The Australian Experience: Peak Commemoration?

Der Gipfel des Gedenkens? Australien und der Erste Weltkrieg


Anzackery. Has the culmination of the centenary years Australians have been exposed to and leading in to the Centenary of Armistice finally hit a road block? Can it be that even for this nation — one that so strongly attaches its sense of national identity to its participation in World War I — citizens have reached Peak Commemoration? Will the overt Anzackery finally be the undoing of community support for these commemorative events? Public acts of commemoration, as has been seen over the centenary anniversary years, are closely intertwined with matters of public history, official sites of memory, monuments and memorials, and national identity. This post examines commemoration and links to teaching for historical consciousness in schools.

The Centenary Years: An Introduction

Internationally, the centenary anniversary years of World War I (WWI) attracted much political, media, and public interest, spanning 2014 to the recent anniversary of Armistice on 11 November, 2018. Australia has spent more on WWI commemorations than any other nation; it is and remains an important component of the nation’s sense of identity. An estimated amount of $552 million[1] was spent, and the single most costly nation-building activity was the Sir John Monash Centre,[2] a museum and interpretive centre, at Villers-Bretonneux.

This Centre, although criticised before it opened for planning to be too celebratory, its brief was to “recall our victories as much as our defeats”[3] is actually sombre in tone, tells the horrific stories of soldiers’ experiences in their own voices, and the immersive visual, light, and sound technology can leave visitors feeling unsettled. Sounds and experience of war, as much as they can be recreated in an artificial environment, are told with limited sanitisation. The Centre does not fall into the familiar pattern of celebratory commemoration discourses. It does not pander to those domestic Australian tourists travelling abroad who expect a jingoistic experience of Australia’s involvement in WWI.

Australia’s commemorations of WWI are often symbols of intensified national identity. Funding for events and projects commemorating rarely attracts mainstream opposition. While government spending and Anzackery attitudes, that is the celebratory “use and promotion of the Anzac[4] legend, especially in ways seen to be excessive or misguided”[5] have been repeatedly criticised; on the whole this has remained on the fringes of public discourses.

The TYFYS Debacle

When airline company Virgin Australia announced[6] it would acknowledge veterans on flights before take-off and planned to offer priority boarding for them as a Thank You for Your Service (TYFYS) style initiative, the company did not expect a negative reception. Announced with the hashtag #ThanksForServing and coming immediately after the very successful international Invictus Games, a sporting event set up for ill and injured soldiers[7], it would seem the stage was set for public support of this plan.

In what appeared to be more a thought bubble than a sophisticated marketing strategy, the reaction was swift and vitriolic. Backlash from veterans centred around several factors: a) not wanting to be identified as a veteran; b) feelings of not being deserving of this type of recognition; c) being tokenistic or too closely mimicking American culture; and d) preference for more meaningful and material support for mental health issues and post-service employment.

Mehran Nejati declared, “veterans’ representatives described the idea as embarrassing, tokenistic and opportunistic…Virgin Australia was fatally misreading the local culture by thinking it could import an American practice out of step with the Australian temperament.”[8]

Fresh in Our Memories Failure

This is not the first time that a company has failed to understand the public’s mood. Woolworths supermarket’s 2015 Anzac xDay advertising campaign backfired tremendously. The commercialisation of Anzac Day, coined as Brandzac Day[9] by critics, was not successful and the supermarket giant withdrew its campaign. With a tagline Fresh in Our Memories and the strategic positioning of the Woolworths logo, shoppers were bombarded with a series of posters. The blatant appropriation of soldiers, was immediately seen as distasteful.

Commemoration as an Act of Historical Consciousness

Putting aside recent national and international debates on monuments and memorials, which Lévesque has claimed “symbolize the new history war”, commemoration features strongly in Australian schools. It would be unusual for a school not to hold an assembly or service that commemorates WWI and subsequent wars. Even when it is not included in the official curriculum almost all schools engage in commemoration activities, such as making poppies, organising assemblies, marching in parades, or observing a minute’s silence—students are annually exposed to practices of commemoration.

Historical consciousness “pertains to the basic human inclination to make meaningful interconnections between the past, the present, and the future. Historical consciousness also has a moral dimension in that narratives of historical change and continuity are at some level also narratives about moral rights and wrongs, interpreted against the background of present-day values and norms.”[10]

It can be used as a point of entry to teach issues of commemoration in the context of each locale. Asserted by Lévesque, in a discussion on monuments, this topic too “could benefit from competencies of historical consciousness as opposed to general politizisation.”[11] Doing so would enable a clear framing of commemoration and avoid accusations of overt political bias.

Taking Seixas’ ideas,[12] the following are suggestions for the classroom.

  1. They (questions) are not just about the past: they form a link between the past, present, and future.
    How have current commemoration and remembrance activities changed and stayed the same in key time periods since WWI? Have changing perspectives on commemoration been influenced by the occurrence of other conflicts such as World War II, Vietnam, and the ongoing military operations in the Middle East?
  2. They are naturally occurring questions in our culture today. They are not just historians’ questions: they are everybody’s.
    Teachers can facilitate students’ understanding about the types of memorials in their local area and where they are positioned: what are examples of incidental history that can be observed when encountering memorials and monuments. What do the visual representations of the monuments say about the socio-political context of the time?
  3. At the same time, precisely because of […] cultural traditions […] though they are natural to ask, they are more difficult to answer.
    Teachers could pose the question, “What do you think the reaction would be if the school’s principal cancelled Anzac Day ceremony and why do you think people would react like that?”

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Holbrook, Carolyn. “Are we brainwashing our children? The place of Anzac in Australian history,” Agora 51, 4 (2016): 16-22.
  • Innes, Melanie and Heather Sharp, “World War I commemoration and student historical consciousness: A study of high-school students’ views,” History Education Research Journal 15 (2018): 193-205.
  • Parkes, Robert J.. Interrupting History: Rethinking Curriculum After ‘The End of History’. New York: Peter Lang, 2011.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] Paul Daley, “Australia’s lavish spending on Anzac memorials cloaks a more distasteful reality,” The Guardian, November 11, 2015 https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/postcolonial-blog/2015/nov/11/lavish-spending-first-world-war-commemorations-cloak-distasteful-reality (last accessed 18 December 2018).
[2] See the official website of the Sir John Monash Centre, https://sjmc.gov.au/ (last accessed 18 December 2018).
[3] Nick Miller, “$100M Monash Centre to form entry point to France’s Western Front,” The Sydney Morning Herald, April 13, 2018 https://www.smh.com.au/world/europe/100m-monash-centre-to-form-entry-point-to-france-s-western-front-20180413-p4z9cg.html  (last accessed 18 December 2018).
[4] Anzac Day is national day for Australians and New Zealanders; originally in remembrance of the (failed) invasion of the combined countries’ Army Corps into Turkey in 1915, it now symbolises involvement in all wars. For official government information, visit https://www.awm.gov.au/commemoration/anzac-day  (last accessed 18 December 2018).
[5] Amanda Laugesen, “Word watch: Anzackery,” Australian National University, 2015, http://www.anu.edu.au/news/all-news/word-watch-anzackery  (last accessed 18 December 2018).
[6] Anne Davies, “Virgin Australia announces US-style plan to honour veterans on every flight,” The Guardian, November 4, 2018, https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2018/nov/04/virgin-australia-honours-veterans-on-flights  (last accessed 18 December 2018).
[7] Mehran Nejati, “Leaping before listening: Why Virgin Australia gets called a publicity hound,” The Conversation, November 16, 2018,  https://www.smartcompany.com.au/startupsmart/startupsmart-marketing/virgin-australia-publicity-hound/  (last accessed 18 December 2018).
[8] For information about the origins and purposes of the Invictus Games, see https://invictusgamesfoundation.org/ (last accessed 18 December 2018).
[9] Conor Duffy, “ ‘Brandzac Day: Historian criticises ‘new low in commercialisation of Anzac’,” ABC News, April 16, 2015, http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-04-15/critics-disgusted-by-‘vulgar’-commercialisation-of-anzac-day/6395756 (last accessed 18 December 2018).
[10] Niklas Ammert, Silvia Edling, Jan Löfström, and Heather Sharp, “Bridging historical consciousness and moral consciousness,” Historical Encounters Journal 4, 1 (2017), 3, http://hej.hermes-history.net/index.php/HEJ/article/download/76/54 (last accessed 10 November 2018).
[11] Stephane Lévesque, “A new approach to debates over Macdonald and other monuments in Canada: Part 1,” Active History November 6, 2018 http://activehistory.ca/2018/11/a-new-approach-to-debates-over-macdonald-and-other-monuments-in-canada-part-1/ (last accessed 16 November 2018).
[12] Peter Seixas, “What is historical consciousness?”, in To the Past: History Education, Public Memory, and Citizenship in Canada, ed. Ruth. W. Sandwell (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2006), 15-16. 

_____________________

Image Credits

View To Sir John Monash Centre From Villers Bretonneux Australian National Memorial © 2018 Heather Sharp.

Recommended Citation

Sharp, Heather: The Australian Experience: Peak Commemoration? In: Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 40, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-13130.

Editorial Responsibility

Moritz Hoffmann / Marko Demantowsky (Team Basel)

Anzackery. Ist der Höhepunkt der Hundertjahrfeierlichkeiten, denen die Australier ausgesetzt waren und die in den 100. Jahrestag des Waffenstillstands mündeten, nun endlich erreicht? Kann es sein, dass selbst für diese Nation, die ihre nationale Identität so stark an ihre Beteiligung am Ersten Weltkrieg knüpft, das höchste Maß an Gedenken erreicht ist? Wird die unverhohlene “Anzackery” der breiten Unterstützung für solche Gedenkveranstaltungen ein Ende setzen? Öffentliche Gedenkveranstaltungen sind, wie im Jubiläumsjahr, eng mit Fragen der öffentlichen Geschichte, offiziellen Gedenkstätten, Denkmälern sowie der nationalen Identität verknüpft. Dieser Beitrag untersucht Gedenkveranstaltungen in Australien hinsichtlich des Geschichtsunterrichtes und der Förderung des historischen Bewusstseins an Schulen.

Die Einhundertjahrs-Jahre: Eine Einführung

International erregte das hundertjährige Jubiläum des Ersten Weltkriegs großes politisches, mediales und öffentliches Interesse, das sich von 2014 bis zum jüngsten Jahrestag des Waffenstillstands am 11. November 2018 erstreckte. Australien hat mehr für Weltkriegsgedenktage ausgegeben als jede andere Nation; solche Veranstaltungen sind und bleiben ein wichtiger Bestandteil der nationalen Identität. Geschätzte 552 Millionen Dollar[1] waren es. Das teuerste Unterfangen zum Aufbau nationaler Identität war das Sir John Monash Centre,[2] ein Museum und Gedenkzentrum in Villers-Bretonneux.

Obwohl das Zentrum bereits vor der Eröffnung kritisiert wurde, da es zu viele Gedenkfeierlichkeiten plane (sein Auftrag lautete “unsere Siege genauso in Erinnerung zu rufen wie unsere Niederlagen”[3]), herrscht dort eigentlich eine düstere Stimmung, erzählt doch die Ausstellung von den schrecklichen Erfahrungen der Soldaten in ihren eigenen Worten. Die immersive Bild-, Licht- und Tontechnik verstört viele Besucher*innen. Geräusche und Kriegserfahrungen, soweit sie in einer künstlichen Umgebung wiedergegeben werden können, werden nur bedingt aus historischer Distanz erzählt. Damit fällt das Zentrum nicht in das vertraute Muster der feierlichen, oftmals überhöhten Gedenkdiskurse. Ebenso wenig biedert sich das Zentrum denjenigen australischen Tourist*innen an, die ins Ausland reisen um hurrapatriotisch im Gedenken an der australischen Teilnahme am Ersten Weltkrieg zu schwelgen.

Australiens Gedenkfeierlichkeiten zum Ersten Weltkrieg sind oft Symbole einer verstärkten nationalen Identität. Die Finanzierung von solchen Veranstaltungen und Projekten trifft selten auf breiten Widerstand. Auch wenn die Regierungsausgaben und die Haltung der “Anzackery,” d.h. die feierliche “Nutzung und Förderung der Anzac-Legende[4], insbesondere in einer Weise, die als übertrieben oder fehlgeleitet angesehen wird”[5], wiederholt kritisiert wurden, ist diese Kritik insgesamt am Rande der öffentlichen Diskurse geblieben.

Das TYFYS-Debakel

Als die Fluggesellschaft Virgin Australia ankündigte[6], sie wolle Kriegsveteranen vor Abflug die Ehre erweisen und plane, ihnen als Thank You for Your Service (TYFYS) vorrangiges Boarding anzubieten, erwartete niemand im Unternehmen Kritik an dieser Aktion. Angekündigt mit dem Hashtag #ThanksForServing und unmittelbar nach den sehr erfolgreichen internationalen Invictus Games, einem Sportereignis für kranke und verletzte Soldat*innen,[7] schienen die Voraussetzungen für die öffentliche Unterstützung eines solchen Vorhabens wie geschaffen zu sein.

Was eher wie eine Gedankenblase als eine ausgeklügelte Marketingstrategie wirkte, zog harsche Kritik auf sich. Die teils vehemente Gegenreaktion der Veteran*innen konzentrierte sich auf mehrere Faktoren: a) nicht als Veteran*in identifiziert werden zu wollen; b) das Gefühl, diese Art der Anerkennung nicht zu verdienen; c) zu eng das amerikanische Vorbild zu imitieren; und d) die Bevorzugung einer sinnvolleren und besseren materiellen Unterstützung für Soldat*innen mit psychischen Leiden sowie eine Aussicht auf Erwerbstätigkeit nach Beendigung des Wehrdienstes.

Mehran Nejati erklärte, “Veteran*innenvertreter beschrieben die Idee als peinlich, heuchlerisch und opportunistisch…. Virgin Australia deutete die lokale Kultur auf verheerende Weise falsch, indem sie dachte, sie könnte eine amerikanische Praxis importieren, die nicht im Einklang mit der australischen Disposition steht”.[8]

Fehler in der Erinnerung

Dies ist nicht das erste Mal, dass ein Unternehmen die öffentliche Stimmung missverstand. Die Werbekampagne Anzac xDay 2015 des Woolworths-Konzerns war ein riesiger Reinfall. Die Kommerzialisierung des Anzac-Days, von Kritiker*innen als Brandzac Day[9] bezeichnet, war alles andere als erfolgreich. Der Supermarkt-Riese zog schließlich seine Kampagne zurück. Mit dem Slogan Fresh in Our Memories (Frisch im Gedenken) und der strategischen Positionierung des Woolworths-Logos wurden die Käufer*innen mit einer Reihe von Postern bombardiert. Die unverhohlene Aneignung von Soldaten wurde sofort als abscheulich empfunden.

Gedenken als historisches Bewusstsein 

Abgesehen von den jüngsten nationalen und internationalen Debatten über Denkmäler und Gedenkstätten, von denen Lévesque feststellt, dass sie “den neuen Krieg um die Geschichte symbolisieren”, ist Gedenken an australischen Schulen stark verankert. Es wäre ungewöhnlich, wenn eine Schule keine Versammlung oder Gottesdienst abhalten würde, die an den Ersten Weltkrieg und nachfolgende Kriege erinnern. Auch wenn es nicht im offiziellen Lehrplan steht, sind fast alle Schulen an Gedenkaktivitäten beteiligt, wie z.B. die Anfertigung von Mohnblüten (als Symbol des Waffenstillstands), der Organisation von Versammlungen, der Teilnahme an Paraden oder der Einhaltung einer Schweigeminute — die Schüler*innen sind jedes Jahr den Praktiken des Gedenkens ausgesetzt.

Historisches Bewusstsein “bezieht sich auf die grundlegende menschliche Neigung, sinnvolle Verbindungen zwischen der Vergangenheit, der Gegenwart und der Zukunft herzustellen. Das historische Bewusstsein hat auch eine moralische Dimension, da Erzählungen von historischem Wandel und Kontinuität auf einer gewissen Ebene auch Erzählungen über moralische Rechte und Fehler sind, die vor dem Hintergrund heutiger Werte und Normen interpretiert werden.”[10]

Solches Bewusstsein kann als Einstieg verwendet werden, um Fragen rund um das Gedenken im lokalen Kontext anzusprechen. Auch dieses Thema, so Lévesque in einer Diskussion über Denkmäler, “könnte von Kompetenzen des historischen Bewusstseins im Gegensatz zur allgemeinen Politisierung profitieren”[11]. Dies würde einen klaren Rahmen für das Gedenken ermöglichen und Vorwürfe offener politischer Verzerrung entgegenwirken.

Nachfolgend, basierend auf Seixas,[12] einige Unterrichtsvorschläge:

  1. Es geht nicht nur um die Vergangenheit, denn solche Fragen und Themen verbinden Vergangenheit, Gegenwart und Zukunft.
    Wie haben sich die aktuellen Gedenk- und Erinnerungsaktivitäten in den wichtigsten Zeiträumen seit dem Ersten Weltkrieg verändert oder sind unverändert geblieben? Wurden Perspektivenwechsel auf das Gedenken durch das Auftreten anderer Konflikte wie den Zweiten Weltkrieg, Vietnam und die laufenden militärischen Operationen im Nahen Osten beeinflusst?
  2. Diese Fragen tauchen ganz selbstverständlich in unserer heutigen Kultur auf. Sie werden nicht nur von Historiker*innen gestellt, sondern von uns allen.
    Lehrer*innen können Schüler*innen das Verständnis für die Arten von Denkmälern in ihrer Umgebung und an ihrem Standort erleichtern: Was sind Beispiele für Nebengeschichten, die bei der Begegnung mit Denkmälern und Gedenkstätten beobachtet werden können? Was sagen die visuellen Darstellungen der Denkmäler über den gesellschaftspolitischen Kontext der Zeit?
  3. Gleichzeitig, gerade wegen der […] kulturellen Traditionen […] obwohl natürlich auch diese zu befragen sind, sind sie schwieriger zu beantworten.
    Lehrer*innen könnten ihre Schüler*innen fragen: “Was meint ihr, wie würde die Reaktion ausfallen, wenn unsere Rektor*innen die Anzac-Day Zeremonie absagen würden? Und warum würden die Leute eurer Meinung nach so reagieren?”

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Holbrook, Carolyn. “Are we brainwashing our children? The place of Anzac in Australian history,” Agora 51, 4 (2016): 16-22.
  • Innes, Melanie and Heather Sharp, “World War I commemoration and student historical consciousness: A study of high-school students’ views,” History Education Research Journal 15 (2018): 193-205.
  • Parkes, Robert J.. Interrupting History: Rethinking Curriculum After ‘The End of History’. New York: Peter Lang, 2011.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] Paul Daley, “Australia’s lavish spending on Anzac memorials cloaks a more distasteful reality,” The Guardian, November 11, 2015 https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/postcolonial-blog/2015/nov/11/lavish-spending-first-world-war-commemorations-cloak-distasteful-reality (last accessed 18 December 2018).
[2] See the official website of the Sir John Monash Centre, https://sjmc.gov.au/ (last accessed 18 December 2018).
[3] Nick Miller, “$100M Monash Centre to form entry point to France’s Western Front,” The Sydney Morning Herald, April 13, 2018 https://www.smh.com.au/world/europe/100m-monash-centre-to-form-entry-point-to-france-s-western-front-20180413-p4z9cg.html  (last accessed 18 December 2018).
[4] Anzac Day is national day for Australians and New Zealanders; originally in remembrance of the (failed) invasion of the combined countries’ Army Corps into Turkey in 1915, it now symbolises involvement in all wars. For official government information, visit https://www.awm.gov.au/commemoration/anzac-day  (last accessed 18 December 2018).
[5] Amanda Laugesen, “Word watch: Anzackery,” Australian National University, 2015, http://www.anu.edu.au/news/all-news/word-watch-anzackery  (last accessed 18 December 2018).
[6] Anne Davies, “Virgin Australia announces US-style plan to honour veterans on every flight,” The Guardian, November 4, 2018, https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2018/nov/04/virgin-australia-honours-veterans-on-flights  (last accessed 18 December 2018).
[7] Mehran Nejati, “Leaping before listening: Why Virgin Australia gets called a publicity hound,” The Conversation, November 16, 2018,  https://www.smartcompany.com.au/startupsmart/startupsmart-marketing/virgin-australia-publicity-hound/  (last accessed 18 December 2018).
[8] For information about the origins and purposes of the Invictus Games, see https://invictusgamesfoundation.org/ (last accessed 18 December 2018).
[9] Conor Duffy, “ ‘Brandzac Day: Historian criticises ‘new low in commercialisation of Anzac’,” ABC News, April 16, 2015, http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-04-15/critics-disgusted-by-‘vulgar’-commercialisation-of-anzac-day/6395756 (last accessed 18 December 2018).
[10] Niklas Ammert, Silvia Edling, Jan Löfström, and Heather Sharp, “Bridging historical consciousness and moral consciousness,” Historical Encounters Journal 4, 1 (2017), 3, http://hej.hermes-history.net/index.php/HEJ/article/download/76/54 (last accessed 10 November 2018).
[11] Stephane Lévesque, “A new approach to debates over Macdonald and other monuments in Canada: Part 1,” Active History November 6, 2018 http://activehistory.ca/2018/11/a-new-approach-to-debates-over-macdonald-and-other-monuments-in-canada-part-1/ (last accessed 16 November 2018).
[12] Peter Seixas, “What is historical consciousness?”, in To the Past: History Education, Public Memory, and Citizenship in Canada, ed. Ruth. W. Sandwell (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2006), 15-16. 

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Blick aufs Sir John Monash Centre vom Villers Bretonneux Australian National Memorial © 2018 Heather Sharp.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Sharp, Heather: Der Gipfel des Gedenkens? Australien und der Erste Weltkrieg In: Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 40, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-13130.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Moritz Hoffmann / Marko Demantowsky (Team Basel)

Copyright (c) 2018 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 6 (2018) 40
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-13130

Tags: , ,

Pin It on Pinterest