Groot Constantia: Wine or Slaves?

Groot Constantia: Wein oder Sklaven?


Groot Constantia is the iconic South African colonial estate. Located centrally in the Cape Peninsula, on the slopes of the Table Mountain among oak trees, it is immediately recognisable and a very popular tourist destination. In the reception area of the manor house, there are two display units on either side of the doorway. One celebrates Constantia’s wine history – 333 years of continuous production — the other the story of its slaves. For most visitors the wine is the attraction, but Constantia needs to be commemorated equally for what it perversely symbolises as part of South Africa’s human heritage.

Slaves and Wine

Hendrik Cloete around 1788, unknown artist. Public Domain via DBNL.

Hendrik Cloete (1725-1799), who owned Groot Constantia from 1778 until his death, is credited for  pioneering viticulture in the Cape in the eighteenth century. A widely reproduced sketch (c. 1788) depicts him smoking at a card table with his (unidentified) personal slave propping up the end of a very long clay pipe. The picture very well conveys both the man and his status as the richest colonist in the Cape.[1]

As Cloete expanded his cultivation of vines and increased the production of quality wine, he constantly added to the number of slaves that he owned by regular purchases. He was one of the Cape’s largest slave owners and employed at least 50 male and female slaves at Groot Constantia, one of ten farms in his possession. He was an astute owner, who not only increased the number of his slaves but also the value of their labour. Early on, he purchased a new cellar man because he was dissatisfied with the previous slave’s work. So satisfied was he with the replacement, April van de Kaap, that Cloete later granted him his freedom in his will. He was also apparently prepared to work alongside his slaves, explaining that he never left the cellar during the pressing season – while his slave workers, however, were picking the grapes in the hot vineyards.[2]

Half a century later, twenty years after the end of slavery at the Cape in 1838, one of Hendrik’s grandsons, Jacob Pieter Cloete, complained:

“I used to have up to one hundred and fifty slaves! And what do you think? Most of them were used to us so much that they were like family members. And now we have such trouble with these people.”

In 1858, he employed only between ten and twenty labourers.[3] Constantia wines became famous in the period of the Cloetes. Much of the corresponding detail is contained in the correspondence between Hendrik with the Cape Governor and the Lords Seventeen of the Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie (VOC). He constantly deplored the company’s trade monopoly and his inability to export enough wine to make a profit. It is clear, however, that the slaves contributed significantly to the reputation of the Groot Constantia wine.

Those in Bondage

Groot Constantia brings many facets of slave life into clearer focus. The insolvency of another of Hendrik Cloete’s grandson’s estates in 1836 resulted in his slaves being auctioned on a farm neighbouring Constantia. A particularly poignant record is that of the sale of Andries of the Cape, aged 3, to Betje, who was a free woman. She was almost certainly his mother.[4] It is difficult to imagine a more telling commentary on life as a Cape slave.

Eighteenth-century slave life could be very precarious. Cloete records the death of many able-bodied male and female slaves from jaundice in 1773. There was never any doubt that they were chattels to be disposed of at their owner’s whim. In his will, for example, Cloete distributed slaves to family members as gifts: all of his granddaughters to whom no slave girl had been bequeathed were given the right to choose a slave girl for themselves. The will also records the names of many slaves whom he either desired to protect from being sold by his estate in their old age, or to reward, like April, in some way. He emphatically desired that male and females slaves who had formed relationships should not be separated, “even less should the children who are not yet twelve years old be separated from their mothers but that such children… be included [with their mothers] at a reasonable price.”[5]

There was a variety of slave occupations. August van Bengale and Sabina van de Kaap were body servants, probably of Hendrik Cloete and his wife, Hester Anna Lourens. The most prominent of his slaves were the mandoor [foreman], the cellar hand and the coachman. There was a brandy distiller, wagon drivers, carpenter, tailor of women’s clothing, fishermen, a chef and his assistant, two house slaves, four female house slaves, a stable-slave, a horse-slave, a cattle-herd, a shepherd, two gardeners, three cellar-slaves and 30 labourers.[6]

Maturing Legacy

The human legacy of 153 years of slavery at Groot Constantia is still widely evident 180 years after emancipation. A Cape Town directory will reveal family names for every month of the year. These names were common in the Cloete records (all but June and December). Also common at Constantia were Biblical names (Anna, David, Eve, Goliath, Jacob, Sarah) and classical allusions (Amour, Bacchus, Diana, Fortune, Gallant, Nero).

Apartheid spatial planning meant that Groot Constantia fell into a white “group area” and many of the descendants of the people whose families had always lived in the Constantia valley were forcibly removed and scattered to bleak areas on the periphery of Cape Town. Groot Constantia itself is now secured under the Groot Constantia Trust, but progress towards compensation and restitution of land remains very slow.[7] As Anna Bohlin has observed, the histories recorded in land claims by their nature refer to events that mostly took place in what are today still white areas.

Public history in this context “carries great potential for bringing into public consciousness the way that apartheid affected, and continues to affect, everyday life for vast numbers of South Africans.”[8] For the estate, its museum, restaurants, farm and winery, one needs to ask both which “public” constitutes their audience and which “history” they claim to represent.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Schutte, G.J. (ed.). Hendrik Cloete, Groot Constantia and the VOC 1778-1799: Documents from the Swellengrebel Archive. Cape Town: Van Riebeeck Society, 2003.
  • Shell, Robert C-H. Children of Bondage. A Social History of Slave Society at the Cape of Good Hope, 1652-1838. Hanover, NH: Wesleyan University Press, 1994.
  • Dane, Philippa, and Sydney-Anne Wallace. The Great Houses of Constantia. Cape Town: Don Nelson, 1981.

Web Resources

_____________________

 [1] As Nigel Worden asks in an exercise for children: “What does the picture tell us about Cloete?”, see Nigel Worden and Kerry Ward, The Chains that Bind Us. A History of Slavery at the Cape. Teachers’ Notes for the Source Pack (Cape Town: University of Cape Town, undated).
[2] G.J. Schutte, “Introduction,” in Hendrik Cloete, Groot Constantia and the VOC 1778-1799. Documents from the Swellengrebel Archive, ed. G.J. Schutte (Cape Town: Van Riebeeck Society, 2003), 15 and 23.
[3] Alexey Vysheslavtsev’s account in Boris Gorelik, ‘An Entirely Different World.’ Russian Visitors to the Cape, 1797-1870(Cape Town: Van Riebeeck Society, 2015), 132.
[4] Philippa Dane and Sydney-Anne Wallace, The Great Houses of Constantia (Cape Town: Don Nelson, 1981), 103-105.
[5] G.J. Schutte, “Introduction,” in Hendrik Cloete, Groot Constantia and the VOC 1778-1799. Documents from the Swellengrebel Archive, ed. G.J. Schutte (Cape Town: Van Riebeeck Society, 2003), 309, https://slavery.iziko.org.za/cloeteera (last accessed 9 november 2018).
[6] G.J. Schutte, “Introduction,” 300-308.
[7] South African History Online, “Timeline of Land Dispossession and Restitution in South Africa 1995-2013,” https://www.sahistory.org.za/topic/timeline-land-dispossession-and-restitution-south-africa-1995-2013 (last accessed 9 november 2018). See for instance: Polity. Restitution of Land Rights Act: Claim for restitution of land rights: Erf 4673 Constantia in Cape Town, Western Cape: Comments invited: http://www.polity.org.za/article/restitution-of-land-rights-act-claim-for-restitution-of-land-rights-erf-4673-constantia-in-cape-town-western-cape-comments-invited-2018-04-05 (last accessed 9 november 2018).
[8] Anna Bohlin, “Claiming land and making memory: Engaging with the past in land restitution,” in History Making and Present Day Politics, ed. Hans Erik Stolten (Uppsala: Nordiska Afrikainstitute, 2007), 114-128.

_____________________

Image Credits

Groot Constantia Manor House © 2019 Rob Siebörger.

Recommended Citation

Siebörger, Rob: Groot Constantia: Wine or Slaves? In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 1, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-13195.

Editorial Responsibility

Moritz Hoffmann / Marko Demantowsky (Team Basel)

Groot Constantia ist ein ikonisches Kolonialanwesen Südafrikas. Zentral auf der Kaphalbinsel, an den Hängen des Tafelbergs unter Eichen gelegen, ist das Gut ein sehr beliebtes und von weither sichtbares Reiseziel. Im Empfangsbereich des Herrenhauses flankieren zwei Vitrinen die Eingangstüre. Eine erinnert an die Geschichte der Weinproduktion auf Constantia — an 333 Jahre fortwährende Kelterei — die andere an die Geschichte der hier gehaltenen Sklaven. Obwohl die meisten BesucherInnen wegen des Weins nach Constantia kommen, muss das Gut ebenso für das, was es perverserweise als Teil des menschlichen Vermächtnisses Südafrikas symbolisiert, in Erinnerung behalten werden.

Sklaven und Wein

Hendrik Cloete um 1788, Zeichner unbekannt. Gemeinfrei via DBNL.

Hendrik Cloete (1725-1799), in dessen Besitz sich Groot Constantia von 1778 bis zu seinem Tod befand, gilt als Pionier des Weinbaus am Kap im 18. Jahrhundert. Eine weit verbreitete Skizze um 1788 zeigt ihn beim Rauchen am Kartentisch, wobei sein (nicht identifizierter) persönlicher Sklave das Ende einer sehr langen Tonpfeife stützt. Das Bild vermittelt sowohl einen Eindruck des Mannes als auch seines Status’ als reichster Kolonist am Kap.[1]

Als Cloete seinen Weinanbau ausweitete und die Produktion von Qualitätswein steigerte, erhöhte er auch die Zahl der Sklav*innen. Er war einer der größten Sklav*innenhalter am Kap und beschäftigte mindestens 50 männliche und weibliche Sklav*innen in Groot Constantia, eines von zehn Gütern in seinem Besitz. Er war ein kluger Besitzer, der nicht nur die Zahl seiner Sklav*innen, sondern auch den Wert ihrer Arbeit erhöhte. Schon früh kaufte er einen neuen Fassmacher, weil er mit der Arbeit des vorherigen Sklaven unzufrieden war. Mit dem Ersatz, April van de Kaap, war er hingegen so zufrieden, dass Cloete ihm später in seinem Testament die Freiheit gewährte. Anscheinend war er auch bereit, mit seinen Sklav*innen zusammenzuarbeiten und erklärte, dass er während der Presszeit den Keller nie verließ — während seine Sklav*innen in der glühenden Hitze die Ernte einfuhren [2].

Ein halbes Jahrhundert später, zwanzig Jahre nach dem Ende der Sklaverei am Kap im Jahr 1838, beschwerte sich einer von Hendriks Enkeln, Jacob Pieter Cloete:

“Früher hatte ich bis zu 150 Sklaven! Und was denkst du? Die meisten von ihnen waren uns so sehr vertraut, dass sie wie Familienmitglieder waren. Und jetzt haben wir solche Probleme mit diesen Leuten.”

1858 beschäftigte er nur noch zehn bis zwanzig Arbeiter*innen.[3] Constantia-Weine wurden in der Zeit der Cloetes berühmt. Die entsprechenden Details sind weitgehend der Korrespondenz zwischen Hendrik mit dem Kapgouverneur und den Heeren XVII der Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie (VOC) zu entnehmen. Cloete beklagte sich ständig über das Handelsmonopol des Unternehmens und dessen Unfähigkeit, genügend Wein gewinnbringend zu exportieren. Fest steht jedoch, dass die Sklav*innen wesentlich zum Ruf des Groot-Constantia-Weins beigetragen haben.

Leibeigenschaft

Neben der Weingeschichte erhellt Groot Constantia viele Facetten des Sklav*innenlebens in Südafrika. Die Insolvenz eines weiteren Weinguts im Besitz von Hendrik Cloetes Enkel im Jahr 1836 führte zur Versteigerung seiner Sklav*innen auf einem Hof in der Nähe von Constantia. Besonders eindrucksvoll ist der Verkauf der dreijährigen Andries of the Cape an Betje, einer freien Frau: Sie war mit ziemlicher Sicherheit seine Mutter.[4] Es ist schwer, sich einen aussagekräftigeren Kommentar über das Leben als Kapsklav*in vorzustellen.

Das Sklav*innenleben im 18. Jahrhundert konnte sehr prekär sein. Cloete verzeichnete den Tod vieler kräftiger Sklav*innen an Gelbsucht im Jahr 1773. Es bestanden nie Zweifel, dass es sich bei ihnen um bewegliches Vermögen handelte, das der Lust und Laune ihres Besitzers ausgesetzt war. In seinem Testament beispielsweise verteilte Cloete Sklav*innen an Familienmitglieder als Geschenke: Alle seine Enkeltöchter, denen kein Sklavenmädchen vermacht worden war, erhielten das Recht, ein Sklavenmädchen auszuwählen. Im Testament sind auch die Namen vieler Sklav*innen festgehalten, die Cloete entweder davor schützen wollte, im hohen Lebensalter von seinem Anwesen verkauft zu werden, oder aber die er, wie im Falle von April, in irgendeiner Weise belohnen wollte. Er wünschte nachdrücklich, dass männliche und weibliche Sklav*innen, die Beziehungen aufgebaut hatten, nicht getrennt werden sollten, ebenso sollten “Kinder unter 12 Jahren nicht von ihren Müttern getrennt werden, sondern […] gemeinsam zu einem vernünftigen Preis verkauft werden.”[5]

Sklav*innen füllten eine große Zahl von Berufen. August van Bengale und Sabina van de Kaap waren Leibdiener*innen, wahrscheinlich von Hendrik Cloete und seiner Frau Hester Anna Lourens. Die bekanntesten Sklav*innen waren der mandoor [Vorarbeiter], der Kellergehilfe und der Kutscher. Es gab einen Branntweinbrenner, Wagenfahrer, Schreiner, Damenschneider, Fischer, einen Koch und seine Assistentin, zwei Haussklaven, vier Haussklavinnen, einen Stallknecht, eine Pferdehalterin, einen Viehhirten, einen Hirten, zwei Gärtner, drei Kellersklaven und 30 Arbeiter*innen [6].

Reifendes Vermächtnis

Das menschliche Vermächtnis von 153 Jahren Sklaverei in Groot Constantia ist auch 180 Jahre nach der Emanzipation noch spürbar. Kapstädter Aufzeichnungen enthalten Familiennamen für jeden Monat des Jahres; außer den Monaten Juni und Dezember waren diese auch in den Cloete-Aufzeichnungen üblich. Ebenfalls in Constantia verbreitet waren biblische Namen (Anna, David, Eva, Goliath, Jakob, Sarah) und klassische Anspielungen (Amour, Bacchus, Diana, Fortune, Gallant, Nero).

Die Raumplanung während  der Apartheid hatte zur Folge, dass Groot Constantia in ein weißes “Gruppengebiet” fiel, und viele der Nachkommen jener Familien die schon immer im Constantia-Tal gelebt hatten, gewaltsam vertrieben wurden und in trostlose Gebiete an der Peripherie von Kapstadt umgesiedelt wurden. Die Zukunft von Groot Constantia ist nun dank des Groot Constantia Trust gesichert. Anna Bohlin zufolge geht es jedoch bei der Entschädigung und Rückgabe von Land nur sehr langsam voran.[7] Die Landansprüche beziehen sich auf Ereignisse, die sich hauptsächlich in den heute noch weißen Gebieten ereignet haben.

Die Public History birgt in diesem Zusammenhang “ein großes Potenzial, das Bewusstsein für die Art und Weise zu schärfen, wie die Apartheid für eine große Zahl von Südafrikanern den Alltag beeinflusst hat und weiterhin beeinflusst.”[8] Für das Anwesen, sein Museum, seine Restaurants, seinen Bauernhof und seine Weinkellerei muss man sich sowohl fragen, welche “Public” ihr Publikum darstellt und auch welche “History” sie zu vertreten vorgibt.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Schutte, G.J. (ed.). Hendrik Cloete, Groot Constantia and the VOC 1778-1799: Documents from the Swellengrebel Archive. Cape Town: Van Riebeeck Society, 2003.
  • Shell, Robert C-H. Children of Bondage. A Social History of Slave Society at the Cape of Good Hope, 1652-1838. Hanover, NH: Wesleyan University Press, 1994.
  • Dane, Philippa, and Sydney-Anne Wallace. The Great Houses of Constantia. Cape Town: Don Nelson, 1981.

Webressourcen

_____________________

 [1] Wie Nigel Worden in einer Übung für Kinder fragt: “Was sagt uns dieses Bild über Cloete?”, siehe Nigel Worden and Kerry Ward, The Chains that Bind Us. A History of Slavery at the Cape. Teachers’ Notes for the Source Pack (Cape Town: University of Cape Town, undatiert).
[2] G.J. Schutte, “Introduction,” in Hendrik Cloete, Groot Constantia and the VOC 1778-1799. Documents from the Swellengrebel Archive, ed. G.J. Schutte (Cape Town: Van Riebeeck Society, 2003), 15 und 23.
[3] Alexey Vysheslavtsev’s account in Boris Gorelik, ‘An Entirely Different World.’ Russian Visitors to the Cape, 1797-1870(Cape Town: Van Riebeeck Society, 2015), 132.
[4] Philippa Dane and Sydney-Anne Wallace, The Great Houses of Constantia (Cape Town: Don Nelson, 1981), 103-105.
[5] G.J. Schutte, “Introduction,” in Hendrik Cloete, Groot Constantia and the VOC 1778-1799. Documents from the Swellengrebel Archive, ed. G.J. Schutte (Cape Town: Van Riebeeck Society, 2003), 309, https://slavery.iziko.org.za/cloeteera (letzter Zugriff 9. November 2018).
[6] G.J. Schutte, “Introduction,” 300-308.
[7] South African History Online, “Timeline of Land Dispossession and Restitution in South Africa 1995-2013,” https://www.sahistory.org.za/topic/timeline-land-dispossession-and-restitution-south-africa-1995-2013 (letzter Zugriff 9. November 2018). Siehe exemplarisch: Polity. Restitution of Land Rights Act: Claim for restitution of land rights: Erf 4673 Constantia in Cape Town, Western Cape: Comments invited: http://www.polity.org.za/article/restitution-of-land-rights-act-claim-for-restitution-of-land-rights-erf-4673-constantia-in-cape-town-western-cape-comments-invited-2018-04-05 (letzter Zugriff 9. November 2018).
[8] Anna Bohlin, “Claiming land and making memory: Engaging with the past in land restitution,” in History Making and Present Day Politics, ed. Hans Erik Stolten (Uppsala: Nordiska Afrikainstitute, 2007), 114-128.

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Groot Constantia Manor House © 2019 Rob Siebörger.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Siebörger, Rob: Groot Constantia: Groot Constantia: Wein oder Sklaven? In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 1, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-13195.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Moritz Hoffmann / Marko Demantowsky (Team Basel)

Copyright (c) 2019 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 7 (2019) 1
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-13195

Tags: , , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest