Fake News, Conspiracy Theories and Textbooks

Fake News, Verschwörungstheorien und das Schulbuch

Abstract:
The article is dealing with the connection between fake news, conspiracy theories and school history textbooks. The spread of fake news and conspiracy theories in the public sphere represents a social challenge of the future. The leading medium textbook can be part of the answer to this challenge if it consistently aims to initiate critical-historical thinking.
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2021-17608
Languages: English, German


We can safely assume that the influence of the virtual world on the historical and political consciousness of students in today’s schools is increasing all the time. There is a particular challenge to education in the widespread dissemination of fake news and conspiracy theories online. History textbooks, which have retained their position as a leading medium of education in the discipline, may be part of the solution to these issues – as long as they consistently seek to instil critical historical thinking in students. This said, the continued reproduction in textbooks – as this article will illustrate for the German and Austrian case – of outdated historical myths, such as the idea that people in the Middle Ages believed in a flat earth‚ indicates that a lot of work remains to be done in this area.

Failed Prophecies

In Austria certainly, the empirical findings currently available are unambiguous in their observation that hard-copy textbooks remain the leading medium in the history classroom. There is no other medium of teaching and learning with such a marked and varied influence on teaching and with such an unassailed position as a central point of reference for teachers.[1] How this situation will develop after the current coronavirus pandemic remains to be seen; it may be that the distance learning necessitated by the shutdown has brought about a form of “forced modernization” that may have accelerated the acceptance and adoption of digital teaching and learning. Where, then, will this leave the physical textbook in the future?

Thus far, at any rate, the prophecies of a “digital revolution” repeatedly advanced since the turn of the millennium have failed to come true: Prior to the pandemic, digital teaching and learning in history classes – at least in Austria – was very much a marginal phenomenon.[2] However, a considerable proportion of our students’ extracurricular learning about history and politics is now likely to take place online. Although we are as yet without comprehensive, reliable empirical findings in this area, it can safely be concluded that the virtual world and the interpretations and orientations it offers are likely to have a marked influence on the emergence of a mature and considered historical and political consciousness – or otherwise – in a young person. In this context, we might well ask what challenges this situation will pose to the design of history textbooks, be they physical or virtual, in the twenty-first century.

Conspiracy Theories and Fake News

Recent years have proved a challenging time for teachers. ‘Fake news’ stories and conspiracy theories, launched with targeted intent, have flooded social networks and permeated the online filter bubbles and echo chambers within which they have garnered millions of likes and shares from humans and “social bots” alike. A recent study published in Science came to the disturbing conclusion that false news stories diffuse “significantly farther, faster, deeper, and more broadly than the truth [as determined by consensus objectification] in all categories of information”.[3] Learners are likewise susceptible to entrapment by these bubbles and chambers, which expose them to the ideas put forward by conspiracy theorists whose videos, many of which receive millions of clicks, promise to finally bring “the truth” to light.[4]

A closer look at widespread conspiracy theories reveals that many of the myths floating around in the virtual “discursive arena” not only lack any validity, but are also often – openly or latently – anti-Semitic. In these bubbles, the claim is that nothing is really what it seems; that everything that happens is staged, orchestrated and controlled by a small elite. Behind all developments there purportedly lurks a grand plan whose ultimate aims vary in accordance with the theory espoused. Since the publication of the oft-cited “Protocols of the Elders of Zion”, the familiar narrative of a global conspiracy, with its ready offer of points of contact to diverse radical ideologies, has reared its head repeatedly in a range of variations. Conspiracy theories around the current coronavirus pandemic have recently generated a fresh crop of far-fetched suppositions. The effect has been to increasingly erode public confidence in hegemonic discourses and in the “official versions” of narratives. Simple patterns of explanation which keep complexity and nuance to a minimum exert a powerful appeal, seemingly providing people, including the young, with orientation in a world frequently characterised by uncertainty and a lack of clear direction. In this context, the critical reflection and consideration advocated for decades by history and citizenship educators appear to have given way, in many arenas, to “radical, sceptical questioning”.

The “Fake News Trap”

Many a history teacher in these times has found herself confronted with a pupil urging her to “take a look at this YouTube video, then you will understand what is really going on!”. Teachers’ use of their textbooks in the classroom as representation of an official discourse stands in sharp and unsettling contrast to the explanatory models with which their students may sometimes come out. In my view, this scenario reflects what is possibly one of the twenty-first century’s central challenges to history education.[5] If the history textbook is such a dominant medium (and if it is to maintain this position), it is evident that it needs to be part of the solution to the fake-news and filter-bubble problem. What is thus to be done? Should our history textbooks turn again to unambiguous representations without blurred edges and to clear “truths”, as in days of yore?[6] It is certainly the case that some history educators have advanced the idea that we should refrain from being too thorough in our critical thinking and our questioning of official representations and interpretations, acts of great centrality to our discipline, due to the great zeal with which conspiracy theorists call “official narratives” into question. On occasion, teachers facing the scenario described above have put a case for caution and restraint with regard to initiating critical and questioning thinking processes in students, lest they be unintentionally led into the arms of conspiracy theorists. This, however, is a hazardous position: history education cannot, must not and will not renounce the ideal of analytical and independent critical thinking and questioning of historical evidence – to do so would ultimately prove counter-productive and, by reducing the capacity for critical assessment of content at individual and population level, play still further into the hands of those pursuing their agendas with false rumours.

Learning to Reflect

One way forward may be to harness the current dominance of physical – and in the future possibly digital – textbooks in our teaching practice.[7] I will now offer two proposals to this end:

1) It is vital that history textbooks and teaching materials initiate thorough, analytical, criterion-led, and therefore reflective historical thinking and consistently seek to leave behind simplistic patterns of interpretation and explanation. A “certain uncertainty” in interpretations and judgements, genuine multi-perspectivity and the juxtaposition of opposing views, and language that moves away from absolutes (”some see it this way, while others think…”) are the order of the day here.[8] Reality is complex, inescapably so; an omniscient and authoritative narrator in a history textbook whose voice seeks to reduce that complexity cannot do it justice, and representations of events in textbooks should not give the impression that such a lofty vantage point is possible. In this context, finding the right dosage is a challenge, for relativist approaches to history are no less dangerous than historical objectivism: without any accepted criteria for judging the plausibility of an account, anything goes, and any conspiracy theory could lay claim to equal validity as one possible narrative among many. History textbooks therefore need to place particular emphasis on the “grammar” of history, the logic of its construction, enabling learners to consider the criteria determining the plausibility of historical narratives – that is, how we can judge a claim made by a certain story – without letting the pendulum swing too close to either positivism or relativism. In this context, the tasks which a textbook sets students take an important role as the “backbone” of a history education that centres historical thinking, insofar as they serve as tools of learners’ empowerment to arrive at independent judgements.[9]

2) All this considered, we must view as inexcusable the persistence of uninformed historical myths in many German and Austrian textbooks, one such notion being the idea that people in the Middle Ages believed in a flat earth.[10] This myth, held dear by many teachers, met its match decades previously, and brief research on the topic is now enough to dispel it conclusively; and yet millions of learners still dutifully absorb it via their twenty-first-century textbooks. This is a highly problematic state of affairs. Textbooks represent a discursive knowledge validated in a special way by state authority via their approval for use in schools, and thus their content appears hegemonic by consensus. Their failure in this context to take account of such unequivocal critique from professional scholarship as regards the “hardiest error of historical teaching” – as the ‘flat earth’ myth has been described since 1951 – will do little to increase trust in textbooks as ‘official’ media and in their stakeholders.[11] Indeed, we might well wonder how textbooks are supposed to help instil thorough consideration of historical evidence in students when only a little critical historical thinking suffices to unmask the overall narrative structure permeating the account of the transition from the Middle Ages to the modern era in even many very recent textbooks as, in the final analysis, an out-and-out myth.[12]

Increase Quality

My intent in citing this example was to demonstrate that, particularly in our age of fake news and conspiracy theories and the concomitant loss of trust in hegemonic patterns of interpretation, academic historians also need to up their game in terms of securing the quality of the representations of history that appear in textbooks. Achieving this, and ensuring that textbooks consistently seek to promote historical thinking, will require close cooperation between the areas of history didactics, historical science, education policy and textbook publishing. After all, if the historical knowledge and information available online operates at a higher level of reflection than that in textbooks – as is by no means generally or invariably the case, but glaringly evident in the “flat earth” example – students and teachers might be justified in wondering what textbooks are actually for.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Barsch, Sebastian, Andreas Lutter, and Christian Meyer-Heidemann, eds. Fake und Filter. Historisches und politisches Lernen in Zeiten der Digitalität. Frankfurt/M.: Wochenschau, 2019.
  • Roland Bernhard et al., ed., Myths in German Language History Textbooks. Braunschweig: Eckert Dossiers, 2009 https://services.e-book.fwf.ac.at/api/object/o:1290/diss/Content/get (last accessed 9 Februar 2021).
  • Sauer, Michael. “Schulgeschichtsbücher. Herstellung, Konzepte, Unterrichtseinsatz,” Geschichte in Wissenschaft und Unterricht 67, no. 9/10 (2016): 588-603.

Web Resources

  • Website of the „Georg-Eckert-Institut for International Textbook Research“ on which many open access publications can be found in the area of textbooks research: http://repository.gei.de/handle/11428/2 (last accessed 9 February 2021).

_____________________

[1] Roland Bernhard, “Das Schulbuch als Leitmedium des Geschichtsunterrichts in Österreich. Empirische Ergebnisse einer Triangulationsstudie und einige Schlussfolgerungen für die LehrerInnenbildung,” in Das Geschichtsschulbuch: Lernen – Lehren – Forschen, ed. Christoph Kühberger, Roland Bernhard, and Christoph Bramann (Münster/New York: Waxmann, 2019), 35-56. Ulrike Kipman and Christoph Kühberger, Zur Nutzung des Geschichtsschulbuches. Eine Large-Scale-Untersuchung bei Schüler/innen und Lehrer/innen in Österreich (Wiesbaden: Springer VS, 2019).
[2] Roland Bernhard, and Christoph Kühberger, “’Digital history teaching’? Qualitativ empirische Ergebnisse aus 50 teilnehmenden Beobachtungen zur Verwendung von Medien im Geschichtsunterricht,” in Geschichtsunterricht im 21. Jahrhundert. Eine geschichtsdidaktische Standortbestimmung, ed. Thomas Sandkühler et al. (Göttingen: V&R Unipress, 2018), 425-440.
[3] Soroush Vosoughi, Deb Roy, and Sinan Aral, “The spread of true and false news online,” Science 359, no. 6380 (2018): 1146-1151.
[4] This phenomenon has been recently adressed from the perspective of history and citizenship education in Sebastian Barsch, Andreas Lutter, and Christian Meyer-Heidemann, eds., Fake und Filter. Historisches und politisches Lernen in Zeiten der Digitalität (Frankfurt/M.: Wochenschau, 2019).
[5] With respect to these challenges see Marco Demantowsky, and Christoph Pallaske, eds., Geschichte lernen im digitalen Wandel (Berlin/München: De Gruyter, 2015).
[6] See the remarks by Matin Tschiggerl who sees similar dilemmas when it comes to challenge conspiracy theories with historical science: Martin Tschiggerl, “Wahrheiten mit Fakten bekämpfen,” in Public History Weekly 8, no. 7 (2020), DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-17026.
[7] See Christian Bunnenberg, “Digitale Schulbücher”, in Praxishandbuch Historisches Lernen und Medienbildung im digitalen Zeitalter, ed. Daniel Bernsen and Ulf Kerber (Leverkusen: Barbara Budrich, 2018), 217–228.
[8] See Jörn Rüsen, Historische Vernunft. Grundzüge einer Historik I (Göttingen:Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1983), 122.
[9] Michele Barricelli, Peter Gautschi, and Andreas Körber, “Historische Kompetenzen und Kompetenzmodelle,” in Handbuch Praxis des Geschichtsunterrichts, ed. Michele Barricelli, and Martin Lücke (Schwalbach: Wochenschau-Verlag, 2012), 207-235
[11] Historical Association (Great Britain), Common Errors in History (London: Geo. Philip & Son, 1951), 4.
[12] Roland Bernhard, “The German Martin Behaim as “real discoverer of America” and the myth of the flat earth in German textbooks from the 18th to the 21st century,” in Myths in German Language History Textbooks, ed. Roland Bernhard et al. (Braunschweig: Eckert Dossiers), 94-119. Full text: https://services.e-book.fwf.ac.at/api/object/o:1290/diss/Content/get (last accessed 9 February 2021).

_____________________

Image Credits

Fake News Media © 2017 Wokandapix.

Recommended Citation

Bernhard, Roland: Fake News, Conspiracy Theories and Textbooks. In: Public History Weekly 9 (2021) 2, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2021-17608.

Translated by Kurt Brügger swissamericanlanguageexpert https://www.swissamericanlanguageexpert.ch/

Editorial Responsibility

Christian BunnenbergPeter Gautschi (Team Lucerne)

Das Geschichts- und Politikbewusstsein von Schüler:innen dürfte sich immer häufiger aus der virtuellen Welt speisen. Die weite Verbreitung von Fake News und Verschwörungtheorien stellt in diesem Zusammenhang eine Herausforderung dar. Das Leitmedium Schulbuch kann Teil der Antwort auf diese Herausforderung sein, wenn es konsequent darauf abzielt, kritisch-historisches Denken zu initiieren. Dass viele deutsche und österreichische Schulbücher noch immer längst überkommene Geschichtsmythen reproduzieren, wie beispielswiese die Idee, im Mittelalter glaubten die Menschen an eine flache Erde, macht in diesem Zusammenhang einige noch existierende Baustellen deutlich. 

Gescheiterte Prophezeiungen

Die zumindest für Österreich vorliegenden empirischen Ergebnisse sind eindeutig: Analoge Schulbücher sind das Leitmedium des Geschichtsunterrichts. Sie beeinflussen wie kein anderes Medium den Unterricht auf viele unterschiedliche Arten und Weisen und sind sowohl qualitativ als auch quantitativ die zentralen Referenzpunkte von Lehrpersonen.[1] Abzuwarten bleiben die Post-Corona-Entwicklungen, die möglicherweise die Akzeptanz des digitalen Lehrens und Lernens durch mit dem Distance Teaching einhergehenden “Zwangsmodernisierungsprozesse” beschleunigt hat. Welche Bedeutung wird dem (analogen) Schulbuch in Zukunft zukommen? Bisher sind die seit den 2000er Jahren vorgebrachten Prophezeiungen einer “digitalen Revolution” jedenfalls noch nicht eingetroffen: Vor dem Start der Pandemie war das digitale Lehren und Lernen im Geschichtsunterricht (zumindest in Österreich) eine kaum vorhandene Randerscheinung.[2]

Das außerschulische “Lernen” bzw. die außerschulische Beschäftigung mit Geschichte und Politik dürfte indes inzwischen zu einem beträchtlichen Teil online erfolgen. Obwohl umfassende belastbare empirische Ergebnisse hierzu noch fehlen, dürften die virtuelle Welt und die in dieser vorhandenen Deutungs- und Orientierungsangebote stark zur Entwicklung von mehr oder weniger reflektiertem Geschichts- und Politikbewusstsein beitragen. Welche Herausforderungen ergeben sich in diesem Zusammenhang für die Gestaltung von Geschichtsschulbüchern im 21. Jahrhundert, unabhängig davon, ob sie analog oder digital vorliegen werden?

Fake News und Verschwörungstheorien

Lehrpersonen standen in den letzten Jahren vor zahlreichen Herausforderungen: Gezielt positionierte Fake News und Verschwörungstheorien überschwemmten die sozialen Netzwerke und eroberten die Filterblasen und Echokammern, in denen sie millionenfach von Menschen und Robotern (“Social Bots”) geliked und geteilt wurden. Eine rezente Science-Studie kommt zu dem beunruhigenden Ergebnis, dass sich auf Twitter falsche Nachrichten signifikant breiter, tiefer, weiter und schneller verbreiten als (durch Konsensobjektivierung ermittelte) wahre Nachrichten.[3] Auch Lernende geraten in entsprechende Blasen und Kammern und werden damit den Ideen von Verschwörungstheoretiker:innen ausgesetzt, deren oft millionenfach geklickte Videos versprechen, endlich “die Wahrheit” ans Licht zu bringen.[4]

Ein genauerer Blick auf weit verbreitete Verschwörungsmythen offenbart, dass viele der in der virtuellen “Diskursarena” herumschwirrenden Theorien nicht nur jeder Triftigkeit entbehren, sondern oft auch (latent) antisemitisch sind. Nichts sei, wie es scheint, alles, was geschieht, wird als von einer kleinen Elite inszeniert, orchestriert und gesteuert wahrgenommen. Hinter allen Entwicklungen steht ein großer Plan, in dem – je nach Theorie – unterschiedliche Ziele verfolgt werden. Seit der Publikation der vielzitierten “Protokolle der Weisen von Zion” wird das altbekannte Deutungsmuster von einer Weltverschwörung, das Anknüpfungspunkte an unterschiedliche radikale Ideologien anbietet, wiederholt bemüht und in unterschiedlichen Varianten neu aufgewärmt. Bunte Blüten treiben jüngst die Verschwörungstheorien zur Corona-Pandemie. Das Vertrauen in die hegemonialen Diskurse bzw. die “offiziellen Versionen” von Darstellungen schwindet jedenfalls zunehmend und es sind die einfachen und komplexitätsreduzierenden Erklärungsmuster, die in einer vielfach von Unsicherheit und Orientierungslosigkeit geprägten Welt eine große Anziehungskraft entfalten und Orientierungsangebote auch für junge Menschen bereitstellen. In diesem Zusammenhang scheint das von der Geschichts- und Politikdidaktik seit Jahrzehnten geforderte kritisch-reflektierte Denken vielerorts einem “radikal-skeptizistischen Hinterfragen” gewichen zu sein.

Die “Fake News Falle”

“Schauen Sie sich mal dieses YouTube-Video an, dann werden Sie schon verstehen, was wirklich vorgeht!” Mit solchen oder ähnlichen Aufforderungen sehen sich Geschichtslehrpersonen derzeit zunehmend konfrontiert. Die starke Verwendung von den offiziellen Diskurs repräsentierenden Geschichtsschulbüchern im Unterricht steht indes in einem scharfen Kontrast zu den Welterklärungsmodellen, die sich bisweilen in solchen oder ähnlichen Aussagen von Lernenden manifestieren. Möglicherweise rühren wir mit diesem Thema an einer der zentralen Herausforderungen des 21. Jahrhundert für die Geschichtsdidaktik.[5] Wenn das Geschichtsschulbuch ein so dominantes Medium darstellt und diese Position auch behaupten soll, liegt es auf der Hand, dass es ein Teil der Lösung des Problems sein muss. Was ist also zu tun? Sollen wir in den Geschichtsschulbüchern wieder zu unmissverständlichen und geglätteten Darstellungen und eindeutigen “Wahrheiten” zurückkehren?[6] Die Idee jedenfalls, dass das für unsere Disziplin so zentrale kritische Denken, das Hinterfragen von offiziellen Geschichten und Deutungen etwas hintangestellt werden sollte, weil auch Verschwörungstheoretiker:innen die “offiziellen Erzählungen” mit so großem Eifer hinterfragen, wird in der Praxis schon vorgetragen. Vereinzelte Lehrpersonen, die sich mit den beschriebenen Problemen konfrontiert sehen, sprechen sich bereits mitunter vehement dafür aus, im Zusammenhang mit der Anbahnung von kritisch-hinterfragendem Denken Vorsicht walten zu lassen, um Schüler:innen nicht ungewollt auf die Spur von Verschwörungstheoretiker:innen zu befördern. Diese Idee birgt allerdings erhebliches Gefahrenpotential. Die Geschichtsdidaktik kann, darf und wird das Ideal eines analytischen und selbstständigen kritischen Denkens und Hinterfragens nicht aufgeben. Die nicht intendierten Nebeneffekte eines solchen Unterfangens – eine Verringerung eben genau dieser Fähigkeiten – würden aus meiner Sicht massiv in die Hände derer spielen, die ihre Agenden mithilfe von falschen Nachrichten durchzusetzen trachten.

Reflektieren lernen

Stattdessen könnte die Dominanz von analogen (und zukünftig möglicherweise digitalen) Schulbüchern in der konkreten Unterrichtspraxis in den besprochenen Zusammenhängen fruchtbar gemacht werden.[7]  Dazu im Folgenden zwei Thesen:

1) Geschichtsschulbücher und Unterrichtsmaterialien müssen tiefes, analytisches, kriteriengeleitetes und damit reflektiertes historisches Denken initiieren und einfache Deutungsmuster und Erklärungen konsequent überwinden. Eine “gewisse Unsicherheit” in den Deutungen und Urteilen, echte Multiperspektivität und Kontroversität sowie eine moderierende Sprache (“einige sehen das auf diese Weise, andere wiederum denken …”) sind hierbei das Gebot der Stunde.[8] Die Realität ist nun einmal so kompliziert, dass eine komplexitätsreduzierende, allwissende und auktoriale Erzählperson in einem Geschichtsschulbuch dieser Komplexität nicht gerecht werden kann und Schulbuchdarstellungen sollten auch nicht den Eindruck erwecken, eine solche übergeordnete Perspektive sei möglich. Dabei stellt die richtige Dosierung eine Herausforderung dar, denn geschichtsrelativistische Zugänge sind nicht weniger gefährlich als platter Geschichtsobjektivismus: Wenn keine Kriterien akzeptiert werden, anhand derer die Plausibilität einer Darstellung beurteilt werden kann, darf alles gesagt werden und jede Verschwörungstheorie könnte als eine mögliche Erzählung unter vielen Anspruch auf “Gleichberechtigung” anmelden. Geschichtsschulbücher müssen daher die “Grammatik” und Konstruktionslogik der Geschichte noch stärker in den Blick nehmen und in diesem Zusammenhang die Lernenden über Plausibilitätskriterien bzw. Triftigkeiten von historischen Narrationen reflektieren lassen, ohne das Pendel in Richtung von Positivismus oder Relativismus ausschlagen zu lassen. Dabei kommt den Lernaufgaben als “Rückgrat” eines auf historisches Denken ausgerichteten Unterrichts eine wichtige Rolle zu, insofern als durch solche die Lernenden potenziell zum selbstständigen Urteilen ermächtigt werden können.[9]

2) In diesem Zusammenhang ist es allerdings nicht zu entschuldigen, dass in vielen deutschen und österreichischen Schulbüchern immer noch abenteuerliche Geschichtsmythen transportiert werden, beispielsweise die Idee, dass die Menschen im Mittelalter an eine flache Erde glaubten.[10] Der (schöne und vielen Lehrpersonen so liebgewordene) Mythos ist seit Jahrzehnten widerlegt – eine kurze Recherche dazu reicht, um sich die fachwissenschaftliche Einsicht zu eigen zu machen und dennoch wurde und wird der “Mythos der flachen Erde” noch im 21. Jahrhundert wahrscheinlich millionenfach über Geschichtsschulbücher in die Köpfe von Lernenden gepflanzt. Dies ist hochgradig problematisch: Schulbücher repräsentieren ein in besonderer Weise staatlich validiertes und damit scheinbar konsensobjektives hegemoniales Diskurswissen. Wenn es in diesem Zusammenhang nicht gelingt, auf eine so unmissverständliche Kritik aus der Fachwissenschaft am (wie der Mythos seit 1951 bezeichnet wird) “hardiest error of historical teaching” zu reagieren, wird dies dem Vertrauen in das offizielle Medium Schulbuch und dessen Stakeholder kaum zuträglich sein.[11]

Qualität erhöhen

Es stellt sich in diesem Sinne auch die Frage, wie Schulbücher dazu beitragen sollen, gründliches Denken zu initiieren, wenn nur ein wenig kritisch-historisches Denken genügt, um den Gesamtaufbau der Narration des Übergangs vom Mittelalter zur Neuzeit auch in vielen ganz aktuellen Schulbüchern als platten Mythos zu entlarven.[12] Das Beispiel soll vor Augen führen, dass es gerade in Zeiten von Fake News und Verschwörungstheorien und einem damit einhergehenden schwindenden Vertrauen in hegemoniale Deutungsmuster einer Anstrengung bedarf, die Qualität von Schulbuchdarstellungen auch aus fachwissenschaftlicher Sicht sicher zu stellen. Dazu – und um historisches Denken konsequent in Schulbüchern zu implementieren – bedarf es einer intensiven Zusammenarbeit zwischen Geschichtsdidaktik, Fachwissenschaft, Bildungspolitik und Schulbuchverlagen. Wenn das online zu findende historische Wissen reflektierter ist als das Schulbuchwissen (was im Zusammenhang mit der flachen Erde der Fall ist, hier aber keineswegs generalisiert werden soll), stellt sich sonst nämlich die Frage nach dem “Wozu” der Schulbücher.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Barsch, Sebastian, Andreas Lutter, and Christian Meyer-Heidemann, eds. Fake und Filter. Historisches und politisches Lernen in Zeiten der Digitalität. Frankfurt/M.: Wochenschau, 2019.
  • Roland Bernhard et al., ed., Myths in German Language History Textbooks. Braunschweig: Eckert Dossiers, 2009 https://services.e-book.fwf.ac.at/api/object/o:1290/diss/Content/get (letzter Zugriff 9. Februar 2021).
  • Sauer, Michael. “Schulgeschichtsbücher. Herstellung, Konzepte, Unterrichtseinsatz,” Geschichte in Wissenschaft und Unterricht 67, no. 9/10 (2016): 588-603.

Webressourcen

  • Website des Georg-Eckert-Instituts für internationale Schulbuchforschung mit zahlreichen open access Publikationen im weiten Feld Schulbuchforschung: http://repository.gei.de/handle/11428/2 (letzter Zugriff 9. Februar 2021).

_____________________

[1] Roland Bernhard, “Das Schulbuch als Leitmedium des Geschichtsunterrichts in Österreich. Empirische Ergebnisse einer Triangulationsstudie und einige Schlussfolgerungen für die LehrerInnenbildung,” in Das Geschichtsschulbuch: Lernen – Lehren – Forschen, ed. Christoph Kühberger, Roland Bernhard, and Christoph Bramann (Münster/New York: Waxmann, 2019), 35-56. Ulrike Kipman and Christoph Kühberger, Zur Nutzung des Geschichtsschulbuches. Eine Large-Scale-Untersuchung bei Schüler/innen und Lehrer/innen in Österreich (Wiesbaden: Springer VS, 2019).
[2] Roland Bernhard, and Christoph Kühberger, “’Digital history teaching’? Qualitativ empirische Ergebnisse aus 50 teilnehmenden Beobachtungen zur Verwendung von Medien im Geschichtsunterricht,” in Geschichtsunterricht im 21. Jahrhundert. Eine geschichtsdidaktische Standortbestimmung, ed. Thomas Sandkühler et al. (Göttingen: V&R Unipress, 2018), 425-440.
[3] Soroush Vosoughi, Deb Roy, and Sinan Aral, “The spread of true and false news online,” Science 359, no. 6380 (2018): 1146-1151.
[4] Dieses Phänomen wurde kürzlich aus der Sicht der Geschichts- und Politikdidaktik umfassend thematisiert Sebastian Barsch, Andreas Lutter, and Christian Meyer-Heidemann, eds., Fake und Filter. Historisches und politisches Lernen in Zeiten der Digitalität (Frankfurt/M.: Wochenschau, 2019).
[5] With respect to these challenges see Marco Demantowsky, and Christoph Pallaske, eds., Geschichte lernen im digitalen Wandel (Berlin/München: De Gruyter, 2015).
[6] Vgl. dazu die Ausführungen von Matin Tschiggerl, der in Bezug auf die Bekämpfung von Verschwörungstheorien durch die Geschichtswissenschaft ein ähnliches Dilemma erkennt: Martin Tschiggerl, “Wahrheiten mit Fakten bekämpfen,” in Public History Weekly 8, no. 7 (2020), DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-17026.
[7] Vgl. Christian Bunnenberg, “Digitale Schulbücher”, in Praxishandbuch Historisches Lernen und Medienbildung im digitalen Zeitalter, ed. Daniel Bernsen and Ulf Kerber (Leverkusen: Barbara Budrich, 2018), 217–228.
[8] Jörn Rüsen, Historische Vernunft. Grundzüge einer Historik I (Göttingen:Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1983), 122.
[9] Michele Barricelli, Peter Gautschi, and Andreas Körber, “Historische Kompetenzen und Kompetenzmodelle,” in Handbuch Praxis des Geschichtsunterrichts, ed. Michele Barricelli, and Martin Lücke (Schwalbach: Wochenschau-Verlag, 2012), 207-235
[11] Historical Association (Great Britain), Common Errors in History (London: Geo. Philip & Son, 1951), 4.
[12] Roland Bernhard, “The German Martin Behaim as “real discoverer of America” and the myth of the flat earth in German textbooks from the 18th to the 21st century,” in Myths in German Language History Textbooks, ed. Roland Bernhard et al. (Braunschweig: Eckert Dossiers), 94-119. https://services.e-book.fwf.ac.at/api/object/o:1290/diss/Content/get (letzter Zugriff 9. Februar 2021).

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Fake News Media © 2017 Wokandapix.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Bernhard, Roland: Fake News, Verschwörungstheorien und das Schulbuch. In: Public History Weekly 9 (2021) 2, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2021-17608.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Christian BunnenbergPeter Gautschi (Team Lucerne)

Copyright (c) 2020 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 9 (2021) 2
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2021-17608

Tags: , ,

1 reply »

  1. To all our non-German speaking readers we recommend the automatic DeepL-Translator for 11 languages. Just copy and paste.

    OPEN PEER REVIEW

    Die Förderung von kritischen Analysekompetenzen durch Geschichtslehrmittel

    Der Beitrag “Fake News, Verschwörungstheorien und das Schulbuch” thematisiert ein für den Geschichtsunterricht zweifellos wichtiges und aktuelles Thema. Während das gedruckte Schulgeschichtsbuch weiterhin eine zentrale Rolle im Unterricht innehat, stehen den Lernenden immer mehr alternative Informations- und Lernmöglichkeiten in Form von Online-Videos, den sozialen Medien und Chaträumen zur Verfügung. Die zunehmende Verbreitung von Verschwörungstheorien, das Hinterfragen von fachwissenschaftlichen Erkenntnissen und das Rezipieren von “alternativen Fakten” führen dabei zu einer steigenden Skepsis gegenüber von Wissenschaft und den Aussagen von Schulbüchern.

    Um auf diese Herausforderungen zu reagieren, muss ein Schulgeschichtsbuch gemäss der Autorin, des Autors erstens das kritische historische Denken fördern und fordern. Zweitens müssen Schulgeschichtsbücher zwingend auf dem aktuellen Stand der Fachwissenschaften sein. Nur so könne es vermieden werden, dass gerade auch durch Schulgeschichtsbücher falsche Narrative und vereinfachte Sichtweisen transportiert werden. Dem ist im Grundsatz zuzustimmen.

    Solche Forderungen an Schulgeschichtsbücher sind allerdings nicht neu.[1] Es gibt eine Vielzahl gelungener Beispiele von Lehrmitteln, die Schüler:innen bewusst zur kritischen Auseinandersetzung mit der behandelten Thematik anregen wollen. So thematisiert – um nur ein Beispiel zu nennen – das Lehrmittel “Zeitreise 3” im Themengebiet “Menschenrechte und Demokratie” sehr differenziert die Einschränkungen von menschenrechtlichen Standards durch demokratische Entscheidungen und fordert die Lernenden explizit dazu auf, dazu Stellung zu beziehen.[2] Dennoch scheint der Erfolg zur Ausbildung von kritischem Denken überschaubar, wie die Autorin, der Autor berichtet. Gerne würde man mehr dazu lesen, wieso dieses Ansinnen bisher zu wenig geglückt ist und in Zukunft gelingen soll. Was muss jetzt anders gemacht werden als bisher?

    Eine Antwort auf diese Frage zu finden, scheint angesichts der aktuellen Pandemie und der damit verbundenen Einschränkungen für Schule und Bildungseinrichtungen umso wichtiger, führt dies doch zu einem rasanten Anstieg der Nutzung von digitalen Bildungsinhalten.[3] Auch in dieser Hinsicht wäre wünschenswert, wenn die Autorin, der Autor dazu noch eine präzisere Aussage wagen würde. Müssen nun die künftigen Geschichtslehrmittel zwingend digitale Inhalte miteinbeziehen und thematisieren und also über das Schulbuch hinaus ins Internet und in die Sozialen Medien führen? Sollen digitale Quellen verlinkt, einbezogen und kritisch hinterfragt werden? Werden durch eine solche Öffnung der Schulgeschichtsbücher die Lernenden zur kritischen Auseinandersetzung mit analogen und digitalen Quellen befähigt und können ihre Kompetenzen im Umgang mit Medien ausdifferenzieren? Oder passiert damit genau das Gegenteil, und die Schulgeschichtsbücher verschwinden im Rauschen des World Wide Webs?

    _______

    [1] Vgl. dazu z.B. Nadine Fink, “Enseigner l’histoire pour former la pensée critique?,” Public History Weekly 5 (2017) 27, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2017-8238; Falk, Pingel, UNESCO Guidebook on Textbook Research and Textbook Revision (Braunschweig: 2010), https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000117188 (letzter Zugriff 10.03.2021); Eckhardt, Fuchs, und Annekatrin, Bock, Palgrave Handbook of Textbook Studies (London: Palgrave, 2018).
    [2] Karin, Fuchs, Hans, Utz, Maria, Heiter, u.a., Zeitreise 3: Das Lehrwerk für historisches Lernen im Fachbereich Räume, Zeiten, Gesellschaften. Ausgabe für die Schweiz (Baar: Klett und Balmer, 2018).
    [3] Vgl. Urs. Pfändler, “Digitale Lernplattformen boomen in der Corona-Krise,” Neue Zürcher Zeitung, 4. März 2021, https://www.nzz.ch/zuerich/digitale-lernplattformen-ersetzen-das-gute-alte-schulbuch-nicht-ld.1603875 (letzter Zugriff 10.03.21).

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

I accept that my given data and my IP address is sent to a server in the USA only for the purpose of spam prevention through the Akismet program.More information on Akismet and GDPR.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest