Culture, Civilization and Historical Consciousness

Kultur, Zivilisation und Geschichtsbewusstsein


Revisions to the history curriculum currently under way in British Columbia, Canada replace, among other changes, a senior course on Comparative Civilizations with one entitled Comparative Cultures. A quest for reconciliation with First Nations and respect for Indigenous knowledge helped to shape the educational milieu in which these changes were proposed. What are the implications for students’ understanding of world history, and of historicity more generally?

The Problem with “Civilization”

British Columbia, Canada’s westernmost province, is in the midst of a comprehensive overhaul of its school curriculum, the first since 2006. World history from the fall of Rome to World War I will continue to be taught in the first two years of secondary school (Grades 8 and 9). Before the current reforms many students revisited these topics in an optional senior course entitled “Comparative Civilizations 12”.

Its first requirement, logically enough, was that students be able to “define the term civilization”. The curriculum document then immediately offered a nod to the values built into definitions, requiring that students be able to “determine the biases and ambiguity” in terms such as “civilized, uncivilized, developing, advanced”.[1] Thus the title of the course included a term — civilization — that was to be subjected immediately to critique. Nevertheless, the curriculum depended on the concept and its correlates: students were elsewhere required to “describe interrelationships among cultural transmission, trade and technological advancement” as well as those among “natural environment […], economy, and the growth of civilizations”.[2] In other words, even if they were potentially suspect, the temporal concepts of development, advancement, and growth, were built into the foundations of the subject matter of Comparative Civilizations 12.

The difficulties in discussing the interrelated growth and spread of literacy, knowledge, technology, wealth, health, democracy and education without using the term “civilization” (or something akin to it) are manifest. And yet, the problems posed by the uncritical use of the term are easy to identify. Civilizations achieved their geographic scope by conquering lands occupied by others. They achieved their wealth — on display in the palaces of ruling classes — by plundering those lands and appropriating the surplus production of those who actually laboured. And they built systems of values that justified subduing, assimilating — or killing — the “uncivilized” in the name of progress. If civilization was a human achievement, then what was to be done with the concomitant crimes and injustices that civilization wrought?

Modernity, Historicity and the West

Underlying and exacerbating these problems for teaching world history is that of Western civilization, specifically. Fuelled by the Enlightenment, science, the printing press, steel, the steam engine, and imperial projects throughout the world, Europeans subdued both local indigenous peoples and larger competing civilizations, while they spread knowledge and ideologies with a claim of universalism. In retrospect, European and European-American revolutions shaped modernity itself, and thus provided the most basic narrative frame to world history as it is understood today. It hardly needs to be said, that a central recent concern for scholars not only in history, but in the humanities and social sciences more broadly, is how much we can or should transcend the development of, assimilation into, and resistance against Western civilization as a key organizing framework for the studying and teaching of the history of the world in the last millennium. Even to those who are most committed to resistance, the place of the West in understanding the coming of the modern world seems inescapable.[3]

A new curriculum

Now, a decade after B.C.’s last curriculum revision, in an educational milieu significantly influenced by efforts to achieve reconciliation with Indigenous Canadians, the ambiguity of British Columbia’s 2006 curriculum in respect to “civilization” is too much to tolerate. The B.C. Ministry of Education, the schools and the universities where teachers are trained are all committed to promoting respect for “aboriginal ways of knowing”. In this atmosphere, any judgments of historical “development” from hunting and gathering through agriculture to industrial production, for instance, or from sovereign local political units to large bureaucratic states, are potentially problematic.[4]

Accordingly, in the current curriculum revision, Comparative Civilizations 12 has been replaced with Comparative Cultures 12.[5] This approach avoids the binary division civilized/uncivilized, as well as the linear triad pre-modern/modern/postmodern. The question is whether historicity is thrown out at the same time. While the idea of “increasingly complex cultures” remains (for now) in the proposed course, that is the only nod to development or growth over time. Rather, for most of the course, students will look over the history of the world by examining diverse belief and value systems, social organizations, and structures of authority.

Something gained, Something lost

If all goes according to plan, students taking this course, like others in the revised curriculum, will be immersed in inquiry throughout their secondary school careers. They will be able to use “historical thinking concepts”, around which each course is framed (and which I have written about and advocated over the course of my career).[6] However, there is no direction for teachers to help them understand the world — and themselves in their situation — as part of an extended temporal process, where earlier actions, decisions and developments lead to new conditions, choices and consequences, a process in which we are all — observers and observed — immersed and shaped. This is the modern condition of historicity, an understanding of which cannot be built without coming to grips with 1) modernity itself as a historical phenomenon, and 2) the European revolutions in economic, political and ideological organization in the eighteenth and early 19th centuries that introduced it.

World history, for 21st century students, cannot simply be the sum of vignettes plucked from here and there around the globe. Narratives of the transition to modernity provide a crucial key for using history, not only to understand the world that we inhabit today, but also for understanding why history — as profound change over time in which we are all immersed in the modern world— needs to be understood in the first place.

Ironically, the new Grade 8 and 9 world history curriculum, with far more choice for students and teachers in the period from the seventh to the twentieth century, now requires teachers to include the study of at least one “Indigenous civilization”. It does not provide any direction in defining that term.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • McGregor, Heather Elisabeth. “One classroom, two teachers? Historical thinking and Indigenous education in Canada.” Critical Education 8,  no. 14 (2017): 1-18. Retrieved from www.library.ubc.ca/oneclassroomtwoteachers
  • “History and Theory in a Global Frame.” Theme issue of History and Theory, no. 53 (2015).

Web Resources

_____________________


[1] British Columbia Ministry of Education Comparative Civilizations Integrated Resource Package. (Victoria, BC, Canada: 2006), p. 26. www2.gov.bc.ca/social-studies-curriculum/comparative-civilizations-12 (last accessed 13 Nov. 2017).
[2] Ibid.
[3] Chakrabarty, Dipesh, Provincializing Europe: Postcolonial Thought and Historical Difference (Princeton NJ: Princeton University Press, 2000).
[4] Denis Shemilt argues that exactly these kinds of developments should provide the large, open frameworks for students’ understanding of world history, in “Drinking an Ocean and Pissing a Cupful,” in National History Standards: The Problem of the Canon and the Future of Teaching History, ed. Linda Symcox and Arie Wilschut (Charlotte NC: Information Age Publishing, 2009): 141-210.
[5] British Columbia Ministry of Education, “BC’s New Curriculum: Curriculum 10-12 Drafts” www.curriculum.gov.bc.ca/curriculum (last accessed 13 Nov. 2017).
[6] Peter Seixas and Tom Morton, The Big Six Historical Thinking Concepts (Toronto: Nelson Education, 2013) and Peter Seixas, “A Model of Historical Thinking.” Educational Philosophy and Theory, (2015), DOI: 10.1080/00131857.2015.1101363 (last accessed 17 November 2017).

_____________________

Image Credits
Haida carving © Ruth Hartnup (via Flickr). More information about the Haida people.

Recommended Citation
Seixas, Peter: Culture, civilization and historical consciousness. In: Public History Weekly 5 (2017) 41, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2017-10620

Editorial Responsibility
Christian Bunnenberg / Peter Gautschi

Copyright (c) 2017 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

Die Überarbeitungen des Lehrplans für Geschichte, die gegenwärtig in British Columbia (Kanada) vorgenommen werden, ersetzen unter anderem einen höheren Lehrgang über “Zivilisationen im Vergleich” durch einen, der mit “Kulturen im Vergleich” betitelt ist. Das Streben nach Versöhnung mit den kanadischen Ureinwohnern (First Nations) und die Achtung des indigenen Wissens haben dazu beigetragen, das Bildungsmilieu neu zu gestalten, in dem diese Veränderungen angeregt wurden. Welche Auswirkungen hat dies auf das Verständnis der SchülerInnen von der Weltgeschichte und der Geschichtswissenschaft im Allgemeinen?

Das Problem mit “Zivilisation”

British Columbia, Kanadas westlichste Provinz, befindet sich inmitten einer umfassenden Überarbeitung seines Schulcurriculums, der ersten seit 2006. Die Weltgeschichte vom Untergang Roms bis zum Ersten Weltkrieg wird weiterhin in den ersten beiden Jahren der Sekundarstufe (8. und 9. Klasse) unterrichtet. Vor den gegenwärtigen Reformen beschäftigten sich viele SchülerInnen in einem fakultativen höheren Kursformat mit dem Titel “Zivilisationen im Vergleich 12” dann erneut mit diesen Themen. Die erste Anforderung war logischerweise, dass die SchülerInnen den “Begriff Zivilisation definieren” können.

Der Lehrplan verwies dann sogleich darauf, wie Werte in Definitionen zum Ausdruck kommen, und verlangte von den SchülerInnen, dass sie in der Lage sein sollten, “Vorurteile und Ambiguität” in Begriffen wie “zivilisiert, unzivilisiert, sich entwickelnd, fortschrittlich” zu erkennen.[1] So beinhaltete der Titel des Kurses einen Begriff – Zivilisation – der sofort zu Kritik Anlass gab. Nichtsdestotrotz beruhte der Kurs auf dem Konzept und seinen wechselseitigen Bezügen: Von den SchülerInnen wurde anderswo verlangt, “wechselseitige Verflechtungen innerhalb von kultureller Überlieferung, Handel und technologischem Fortschritt darzulegen” ebenso wie diejenigen innerhalb von “natürlicher Umwelt […], Wirtschaft und Entwicklung von Zivilisationen”.[2] Anders ausgedrückt: Selbst wenn diese potenziell verdächtig erschienen, die Konzepte von Entwicklung, Fortschritt und Wachstum lagen der Thematik von “Zivilisationen im Vergleich 12” zugrunde.

Die Schwierigkeiten beim Diskutieren von wechselseitig verflochtener Entwicklung und wachsender Alphabetisierung, Wissen, Technologie, Wohlstand, Gesundheit, Demokratie und Bildung, ohne den Begriff “Zivilisation” (oder etwas Ähnlichem) zu benutzen, sind offensichtlich. Und dennoch, die Probleme, die sich aus einer unkritischen Anwendung des Begriffs ergeben, sind leicht erkennbar. Zivilisationen erlangten ihre geographische Ausdehnung durch das Erobern von Land, das andere bewohnten. Sie erwarben ihren Wohlstand – ersichtlich an den Palästen der herrschenden Klassen – durch das Plündern dieser Ländereien und des Sich-Aneignens von Überschusserzeugnissen von denjenigen, welche sich effektiv abmühten. Und sie errichteten Wertesysteme, die das Unterwerfen, Assimilieren – oder Morden – der “Unzivilisierten” im Namen des Fortschritts rechtfertigten. Falls Zivilisation eine menschliche Errungenschaft darstellen sollte, wie hätte man dann mit den damit einhergehenden Verbrechen und Ungerechtigkeiten zu verfahren, welche die Zivilisation mit sich gebracht hatte.

Moderne, Historizität und der Westen

Was den Problemen in Bezug auf das Unterrichten von Weltgeschichte zugrunde liegt und sie verschärft, ist spezifisch für die westliche Zivilisation. Geschürt durch die Aufklärung, die Wissenschaft, die Dampfmaschine und imperialistische Vorhaben weltweit unterwarfen die Europäer sowohl die lokalen indigenen Völker als auch grössere konkurrierende Zivilisationen, währendem sie Wissen und Ideologien mit dem Anspruch auf Universalismus verbreiteten. Im Rückblick formten europäische und europäisch-amerikanische Revolutionen die Moderne selbst und schufen so den grundlegenden narrativen Rahmen der Weltgeschichte, so wie sie heutzutage verstanden wird. Es bedarf kaum einer Erwähnung, dass eines der zentralen jüngsten Anliegen der WissenschaftlerInnen nicht nur in der Geschichte, sondern auch ganz allgemein in den Geistes- und Sozialwissenschaften, darin besteht, inwieweit wir die Entwicklung von, Assimilation in und den Widerstand gegen die westliche Zivilisation als zentrales Organisationsgefüge für das Studieren und das Unterrichten der Weltgeschichte des letzten Jahrtausends überschreiten können oder sollten. Selbst denjenigen, die dem Widerstand am meisten verpflichtet sind, scheint der Platz des Westens im Verständnis des Entstehens der modernen Welt unabdingbar.[3]

Ein neuer Lehrplan

Heute, ein Jahrzehnt nach British Columbias letzter Lehrplanüberarbeitung, in einem Bildungsumfeld, das beeinflusst wird vom Bemühen, mit den indigenen KanadierInnen zur Versöhnung zu gelangen, ist die Ambiguität von British Columbias Lehrplan in Bezug auf “Zivilisation” zu augenfällig, um toleriert zu werden. British Columbias Bildungsministerium, die Schulen und die Universitäten, an denen die LehrerInnen ausgebildet werden, haben sich dazu bekannt, den Respekt gegenüber den “Formen des Wissens der Ureinwohner” zu fördern. In dieser Atmosphäre sind zum Beispiel irgendwelche Urteile über die historische “Entwicklung” vom Jagen und Sammeln über den Ackerbau zur industriellen Produktion oder von souveränen lokalen politischen Einheiten zu grossen bürokratischen Staaten potenziell problematisch.[4]

Entsprechend ist in der gegenwärtigen Lehrplanüberarbeitung “Zivilisationen im Vergleich 12” mit “Kulturen im Vergleich 12” ersetzt worden.[5] Dieser Ansatz vermeidet die binäre Zweiteilung von zivilisiert/unzivilisiert ebenso wie die lineare Triade vormodern/modern/postmodern. Es stellt sich nun die Frage, ob Historizität dabei über Bord gegangen ist. Während die Idee von “zunehmend komplexeren Kulturen” im Kurs bestehen bleibt (für den Moment), ist dies der einzige Verweis auf Entwicklung oder Wachstum im Laufe der Zeit. In Bezug auf den grössten Teil des Lehrgangs werden die SchülerInnen eher die Weltgeschichte betrachten, indem sie verschiedene Glaubens- und Wertesysteme, soziale Einrichtungen und autoritäre Strukturen einer genaueren Prüfung unterziehen.

Etwas gewonnen, etwas verloren

Falls alles planmässig vorangeht, werden die SchülerInnen, die diesen Lehrgang belegen (wie andere im überarbeiteten Lehrplan) während ihrer gesamten Sekundarschulkarriere in Recherchen eintauchen. Sie werden in der Lage sein, “historische Denkkonzepte”, auf deren Gefüge jeder Kurs ruht (und über die ich im Verlaufe meines Wirkens Texte verfasst und in Vorlesungen referiert habe), anzuwenden.[6]

Und dennoch, es gibt keine Anleitung für LehrerInnen, die ihnen helfen, die Welt – und sich selbst in ihrer Lage – als Teil eines ausgedehnten zeitlichen Prozesses zu verstehen, in dem frühere Handlungen, Entscheidungen und Entwicklungen zu neuen Bedingungen, Auswahlmöglichkeiten und Folgen führen, ein Prozess, in welchen wir alle – BetrachterInnen und Betrachtete – eingebunden und in dem wir geformt werden. Dies ist die moderne Grundbedingung von Historizität, ein Verständnis, auf dem nicht aufgebaut werden kann, ohne zu Rande zu kommen mit 1.) der Moderne an sich als einem historischen Phänomen, und 2.) den europäischen Revolutionen innerhalb ihrer wirtschaftlichen, politischen und ideologischen Organisationsstrukturen des 18. und frühen 19. Jahrhunderts, die die Moderne einleiteten.

Weltgeschichte für SchülerInnen des 21. Jahrhunderts kann nicht einfach die Summe von Vignetten sein, die, hier und dort, rund um den Globus gepflückt werden. Narrative vom Übergang in die Moderne bilden einen entscheidenden Schlüssel für das Nutzen von Geschichte, nicht nur um die Welt, in der wir heute leben, zu verstehen, sondern auch um zu begreifen, weshalb Geschichte in erster Linie als tiefgreifender Wandel über die Zeit hinweg, in den wir alle in der modernen Welt eingebunden sind, verstanden werden muss.

Der neue Lehrplan für Weltgeschichte in der 8. und 9. Klasse, der eine weit grössere Auswahl für die SchülerInnen und LehrerInnen im Zeitraum vom 7. bis zum 20. Jahrhundert gewährt, verlangt nun paradoxerweise von den LehrerInnen, beim Unterrichten wenigsten eine “indigene Zivilisation” miteinzubeziehen. Er gibt allerdings nicht die geringste Anleitung, wie die Bezeichnung zu definieren sei.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • McGregor, Heather Elisabeth. “One classroom, two teachers? Historical thinking and Indigenous education in Canada.” Critical Education 8,  no. 14 (2017): 1-18. Retrieved from www.library.ubc.ca/oneclassroomtwoteachers
  • “History and Theory in a Global Frame.” Theme issue of History and Theory, no. 53 (2015).

Webressourcen

_____________________


[1] British Columbia Ministry of Education Comparative Civilizations Integrated Resource Package. (Victoria, BC, Canada: 2006), S. 26. www2.gov.bc.ca/social-studies-curriculum/comparative-civilizations-12 (letzter Zugriff 13.11.2017).
[2] Ibid.
[3] Chakrabarty, Dipesh, Provincializing Europe: Postcolonial Thought and Historical Difference (Princeton NJ: Princeton University Press, 2000).
[4] Denis Shemilt legt dar, dass genau diese Arten von Entwicklungen die grossen, offenen Gerüste für das Verständnis der SchülerInnen für Weltgeschichte bilden sollten, in National History Standards: The Problem of the Canon and the Future of Teaching History, ed. Linda Symcox and Arie Wilschut (Charlotte NC: Information Age Publishing, 2009): 141-210.
[5] British Columbia Ministry of Education, “BC’s New Curriculum: Curriculum 10-12 Drafts” www.curriculum.gov.bc.ca/curriculum (letzter Zugriff am 13.11. 2017).
[6] Peter Seixas und Tom Morton, The Big Six Historical Thinking Concepts (Toronto: Nelson Education, 2013) and Peter Seixas, “A Model of Historical Thinking.” Educational Philosophy and Theory, (2015), DOI: 10.1080/00131857.2015.1101363 (letzter Zugriff 13.11.2017).

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis
Haida carving © Ruth Hartnup (via Flickr). More information about the Haida people.

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Seixas, Peter: Kultur, Zivilisation und Geschichtsbewusstsein. In: Public History Weekly 5 (2017) 41, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2017-10620

Translated by Kurt Brügger swissamericanlanguageexpert

Redaktionelle Verantwortung
Christian Bunnenberg / Peter Gautschi

Copyright (c) 2017 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.


Categories: 5 (2017) 41
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2017-10620

Tags: , ,

3 replies »

  1. Für eine deutschsprachige Version bitte nach unten scrollen.

    We Don’t Need to Turn Away From Modernity, Rather We Need its Renaissance

    First of all, Peter Seixas is basically right in asserting that the integration of the indigenous population into Canadian history and a corresponding change in the curricula of historical learning are necessary.

    They require a significant change in the strategy of historical thinking. Of course, changing the term ‘civilization’ to ‘culture’ is not enough for such a change to be effective. At the same time, however, an uncritical acceptance of the post-colonial turn in historical scholarship is not the answer either.

    The implied need for recognition of non-Western cultures and traditions makes use, in principle, of universalistic norms such as the humane treatment of cultural difference, which for their part belong to the core of modern thought. Is this thinking supposed to lapse to radical criticism? This would turn the necessary renewal of Public History into a state of performative self-contradiction. Rather than abandoning modern history altogether, it is more important to develop a concept of history that integrates archaic and pre-modern forms of life into a more encompassing idea of development. This is quite possible within the framework of modern historical thinking, while post-colonialism has not developed viable ideas apart from its criticism thereof.

    Above all, the unconditional recognition of indigenous knowledge as equal to Western-modern forms of thought (especially the sciences) should be rejected as thoroughly ideological. Such indigenous knowledge is characterised by elements that are anything but worthy of recognition – for example faith in spirits, witch hunts, cannibalism, misogyny. These can only be used as sources of meaning in the sense of a phantasmagoric (Rousseauistic) alienation from the disenchanting rationality of modern scholarship.

    It should rather be a matter of rethinking familiar concepts of modernity in new and more critical ways. It is essential to record the intellectual achievements that have entered the cultural foundations of our civil society. These include universalistic norms such as human dignity and the humanism of intercultural recognition, the democratic organisation of political rule, the rationality of scientific discourses, and the pluralism of world-views in systems of interpretation.

    History has to be (re)conceptualised on the basis of these binding values and forms of thought. The universal validity of these values demands a universal historical perspective. If such a perspective were to be developed on the basis of anthropological universals, it would also include the cultures that had previously been left out.[1] This perspective must then be fleshed out and made educationally relevant according to the given life circumstances of the pupils.

    As such, modernity remains the determining factor of historical orientation. At the same time, however, the critique of modernity must be brought into play more vigorously than before: colonisation, imperialism, industrial-environmental destruction, world wars, genocides and similar disasters must be made intelligible by the logic of modernisation and at the same time made to seem surmountable with this same logic. “The wound can be healed only by the spear that smote it”. Modernity has developed in and of itself a potential for self-criticism, which should be brought into play afresh. I can name for example the hermeneutics of the understanding of others and the historicism that is committed to it, which, from its original logic, contains a universal humanism of cultural difference.

    There are no viable concepts of a cultural reorientation which has left behind modernity as a discarded epoch of universal history. Today’s post-modernity does not spark an inspiring future perspective that could be made plausible based on historical experience. On the contrary, the popular prefix “post”, now part of the jargon of the progressivity of the humanities and social sciences, only shows that the intelligentsia has lost the ground of history under its feet.

    We do not need the abandonment of modernity, but rather a renaissance of its untapped humanistic potential.[2] This renaissance calls for a ruthless self-criticism of modernity, which has long existed as an intellectual achievement from its very beginning. Instead of losing itself post-humanly in the fog of historical wishful thinking, inhumane experiences should be worked through in the shadow of modernity and interpreted with new categories (such as suffering and grief).

    References
    [1] Antweiler, Christoph: Mensch und Weltkultur. Für einen realistischen Kosmopolitismus im Zeitalter der Globalisierung. Bielefeld: Transcript 2011 [Antweiler, Christoph: Inclusive Humanism. Anthropological Basics for a Realistic Cosmopolitanism. Göttingen: V & R unipress 2012.
    [2] Dazu: Todorov, Tzvetan: Imperfect garden. The legacy of humanism. Princeton: Princeton University Press 2002; Nida-Rümelin, Julian: Humanismus als Leitkultur. Ein Perspektivenwechsel. München: C.H. Beck 2006; Rüsen, Jörn (Ed.): Perspektiven der Humanität. Menschsein im Diskurs der Disziplinen. Bielefeld: Transcript 2010 [Rüsen, Jörn (Ed.): Approaching Humankind. Towards an Intercultural Humanism. Göttingen: V&R unipress 2013].

    Translated from German by Dr Katalin Morgan. (katalin.morgan (at) uni-due (dot) de)

    ————————

    Wir brauchen keine Abkehr von der Moderne, sondern ihre Renaissance

    Zunächst einmal ist Peter Seixas grundsätzlich recht zu geben: die Integration der indianischen Bevölkerung in die kanadische Geschichte und eine entsprechende Änderung der Curricula des historischen Lernens sind notwendig.

    Sie erfordern eine erhebliche Veränderung in der Strategie des historischen Denkens. Mit dem Wechsel der Termini ‘civilization‘ zu ‘culture‘ ist es natürlich nicht getan. Ebenso wenig sollte man aber die postkoloniale Wende in der Geschichtswissenschaft unkritisch übernehmen.

    Die hier geforderte Anerkennung nicht-westlicher Kulturen und Traditionen macht nämlich im Grundsatz von universalistischen Normen des humanen Umgangs mit kultureller Differenz Gebrauch, die ihrerseits zum Kernbestand des modernen Denkens gehören. Dieses Denken soll einer radikalen Kritik verfallen? Damit brächte sich die notwendige Erneuerung der Geschichtskultur in einen performativen Selbstwiderspruch. Statt die moderne Geschichte zu verabschieden, kommt es vielmehr darauf an, ein Geschichtskonzept zu entwickeln, das archaische und vormodernen Lebensformen in die Vorstellung einer umgreifenden Entwicklung integriert. Das ist im Rahmen eines modernen Geschichtsdenkens durchaus möglich, während der Postkolonialismus außer seiner Kritik daran keine tragfähigen Ideen entwickelt hat.

    Erst recht sollte eine umstandslose Anerkennung von indigenem Wissen (“indigenous knowledge”) als gleichberechtigt neben den westlich-modernen Denkformen (vor allem der Wissenschaften) als durch und durch ideologisch zurückgewiesen werden. Dieses Wissen zeichnet sich nämlich durch Bestandteile aus, die alles andere als anerkennenswert sind – ich nenne beispielhaft Geisterglaube, Hexenverfolgung, Kannibalismus, Misogynie. Nur in der Form einer phantasmagorischen (Rousseau’istischen) Verfremdung lässt es sich gegen die entzaubernde Rationalität moderner Wissenschaftlichkeit als Sinnquelle ausspielen.

    Es sollte vielmehr darauf ankommen, vertraute Denkformen der Moderne neu und viel kritischer als bisher zur Geltung zu bringen. Unbedingt festzuhalten sind die geistigen Errungenschaften, die in die kulturellen Grundlagen unserer Zivilgesellschaft eingegangen sind. Dazu gehören universalistischen Normen wie die Menschenwürde, und der Humanismus interkultureller Anerkennung, die demokratische Organisation politischer Herrschaft, die Rationalität wissenschaftlicher Diskurse und der Pluralismus weltanschaulicher Deutungssysteme.

    Geschichte ist am Leitfaden dieser verbindlichen Werte und Denkformen (neu) zu konzipieren. Die universale Geltung dieser Werte verlangt eine universale historische Perspektive. Entwirft man sie auf der Basis anthropologischer Universalien, sind auch die Kulturen eingeschlossen, die bisher außen vor geblieben waren.[1] Diese Perspektive muss dann didaktisch auf die vorgegebenen Lebensumstände der SchülerInnen hin konkretisiert werden.

    Damit bleibt die Moderne bestimmender Horizont der historischen Orientierung. Zugleich aber müssen die modernitätskritischen Gesichtspunkte energischer ins Spiel gebracht werden als bisher: Kolonialisierung, Imperialismus, industrielle Umweltzerstörung, Weltkriege, Völkermorde und ähnliche Desaster müssen aus der Logik der Modernisierung verständlich gemacht werden und zugleich mit dieser Logik als überwindbar erscheinen.”Die Wunde schließt der Speer nur, der sie schlug.” Die Moderne hat in und aus sich selbst ein Potenzial von Selbstkritik entfaltet, das neu ins Spiel gebracht werden sollte. Ich erwähne nur die Hermeneutik des Fremdverstehens und den ihr verpflichteten Historismus, der von seiner ursprünglichen Logik her einen universalen Humanismus kultureller Differenz enthält.

    Tragfähige Konzepte einer kulturellen Neuorientierung, die die Moderne als abgelegte Epoche der Universalgeschichte hinter sich gelassen hat, gibt es nicht. Aus der heute üblichen Post-Modernität lässt sich kein Funke einer inspirierenden Zukunftsperspektive schlagen, die sich mit historischer Erfahrung plausibel machen ließe. Im Gegenteil: das Lieblingspräfix post-, das inzwischen zum Jargon kultur- und sozialwissenschaftlicher Progressivität gehört, indiziert nur, dass die Intelligenzija den Boden der Geschichte unter den Füßen verloren hat.

    Wir brauchen keine Abkehr von der Moderne, sondern eine Renaissance ihres unausgeschöpften humanistischen Potenzials.[2] Diese Renaissance verlangt eine schonungslose Selbstkritik der Moderne, die es von ihren Anfängen an als geistige Leistung schon längst gibt. Anstatt sich post-human im Nebel historischen Wunschdenkens zu verlieren, sollten die Inhumanitätserfahrungen im Schatten der Moderne aufgearbeitet und mit neuen Kategorien (z.B. derjenigen des Leidens und der Trauer) gedeutet werden.

    Die Leitfrage eines zeitgemäßen und zukunftsfähigen historischen Denkens lautet: Was ist der Mensch? Die historische Erfahrung gibt darauf eine durch und durch ambivalente Antwort (übrigens auch aus der Geschichte der indigenen und nicht-westlichen Völker). Der Geschichtsunterricht soll die Schüler dazu befähigen, diese Frage an den konkreten Themen ihrer historischen Orientierung auf sich zu beziehen und eine menschenwürdige Antwort zu finden.

    Anmerkungen
    [1] Antweiler, Christoph: Mensch und Weltkultur. Für einen realistischen Kosmopolitismus im Zeitalter der Globalisierung. Bielefeld: Transcript 2011 [Antweiler, Christoph: Inclusive Humanism. Anthropological Basics for a Realistic Cosmopolitanism. Göttingen: V & R unipress 2012.
    [2] Dazu: Todorov, Tzvetan: Imperfect garden. The legacy of humanism. Princeton: Princeton University Press 2002; Nida-Rümelin, Julian: Humanismus als Leitkultur. Ein Perspektivenwechsel. München: C.H. Beck 2006; Rüsen, Jörn (Ed.): Perspektiven der Humanität. Menschsein im Diskurs der Disziplinen. Bielefeld: Transcript 2010 [Rüsen, Jörn (Ed.): Approaching Humankind. Towards an Intercultural Humanism. Göttingen: V&R unipress 2013].

  2. Thank you to Jörn Rüsen for this thoughtful response to “Culture, Civilization and Historical Consciousness.” I agree with everything he has written. Indeed, the original article could only have been written with the lessons I have learned from Prof. Dr. Rüsen.

    Some of his comments, however, lead me to wonder whether my article does not adequately express the positions I hold, and that it was open to misreading. I certainly did not advocate the abandonment of the term “civilization” for “culture.” Indeed, I was trying to explain the underlying problem of which this abandonment by the British Columbia Ministry of Education is actually a symptom. That is, in an attempt to come to reconciliation with indigenous peoples, any narrative of world history that presents modernity, the western Enlightenment, science, humanism, and large democratic states as ACHIEVEMENTS has become suspect. My intention was to suggest exactly what is so well stated by Jörn Rüsen: “Rather than abandoning modern history altogether, it is more important to develop a concept of history that integrates archaic and pre-modern forms of life into a more encompassing idea of development. This is quite possible [though not easy] within the framework of modern historical thinking.”

  3. Please find an English version below.

    Selbstkritische Moderne ist Postmoderne

    Mich lässt der konsensuelle Austausch von Peter Seixas und Jörn Rüsen etwas unzufrieden zurück. Das mag an meiner Projektion liegen, dass sich da zwei einig sind, dass früher (in der Zivilisation der Moderne) alles besser war. Und was nicht gerade besser war (der Zivilisationsbruch der Moderne), das hätte die Moderne mit ihren eigenen Mitteln schon noch geradebiegen können, wenn man sie nur machen ließe. Ich möchte dagegen Partei ergreifen für eine wohlverstandene Postmoderne, aber nicht für Kultur gegen Zivilisation.

    Ich war verwundert, in Texten über Kultur versus Zivilisation nicht die Verweise auf frühere Entgegensetzungen dieser schillernden Begriffe vorzufinden, speziell die Glorifizierung “deutscher Kultur” gegenüber “welscher Zivilisation”, die als Propagandachiffre für die deutsch-französische Erbfeindschaft galt und die deutsche Ablehnung westlicher Werte (Demokratie, Menschenrechte) mit der angeblichen Überlegenheit der deutschen Kultur(nation) begründete.

    Die Ersetzung von “Zivilisation” durch “Kultur” ist für meine deutschen Ohren eine Feier von Partikularismus gegenüber Universalismus. Die gefährliche antimoderne Tendenz besteht dabei aus meiner Sicht darin, dass man die den Individuen zustehenden universellen Menschenrechte zugunsten von Gruppenrechten (auf Selbstbestimmung als Kollektiv) zu beschneiden versuchen kann. Das hat aber nichts mit Postmoderne zu tun, sondern ist die antimoderne Option der Moderne selbst, die demokratische Wahl der autoritären Partei, das Zurückschlagen der Aufklärung in Mythologie.
    Dabei wird die technisch-industriell fortgeschrittene Macht (durch Mittel der Massenbeeinflussung, Massenüberwachung, Massenvernichtung) gegen die Menschen gewendet, obwohl dieses Ausmaß an Macht nur durch die Aufklärung und ihr rationales, humanistisches und egalitäres Denken überhaupt geschaffen werden konnte. Dass “der Ausgang des Menschen aus seiner selbstverschuldeten Unmündigkeit”[1] zur Unterjochung des Menschen unter seine selbst geschaffenen Machtmittel führen kann, und zwar vor 100 Jahren, heute und in 100 Jahren, ist die der Moderne innewohnende Ambivalenz, oder die “Dialektik der Aufklärung”.[2]

    Als Postmoderne würde ich jedes Denken bezeichnen, das diese Ambivalenz der Moderne anerkennt und durch “schonungslose Selbstkritik der Moderne” (Rüsen) zu überwinden versucht. Ich hoffe, dass Jörn Rüsen verzeiht, wenn ich ihn daher als Postmodernisten identifiziere. Denn womit soll die Moderne Selbstkritik treiben, wenn nicht mit ihrem ureigenen Mittel, systematischem Vernunftgebrauch? Sie darf dabei nur nicht ihrem eigenen Mythos verfallen und eine konkrete Vernunft absolut setzen, denn sonst wird sie totalitär, das heißt sie setzt Unterjochung an Stelle der Befreiung. Horkheimer/Adorno: “Nimmt Aufklärung die Reflexion auf dieses rückläufige Moment nicht in sich auf, so besiegelt sie ihr eigenes Schicksal.”[3]

    Daher ist wohlverstandene Postmoderne keine Abkehr von der Moderne, sondern ihr selbstkritisches Zu-sich-selbst-Kommen. Eine Position der Abkehr von der Moderne ist als antimodern viel passender bezeichnet. Postmodern bedeutet für mich, um Peter Seixas Formulierung zu präzisieren, dass “any narrative of world history that presents modernity, the western Enlightenment, science, humanism, and large democratic states [solely] as ACHIEVEMENTS has become suspect”. Zu recht, wie ich finde, denn eine Präsentation der Moderne ausschließlich als Errungenschaft wäre nicht selbstkritisch. Ich gehe aber davon aus, dass Peter Seixas, Jörn Rüsen und ich uns einig sind, dass selbstkritisches modernes historisches Denken nicht ohne Multiperspektivität und Pluralismus möglich ist.

    Anmerkungen
    [1] Immanuel Kant: Beantwortung der Frage: Was ist Aufklärung?, in AA VIII, 35.
    [2] Max Horkheimer, Theodor W. Adorno: Dialektik der Aufklärung. Philosophische Fragmente, Frankfurt am Main 2003.
    [3] Ebenda, S. 13.

    —————————————-

    Self-critical Modernism is Postmodernism

    I am somewhat dissatisfied with the consensual exchange between Peter Seixas and Jörn Rüsen. This may be due to my projection that there is a consensus that everything was better in the past (in modern civilization). And what wasn’t exactly better (the rupture in modern civilization), modern spirit could have straightened it out with its own means, if only we would let it go its way. To disagree, I would like to take sides in favour of a well-understood postmodernism, but not in favour of culture versus civilization.

    I was surprised not to find in Seixas’ and Rüsens texts about culture versus civilization the references to earlier confrontations of these dazzling terms, especially the glorification of “German culture” in relation to “welsch civilisation”, which was regarded as propaganda cipher for the German-French enmity of heredity and which justified the German rejection of Western values (democracy, human rights) with the alleged superiority of the German nation as a “Kulturnation”.

    The replacement of “civilization” by “culture” is for my German ears a celebration of particularism versus universalism. In my view, the dangerous anti-modern tendency is to try to curtail the universal human rights of individuals in favour of group rights (on self-determination as a collective). However, this has nothing to do with postmodernism, but is the anti-modernist option of modernity itself, the democratic vote for the authoritarian party, the Enlightenment’s relapse into mythology.

    In doing so, technically and industrially advanced power (by means of mass influencing, mass monitoring, mass destruction) is turned against humans, although this extent of power could only be created by the Enlightenment and its rational, humanitarian and egalitarian thinking. The fact that “departure of the human being from its self-incurred minority”[1] can lead to the subjugation of mankind under its self-generated means of power, 100 years ago, today and 100 years from now, is the ambivalence inherent in modernity, or the “Dialectic of Enlightenment”.[2]

    I would describe postmodernism as any kind of thinking that recognises this ambivalence of modernity and tries to overcome it by “ruthless self-criticism of modernity” (Rüsen). I hope that Jörn Rüsen will forgive me if I therefore identify him as a postmodernist. How should modernity drive self-criticism, if not with its very own means, systematic use of reason? It must not, however, fall for its own myth and set a concrete reason absolutely, for otherwise it will become totalitarian, i. e. it puts subjugation in place of liberation. Horkheimer/Adorno: “If Enlightenment does not assimilate reflection on this regressive moment, it seals its own fate.”[3]

    Therefore, well-understood postmodernism is not a turning away from modernity, but its self-critical approach to itself. A position of turning away from modernity is much more appropriately described as antimodern. Postmodern means for me, to clarify Peter Seixas’ formulation, that “any narrative of world history that presents modernity, the western Enlightenment, science, humanism, and large democratic states [solely] as ACHIEVEMENTS has become suspect”. Quite rightly, in my opinion, because a presentation of modernity solely as an achievement would not be self-critical. But I assume that Peter Seixas, Jörn Rüsen and I agree that self-critical modern historical thinking is not possible without multiplicity and pluralism.

    References
    [1] Immanuel Kant: Beantwortung der Frage: Was ist Aufklärung?, in AA VIII, 35 (translation by Stephen Orr, URL: https://bdfwia.github.io/bdfwia.html)
    [2] Max Horkheimer, Theodor W. Adorno: Dialektik der Aufklärung. Philosophische Fragmente, Frankfurt am Main 2003.
    [3] Ibidem, p. 13 (translation by Edmund Jephcott, 2002).

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

Pin It on Pinterest