Pandora’s Box Reopened? Debating Germany after 1990

Die Büchse der Pandora? Deutschland nach 1990


It seems to be a never-ending story. Nearly 30 years after reunification, Germany is again debating differences and conflicts between East and West. After years of silence, the rise of right-wing populism in the East is again fuelling politicized, polarized and polemic discussions about East-German “deviations” – and their historical origins. Especially scholars of contemporary history could play a crucial role in facilitating a differentiated debate by developing new perspectives on and shaping new narratives of recent German history, thus overcoming the exhausting and exhausted blame game between East and West.

Who Wants to Open the “Box”?

Looking at the recent debate in German media, someone seems to have tried to open Pandora’s Box. Richard Schröder, former Chairman of the Social Democrats in the first (and last) freely elected GDR parliament seemed to be outraged. Schröder levelled a harsh attack at his fellow party member, the Saxon State Minister for Gender Equality and Integration, Petra Köpping.[1] After a devastating review of her bestselling book Integriert doch erstmal uns!,[2] Schröder even threatened to leave his already deeply shaken party. What had happened? Köpping’s publication demanded a critical reassessment of recent (East) German history. The cultural damage suffered by the economic “shock therapy” after reunification during the early 1990s should, she declared, be a broad topic for public and scientific debate. Especially the role of the highly controversial Treuhandanstalt, a special agency run by Western managers to privatize or liquidate the over 8,500 enterprises of East Germany’s planned economy, should be discussed by a so-called “truth and reconciliation commission.”[3]

A Call to Arms

This claim worked like a call to arms: Conservative, liberal and mostly Western advocates, as well as left-wing and mostly Eastern critics, are once again rushing to arm the trenches criss-crossing the politics of history. While the former hail the economic transformation directed by the Treuhand and its leading managers as tremendous success,[4] the latter deplore a brutal Western capitalist regime, which imposed neoliberal “shock therapy” upon the powerless East Germans.[5]

After the Populist Shock

It seems that the harsh conflicts of the early 1990s are coming back out of the blue: After the striking electoral successes of the right-wing, anti-immigrant “Alternative für Deutschland” (AfD), especially in Eastern Germany, and after violent clashes in Chemnitz in August 2018, debates over long-lasting conflicts between East and West were lashing a surprised nation.[6] Thirty years after reunification, long-demanded “inner unity” now seemed sheer chimera. And a hectic search for the “causes” started again: Were the long-term effects of a collectivist dictatorship and its repressive institutions, which had crippled a country’s democratic capacities, now hitting home? Or were they the consequences of the profound cultural changes and challenges many Easterners had suffered especially in the wake of capitalist “shock therapy”?[7]

Two Arch-Villains

In the end, a typical German blame game about GDR history has once again erupted. Two “arch-villains” are facing off: On the one hand, the communist SED regime, which presided above a completely run-down planned economy before 1990, but never had to face the harsh consequences of four decades of politicized mismanagement[8]; and on the other, the Treuhand, with its post-1990 hit-and-run makeover (i.e. privatization) of a planned into a market economy after 1990, which crippled East German society with deindustrialization, mass unemployment and mass exodus.[9] In the end, there seems little to no room for a balanced discussion that might provide a more complex explanation. Coming to recent (East) German history, light and darkness seem to be the only possible conditions.

A “Bad Bank” of Memory Culture

In the field of memory culture, the Treuhand was identified as one important piece of the East German puzzle. Nearly unknown to Western Germans or younger people today, simply mentioning the name of this long-gone organization can infuriate older  East Germans. In a short study for the German Federal Ministry of Economics, my co-author and I described the Treuhandanstalt as a “bad bank” in a strikingly divided German remembrance culture.[10] As a kind of a dystopic myth, in the eyes of many elder East Germans, the Treuhand stands for everything that went wrong after the unexpected downfall of socialism. In the East, the high expectations of revolution in 1989 suddenly turned into profound disillusion after reunification at the end of 1990. From their perspective, the Eastern part of the country was completely taken over by Western elites, institutions and ideas – with nearly no room for additional experiences from the East. For this complete takeover, the Treuhand served as the focal point of a debated “unification crisis.”[11]

“Protective Shield” or “Boomerang”?

In the short run, especially this organization had absorbed much of the collective frustrations after ordering mass redundancies and company closures. In no less than two years, nearly 90 percent of state companies were privatized (mostly to Western firms) or shut down; out of 4 million jobs in 1990 only 1 million survived. In this time, the Treuhand functioned as a “protective shield” for the political and economic system of the reunited Germany.[12] But its cultural long-term impact has been remarkable, and may be likened to a cultural boomerang: During the last couple of years, for many Easterners the Treuhand has transformed into a cultural symbol of submission and liquidation. Nowadays, it marks a striking cultural distance many Easterners are expressing concerning the political and economic institutions.

Overcoming the “End of History”?

This explains the fears of “reopening” Pandora’s box. But how might we move on from this point, especially as historians of contemporary history? Until recently, the year 1990 marked the notorious “end of history” in historical research – with reunification as a national happy ending to a long and dark German “special path” in the “age of extremes.”[13] Even these old historical narratives demonstrate that the disciplinary barrier of 1990 is outdated. If contemporary history claims to be a “history of our present problems,” then we need to end  the “end of history.”[14] Discussing the times of transformation after 1990, especially distanced and source-oriented historians could provide overheated public debate with sobre empirical research, differentiated perspectives and, most of all, new narratives beyond the old stereotypes. Ultimately, we might even be able to offer some new leitmotifs, ones able to intertwine the still-divided histories of the GDR and post-GDR, of East and West Germany, but also of Germany and Eastern and Western Europe. Perhaps we might even be able to bring them together into a broader picture. Thus, perhaps the fears of what lies in Pandora’s box are unfounded.[15]

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Böick, Marcus: Die Treuhand. Idee – Praxis – Erfahrung 1990 – 1994. Göttingen: Wallstein, 2018.
  • Großbölting, Thomas, und Christoph Lorke, eds. Deutschland seit 1990. Wege in die Vereinigungsgesellschaft. Stuttgart: Franz Steiner Verlag, 2018.
  • Jarausch, Konrad H., ed. United Germany. Debating Processes and Prospects. New York: Berghahn, 2013.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] Richard Schröder, “Dann ist die SPD auf dem Weg zur Sekte,” Welt, 17 October 2018, https://www.welt.de/debatte/kommentare/plus182243590/Wahrheitskommission-Richard-Schroeder-distanziert-sich-von-der-SPD.html (last accessed 28 October 2018).
[2] Petra Köpping, Integriert doch erstmal uns! Eine Streitschrift für den Osten (Berlin: Ch. Links Verlag, 2018).
[3] Markus Decker, “Debatte vor dem 3. Oktober. Jetzt entscheidet sich, ob dieses Land zusammengehört,” Berliner Zeitung 30 September 2018, https://www.berliner-zeitung.de/politik/debatte-vor-dem-3–oktober–jetzt-entscheidet-sich–ob-dieses-land-zusammengehoert–31372758 (last accessed 28 October 2018).
[4] Kerstin Schwenn, “Traum, Trauma und Treuhand,” Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung 3 October 2018, http://www.faz.net/aktuell/wirtschaft/mehr-wirtschaft/die-treuhand-machte-schnell-zu-schnell-fuer-viele-15816815.html  (last accessed 28 October 2018); Karl-Heinz Paqué, “Der Osten braucht Politik, nicht Mitleid,” Welt, 30 September 2018, https://www.welt.de/wirtschaft/article181718570/Karl-Heinz-Paque-Der-Osten-braucht-Politik-nicht-Mitleid.html (last accessed 28 October 2018); Dierk Hoffmann, “Transformation einer Volkswirtschaft“, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, 17 September 2018, http://www.faz.net/aktuell/politik/inland/transformation-rolle-der-treuhand-wird-einseitig-belichtet-15790822.html (last accessed 28 October 2018).
[5] Martin Dulig, “Mit den Augen des Ostens,” Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, 21 October 2018, http://www.faz.net/aktuell/politik/inland/bewertung-der-nachwendezeit-mit-den-augen-des-ostens-15846887.html (last accessed 28 October 2018);
“Thüringens Regierungschef will Treuhandgeschichte aufarbeiten lassen,” Zeit-Online, 27 August 2018, https://www.zeit.de/politik/deutschland/2018-08/bodo-ramelow-treuhand-aufarbeitung-ddr (last accessed 28 October 2018).
[6] Jo Harper, “East Germany: It’s not just the economy, stupid!,” Deutsche Welle, 13 September 2018): https://www.dw.com/en/east-germany-its-not-just-the-economy-stupid/a-45454241 (last accessed 28 October 2018).
[7] See Naomi Klein’s famous and much debated, The Shock Doctrine. The Rise of Disaster Capitalism (London: Penguin Books, 2007).
[8] See for example: Birgit Breuel, Michael C. Burda, eds., Ohne historisches Vorbild. Die Treuhandanstalt 1990 bis 1994. Eine kritische Würdigung (Berlin: Bostelmann & Siebenhaaar Verlag, 2005).
[9] An Example: Dirk Laabs, Der deutsche Goldrausch. Die wahre Geschichte der Treuhand (München: Pantheon Verlag, 2012).
[10] For a more detailed analysis, see: Marcus Böick, Constantin Goschler, Wahrnehmung und Bewertung der Arbeit der Treuhandanstalt (Bochum: Federal Ministry of Economics, 2017), https://www.bmwi.de/Redaktion/DE/Publikationen/Studien/wahrnehmung-bewertung-der-arbeit-der-treuhandanstalt-lang.pdf?__blob=publicationFile&v=24 (last accessed 28 October 2018).
[11] Jürgen Kocka, Vereinigungskrise. Zur Geschichte der Gegenwart (Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1995).
[12] Wolfgang Seibel, Verwaltete Illusionen. Die Privatisierung der DDR-Wirtschaft durch die Treuhandanstalt und ihre Nachfolger 1990-2000 (Frankfurt/New York: Campus Verlag, 2005).
[13] Francis Fukuyama, The End of History and the Last Man (London/New York: Penguin, 1992); as a kind of a German “milestone” see: Heinrich August Winkler, Der lange Weg nach Westen (München: C.H. Beck, 2002); as a critical account: Christoph Kleßmann, “Deutschland einig Vaterland? Politische und gesellschaftliche Verwerfungen im Prozess der deutschen Vereinigung,” Zeithistorische Forschungen/Studies in Contemporary History 8 (2009), H. 1: https://zeithistorische-forschungen.de/1-2009/id=4555 (last accessed 28 October 2018).
[14] Philipp Ther, Die neue Ordnung auf dem alten Kontinent. Geschichte des neoliberalen Europa (Berlin: Suhrkamp, 2014); Norbert Frei, Dietmar Süß, eds., Privatisierung. Idee und Praxis seit den 1970er Jahren (Göttingen: Wallstein, 2012); for further reading: Marcus Böick und Angela Siebold, “Die Jüngste als Sorgenkind? Plädoyer für eine jüngste Zeitgeschichte als Varianz- und Kontextgeschichte von Übergängen,” Deutschland Archiv (2011): http://www.bpb.de/geschichte/zeitgeschichte/deutschlandarchiv/54133/juengste-zeitgeschichte (last accessed 28 October 2018).
[15] Ilko-Sascha Kowalczuk, “Und was hast du bis 1989 getan?,” Süddeutsche Zeitung, 23. Oktober 2018, https://www.sueddeutsche.de/kultur/ddr-geschichte-aufarbeitung-1.4179958?reduced=true (last accessed 28 October 2018).

_____________________

Image Credits

Berlin, Construction Work in front of the Treuhandanstalt © Bundesarchiv, B 145 Bild-F088842-0025, Thurn, Joachim F., CC-BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

Recommended Citation

Böick, Marcus: Pandora’s Box Reopened? Debating Germany after 1990. In: Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 40, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-13148.

Editorial Responsibility

Moritz Hoffmann / Marko Demantowsky (Team Basel)

Es scheint eine unendliche Geschichte. Fast dreißig Jahre nach der Vereinigung diskutiert Deutschland über Unterschiede zwischen Ost und West. Nach Jahren der Stille hat der Aufstieg des Rechtspopulismus die Debatten über ostdeutsche “Abweichungen” sowie deren Ursachen erneut angefacht. Gerade Zeithistoriker*innen könnten eine wichtige Rolle spielen, wenn es darum geht, eine differenzierte Debatte zu führen. Insbesondere durch die Entwicklung neuer Perspektiven und neuer Erzählungen für die allerjüngste deutsche Geschichte, die letztlich das erschöpfte wie erschöpfende Denken in Stereotypen und Schuldkategorien überwinden helfen.

Wer wagt es, die Büchse öffnen?

Betrachtet man die öffentlichen Diskussionen, scheint es, als habe jemand die Büchse der Pandora zu öffnen versucht. Der frühere SPD-Volkskammer-Fraktionschef Richard Schröder schien empört. Scharf griff Schröder seine Genossin Petra Köpping an, die sächsische Staatsministerin für Gleichstellung und Integration.[1] Nach einem Verriss ihres im Osten ungemein erfolgreichen Buches “Integriert doch erstmal uns!“,[2] drohte Schröder sogar, seine Partei zu verlassen. Was war passiert? Köpping fordert eine kritische “Aufarbeitung” der (ost-)deutschen Geschichte. Die auf die ökonomische “Schock-Therapie” zurückzuführenden kulturellen Beschädigungen in den frühen 1990er-Jahren sollten Gegenstand öffentlicher wie wissenschaftlicher Debatten werden. Insbesondere die Rolle der Treuhand – der von westdeutschen Managern geleiteten Agentur zur Privatisierung der 8.500 Planwirtschafts-Betriebe – sollte Fokus einer “Wahrheits- und Versöhnungskommission” sein.[3]

Das ausgegrabene Kriegsbeil

Mit dieser Forderung war das Kriegsbeil ausgegraben: Konservative, liberale und meist westdeutsche Verteidiger sowie linke und meist ostdeutsche Kritiker eilten schnurstracks in ihre Schützengräben auf dem Schlachtfeld. Während die erste Gruppe den Wirtschaftsumbau als außerordentliche wie alternativlose Erfolgsgeschichte auf den verrotteten Trümmern der Planwirtschaft verteidigt,[4] erkennen ihre Gegner in diesen Vorgängen kaum mehr als ein brutales, von westlichen Kapitalisten gelenktes Unrechts-Regime, dessen neoliberale “Schock-Therapie” zur Enteignung hilfloser Ostdeutscher geführt habe.[5]

Der Populismus-Schock

Es scheint, als kämen alte Konflikte mit Macht wieder zurück – und dies aus dem “Blauen” heraus: Nach überraschenden Wahlerfolgen der rechtspopulistischen Alternative für Deutschland (AfD) sowie Ausschreitungen in Chemnitz im August 2018 brach eine Debatte über langfristige Ost-West-Differenzen wieder auf.[6] Die lange beschworene “innere Einheit” erschien als Chimäre. Unversehens begann der Ursachenstreit: Sind dies (intergenerationelle) Langzeitfolgen der Sozialisation durch das kollektivistische SED-Regime und seine repressiven Institutionen, die die Demokratiefähigkeit der Bevölkerung nachhaltig beschädigt habe? Oder ist diese “Ost-West-Kluft” Resultat der massiven gesellschaftlichen Umbrüche und kulturellen Herausforderungen aus der Zeit nach 1990, in der viele Ostdeutsche sich massiv mit den Folgen einer kapitalistischen “Schocktherapie” konfrontiert sahen?[7]

Zwei Erzbösewichte

Damit wurde die geschichtspolitische Suche nach den “Schuldigen” wieder eröffnet. Zugespitzt stehen sich zwei Erzbösewichte gegenüber: In der einen Ecke das SED-Regime, das bis 1990 eine heruntergewirtschaftete Planwirtschaft betrieb, aber nie die harten Konsequenzen seines vier Jahrzehnte währenden Missmanagements ziehen musste.[8] Andererseits die Treuhandanstalt und die von ihr beschleunigten Massenprivatisierungen auf dem Weg von der Plan- zur Marktwirtschaft, die die Ost-Gesellschaft mit Deindustrialisierung, Massenarbeitslosigkeit und Abwanderung erschütterten.[9] Zwischen beiden Polen bleibt wenig Raum für Differenzierung und Dialog. Im Feld der jüngsten Zeitgeschichte scheinen “Licht” und “Finsternis” häufig die einzig möglichen Zustände zu sein.

Eine erinnerungskulturelle “Bad Bank“

Die Treuhand erscheint als wichtiges Puzzleteil. Während sie jedoch Westdeutschen oder Jüngeren in der heutigen Zeit kaum noch ein Begriff ist, kann schon die Nennung des Namens ein ostdeutsches Publikum in Aufregung versetzen. In einer Studie für das Bundeswirtschaftsministerium haben wir die Treuhand als eine “Bad Bank” einer abgetrennten Ost-Erinnerungskultur beschrieben.[10] Wie ein Negativ-Mythos steht sie für ältere Ostdeutsche für all diejenigen Dinge, die nach dem Zusammenbruch der DDR falsch gelaufen seien. Die Erwartungen der Revolution 1989 waren binnen Jahresfrist in Enttäuschungen umgeschlagen. In den Augen vieler Ostdeutscher wurde ihr Teil Deutschlands vollständig von westdeutschen Eliten, Institutionen und Ideen dominiert, wobei für abweichende Erfahrungen oder Ideen kein Raum blieb. Bei dieser “Übernahme” spielte die Treuhand in der “Vereinigungskrise” eine Schlüsselrolle.[11]

“Schutzschild” oder “Boomerang“?

Kurzfristig sollte die Organisation die erheblichen Frustrationen über die von ihr verkündeten Massenentlassungen und Betriebsschließungen auf sich ziehen. In nicht einmal zwei Jahren hatte die Treuhand im Eiltempo 90 Prozent der Staatsbetriebe meist an westdeutsche Investoren privatisiert oder abgewickelt; von den vier Millionen Arbeitsplätzen waren nur eine Million geblieben. In dieser Zeit schien die Organisation als “Schutzschild” für das politische wie wirtschaftliche System zu wirken, das den Unmut absorbierte.[12] Jedoch erscheinen auch die kulturellen Langzeiteffekte bedenkenswert, die wie ein Boomerang-Effekt anmuten: So hat sich die Treuhand in ein Symbol der “Unterwerfung” und “Abwicklung” durch den Westen verwandelt. Bis in die Gegenwart lässt sich hieran die Distanz festmachen, die viele Ostdeutsche gegenüber der politischen wie wirtschaftlichen Ordnung artikulieren.

Nach dem “Ende der Geschichte”

All dies erklärt die Ängste davor, die Büchse der Pandora erneut zu öffnen. Aber wie sollten Zeithistoriker*innen damit umgehen? Bis vor kurzem schien “1990” für die Zunft das tatsächliche “Ende der Geschichte” zu markieren. Die Einheit erschien als nationales Happy End nach dunklem “Sonderweg” durch das “Zeitalter der Extreme”.[13] Gerade diese Erzählformeln deuten an, dass diese Zäsursetzung überholt ist. Wenn die Zeitgeschichte ihrem Anspruch als “Problemgeschichte der Gegenwart” gerecht werden will, muss sie dieses “Ende der Geschichte” überwinden.[14] Der Rückblick sollte es distanziert-quellenorientierten Historiker*innen ermöglichen, der Debatte neue Impulse zu verleihen – durch empirische Forschungen, differenzierte Perspektiven und neue Erzählangebote jenseits altbekannter Stereotype. So können wir neue Leitmotive entwickeln, um die getrennten Geschichten von DDR und Nach-DDR, von Ost- und Westdeutschland sowie von Deutschland als auch von West- und Osteuropa miteinander zu verknüpfen und in ein weites Panorama einzubetten. Und am Ende muss auch niemand mehr Angst vor einer Büchse haben.[15]

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Böick, Marcus: Die Treuhand. Idee – Praxis – Erfahrung 1990 – 1994. Göttingen: Wallstein, 2018.
  • Großbölting, Thomas, und Christoph Lorke, eds. Deutschland seit 1990. Wege in die Vereinigungsgesellschaft. Stuttgart: Franz Steiner Verlag, 2018.
  • Jarausch, Konrad H., ed. United Germany. Debating Processes and Prospects. New York: Berghahn, 2013.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] Richard Schröder, “Dann ist die SPD auf dem Weg zur Sekte,” Welt, 17. Oktober 2018, https://www.welt.de/debatte/kommentare/plus182243590/Wahrheitskommission-Richard-Schroeder-distanziert-sich-von-der-SPD.html (last accessed 28 October 2018).
[2] Petra Köpping, Integriert doch erstmal uns! Eine Streitschrift für den Osten (Berlin: Ch. Links Verlag, 2018).
[3] Markus Decker, “Debatte vor dem 3. Oktober. Jetzt entscheidet sich, ob dieses Land zusammengehört,” Berliner Zeitung 30. September 2018, https://www.berliner-zeitung.de/politik/debatte-vor-dem-3–oktober–jetzt-entscheidet-sich–ob-dieses-land-zusammengehoert–31372758 (last accessed 28 October 2018).
[4] Kerstin Schwenn, “Traum, Trauma und Treuhand,” Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung 3. Oktober 2018), http://www.faz.net/aktuell/wirtschaft/mehr-wirtschaft/die-treuhand-machte-schnell-zu-schnell-fuer-viele-15816815.html  (last accessed 28 October 2018); Karl-Heinz Paqué, “Der Osten braucht Politik, nicht Mitleid,” Welt, 30. September 2018, https://www.welt.de/wirtschaft/article181718570/Karl-Heinz-Paque-Der-Osten-braucht-Politik-nicht-Mitleid.html (last accessed 28 October 2018); Dierk Hoffmann, “Transformation einer Volkswirtschaft“, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, 17. September 2018, http://www.faz.net/aktuell/politik/inland/transformation-rolle-der-treuhand-wird-einseitig-belichtet-15790822.html (last accessed 28 October 2018).
[5] Martin Dulig, “Mit den Augen des Ostens,” Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, 21. Otober 2018, http://www.faz.net/aktuell/politik/inland/bewertung-der-nachwendezeit-mit-den-augen-des-ostens-15846887.html (last accessed 28 October 2018);
“Thüringens Regierungschef will Treuhandgeschichte aufarbeiten lassen,” Zeit-Online, 27. August 2018, https://www.zeit.de/politik/deutschland/2018-08/bodo-ramelow-treuhand-aufarbeitung-ddr (last accessed 28 October 2018).
[6] Jo Harper, “East Germany: It’s not just the economy, stupid!,” Deutsche Welle, 13. September 2018): https://www.dw.com/en/east-germany-its-not-just-the-economy-stupid/a-45454241 (last accessed 28 October 2018).
[7] Vgl. das bekannte und intensive diskutierte Buch von: Naomi Klein, The Shock Doctrine. The Rise of Disaster Capitalism (London: Penguin Books, 2007).
[8] Exemplarisch hierfür: Birgit Breuel, Michael C. Burda, eds., Ohne historisches Vorbild. Die Treuhandanstalt 1990 bis 1994. Eine kritische Würdigung (Berlin: Bostelmann & Siebenhaaar Verlag, 2005).
[9] Ebenso exemplarisch: Dirk Laabs, Der deutsche Goldrausch. Die wahre Geschichte der Treuhand (München: Pantheon Verlag, 2012).
[10] Weiterführend siehe: Marcus Böick, Constantin Goschler, Wahrnehmung und Bewertung der Arbeit der Treuhandanstalt (Bochum: Federal Ministry of Economics, 2017), https://www.bmwi.de/Redaktion/DE/Publikationen/Studien/wahrnehmung-bewertung-der-arbeit-der-treuhandanstalt-lang.pdf?__blob=publicationFile&v=24 (last accessed 28 October 2018).
[11] Jürgen Kocka, Vereinigungskrise. Zur Geschichte der Gegenwart (Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1995).
[12] Wolfgang Seibel, Verwaltete Illusionen. Die Privatisierung der DDR-Wirtschaft durch die Treuhandanstalt und ihre Nachfolger 1990-2000 (Frankfurt/New York: Campus Verlag, 2005).
[13] Francis Fukuyama, The End of History and the Last Man (London/New York: Penguin, 1992); als ein prominentes Beispiel hierfür: Heinrich August Winkler, Der lange Weg nach Westen (München: C.H. Beck, 2002); eine kritische Diagnose: Christoph Kleßmann, “Deutschland einig Vaterland? Politische und gesellschaftliche Verwerfungen im Prozess der deutschen Vereinigung,” Zeithistorische Forschungen/Studies in Contemporary History 8 (2009), H. 1: https://zeithistorische-forschungen.de/1-2009/id=4555 (last accessed 28 October 2018).
[14] Philipp Ther, Die neue Ordnung auf dem alten Kontinent. Geschichte des neoliberalen Europa (Berlin: Suhrkamp, 2014); Norbert Frei, Dietmar Süß, eds., Privatisierung. Idee und Praxis seit den 1970er Jahren (Göttingen: Wallstein, 2012); weiterführend hierzu auch: Marcus Böick und Angela Siebold, “Die Jüngste als Sorgenkind? Plädoyer für eine jüngste Zeitgeschichte als Varianz- und Kontextgeschichte von Übergängen,” Deutschland Archiv (2011): http://www.bpb.de/geschichte/zeitgeschichte/deutschlandarchiv/54133/juengste-zeitgeschichte (last accessed 28 October 2018).
[15] Ilko-Sascha Kowalczuk, “Und was hast du bis 1989 getan?,” Süddeutsche Zeitung, 23. Oktober 2018, https://www.sueddeutsche.de/kultur/ddr-geschichte-aufarbeitung-1.4179958?reduced=true (last accessed 28 October 2018).

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Berlin, Bauarbeiten vor der Treuhandanstalt © Bundesarchiv, B 145 Bild-F088842-0025, Thurn, Joachim F., CC-BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Böick, Marcus: Die Büchse der Pandora? Deutschland nach 1990. In: Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 40, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-13148.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Moritz Hoffmann / Marko Demantowsky (Team Basel)

Copyright (c) 2018 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 6 (2018) 40
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-13148

Tags: , ,

1 reply »

  1. To all our non-English speaking readers we recommend the automatic DeepL-Translator. Just copy and paste.

    For someone like me, who was born twenty-five years ago in the beginning of the 90s, a separated East and West Germany is history, a reunited country is all I know. The German reunification is something I have only encountered through stories told by my parents and their friends, through often very emotional videos on Youtube of people climbing the Berlin wall on November 9th 1989 and briefly as a topic in my History classes in school. However, the Treuhandanstalt was an institution I had not heard of until much later during my studies in college. It is of course possible that I might be an exception. Nevertheless, as far as I know, most of my peers, or in oder to apply the current buzzword for this generation “the millennials“, have never heard of the Treuhand. This is mostly due to the fact that many educational plans in Germany do not include the years after 1989/1990 in their catalogue of requirements.[1]

    However, the increasing electoral successes of the “Alternative für Deutschland“ in Germany’s east and incidents like the latest escalation of demonstrations in Chemnitz in August 2018 have redirected the publics eye to the complex issue of Germany`s reunification and its consequences. Current politics confront us with a time and a process, many seem to have forgotten. Therefore, Marcus Boeick asks for an essential reevaluation of the reunification of East and West Germany since 1990. A debate, apparently so delicate, that reopening it can be compared with releasing the evils and sicknesses contained in Pandora`s Box.

    The central problem seems to be that two irreconcilable points of view dominate the debate. On the one hand, East Germans blame the “shock-therapy“ which had been administered to the East German economy after 1990. Boeick identifies the ruthless efforts for privatisation of the Treuhandanstalt as the main source of discontent for East Germans, especially of the older generations. Therefore, nowadays the Treuhand is often associated with heteronomy and submission. On the other hand, West Germans, especially the younger ones, often have not even heard of the Treuhand and are also in other respects ignorant to the problems of the former GDR. Others, would claim that it was not the “hit-and-run makeover“ administered by the Treuhand which lead to current inequality, but that we are facing a necessary long-term consequence of four decades of the SED dictatorship.

    Hence, Boeick rightly asks for a more balanced and informed discussion. Admittedly, thirty years have passed since the fall of the Berlin wall, only one decade less than the GDR existed. However, the misunderstandings between East and West have not disappeared. The reasons are more complex and any Historian knows they go beyond the years 1949 and 1990. Current issues are numerous. For instance, unemployment and brain drain are much more severe in Germany’s east than in the west. Furthermore, states like Mecklenburg-Vorpommern or Brandenburg have to battle an increasing depopulation and overageing especially in the rural areas, whereas Baden-Württemberg or the city states are facing more and more intense housing problems and rising rents due to over population.

    Therefore, regardless of current or passed differences, wether concerning historical reasons or nowadays problems, it seems crucial to revisit and reinitiate the reunification debate. Democracy is nothing but communication and often dispute.

    Accordingly, we have to acknowledge that different regions have different problems and therefore different points of view. Moreover, it seems crucial that we talk to each other and that we do not create an artificial “us“ and “they“. This is even more important with regard to the younger generations, who need to be informed and educated. In order to enable our young generations to understand the present, we need to talk about the past i.e. the reunification, including the Treuhand. This is only one of the few reasons why student exchange programmes between east and west are still reasonable.2 Through this type of exchange programme students can engage with history and its consequences in real life and experience that every statement can be assessed from a different perspective. Therefore, the reunification and the years after 1989/90 are a great example of how the demand for multi-perspectivity in History classes can not only be conveyed through the analysis of texts or images but through the interaction with contemporary witnesses and local history.[3]

    Thus, understanding that Germany’s history did not end in 1990, entails adapting educational plans. It also means, initiating a public conversation about the past which might facilitated a conversation about the future. The present issue is a brilliant example of how historiography can take away the fears of opening Pandora’s Box. Facing Pandora’s evils might even facilitate the healing of the collective psyche. Thus, historians as well as teachers of History should raise their voice more often in order to help the general public understand its present and help shape its future.

    References
    [1] For instance, the new education plan for Baden-Württemberg from 2016 does not schedule the German (or international) history after 1990 at all. “Gymnasium-Geschichte.“ Bildungspläne Baden-Württemberg, http://www.bildungsplaene-bw.de/bildungsplan,Lde/Startseite/BP2016BW_ALLG/BP2016BW_ALLG_GYM_G. Accessed 10 January 2019.
    [2] The delegate for east Germany, Iris Gleicke, has claimed that such exchange programmes had become obsolete. In my opinion, this is not the case, especially with regard to the recent events (s.o.). For Gleicke’s demands see for instance: “Gleicke Hält Ost-West Schüleraustausch für Unzeitgemäß.“ Zeit Online, 16. Januar 2018, http://www.zeit.de/politik/deutschland/2018-01/ostbeauftragte-ost-west-schueleraustausch-idee-reaktionen. Accessed 10 January 2019.
    [3] For the demand of multi-perspectivity in History classes see: Bergmann, Klaus. Multiperspektivität. Geschichte Selber Denken, 2007, p. 66.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest