School History Textbooks in the 21st Century

Schulgeschichtsbücher im 21. Jahrhundert

 

Monthly Editorial March 2021 | Einführung in den Monat März 2021

Abstract:
In many places the school history textbook has remained the leading medium for teaching history in schools, and the number of school history textbooks sold mostly exceeds that of all other non-fiction books with historical themes many times over. Will this remain the case in the future also? And how do school history textbooks deal with the new challenges?
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2021-17618
Languages: English, Deutsch


School history textbooks are the products of social processes of negotiation and mirror science, practice and politics.[1] They are media for the thematization of ‘common sense’ and for the cross-generational and cross-milieu mediation of knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviors.[2] Influenced by the megatrends of the 21st century – for example, digitalization, nomadization, acceleration, knowledge expansion, value change, ecologization, economization[3] – as well as current pedagogical concerns – e.g. competence, lifeworld and present-world orientation, inclusion or differentiation – they are currently undergoing a major change. Nevertheless, in many places the school history textbook has remained the leading medium for teaching history in schools,[4] and the number of school history textbooks sold mostly exceeds that of all other non-fiction books with historical themes many times over. Will this remain the case in the future also? And how do school history textbooks deal with the new challenges?

As a Leading Medium

Jörn Rüsen‘s statement in 1992 that “the textbook is the most important medium in the teaching of history” still receives broad approval at present.[5] Even if pedagogical and didactic fashions also come and go and the conception has oscillated over the decades between overall representations without working materials, an uncommented presentation of sources or the combined learning and workbook, the school history textbook as a medium has remained largely untouched, although the alternatives have become more numerous: Educational publishers, interest association and historical-cultural institutions produce thematically narrowly focused thematic booklets which offer more breadth and depth though compared to the school history textbook, but are, nevertheless, committed to similar conventions in their conception. Digital educational offerings and open educational resources oscillate between collections of worksheets, topic-related learning environments and extensive, didactically well thought out hypertext offerings.[6] In the end, however, to this day there is hardly a competing product that comes close to the traditional, manageable, reliable, professionally presented compilation of representational texts aligned with the curriculum, sources, work assignments, and methodical hints in school history textbook series.

As an Obsolescent Model

But is this the future?[7] Or has the school history textbook not long since become a relic of bygone days when (national) history was presented as a static narration for going it through chronologically? Because the weak points of this leading medium are obvious:

  • Firstly, the space available limits the scope and number of texts and materials, and thus the selection options for a differentiated presentation of the past.
  • Secondly, present-world and lifeworld references are difficult to implement in the school history textbook: Historical-cultural phenomena remain underrepresented and (daily) current history-related debates do not take place or only with a time delay in the next edition.
  • Thirdly, school history textbooks are permanently lagging behind the digital development.
  • Fourthly, school history textbooks generally seem to fail to meet the required high standards: They are characterized as either too complicated or too banal – sometimes both at the same time.
  • Fifthly, school history textbooks regularly disappoint the expectations of all specialists because exactly those topics which these experts focus on are either not included or insufficiently implemented.

In brief: the good school history textbook does not exist! No wonder, then, that it has long been called an obsolescent model! The inadequacy of school history textbooks in relation to a wide variety of demands is also related to the fact that a school history textbook is always the result of many compromises.

As a Compromise

The saddle function of school history textbooks – on the one hand, as a mirror of society and, on the other hand, as a driver of historical education – makes their development a challenging enterprise which can be analyzed[9] in three fields of tension following the Aarau curriculum standard by Rudolf Künzli and Stefan Hopmann[8]: Firstly, in school history textbooks it is about finding a balance in the field of tension between tradition, for example the cultural heritage of a society, and emancipation, for example in the mediation of key problems of the future. Secondly, it is about taking use of orders and findings of the historical sciences and, at the same time, to keep an eye on the teachability and also by means of elementarization and didactic reconstruction to identify a plausible mediation sequence and acquisition opportunity. Thirdly, this balancing out of factual orientation and child orientation must succeed in such a way that the school history textbook is accepted by the sciences as well as approved by politicians and embraced by practitioners. Such mediations between the parties involved and this target-oriented search for compromises are strengths of history didactics.[10]

As a Hub

School history textbooks have to address a wide variety of audiences in order to reach the classroom at all: They must demonstrate to those responsible for education that they implement the curricula and reflect the social consensus. They must make the teachers’ difficult task of teaching history well easier. They must provide learners with stimulating and meaningful learning processes.

Since school history textbooks are used differently in everyday teaching[11] and in the various forms of teaching –  from direct instruction to independent learning of the students – and should guide and support the mediation of history, three different spheres move into focus: Firstly, the school history textbook opens up a factually correct and rich space of offerings with comprehensible presentation texts and diverse sources. This space of offerings must be well structured and clear so that teachers and learners do not get lost in the analog and digital school history textbook which usually consists of several components. Secondly, the school history textbook provides a space for communication that must be designed in a way that individual and collaborative learning in the classroom in a target-oriented way is supported. Also more recent and especially digital school history textbooks still neglect the fact that school learning takes place in the community and that this very feature is a great advantage for unlocking meaning, for negotiating and building significance. Thirdly, the school history textbook provides a space for appropriation, to enable learners to, for example, engage in meaningful learning processes by means of task culture and to hold on to what they have learned.

As a Battlefield

Because the school history textbook serves as a hub for a wide variety of concerns and as a meeting place for many parties involved, disputes over school history textbooks also arise frequently.[12] On the one hand, debates regularly escalate about the appropriate presentation of certain facts such as the period of imperialism and colonialism or National Socialism.[13] Differing opinions on the appropriate implementation of certain social or educational concerns, for example, how to deal with racism or anti-Semitism[14], occasionally lead to disputes as well. And finally, textbooks become the battleground when nations are divided or involved in conflicts with neighbors.[15] It is therefore only logical that the most different specialized institutions engage in the peace-building impact of school history textbooks.[16] And the Council of Europe also established an Observatory on History Teaching in November 2020 which is intended to be “a valuable tool in the fight against dangerous revisionism and attempts to falsify historical truth.”[17]

For History Education

School history textbooks are still autobiographies of nations also in the 21st century[18], but, moreover, they are, thanks to recent pedagogical developments and competence orientation, first and foremost, well-balanced learning media. Furthermore, they have far more functions than imparting knowledge to students and enabling them to solve problems. In particular when it comes to school history textbooks, the focus often lies on additional concerns, for example, “the linking of our ego with the world”, as Wilhelm von Humboldt already formulated it in 1793 when he described “education.”[19] History education is not about mere adaptation of the individual to a world given to him and therefore not exclusively about solving certain problems in this world. Much rather, it is a matter of a multi-faceted confrontation “in which the individual can develop his or her own form of being human in this world – hence educates himself or herself.”[20] Education – thus it can be summarized briefly and popularly – mirrors a reflective approach to oneself, to others and to the world [21].

Thus, in the 21st century also, school history textbooks then have the central task of enabling learners to deal with history, with society and with themselves. What particular challenges arise in this field is the topic of this month on Public History Weekly. The following articles on the topic will be published:

In her article, Sabrina Schmitz-Zerres deals with descriptions of the future in current German school history textbooks. In the narrative texts, not only the past and its consequences for the present are described, but also possible future developments. An analysis reveals narrative concepts and proposes to focus on contingency as a principle of history narration.
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2021-17627

Roland Bernhard is dedicated to the connection between Fake News, conspiracy theories and school history textbooks. The spread of fake news and conspiracy theories in the public sphere represents a social challenge of the future. The leading medium of textbooks can be part of the answer to this challenge if it consistently aims to initiate critical-historical thinking.
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2021-17608

Felicitas Macgilchrist asks what happens to content and historical knowledge when the materiality or mediality of history textbooks changes over time. Her observation is that school history textbooks need to be “elatic”, holding different fields together like a rubber band. The particular focus is on the connection between school history textbooks and the representation of national history.
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2021-17609

In his contribution, Markus Bernhardt refers to the history textbook as a “battlefield” that is used not only by various social interest groups but also by actors in the field of history, who in this context articulate their discomfort with the didactics of history. The history textbook is often seen as a medium in which the main data of world history are summarised in text form in a way that is up-to-date for research. The fact that textbooks rather reflect the social and historical-cultural discourse on historical topics is often alien to these actors and sometimes leads to undifferentiated textbook bashing.
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2021-17758

As every month, new and trenchant contributions can be found in the Speakers’ corner in March, which hopefully, just like the focal contributions, will bring new insights and stimulate discussion.

Dirk Vaihinger answers the questions of the editors of this theme month in an interview. He is the programme manager of Lehrmittelverlag Zürich and has many years of experience in management positions in the publishing industry. The conversation with him opens up new perspectives: How do educational publishers meet the great challenges of the present and the future?
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2021-17610.

In his contribution, Daniel Schumacher takes on the German culture of remembrance, using the example of the controversy surrounding the “Friedensstatue” erected in Berlin at the end of 2020. In his view, this culture of remembrance is self-contained and therefore offers hardly any points of contact for the integration and negotiation of multi-layered “problematic histories” of minority groups. He would like to encourage reflection on what is understood by “German” culture of remembrance in the 21st century, who is allowed to help shape it and what social role it can play.
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2021-17716

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Gautschi, Peter. “Ideas and Concepts for Using Textbooks in the Context of Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences and Humanities.” In The Palgrave Handbook of Textbook Studies, 1st edition, edited by Eckhardt Fuchs, and Annekatrin Bock, 127-139. New York: Palgrave Macmillan US, 2018.
  • Matthes, Eva, Syliva Schütze, and Werner Wiater. Digitale Bildungsmedien im Unterricht (Beiträge zur historischen und systematischen Schulbuchforschung 17). Bad Heilbrunn: Klinkhardt, 2003.
  • Fuchs, Eckhardt, Joachim Kahlert, and Uwe Sandfuchs. Schulbuch konkret – Kontexte – Produktion – Unterricht. Bad Heilbrunn: Klinkhardt, 2010.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] Barbara Christophe, Annekatrin Bock, Eckhardt Fuchs et al., “New Directions,” in The Palgrave Handbook of Textbook Studies, ed. Eckhardt Fuchs, and Annekatrin Bock (New York: Palgrave Macmillan US, 2018), 413 – 421.
[2] Peter Gautschi, “Geschichtslehrmittel. Wie sie entwickelt werden und was von ihnen erwartet wird”, in Lehrpläne und Bildungsstandards: Was Schülerinnen und Schüler lernen sollen; Festschrift zum 65. Geburtstag von Prof. Dr. Rudolf Künzli, ed. Lucien Criblez et al. (Bern: hep-Verlag, 2006), 140.
[3] The term “megatrend” probably comes from the American futurologist John Naisbitt’s 1982 book of the same name, in which he describes overarching developments that manifest themselves globally and over a longer period of time. Cf. for example https://digitalswitzerland.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Megatrends_Report_Swissfuture.pdf (last accessed 25 February 2021).
[4] Bernd Schönemann and Holger Thünemann, Schulbucharbeit. Das Geschichtslehrbuch in der Unterrichtspraxis. Schwalbach/Ts: Wochenschau, 2010.
[5] Jörn Rüsen, “Das ideale Schulbuch. Überlegungen zum Leitmedium des Geschichtsunterrichts,” Internationale Schulbuchforschung 14, no. 3 (1992): 237–250.
[6] Anja Neubert, “Freie Bildungsmaterialien (OER) für historisches Lernen und Lehren,” in Praxishandbuch Historisches Lernen und Medienbildung im digitalen Zeitalter, ed. Daniel Bernsen, and Ulf Kerber (Bonn: bpb, 2017), 206-216.
[7] Markus Bernhardt, and Christian Bunnenberg, “Alter Wein in neuen Schläuchen oder Aufbruch zu neuen Ufern? Kritische Überlegungen zu einem digitalen Schulgeschichtsbuch am Beginn des 21. Jahrhunderts,” in Nutzung digitaler Medien im Geschichtsunterricht, ed. by Christoph Kühberger (Salzburg: Studien Verlag, 2015), 79-102.
[8] The Aarau curriculum standard is an instrument for describing problems and progressions of curriculum work in a systematised way. (Stefan Hopmann and Rudolf Künzli, “Entscheidungsfelder der Lehrplanarbeit: Grundzüge einer Theorie der Lehrplanung,” in Lehrpläne: wie sie entwickelt werden und was von ihnen erwartet wird: Forschungsstand, Zugänge und Ergebnisse aus der Schweiz und der Bundesrepublik Deutschland; Nationales Forschungsprogramm 33, Wirksamkeit unserer Bildungssysteme, ed. by Rudolf Künzli, and Stefan Hopmann (Chur: Rüegger, 1998), 18.
[9] Peter Gautschi, “Geschichtslehrmittel. Wie sie entwickelt werden und was von ihnen erwartet wird”, in Lehrpläne und Bildungsstandards: Was Schülerinnen und Schüler lernen sollen; Festschrift zum 65. Geburtstag von Prof. Dr. Rudolf Künzli, ed. Lucien Criblez et al. (Bern: hep-Verlag, 2006), 117-148.
[10] Peter Gautschi, “Fachdidaktik als Design-Science. Videobasierte Unterrichts- und Lehrmittelforschung zum Lehren und Lernen von Geschichte,” in transfer Forschung <> Schule. Heft 2: Visible Didactics – Fachdidaktische Forschung trifft Praxis, ed. by Christa Juen-Kretschmer et al. (Bad Heilbrunn: Klinkhardt), 53-66.
[11] Peter Gautschi, “Anforderungen an zukünftige Schulgeschichtsbücher,” in Jede Gegenwart hat ihre Gründe. Geschichtsbewusstsein, historische Lebenswelt und Zukunftserwartung im frühen 21. Jahrhundert. Hans-Jürgen Pandel zum 70. Geburtstag, ed. by Michele Barricelli, Axel Becker, and Christian Heuer (Schwalbach/Ts: Wochenschau, 2011), 164-176
[12] Julia Lerch, “Embracing Diversity? Textbook Narratives in Countries with a Legacy of Internal Armed Conflict 1950 to 2011,” in History Can Bite: History Education in Divided and Postwar Societies, ed. by Denise Bentrovato, Karina V. Korostelina, and Martina Schulze (Göttingen: V&R Unipress, 2016), 31-43. Anna Drake and Allison McCulloch, “Deliberating and Learning Contentious Issues. How Divided Societies Represent Conflict in History Textbooks,” Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism 13, no. 3 (2013), 277–294. Joseph Moreau, Schoolbook Nation. Conflicts Over American History Textbooks from the Civil War to the Present (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2003). Yoshiko Nozaki, and Mark Selden, “Historical Memory, International Conflict, and Japanese Textbook Controversies in Three Epochs,” in Journal of Educational Media Memory and Society 1, no.1 (2009), 117–144.
[13] Cf. as a current example the criticism of the historian Martin Cüppers, “Darstellung von NS-Verbrechen in Schulbüchern. Geschichtsdidaktik hinkt der Forschung hinterher,” in https://www.deutschlandfunk.de/darstellung-von-ns-verbrechen-in-schulbuechern.1148.de.html?dram:article_id=492406  (last accessed 25 February 2021).
[14] Elina Marmer and Papa Sow, Wie Rassismus aus Schulbüchern spricht. Kritische Auseinandersetzung mit “Afrika”-Bildern und Schwarz-Weiß-Konstruktionen in der Schule – Ursachen, Auswirkungen und Handlungsansätze für die pädagogische Praxis (Weinheim: Beltz Juventa, 2015), 110-129. Vgl. auch: https://www.schweizer-illustrierte.ch/family/die-schulbucher-unserer-kinder-sind-rassistisch  (last accessed 25 February 2021).
[15] Nadine Fink, Markus Furrer and Peter Gautschi, eds., The Teaching of the History of One’s Own Country. International Experiences in a Comparative Perspective (Frankfurt/Main: Wochenschau Verlag, 2020).
[16] The founding of the International Textbook Institute in 1953 and the Georg Eckert Institute for International Textbook Research in 1975 in Germany, or the Korea Textbook Research Foundation in 1992 and the Institute of Textbook Research in Hungary in 2006, show that science and politics are also focusing on the usefulness of school history textbooks in national and international reconciliation processes.
[17] https://www.coe.int/fr/web/education/-/observatory-on-history-teaching-in-europe-a-new-flagship-project-of-the-education-department  (last accessed 25 February 2021).
[18] Wolfgang Jacobmeyer, “Das Schulgeschichtsbuch – Gedächtnis der Gesellschaft oder Autobiographie der Nation,” in Geschichte, Politik und ihre Didaktik. Zeitschrift für historisch-politische Bildung, Beiträge und Nachrichten für die Unterrichtspraxis 16, no. 1-2 (1998), 30.
[19] Wilhelm von Humboldt, Gesammelte Schriften/1785-1795 (Berlin 1903), 283.
[20] Wolfgang Sander, “Bildung – zur Einführung in das Schwerpunktthema,” in Zeitschrift für Didaktik der Gesellschaftswissenschaften 5, no.2 (2014), 7-15.
[21] Wikipedia: “Bildung”, https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bildung (last accessed 25 February 2021).

_____________________

Image Credits

History books © geralt

Recommended Citation

Gautschi, Peter, and Christian Bunnenberg: School History Textbooks in the 21st Century. In: Public History Weekly 9 (2021) 2, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2021-17618.

Translated by Kurt Brügger swissamericanlanguageexpert https://www.swissamericanlanguageexpert.ch/

Schulgeschichtsbücher sind Produkte von gesellschaftlichen Aushandlungsprozessen und spiegeln Wissenschaft, Praxis und Politik.[1] Sie sind Medien zur Thematisierung von ‘common sense’ und zur generationen- und milieuübergreifenden Vermittlung von Wissen, Können, Haltungen und Einstellungen.[2] Beeinflusst von Megatrends des 21. Jahrhunderts – zum Beispiel Digitalisierung, Nomadisierung, Beschleunigung, Wissensexpansion, Wertewandel, Ökologisierung, Ökonomisierung [3] – sowie von aktuellen pädagogischen Anliegen – etwa Kompetenz-, Lebenswelt- und Gegenwartsorientierung, Inklusion oder Differenzierung – unterliegen sie gegenwärtig einem grossen Wandel. Dennoch hat sich vielerorts das Schulgeschichtsbuch als Leitmedium der schulischen Geschichtsvermittlung gehalten [4], und die Anzahl der verkauften Schulgeschichtsbücher übertrifft diejenige aller anderen Sachbücher mit geschichtlichen Themen meist um ein Vielfaches. Bleibt dies auch in Zukunft so? Und wie gehen Schulgeschichtsbücher mit den neuen Herausforderungen um?

Als Leitmedium

Der Feststellung von Jörn Rüsen aus dem Jahr 1992, dass “das Schulbuch das wichtigste Medium im Geschichtsunterricht ist”, erhält gegenwärtig noch breite Zustimmung.[5] Wenn also auch pädagogische und didaktische Moden kommen und gehen und die Konzeption über die Jahrzehnte hinweg zwischen Gesamtdarstellungen ohne Arbeitsmaterialien, einer unkommentierten Darbietung von Quellen oder dem kombinierten Lern- und Arbeitsbuch oszilliert, das Schulgeschichtsbuch als Medium bleibt im Großen und Ganzen unangetastet, obwohl die Alternativen zahlreicher werden: Bildungsverlage, Interessenverbände und geschichtskulturelle Institutionen produzieren thematisch eng geführte Themenhefte, die gegenüber dem Schulgeschichtsbuch zwar mehr Breite und Tiefe bieten, aber doch ähnlichen Konventionen bei der Konzeption verpflichtet sind. Digitale Bildungsangebote und Open Educational Resources changieren zwischen Arbeitsblattsammlungen, themenbezogenen Lernumgebungen und umfangreichen, didaktisch durchdachten Hypertext-Angeboten.[6] Letztlich jedoch reicht bis heute kaum ein Konkurrenzprodukt an die tradierte, überschaubare, zuverlässige, professionell dargebotene und auf den Lehrplan abgestimmte Zusammenstellung von Darstellungstexten, Quellen, Arbeitsaufträgen und methodischen Hinweisen in Schulgeschichtsbuchreihen heran.

Als Auslaufmodell

Aber ist das die Zukunft?[7] Oder ist das Schulgeschichtsbuch nicht schon längst ein Relikt aus vergangenen Tagen, in denen die (nationale) Geschichte als statische Narration für einen chronologischen Durchgang dargeboten wurde? Denn die Schwachstellen dieses Leitmediums sind offenbar:

  • Erstens limitiert der zur Verfügung stehende Raum den Umfang und die Anzahl der Texte und Materialien und damit die Auswahlmöglichkeit für eine differenzierte Darstellung von Vergangenheit.
  • Zweitens sind Gegenwarts- und Lebensweltbezüge im Schulgeschichtsbuch schwer umzusetzen: Geschichtskulturelle Phänomen bleiben unterrepräsentiert und (tages)aktuelle geschichtsbezogene Debatten finden nicht oder nur zeitverzögert in der nächsten Auflage statt.
  • Drittens hinken Schulgeschichtsbücher der digitalen Entwicklung permanent hintennach.
  • Viertens scheint es Schulgeschichtsbüchern generell nicht zu gelingen, das geforderte Anspruchsniveau zu treffen: Sie werden als zu kompliziert oder als zu banal charakterisiert – manchmal gleichzeitig als beides.
  • Fünftens enttäuschen Schulgeschichtsbücher regelmässig die Erwartungen aller Spezialistinnen und Spezialisten, weil genau diejenigen Themen, auf die diese Fachleute schauen, entweder nicht aufgenommen oder ungenügend umgesetzt sind.

Kurz: das gute Schulgeschichtsbuch gibt es nicht! Kein Wunder also, dass es seit Langem als Auslaufmodell bezeichnet wird! Das Ungenügen von Schulgeschichtsbüchern in Bezug auf verschiedenste Ansprüche hängt auch damit zusammen, dass ein Schulgeschichtsbuch immer das Resultat von vielen Kompromissen ist.

Als Kompromiss

Die Sattelfunktion von Schulgeschichtsbüchern – einerseits als Spiegel von Gesellschaft und andererseits als Motor historischer Bildung – macht deren Entwicklung zu einem herausfordernden Unternehmen, welches sich in Anlehnung an das Aarauer Lehrplannormal von Rudolf Künzli und Stefan Hopmann [8] in drei Spannungsfeldern analysieren lässt [9]: In Schulgeschichtsbüchern geht es erstens darum, eine Balance zu finden im Spannungsfeld von Tradition, zum Beispiel des kulturellen Erbes einer Gesellschaft, und Emanzipation, etwa der Vermittlung von Schlüsselproblemen der Zukunft. Zweitens geht es darum, Ordnungen und Erkenntnisse der Geschichtswissenschaften zu nutzen und gleichzeitig die Lehrbarkeit im Auge zu behalten und also mittels Elementarisierung und didaktischer Rekonstruktion eine plausible Vermittlungsreihenfolge und Aneignungsmöglichkeit zu identifizieren. Diese Ausbalancierung zwischen Sach- und Kindorientierung muss drittens so gelingen, dass das Schulgeschichtsbuch sowohl von den Wissenschaften akzeptiert, als auch von der Politik genehmigt und von der Praxis angenommen wird. Solche Vermittlungen zwischen den Beteiligten und dieses zielorientierte Suchen von Kompromissen sind Stärken der Geschichtsdidaktik.[10]

Als Drehschreibe

Schulgeschichtsbücher müssen sich an verschiedenste Adressatinnen und Adressaten wenden, um überhaupt im Schulzimmer anzukommen: Den Bildungsverantwortlichen müssen sie darlegen, dass sie die Lehrpläne umsetzen und den gesellschaftlichen Konsens spiegeln. Den Lehrer:innen müssen sie ihre schwierige Aufgabe, gut Geschichte zu unterrichten, erleichtern. Den Lernenden müssen sie anregende und bedeutsame Lernprozesse ermöglichen.

Da Schulgeschichtsbücher im Unterrichtsalltag unterschiedlich eingesetzt werden [11] und in den verschiedenen Unterrichtsformen – von der direkten Instruktion bis zum eigenständigen Lernen der Schüler:innen – die Vermittlung anleiten und unterstützen sollen, rücken drei unterschiedliche Sphären in den Blick: Erstens eröffnet das Schulgeschichtsbuch einen sachrichtigen und reichhaltigen Angebotsraum mit verständlichen Darstellungstexten und vielfältigen Quellen. Dieser Angebotsraum muss übersichtlich und klar sein, damit sich die Lehrenden und Lernenden nicht im analogen und digitalen Schulgeschichtsbuch, das in der Regel aus mehreren Komponenten besteht, verlieren. Zweitens bietet das Schulgeschichtsbuch einen Kommunikationsraum, der so beschaffen sein muss, dass individuelles und gemeinsames Lernen im Klassenraum zielführend unterstützt wird. Auch neuere und insbesondere digitale Schulgeschichtsbücher vernachlässigen nach wie vor den Umstand, dass schulisches Lernen in der Gemeinschaft stattfindet und dass gerade dieses Merkmal ein grosser Vorzug ist, um Sinn zu erschliessen, zu verhandeln und Bedeutung aufzubauen. Drittens bietet das Schulgeschichtsbuch einen Aneignungsraum, um beispielsweise mittels Aufgabenkultur den Lernenden sinnvolle Lernprozesse zu ermöglichen und das Gelernte festzuhalten.

Als Kampfplatz

Weil das Schulgeschichtsbuch als Drehscheibe verschiedenster Anliegen und als Begegnungsort vieler Beteiligten dient, kommt es auch immer wieder zum Streit um Schulgeschichtsbücher.[12] Zum einen eskalieren regelmässig Debatten um die angemessene Darstellung von bestimmten Sachverhalten, etwa der Zeit des Imperialismus und Kolonialismus oder des Nationalsozialismus.[13] Auch zum Streit führen gelegentlich unterschiedliche Meinungen zur angemessenen Umsetzung bestimmter gesellschaftlicher oder pädagogischer Anliegen, etwa zum Umgang mit Rassismus oder Antisemitismus.[14] Und schliesslich werden Schulbücher zum Kampfplatz, wenn Nationen gespalten oder in Konflikte mit den Nachbarn verwickelt sind.[15] Es ist deshalb folgerichtig, dass sich verschiedenste spezialisierte Institutionen für die friedensfördernde Wirkung von Schulgeschichtsbüchern engagieren.[16] Und auch der Europarat hat im November 2020 eine Beobachtungsstelle für Geschichtsunterricht etabliert, die “ein wertvolles Werkzeug im Kampf gegen gefährlichen Revisionismus und Versuche, die historische Wahrheit zu verfälschen” sein soll.[17]

Zur historischen Bildung

Schulgeschichtsbücher sind auch im 21. Jahrhundert nach wie vor Autobiografien von Nationen[18], aber sie sind auch dank neuerer pädagogischer Entwicklungen und der Kompetenzorientierung vor allem und in erster Linie ausbalancierte Lernmedien. Sie haben zudem weit mehr Funktionen, als den Schüler:innen Wissen zu vermitteln und sie zu befähigen, Probleme zu lösen. Gerade bei Schulgeschichtsbüchern stehen oft zusätzliche Anliegen im Zentrum, zum Beispiel “die Verknüpfung unseres Ichs mit der Welt”, wie das Wilhelm von Humboldt schon 1793 formulierte, als er “Bildung” beschrieb.[19] Im Geschichtsunterricht geht es nicht um blosse Anpassung des Einzelnen an eine ihm vorgegebene Welt und deshalb nicht ausschliesslich um das Lösen von bestimmten Problemen in dieser Welt. Vielmehr geht es um eine vielfältige Auseinandersetzung, “bei der der Einzelne seine je eigene Form des Menschseins in dieser Welt entwickeln kann – sich also selbst bildet”.[20] Bildung – so lässt sich kurz und populär zusammenfassen – spiegelt einen reflektierten Umgang mit sich selber, mit anderen und mit der Welt.[21]

So haben denn Schulgeschichtsbücher auch im 21. Jahrhundert die zentrale Aufgabe, den Lernenden den Umgang mit Geschichte, mit Gesellschaft und mit sich selber zu ermöglichen. Welche besonderen Herausforderungen sich in diesem Feld zeigen, ist Thema dieses Monats auf Public History Weekly. Folgende Beiträge erscheinen zum Thema:

Sabrina Schmitz-Zerres beschäftigt sich in ihrem Artikel mit Zukunftsbeschreibungen in aktuellen deutschen Schulgeschichtsbüchern. In den Darstellungstexten werden nicht nur die Vergangenheit und ihre Folgen für die Gegenwart, sondern auch mögliche zukünftige Entwicklungen beschrieben. Eine Analyse zeigt narrative Konzepte auf und schlägt vor, Kontingenz als Prinzip der Geschichtserzählung in den Mittelpunkt zu stellen.
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2021-17627

Roland Bernhard widmet sich dem Zusammenhang von Fake News, Verschwörungstheorien und Schulgeschichtsbüchern. Die Verbreitung von Fake News und Verschwörungstheorien im öffentlichen Raum stellt eine gesellschaftliche Herausforderung der Zukunft dar. Das Leitmedium Schulbuch kann Teil der Antwort auf diese Herausforderung sein, wenn es konsequent darauf abzielt, kritisch-historisches Denken zu initiieren.
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2021-17608

Felicitas Macgilchrist  fragt danach, was mit Inhalten und historischem Wissen geschieht, wenn sich die Materialität oder Medialität von Schulgeschichtsbüchern im Laufe der Zeit wandelt. Ihre Beobachtung ist, dass Schulgeschichtsbücher “elastisch” sein müssen und wie ein Gummiband verschiedene Felder zusammenhalten. Der besondere Fokus liegt dabei auf dem Zusammenhang von Schulgeschichtsbüchern und der Darstellung nationaler Geschichte.
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2021-17609

Markus Bernhardt verweist in seinem Beitrag auf das Schulgeschichtsbuch als “Kampfplatz”, den neben unterschiedlichen gesellschaftlichen Interessensgruppen auch Akteure der Geschichtswissenschaft nutzen, die in diesem Zusammenhang ihren Unbehagen gegenüber der Geschichtsdidaktik artikulieren. Das Schulgeschichtsbuch  wird dabei häufig als Medium angesehen, in dem die Hauptdaten der Weltgeschichte forschungsaktuell in Textform zusammengefasst sind. Dass Schulbücher eher den gesellschaftlichen und geschichtskulturellen Diskurs zu historischen Themen abbilden, ist diesen Akteuren oft fremd und führt manchmal zu undifferenzierter Schulbuchschelte.
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2021-17758

Wie jeden Monat finden sich auch im März neue und pointierte Beiträge im Speakers’ Corner, die hoffentlich ebenso wie die Schwerpunktbeiträge neue Erkenntnisse bringen und die Diskussion anregen.

Dirk Vaihinger steht den Herausgebern dieses Themenmonats in einem Interview Rede und Antwort. Er ist Programmleiter des Lehrmittelverlags Zürich und hat langjährige Erfahrungen in Leitungspositionen im Verlagswesen. Das Gespräch mit ihm eröffnet neue Perspektiven: Wie begegnen Bildungsverlage den grossen Herausforderungen der Gegenwart und Zukunft?
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2021-17610.

Daniel Schumacher nimmt sich in seinem Beitrag am Beispiel der Kontroverse um die Ende 2020 in Berlin errichtete “Friedensstatue” der deutschen Erinnerungskultur an. Diese ist seiner Ansicht nach in sich geschlossen und bietet daher kaum Anknüpfungspunkte für die Integration und Verhandlung vielschichtiger “problematischer Geschichten” von Minderheitsgruppen. Er möchte zum Nachdenken darüber anregen, was im 21. Jahrhundert unter “deutscher” Erinnerungskultur verstanden wird, wer diese mitgestalten darf und welche gesellschaftliche Rolle ihr zukommen kann.
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2021-17716

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Gautschi, Peter. “Ideas and Concepts for Using Textbooks in the Context of Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences and Humanities.” In The Palgrave Handbook of Textbook Studies, 1st edition, edited by Eckhardt Fuchs, and Annekatrin Bock, 127-139. New York: Palgrave Macmillan US, 2018.
  • Matthes, Eva, Syliva Schütze, and Werner Wiater. Digitale Bildungsmedien im Unterricht (Beiträge zur historischen und systematischen Schulbuchforschung 17). Bad Heilbrunn: Klinkhardt, 2003.
  • Fuchs, Eckhardt, Joachim Kahlert, and Uwe Sandfuchs. Schulbuch konkret – Kontexte – Produktion – Unterricht. Bad Heilbrunn: Klinkhardt, 2010.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] Barbara Christophe, Annekatrin Bock, Eckhardt Fuchs et al., “New Directions,” in The Palgrave Handbook of Textbook Studies, ed. Eckhardt Fuchs, and Annekatrin Bock (New York: Palgrave Macmillan US, 2018), 413 – 421.
[2] Peter Gautschi, “Geschichtslehrmittel. Wie sie entwickelt werden und was von ihnen erwartet wird”, in Lehrpläne und Bildungsstandards: Was Schülerinnen und Schüler lernen sollen; Festschrift zum 65. Geburtstag von Prof. Dr. Rudolf Künzli, ed. Lucien Criblez et al. (Bern: hep-Verlag, 2006), 140.
[3] Der Begriff „Megatrend“ stammt wohl vom amerikanischen Futurologe John Naisbitt aus seinem gleichnamigen Buch von 1982. Darin beschreibt er übergeordnete Entwicklungen, die sich global und über eine längere Zeitdauer manifestieren. Vgl. dazu etwa https://digitalswitzerland.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Megatrends_Report_Swissfuture.pdf (letzter Zugriff 25. Februar 2021).
[4] Bernd Schönemann and Holger Thünemann, Schulbucharbeit. Das Geschichtslehrbuch in der Unterrichtspraxis. Schwalbach/Ts: Wochenschau, 2010.
[5] Jörn Rüsen, “Das ideale Schulbuch. Überlegungen zum Leitmedium des Geschichtsunterrichts,” Internationale Schulbuchforschung 14, no. 3 (1992): 237–250.
[6] Anja Neubert, “Freie Bildungsmaterialien (OER) für historisches Lernen und Lehren,” in Praxishandbuch Historisches Lernen und Medienbildung im digitalen Zeitalter, ed. Daniel Bernsen, and Ulf Kerber (Bonn: bpb, 2017), 206-216.
[7] Markus Bernhardt, and Christian Bunnenberg, “Alter Wein in neuen Schläuchen oder Aufbruch zu neuen Ufern? Kritische Überlegungen zu einem digitalen Schulgeschichtsbuch am Beginn des 21. Jahrhunderts,” in Nutzung digitaler Medien im Geschichtsunterricht, ed. by Christoph Kühberger (Salzburg: Studien Verlag, 2015), 79-102.
[8] Das Aarauer Lehrplannormal ist ein Instrument, um Probleme und Verläufe der Lehrplanarbeit systematisierend zu beschreiben . (Stefan Hopmann and Rudolf Künzli, “Entscheidungsfelder der Lehrplanarbeit: Grundzüge einer Theorie der Lehrplanung,” in Lehrpläne: wie sie entwickelt werden und was von ihnen erwartet wird: Forschungsstand, Zugänge und Ergebnisse aus der Schweiz und der Bundesrepublik Deutschland; Nationales Forschungsprogramm 33, Wirksamkeit unserer Bildungssysteme, ed. by Rudolf Künzli, and Stefan Hopmann (Chur: Rüegger, 1998), 18.
[9] Peter Gautschi, “Geschichtslehrmittel. Wie sie entwickelt werden und was von ihnen erwartet wird”, in Lehrpläne und Bildungsstandards: Was Schülerinnen und Schüler lernen sollen; Festschrift zum 65. Geburtstag von Prof. Dr. Rudolf Künzli, ed. Lucien Criblez et al. (Bern: hep-Verlag, 2006), 117-148.
[10] Peter Gautschi, “Fachdidaktik als Design-Science. Videobasierte Unterrichts- und Lehrmittelforschung zum Lehren und Lernen von Geschichte,” in transfer Forschung <> Schule. Heft 2: Visible Didactics – Fachdidaktische Forschung trifft Praxis, ed. by Christa Juen-Kretschmer et al. (Bad Heilbrunn: Klinkhardt), 53-66.
[11] Peter Gautschi, “Anforderungen an zukünftige Schulgeschichtsbücher,” in Jede Gegenwart hat ihre Gründe. Geschichtsbewusstsein, historische Lebenswelt und Zukunftserwartung im frühen 21. Jahrhundert. Hans-Jürgen Pandel zum 70. Geburtstag, ed. by Michele Barricelli, Axel Becker, and Christian Heuer (Schwalbach/Ts: Wochenschau, 2011), 164-176
[12] Julia Lerch, “Embracing Diversity? Textbook Narratives in Countries with a Legacy of Internal Armed Conflict 1950 to 2011,” in History Can Bite: History Education in Divided and Postwar Societies, ed. by Denise Bentrovato, Karina V. Korostelina, and Martina Schulze (Göttingen: V&R Unipress, 2016), 31-43. Anna Drake and Allison McCulloch, “Deliberating and Learning Contentious Issues. How Divided Societies Represent Conflict in History Textbooks,” Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism 13, no. 3 (2013), 277–294. Joseph Moreau, Schoolbook Nation. Conflicts Over American History Textbooks from the Civil War to the Present (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2003). Yoshiko Nozaki, and Mark Selden, “Historical Memory, International Conflict, and Japanese Textbook Controversies in Three Epochs,” in Journal of Educational Media Memory and Society 1, no.1 (2009), 117–144.
[13] Vgl. dazu als aktuelle Beispiel die Kritik des Historikers Martin Cüppers, “Darstellung von NS-Verbrechen in Schulbüchern. Geschichtsdidaktik hinkt der Forschung hinterher,” in https://www.deutschlandfunk.de/darstellung-von-ns-verbrechen-in-schulbuechern.1148.de.html?dram:article_id=492406  (letzter Zugriff 25. Februar 2021).
[14] Elina Marmer and Papa Sow, Wie Rassismus aus Schulbüchern spricht. Kritische Auseinandersetzung mit “Afrika”-Bildern und Schwarz-Weiß-Konstruktionen in der Schule – Ursachen, Auswirkungen und Handlungsansätze für die pädagogische Praxis (Weinheim: Beltz Juventa, 2015), 110-129. Vgl. auch: https://www.schweizer-illustrierte.ch/family/die-schulbucher-unserer-kinder-sind-rassistisch  (letzter Zugriff 25. Februar 2021).
[15] Nadine Fink, Markus Furrer and Peter Gautschi, eds., The Teaching of the History of One’s Own Country. International Experiences in a Comparative Perspective (Frankfurt/Main: Wochenschau Verlag, 2020).
[16] Die Gründungen des Internationalen Schulbuchinstituts 1953 und des Georg-Eckert-Instituts für Internationale Schulbuchforschung 1975 in Deutschland oder der Korea Textbook Research Foundation 1992 und des Institute of Textbook Research in Ungarn 2006 zeigen, dass sich Wissenschaft und Politik auch auf den Nutzen von Schulgeschichtsbüchern in nationalen und internationalen Versöhnungsprozessen konzentriert.
[17] https://www.coe.int/fr/web/education/-/observatory-on-history-teaching-in-europe-a-new-flagship-project-of-the-education-department  (letzter Zugriff 25. Februar 2021).
[18] Wolfgang Jacobmeyer, “Das Schulgeschichtsbuch – Gedächtnis der Gesellschaft oder Autobiographie der Nation,” in Geschichte, Politik und ihre Didaktik. Zeitschrift für historisch-politische Bildung, Beiträge und Nachrichten für die Unterrichtspraxis 16, no. 1-2 (1998), 30.
[19] Wilhelm von Humboldt, Gesammelte Schriften/1785-1795 (Berlin 1903), 283.
[20] Wolfgang Sander, “Bildung – zur Einführung in das Schwerpunktthema,” in Zeitschrift für Didaktik der Gesellschaftswissenschaften 5, no.2 (2014), 7-15.
[21] Wikipedia: “Bildung”, https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bildung (letzter Zugriff 25. Februar 2021).

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

History books © geralt

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Gautschi, Peter, and Christian Bunnenberg: Schulgeschichtsbücher im 21. Jahrhundert. In: Public History Weekly 9 (2021) 2, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2021-17618.

Copyright (c) 2020 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 9 (2021) 2
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2021-17618

Tags: ,

3 replies »

  1. To all our non-German speaking readers we recommend the automatic DeepL-Translator for 11 languages. Just copy and paste.

    Geschichtsschulbücher und Bildung

    Geschichtsschulbücher lassen sich aufgrund ihrer Verbreitung und ihrer Bedeutung für die Praxis des Geschichtsunterrichts nicht nur als Wissensspeicher und “ausbalancierte Arbeitsmittel”, sondern auch als Materialisierungen gesellschaftlicher Subjektivierungspraktiken verstehen.

    In ihnen wird didaktisiertes “Konsenswissen” (Thomas Höhne) zur Verfügung gestellt, auf das sich die am Aushandlungsprozess beteiligten Akteur:innen und Institutionen (Wissenschaft, Bildungspolitik, Schulpraxis) in einem aufwendigen Prozess bereits geeinigt haben. Es sind normalisierte, disziplinierte und disziplinierende, Narrative und Wissensbestände, die präsentiert werden. Das Geschichtsschulbuch macht aus den vielen Geschichten, den Antworten der Geschichtswissenschaft auf spezifische historische Fragen, die eine Geschichte und stellt diese als hegemoniales, didaktisiertes Vermittlungs- und Orientierungs-Wissen für jemanden und zu einem bestimmten Zweck zur Verfügung.

    Geschichtsschulbücher sind somit einerseits staatlich-kontrollierte Konstruktionen und zugleich kontrollierende Konstrukteure von Geschichte(n), indem sie die hegemoniale Geschichte und die Methoden historischen Denkens als approbiertes Wissen zur Verfügung stellen, die für die Erziehung zum historisch-gebildeten Subjekt bedeutsam erscheinen.

    Geschichtsschulbücher, so könnte man sagen, disziplinieren so eben auch Denk- und Handlungsweisen, indem sie versuchen, durch ihr spezifisches Schulbuchwissen Subjektivierungsprozesse des demokratischen Kopfes zu kontrollieren und zu steuern. Sie sind im Foucault’schen Sinne Medien des Regierens, indem sie gültige und anerkannte Narrative über und für die Gesellschaft zur Verfügung stellen und auf Anerkennung zielen.

    Auch das Geschichtsschulbuch ist so ein Ort, an dem Differenzen durch Ordnungen gerade erst erzeugt werden. Es inkludiert nicht nur, sondern schließt eben auch aus. Akteur:innen, Perspektiven und andere Geschichte(n).

    Peter Gautschi und Christian Bunnenberg ist also zuzustimmen, wenn sie davon schreiben, dass Geschichtsschulbücher “weit mehr Funktionen” haben, “als den Schüler:innen Wissen zu vermitteln und sie zu befähigen, Probleme zu lösen”. Wer aber über Geschichtsschulbücher als Bildungsmedien schreibt, sollte gleichzeitig auch auf die andere Seite historischer Bildung sehen und das Scheitern von und an Bildungsanstrengungen in den Blick nehmen. So werden durch Geschichtsschulbücher eben nicht nur Prozesse historischer Bildung ermöglicht, sondern eben auch durch diese verhindert. Das durch (historische) Bildung evozierte “Anderswerden” des Individuums muss immer gleichzeitig und in beide Richtungen gedacht werden.

  2. To all our non-German speaking readers we recommend the automatic DeepL-Translator for 11 languages. Just copy and paste.

    Schulbuch als Drehscheibe

    Wie die Autoren zutreffend schreiben, verbindet man mit Geschichtsbüchern meist den Kompromiss, aber – so würde ich behaupten – bisher weniger die Drehscheibe oder einen Ort der Auseinandersetzung (positiv gedacht, “Kampfplatz” scheint mir negativ konnotiert zu sein). Vielleicht ist das das Problem? Schlägt man ein beliebiges deutsches Schulbuch auf, sieht man zunächst die Themen, die darin aus Gründen der Tradition behandelt werden müssen und erst auf den zweiten Blick einige gedankliche Verknüpfungen mit der Gegenwart. Zudem sind die Verfassertexte meist an der Oberfläche geglättete Darstellungen, die alternative Perspektiven und Kontroversen nicht explizit benennen, sondern erst bei kritischer Lektüre preisgeben (Christophe et al. 2014).

    Doch selbst wenn in vorbildlicher Art problemorientierte Fragen aufgeworfen, Kontroversen systematisch aufgegriffen und gegenwartsorientierte Perspektiven eröffnet werden, wie beispielsweise in Buchners Kolleg Geschichte (2017), neigen Geschichtsbücher dazu, abgeschlossen zu wirken und nicht zur Auseinandersetzung einzuladen. Woran liegt das? Bei näherer Betrachtung der Rubrik «Geschichte kontrovers» im genannten Buch, das hier als typisches Beispiel für aktuelle Geschichtsbücher dient, fallen drei Punkte auf:
    1) Die meisten Themen dürften zwischen «kalt» («Der Wiener Kongress – zynische Gleichgewichtspolitik oder neue Friedenskultur?») und «lauwarm» («Warum scheiterte Weimar?») liegen, bezogen auf die Emotionen, die sie bei ihren jugendlichen Leser*innen auslösen können (vgl. dazu Goldberg et al. 2011; Wansink et al. 2018), und insofern nicht zur Diskussion inspirieren.
    2) Die potentiell «heißen», auf erinnerungskulturelle Konflikte verweisenden Themen, wie etwa die Frage nach der Zustimmung der Deutschen zum Nationalsozialismus oder der Vergleich zwischen NS-Diktatur und DDR, werden als Fachkontroversen zwischen Historikern, nicht als gesellschaftliche Debatten vorgestellt.
    3) Gesellschaftliche Debatten, die für Schüler*innen durchaus Relevanz haben könnten, werden nicht auf die lebensweltlichen Erfahrungen der Schüler*innen bezogen («Verfassungspatriotismus – eine Alternative?»).

    Es ist nichts dagegen einzuwenden, dass Schüler*innen historische Fachkontroversen kennenlernen, jedoch werden sie in dieser Form nur als passive Rezipient*innen adressiert, die an Debatten «herangeführt» werden. Würde man das Schulbuch eher als Drehscheibe denken, die die Nutzer*innen von unterschiedlichen Punkten aus betreten, auf der sie miteinander in Austausch kommen, sich weiterbewegen und dann wieder verlassen, treten die Schüler*innen in eine aktivere Rolle. Wie ein Geschichtsbuch als ein solcher beweglicher Kommunikationsraum gestaltet sein könnte, ist keine leichte Frage, die vielleicht im gedruckten Schulbuch gar nicht gelöst werden kann. Wichtig erscheint mir aber, dass zusätzlich zur Hinführung zu wissenschaftlichen Debatten der Versuch unternommen wird, gesellschaftlich schwierige historische Themen aus Perspektiven zu beleuchten, die für Schüler*innen relevant sind.

    Für die heutige multinationale, multiethnische, multilinguale und multireligiöse Schülerschaft sollten beispielsweise Fragen nach «Verfassungspatriotismus» differenzierter aufgefächert und gegebenenfalls in Fragen nach «Zugehörigkeiten» übersetzt werden. Zudem kann, gerade wenn Fragen der Identität angesprochen werden, die übliche Präsentation von zwei konträren Positionen polarisierend wirken, hier wäre es wünschenswert, mehrere abgestufte Positionen anzubieten. Bei anderen Themen könnte man ein Deutungsspektrum historischer Ereignisse, Prozesse oder Personen aufzeigen, das auch erinnerungskulturelle Konflikte aufgreift. So würde das Geschichtsbuch die Schüler*innen in ihrer Vielfalt adressieren und damit die Voraussetzung für Diskussionen schaffen, in denen sich viele wiederfinden können.

    _______________________
    – Christophe, B., Baier, K., Zehr, K. (2014): Schulbücher als Seismographen für diskursive Büche: Ein neuer Ansatz in der Kulturwissenschaftlichen Schulbuchforschung Dargestellt am Beispiel der Analyse von Schulbucherzählungen über den Kalten Krieg.“ Eckert.Working Papers 4.
    – Buchners Kolleg Geschichte (2017). Ausgabe Schleswig-Holstein. Qualifikationsphase,
    hg. von Rolf Schulte und Benjamin Stello. Bamberg: C. C. Buchner. https://www.ccbuchner.de/titel-1-1/qualifikationsphase-4957/.
    – Goldberg, T., Schwarz, B., & Porat, Dan (2011). ‘Could they do it differently?’ Narrative and argumentative changes in students’ writing following discussion of ‘hot’ historical issues. Cognition and Instruction 29 (2), 185–217.
    – Wansink, B. Akkerman, S., Zuiker, I., & Wubbels, T. (2018). Where does teaching multiperspectivity begin and end? An analysis of the uses of temporality. Theory & Research in Social Education, 46 (4), 495–527.

  3. To all our non-German speaking readers we recommend the automatic DeepL-Translator for 11 languages. Just copy and paste.

    Ich möchte dem Beitrag weitgehend und dem Kommentar von Maren Tribukait im Besonderen zustimmen und einen Aspekt hinzufügen. Vielleicht ist dieser Charakter von Büchern für den Geschichtsunterricht auch mit (!) dadurch zu erklären, dass von Geschichtsunterricht noch immer erwartet wird, dass in ihm “die Geschichte” oder wenigstens immer etwas “Richtiges” (um nicht “Wahres” zu schreiben) über “die Vergangenheit” ausgesagt werden muss – und er mitsamt seinen Medien diesen vornehmlich “darstellenden” Charakter auch bedient, im Gegensatz zu einem anderen möglichen Grundkonzept von Geschichtsunterricht als einer vornehmlich auf “Befähigung” denn auf “Darstellung” ausgerichteten Veranstaltung.

    Entsprechend sind wohl auch die Bücher für den Geschichtsunterricht in den Augen und in der Umgangsweise vieler (und wohl auch in ihrer Gestaltung) trotz aller Ergänzung durch Methodenorientierung und Methodenseiten, “Kompetenztrainings”, Versuche der Umsetzung einer Lern- statt einer Leistungsaufgabenkultur immer noch vornehmlich “Schul-Geschichtsbücher” als “Geschichts-Schulbücher” sind, also eher Darstellungen “der” oder “einer” Geschichte für den Gebrauch in der Schule als Schulbücher über den Gegenstand (die Disziplin) Geschichte (oder gar “historisches Lernen”)?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

I accept that my given data and my IP address is sent to a server in the USA only for the purpose of spam prevention through the Akismet program.More information on Akismet and GDPR.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest