It remains to be seen how Mr. Schulze Wessel is going to answer to these questions (if, indeed, he will give an answer at all!). In the meantime, it only remains to be hoped that the didactics of history will discard its former role as too hushed a counterpart: We must not allow anybody to treat us in this inacceptable manner.

    References
    [1] Announcement of the Association of German Historians at 20 September 2016: Mitgliederversammlung des Verbandes der Historiker und Historikerinnen Deutschlands wählt neuen Vorstand, http://www.historikerverband.de/mitteilungen/mitteilungs-details/article/mitgliederversammlung-des-verbandes-der-historiker-und-historikerinnen-deutschlands-waehlt-neuen-vor.html (zuletzt am 6.12.2016).
    [2] Thomas Sandkühler: Letter to the editor concerning Martin Schulze Wessel, “Wie die Zeit aus der Geschichte verschwindet“ (FAZ v. 14.9.2016, S. N 4). In FAZ v. 17.9.2016, S. 33 (online https://www.facebook.com/thomas.sandkuhler.5/posts/675921962572288, last accessed at 6 December 2016).

  2. Replik

    Es hört nicht auf: “Fakten oder Kompetenzen – was sollen Schüler lernen? Ein Streitgespräch”. Erneut wurden in der “Zeit” vom 2. März 2017 zwei KontrahentInnen aufeinander losgelassen, die diese müßige Diskussion ausfechten.[1] In der Öffentlichkeit entsteht einmal mehr der Eindruck, es gehe beim schulischen Lernen um ein rigides “Entweder – Oder” von Fakten und Kompetenzen.

    Marian Richling hat völlig Recht, wenn er in seinem Kommentar schreibt: “Es geht in der Debatte also nicht um ein ‘Entweder-oder’, sondern um ein ‘Sowohl als auch’. Entsprechend enthält der angeblich so inhaltsleere Lehrplan Geschichte in Sachsen-Anhalt zu jedem Thema, das nun als ‘Kompetenzschwerpunkt’ bezeichnet wird, eine Sparte mit der Überschrift ‘Zentrale Wissensbestände’.”

    Es gibt momentan ohnehin keinen alternativen Weg (mehr): Oder glaubt wirklich jemand ernsthaft, es würde irgendein Bundesland in nächster Zeit nicht-kompetenzorientierte Lehrpläne einführen? Der grundlegende Kampf gegen Kompetenzorientierung ist also nicht realistisch und vermutlich intellektuelle Energieverschwendung. Zielführender (weil konstruktiv) sind Wortmeldungen, die kompetenzorientierte Zugänge nicht völlig ablehnen, sondern diese auf den Prüfstand stellen und z. B. auf “weiße Flecken der Kompetenzdebatte” hinweisen.[2]

    Ein weiterer Punkt, den Marian Richling anreißt, ist von Bedeutung: Nicht nur in Sachsen-Anhalt, auch in anderen Bundesländern sind GeschichtsdidaktikerInnen zu wenig in die Erarbeitung von Curricula für den Geschichtsunterricht eingebunden. Oft haben die universitären Experten nur beratende Funktion bei der Erstellung eines Lehrplans. Welche Gründe dies hat, ließe sich auch trefflich diskutieren. Jedenfalls scheint die angebliche “theoretische Abgehobenheit” der Geschichtsdidaktik als Vorurteil nicht nur bei meinungsstarken Fachhistorikern verbreitet zu sein. Mal sehen, was auf der Zweijahrestagung der Konferenz für Geschichtsdidaktik in Berlin zum Stand der Dinge gesagt wird. Ende September lautet dort das Thema „Geschichtsunterricht im 21. Jahrhundert. Eine geschichtsdidaktische Standortbestimmung“.[3] Es ist zu wünschen (oder: zu erwarten?), dass der Öffentlichkeit dort mehr geboten wird als Beschwörungen des “Untergangs” historischen Lernens.

    Fussnoten
    [1] Die Zeit Nr. 10/2017 vom 02. März 2017. Auf Seite 65 findet sich das angegebene Zitat als Ankündigung des auf S. 67 abgedruckten Gesprächs zwischen Petra Stanat, Direktorin des Instituts zur Qualitätsentwicklung im Bildungswesen an der HU Berlin und Hans Peter Klein, Professor für Didaktik der Biowissenschaften an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt a.M. (Überschrift auf S. 67: “Einsen für alle. Was soll die Schule Kindern beibringen? Wissen oder Können? Zwei Bildungsexperten streiten sich”).
    [2] Saskia Handro/Bernd Schönemann (Hrsg.): Aus der Geschichte lernen? Weiße Flecken der Kompetenzdebatte. Münster u.a. 2016 (= Geschichtskultur und historisches Lernen, Bd. 15).
    [3] Ein ausführlicher CfP und eine Beschreibung der einzelnen Sektionen sind zu finden unter: http://www.hsozkult.de/event/id/termine-31847 (letzter Zugriff 07.03.17).

Pin It on Pinterest