Fighting Truth with Facts

Wahrheiten mit Fakten bekämpfen

Abstract:
This essay looks at the phenomenon of conspiracy theories from the perspective of historical science and the theory of science. The central thesis is that the answer to the false facts of conspiracy theories cannot be an absolute truth claim of science, but rather the teaching of historical competence and media competence. Both skills are essential to debunk the anti-scientific truth promises of conspiracy theories.
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-17026
Languages: English, German


Social crises fuel conspiracy theories.[1] This relation has been known not only since the current COVID-19 pandemic, but has become particularly clear in the spring of 2020.[2] In the face of a state that used its full biopolitical power to intervene more directly than usual in the individual lives of its citizens and in some cases thereby restricts their basic rights and freedoms, many conspiracy theorists have been confronted with their worst fears.[3] At least since the public discussion in numerous countries – including Germany and Austria – about a possible compulsory vaccination against the new coronaviruses arose, not only have the wildest conspiracy theories flourished in various social media, but their followers have also started to take it to the streets.[4] In this essay, I will reflect on how we as public historians can exercise our social responsibility and respond to the spread of such theories. 

What do Conspiracy Theories Swear By?

The special responsibility of the historical sciences lies above all in demonstrating that conspiracy theories, in addition to their numerous other flaws that distinguish them from scientific theories, are also rooted in an understanding of history that is not tenable from the perspective of modern historiography. In order to concretize these considerations, I will first offer an operational definition of the term “conspiracy theory”. I understand it as a complex narrative that explains historical or contemporary phenomena as the result of a conspiratorial plan concocted by a certain group or individuals. They are self-contained, self-referential theories that regard all explanatory models that lie outside their own narrative as part of the very conspiracy they seek to uncover. This makes them impossible to falsify by scientific standards.

Conspiracy theories follow a teleological view of history that draws a continuous line of development of an imagined conspiracy from the past into the present and future. They presuppose an absolute power of action of the subject as a historical actor, since—from their perspective—nothing happens in human history by chance or as a consequence of complex processes, but rather on the basis of the will and actions of the conspirators. What all conspiracy theories have in common is their claim to reduce complexity through monocausal explanations, whereby they can themselves take on extremely complex forms.[5]

Conspiracy theories are often the most radical form of counter-discourse and not only negate the contents and results of hegemonic discourses, but reject them in their entirety. Nevertheless, many of them imitate scientific theories: They present themselves in an intersubjectively comprehensible way through a multitude of “sources” and “proofs”, quote “expert positions” and thus create an aura of “scientificity”. In doing so, they produce their own “facts”, which often go hand in hand with a radical form of self-empowerment of the conspiracists: They rise to become experts and claim to have arrived at the “truth” through their own “research”, from which they derive identity-specific narratives of superiority and communality.[6]

The Dilemma with the Truth

This very power of subjects as historical actors should by all means be a particularly burning issue to us as public historians. Here we find ourselves confronted with an image of history that seems to have originated directly in the 19th century and prescribes that it is once again the great men who impose their will on history—as dark powers, but nevertheless as those who control and plan the destinies of humanity. However, history can only be planned by men in their time to a limited extent. It is plannable for us historians as those who negotiate it as an intersubjective and discursive construction of an imagined past in the present.[7]

It is precisely at this point that I see myself confronted with a dilemma regarding my self-understanding as a historian: I cannot provide satisfactory answers to those who are searching for absolute historical truths as well as the secret forces and powers in history; I can only offer different views in terms of how it might have been.[8] These are fact-based, but are not absolute certainties. The desire for certainty, however, can drive those seeking meaning into the arms of the charlatans at the Kopp Verlag. But how can this Gordian knot of historical interpretative sovereignty be untied? By returning to historicist positivism in order to destroy the false truths of conspiracy theories with the right truths of science and academics? On the contrary! Conspiracy theories must be named and deconstructed for what they are: ideological models striving to explain the world which in their absolute claim to truth have more in common with religions than with scientific theories.[9]

No Knowledge is Forever

It is essential that we continue to emphasize the constructed character of any historical knowledge in public communication outside the academic resonant cavity and to refute those who claim the truth for themselves with basic philosophy of science. All too often, however, historians act in a Janus-faced manner when in public: While we move among ourselves in the usual narratives of constructivist historical science, we often continue to appear to the outside world as the honored scholars who would know historical truth. While this persists, it may be that we  unintentionally legitimize those to whom reflected positions are fundamentally completely alien.

We must not only teach historical competence but also live it and make it clear that all those who claim absolute truths for themselves are in fact false prophets. Furthermore, we must also explain what historical facts are and what distinguishes them from supposed truths: Facts are intersubjectively verifiable and their construction falsifiable—they can change, but they are not arbitrary.[10] A constructivist understanding of history does not exclude the existence of established factual knowledge, but always relates it to its epistemological premises and conditions. To name this openly and clearly must be both the aspiration and task of public history. Sufficient scientific communication thrives on the fact that scientific findings are only ever temporary and relative. In the course of the Covid-19 pandemic, some recipients found it particularly difficult to understand that scientists can also change their positions in the face of new facts—they are already too accustomed to their total conviction.

Rise Up Against Conspiracy Theories

However, historical competence also entails showing that the power of historical actors is limited and that we cannot identify a single conspiracy in human history that has been as powerful and successful as prominent conspiracy theories suggest. At the same time, basic source criticism must also be taught as a sine qua non of recent media competence. The “cui bono” so popular among conspiracy theorists is especially true for those who disseminate such theories—be it state authorities who want to destabilize other states or international communities, or those in the media who hope to gain an advantage in the battle for attention by spreading them.

There is a reason why conspiracy theories, despite their early forms in Greco-Roman antiquity, are a product of the early modern era—they represent a rebellion of superstition against reason, often camouflaged by a pseudo-scientific cloak.[11] They must therefore be fought in the same way as actual superstition: by providing people with the tools to free themselves from their self-imposed immanence. This must be one of the core tasks of public history.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Butter, Michael. Nichts ist wie es scheint. Über Verschwörungstheorien. Berlin: Suhrkamp, 2018.
  • Butter, Michael, und Knight Peter. Routledge Handbook of Conspiracy Theories. London: Routledge, 2020.
  • Walach, Thomas. Das Unbewusste und die Geschichtsarbeit. Theorie und Methode einer öffentlichen Geschichte. Wiesbaden: Springer Verlag, 2019.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] Jan Willem Prooijen, und Karen M Douglas, “Conspiracy theories as part of history: The role of societal crisis situations,” Memory Studies 10, no. 3 (2017): 323–333, https://doi.org/10.1177/1750698017701615 (last accessed 16 June 2020).
[2] Lotte Pummerer, und Kai Sassenberg, “Conspiracy Theories in Times of Crisis and Their Societal Effects: Case ‘corona,’” PsyArXiv 14, (April 2020): doi:10.31234/osf.io/y5grn (last accessed 16 June 2020); Peter J. Hotez, “COVID19 meets the Antivaccine Movement,” Microbes and infection 22, no. 4-5 (2020): 162-164, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.micinf.2020.05.010 (last accessed 16 June 2020).
[3]). Einen hervorragenden Überblick über den Begriff der Biopolitik bietet: Thomas Lemke, Biopolitik zur Einführung (Hamburg: Junius 2007).
[4] siehe u.a.: Katrin Schuler, “Angst vor der Zwangsimpfung,” Die Zeit, 11. Mai 2020, https://www.zeit.de/politik/deutschland/2020-05/corona-falschinformation-zwangsimfpung-geheimplaene-geruecht (last accessed 16 June 2020).
[5] Diese Definition orientiert sich im Großen und Ganzen an der gängigen Forschungslandschaft zu Verschwörungstheorien. Besonders stark ist sie beeinflusst von: Michael Butter, Nichts ist wie es scheint. Über Verschwörungstheorien (Berlin: Suhrkamp Verlag, 2018).
[6] Roland Imhoff, und Pia Karoline Lamberty, “Too special to be duped: Need for uniqueness motivates conspiracy beliefs,” European Journal of Social Psychology 47, no. 6 (2017): 724-734. Online verfügbar unter: https://doi.org/10.1002/ejsp.2265 (last accessed 22 June 2020).
[7] Martin Tschiggerl, Thomas Walach, und Stefan Zahlmann, Geschichtstheorie (Wiesbaden: Springer Verlag, 2019).
[8] Zu dieser Problematik siehe u.a.: Thomas Walach, Das Unbewusste und die Geschichtsarbeit. Theorie und Methode einer öffentlichen Geschichte (Wiesbaden: Springer Verlag, 2019).
[9] Vgl.: Armin Pfahl-Traughber, “Bausteine. Zu einer Theorie über Verschwörungstheorien,” in Verschwörungstheorien. Theorie-Geschichte-Wirkung, ed. Helmut Reinalter (Innsbruck: Studien Verlag, 2002), 32.
[10] Zu diesem Verständnis von Fakten siehe: Alun Munslow, Deconstructing History (New York: Taylor and Francis, 2007), 6–8; Alun Munslow, The Routledge Companion to Historical Studies (New York: Routledge, 2006), 107–109.
[11] Michael Butter, Nichts ist wie es scheint. Über Verschwörungstheorien (Berlin: Suhrkamp, 2018).

_____________________

Image Credits

Corona, © Matryx, https://pixabay.com/de/illustrations/corona-coronavirus-covid-covid-19-5023599/.

Recommended Citation

Tschiggerl, Martin: Fighting Truth with Facts. In: Public History Weekly 8 (2020) 7, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-17026.

Copy-Editing

Stefanie und Paul Jones (paul.stefanie@outlook.at)

Editorial Responsibility

Isabella Schild / Thomas Hellmuth (Team Vienna)

Gesellschaftliche Krisen befeuern Verschwörungstheorien.[1] Dieser Zusammenhang ist nicht erst seit der aktuellen COVID-19 Pandemie bekannt, wird im Frühling des Jahres 2020 aber einmal mehr besonders deutlich.[2] Angesichts eines Staates, der seine volle biopolitische Macht nutzt, um direkter als sonst in die individuellen Lebenswelten seiner Bürger*innen einzugreifen und mitunter auch deren Grund- und Freiheitsrechte einschränkt, sahen sich viele Verschwörungstheoretiker*innen mit ihren schlimmsten Ängsten konfrontiert.[3] Spätestens seitdem in zahlreichen Staaten – darunter auch Deutschland und Österreich – öffentlich über eine mögliche Impfpflicht gegen die neuartigen Coronaviren diskutiert wird, blühen nicht nur in unterschiedlichen sozialen Medien die wildesten Verschwörungstheorien auf, sondern beginnen deren Anhänger*innen auch, auf die Straße zu gehen.[4] In diesem Essay möchte ich darüber nachdenken, wie wir als Public Historians unsere gesellschaftliche Verantwortung wahrnehmen und auf die Verbreitung derartiger Theorien reagieren können.

Worauf schwören Verschwörungstheorien?

Die besondere Verantwortung der Geschichtswissenschaft liegt vor allem darin aufzuzeigen, dass Verschwörungstheorien neben ihren zahlreichen anderen Makeln, die sie von wissenschaftlichen Theorien unterscheiden, auch einem Verständnis von Geschichte verhaftet sind, das aus der Perspektive einer rezenten Geschichtswissenschaft nicht haltbar ist. Um diese Überlegungen zu konkretisieren, möchte ich zunächst ein Arbeitsdefinition des Begriffs Verschwörungstheorie anbieten. Ich verstehe diese als komplexe Narrative, mit denen historische oder gegenwärtige Phänomene als Folge eines konspirativen Plans einer bestimmten Gruppe oder bestimmter Einzelpersonen erklärt werden. Sie sind abgeschlossene, selbstreferentielle Theoriegebäude, die alle Erklärungsmodelle, die außerhalb des eigenen Narrativs liegen als Teil eben jener Verschwörung ansehen, die sie aufzudecken versuchen. Dies macht sie nach wissenschaftlichen Standards unmöglich zu falsifizieren.

Verschwörungstheorien folgen einem teleologischen Geschichtsbild, das eine kontinuierliche Entwicklungslinie einer vorgestellten Verschwörung aus der Vergangenheit in die Gegenwart bis in die Zukunft zieht. Sie setzen eine absolute Handlungsmächtigkeit des Subjekts als historischem Akteur voraus, da aus ihrer Perspektive in der menschlichen Geschichte nichts durch Zufall oder als Folge komplexer Prozesse geschieht, sondern aufgrund des Willens und der Handlungen der Verschwörer*innen. Gemein ist Verschwörungstheorien der Anspruch, Komplexität durch monokausale Erklärungen zu reduzieren, wobei sie dabei selbst ausgesprochen komplexe Formen annehmen können.[5]

Oft sind Verschwörungstheorien die radikalstmögliche Form eines Gegendiskurses und negieren nicht nur die Inhalte und Ergebnisse hegemonialer Diskurse, sondern lehnen diese in ihrer Gesamtheit ab. Gleichwohl imitieren viele von ihnen wissenschaftliche Theorien: Sie stellen sich durch eine Vielzahl von “Quellen” und “Beweisen” intersubjektiv nachvollziehbar dar, zitieren “Expertenpositionen” und erzeugen damit eine Aura der “Wissenschaftlichkeit”. Dabei schaffen sie ihre eigenen “Fakten”, was oft mit einer radikalen Form der Selbstermächtigung der Verschwörungstheoretiker*innen einhergeht: Diese erheben sich zu Expert*innen und behaupten, durch ihre eigene “Forschung” zur “Wahrheit” gelangt zu sein und leiten daraus identitätskonkrete Narrative von Erhabenheit und Gemeinschaftlichkeit ab.[6]

Das Dilemma mit der Wahrheit

Gerade die Handlungsmacht von Subjekten als historischen Akteur*innen müsste uns als Public Historians eigentlich besonders auf der Seele brennen. Sehen wir uns hier doch mit einem Geschichtsbild konfrontiert, das direkt dem 19. Jahrhundert entsprungen zu sein scheint und demnach es einmal mehr die großen Männer – in seltenen Fällen auch die großen Frauen -– sind, die der Geschichte ihren Willen aufzwingen – als finstere Mächte zwar, nichtsdestotrotz aber als diejenigen, welche die Geschicke der Menschheit steuern und planen wollen. Geschichte ist für den Mensch in der Zeit aber nur bedingt planbar. Planbar ist sie vielmehr für uns Historiker*innen, als diejenigen, die sie als intersubjektive und diskursive Konstruktion einer vorgestellten Vergangenheit in der Gegenwart ausverhandeln.[7]

Und genau an dieser Stelle sehe ich mich in meinem Selbstverständnis als Historiker mit einem Dilemma konfrontiert: Ich kann denjenigen, die nach absoluten historischen Wahrheiten und den geheimen Kräften und Mächten in der Geschichte suchen, keine befriedigenden Antworten liefern, sondern lediglich Bedeutungsangebote, wie es denn gewesen sein könnte.[8] Diese sind zwar faktenbasiert, aber gerade keine absoluten Gewissheiten. Der Wunsch nach Gewissheit kann die Sinnsuchenden aber gerade in die Arme der Scharlatane des Kopp Verlags treiben. Doch wie lässt sich dieser gordische Knoten der historischen Deutungshoheit lösen? Durch ein Zurück zum historistischen Positivismus, um die “falsche Wahrheit” der Verschwörungstheorien durch die “richtige Wahrheit” der Wissenschaft zu zerstören? Ganz im Gegenteil! Verschwörungstheoretische Vergangenheitskonzepte müssen als das benannt und dekonstruiert werden, was sie sind: Ideologische Welterklärungsmodelle, die in ihrem absoluten Wahrheitsanspruch mehr mit Religionen gemeinsam haben als mit wissenschaftlichen Theorien.[9]

Kein Wissen ist für immer

Es ist von essentieller Bedeutung, den Konstruktionscharakter jedweder historischen Erkenntnis weiterhin in der öffentlichen Kommunikation, auch außerhalb des wissenschaftlichen Resonanzraums, zu betonen und jene, welche die Wahrheit für sich beanspruchen, mit basaler Wissenschaftstheorie zu entzaubern. Allzu oft agieren Historiker*innen in der Öffentlichkeit aber janusköpfig: Während wir uns untereinander in den gängigen Narrativen konstruktivistischer Geschichtswissenschaft bewegen, treten wir nach außen oft weiterhin als die honorigen Gelehrten auf, welche die historische Wahrheit kennen würden. Dadurch könnten wir ungewollt jene legitimieren, denen reflektierte Positionen grundsätzlich vollkommen fremd sind und implizieren, dass “wahre” Aussagen über die Vergangenheit grundsätzlich möglich wären.

Wir müssen historische Kompetenz nicht nur lehren, sondern auch leben und klar machen, dass all jene, welche absolute Wahrheiten für sich beanspruchen, falsche Propheten sind. Dabei müssen wir aber auch erklären, was historische Fakten sind und was sie von vermeintlichen Wahrheiten unterscheidet: Fakten sind intersubjektiv überprüfbar und ihre Konstruktion falsifizierbar – sie können sich ändern, sind aber nicht beliebig.[10] Ein konstruktivistisches Verständnis von Geschichtswissenschaft schließt die Existenz gesicherten Faktenwissens nicht aus, setzt dieses aber stets in Relation zu seinen epistemologischen Voraussetzungen und Bedingungen. Dies offen und klar zu benennen, muss Anspruch und Aufgabe der Public History sein. Gute Wissenschaftskommunikation lebt davon, dass wissenschaftliche Erkenntnisse immer nur temporär und relativ sind. Zu verstehen, dass Wissenschaftler*innen angesichts neuer Fakten ihre Positionen auch ändern können, fiel manchen Rezipient*innen im Zuge der Covid-19 Pandemie besonders schwer – zu sehr sind sie bereits an den Brustton der Überzeugung gewöhnt.

Kampf den Verschwörungstheorien

Historische Kompetenz besteht jedoch auch darin, zu zeigen, dass die Handlungsmacht historischer Akteure begrenzt ist und wir in der gesamten menschlichen Geschichte keine einzige Verschwörung ausmachen können, die langfristig auch nur in Ansätzen so mächtig und erfolgreich war, wie es in prominenten Verschwörungstheorien unterstellt wird. Gleichzeitig muss auch basale Quellenkritik als sine qua non rezenter Medienkompetenz vermittelt werden. Das unter Verschwörungstheoretiker*innen so populäre “cui bono?” gilt gerade auch für jene, die derartige Theorien verbreiten. Seien es staatliche Instanzen, die dadurch andere Staaten oder Staatengemeinschaften destabilisieren wollen, oder Medienmacher*innen, die sich von ihrer Verbreitung einen Vorteil in der Aufmerksamkeitsökonomie erhoffen.

Verschwörungstheorien sind trotz ihrer Frühformen in der griechisch-römischen Antike nicht umsonst ein Produkt der Frühen Neuzeit – ein Aufbäumen des Aberglaubens gegen die Vernunft, oft getarnt durch einen pseudowissenschaftlichen Deckmantel.[11] Sie müssen daher auf dieselbe Art und Weise bekämpft werden wie der tatsächliche Aberglaube: Indem man den Menschen jene Werkzeuge zur Verfügung stellt, sich aus ihrer selbst auferlegten Unmündigkeit zu befreien. Dies muss eine der Kernaufgaben der Public History sein.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Butter, Michael. Nichts ist wie es scheint. Über Verschwörungstheorien. Berlin: Suhrkamp, 2018.
  • Butter, Michael, und Knight Peter. Routledge Handbook of Conspiracy Theories. London: Routledge, 2020.
  • Walach, Thomas. Das Unbewusste und die Geschichtsarbeit. Theorie und Methode einer öffentlichen Geschichte. Wiesbaden: Springer Verlag, 2019.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] Jan Willem Prooijen, und Karen M Douglas, “Conspiracy theories as part of history: The role of societal crisis situations,” Memory Studies 10, no. 3 (2017): 323–333, https://doi.org/10.1177/1750698017701615 (letzter Zugriff am 16. Juni 2020).
[2] Lotte Pummerer, und Kai Sassenberg, “Conspiracy Theories in Times of Crisis and Their Societal Effects: Case ‘corona,’” PsyArXiv 14, (April 2020): doi:10.31234/osf.io/y5grn (letzter Zugriff am 16. Juni 2020); Peter J. Hotez, “COVID19 meets the Antivaccine Movement,” Microbes and infection 22, no. 4-5 (2020): 162-164, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.micinf.2020.05.010 (letzter Zugriff am 16. Juni 2020).
[3]). Einen hervorragenden Überblick über den Begriff der Biopolitik bietet: Thomas Lemke, Biopolitik zur Einführung (Hamburg: Junius 2007).
[4] siehe u.a.: Katrin Schuler, “Angst vor der Zwangsimpfung,” Die Zeit, 11. Mai 2020, https://www.zeit.de/politik/deutschland/2020-05/corona-falschinformation-zwangsimfpung-geheimplaene-geruecht (letzter Zugriff am 16. Juni 2020).
[5] Diese Definition orientiert sich im Großen und Ganzen an der gängigen Forschungslandschaft zu Verschwörungstheorien. Besonders stark ist sie beeinflusst von: Michael Butter, Nichts ist wie es scheint. Über Verschwörungstheorien (Berlin: Suhrkamp Verlag, 2018).
[6] Vgl. Roland Imhoff, und Pia Karoline Lamberty, “Too special to be duped: Need for uniqueness motivates conspiracy beliefs,” European Journal of Social Psychology 47, no. 6 (2017): 724-734. Online verfügbar unter: https://doi.org/10.1002/ejsp.2265 (letzter Zugriff am 22. Juni 2020).
[7] Vgl. Martin Tschiggerl, Thomas Walach, und Stefan Zahlmann, Geschichtstheorie (Wiesbaden: Springer Verlag, 2019).
[8] Zu dieser Problematik siehe u.a.: Thomas Walach, Das Unbewusste und die Geschichtsarbeit. Theorie und Methode einer öffentlichen Geschichte (Wiesbaden: Springer Verlag, 2019).
[9] Vgl.: Armin Pfahl-Traughber, “Bausteine. Zu einer Theorie über Verschwörungstheorien,” in Verschwörungstheorien. Theorie-Geschichte-Wirkung, ed. Helmut Reinalter (Innsbruck: Studien Verlag, 2002), 32.
[10] Zu diesem Verständnis von Fakten siehe: Alun Munslow, Deconstructing History (New York: Taylor and Francis, 2007), 6–8; Alun Munslow, The Routledge Companion to Historical Studies (New York: Routledge, 2006), 107–109.
[11] Michael Butter, Nichts ist wie es scheint. Über Verschwörungstheorien (Berlin: Suhrkamp, 2018).

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Corona, © Matryx, https://pixabay.com/de/illustrations/corona-coronavirus-covid-covid-19-5023599/.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Tschiggerl, Martin: Wahrheiten mit Fakten bekämpfen. In: Public History Weekly 8 (2020) 7, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-17026.

Lektorat

Stefanie und Paul Jones (paul.stefanie@outlook.at)

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Isabella Schild / Thomas Hellmuth (Team Vienna)

Copyright (c) 2020 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 8 (2020) 7
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-17026

Tags: , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

I accept that my given data and my IP address is sent to a server in the USA only for the purpose of spam prevention through the Akismet program.More information on Akismet and GDPR.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest