Historical Thinking. Diagnose Learning Processes Instead of Assessing Performance

Historisches Denken. Lernprozessdiagnose statt Leistungsmessung

 

“If you wish to improve teaching and learning, you have to attend to teaching and learning.” With this statement, Bruce A. VanSledright suggests to leave the current fixation on large-scale assessment of historical thinking behind and to turn research attention to the description and diagnosis of individual learning processes. According to VanSledright, this is the only way to successfully support students and teachers in the teaching and learning of history, which, in turn, is the only way to substantially improve history education.

Practical Suggestions Based on Questionnaires?

While VanSledright’s position[1] may not be a radically new one, it is certainly relevant – especially in its poignancy. Recent publications by Berlin political scientist Klaus Schroeder unwillingly help to prove VanSledrights point. In a sense, everything has been said about Schroeder’s studies: theoretical deficiencies, methodological monism, one-dimensional and therefore apodictic conclusions.[2] Nevertheless, Schroeder tries to explain to teachers “how good history teaching can be achieved”. This was the topic of a recent radio panel Schroeder as well as Peter Droste and Alfons Kenkmann participated in.[3] Schroeder’s contribution, however, was limited to a pre-recorded initial statement which proved to be a “magic moment” of reflecting on history education.[4] Among other things, he suggests that more contemporary history be taught – even though newer curricula already favour modern and contemporary history at the expense of topics from ancient and medieval history. In addition to that, Schroeder puts his money on repetition: „When content gets repeated, it will be remembered better” (our translation). Repetitio est mater studiorum. This insight by Cassiodor can be found in Wikipdia’s “list of Latin phrases (R)”.[5] And as far as field trips to memorials and places of remembrance are concerned, Schroeder recommends thorough preparation and follow-up activities. The list of truisms could easily be extended. The real problem, however, is the fact that Schroeder and colleagues did not research history education as such. Their main means of data acquisition were closed surveys relying on multiple choice and Likert scale items. Their results as well as their practical recommendations rest solely on this basis.

Post-PISA euphoria for large scale assessments: cui bono?

Similar to research on learning in other fields, in the wake of PISA the German discourse on history education has displayed a remarkable euphoria for measuring learning outcome.[6] As is generally known, Jörn Rüsen defined the didactics of history as the “science of historical learning”,[7] not, as one could be led to think, as the science of historical assessment. While this is not a fundamental rejection of all attempts to empirically chart historical thinking and learning, important questions arise: Can central competences of historical thinking be reliably measured and graded in a large scale format? Do we have the necessary assessment tasks to do this? And if so, what advantages does this form of assessment provide? The remarks by US educational scientists James Pellegrino, Naomi Chudowsky and Robert Glaser shed interesting light on these questions: “A second issue concerns the usefulness of current assessments for improving teaching and learning – the ultimate goal of education reforms. On the whole, most current large-scale tests provide very limited information that teachers and educational administrators can use to identify why students do not perform well or to modify the conditions of instruction in ways likely to improve student achievement. […] Tests do not reveal whether students are using misguided strategies to solve problems or fail to understand key concepts within the subject matter being tested. They do not show whether a student is advancing toward competence or is stuck at a partial understanding of a topic that could seriously impede future learning. Indeed, it is entirely possible that a student could answer certain types of test questions correctly and still lack the most basic understanding of the situation being tested, as a teacher would quickly learn by asking the student to explain the answer”.[8]

Improving education by diagnosing learning processes

To rely solely on large scale assessment thus seems to be insufficient. An equally important task for teachers and researchers alike is to “improve teaching and learning”. To that end, they need to “identify why students do not perform well” which, in turn, depends upon open task formats. And not least we should initiate a dialogue with our students about the “outcome” of these tasks (“learn by asking the student to explain the answer”). Only then will we be able to find out about specific challenges students face when thinking historically (whether voluntarily or because they are told to). This research, in turn, is a necessary prerequisite to any improvements to history education that we may be able to contribute. This is the central task for any empirical research that aims to be relevant to practitioners. Large scale assessment and quantification may not be completely redundant. However, if you want education to succeed, you have to focus on diagnosing and analysing individual processes of teaching and learning, unlike Klaus Schroeder. In other words: “If you wish to improve teaching and learning, you have to attend to teaching and learning.”[9]

Literatur

  • Köster, Manuel et al. (eds.): Researching History Education. International Perspectives and Disciplinary Traditions, Schwalbach/Ts. 2014.
  • Pellegrino, James W. et al. (eds.): Knowing what Students Know. The Science and Design of Educational Assessment. 2nd ed. Washington, DC 2003.
  • VanSledright, Bruce A.: Assessing Historical Thinking and Understanding. Innovative Designs for New Standards, New York/London 2014.

Externer Link

  • Was tun gegen historischen “Analphabetismus”? Wie guter Geschichtsunterricht gelingen kann. Diskussion mit Hörerbeteiligung im Deutschlandfunk am 05.04.2014: http://www.deutschlandfunk.de/schwerpunktthema-was-tun-gegen-historischen-analphabetismus.1180.de.html?dram:article_id=282015 (zuletzt am 19.05.2014).

[1] VanSledright, Bruce A.: Assessing Historical Thinking and Understanding. Innovative Designs for New Standards, New York/London 2014, p. 114. [2] Besides Markus Bernhardt’s contribution to this journal and Saskia Handro’s as well as Christoph Hamann’s replies, cf. Handro, Saskia / Schaarschmidt, Thomas (eds..): Aufarbeitung der Aufarbeitung. Die DDR im geschichtskulturellen Diskurs, Schwalbach/Ts. 2011, particularly the contribution by Handro (particularly p. 90) and by Bodo von Borries, p. 121-139. [3] See http://www.deutschlandfunk.de/schwerpunktthema-was-tun-gegen-historischen-analphabetismus.1180.de.html?dram:article_id=282015 (retrieved 08.05.2014). Jochen Pahl made me aware of this. [4] Ibid. [5] See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Latin_phrases_%28R%29 (retrieved 08.05.2014). [6] Cf. Sander, Wolfgang: Im Land der kompetenten Säuglinge. Wie Legitimationsfloskeln vom Kindergarten bis zur Hochschule den Kompetenzbegriff aushöhlen. In: FAZ, Nr. 97, 26.04.2013, p. 7; idem: Die Kompetenzblase – Transformationen und Grenzen der Kompetenzorientierung. In: Zeitschrift für Didaktik der Gesellschaftswissenschaften 4 (2013), 1, pp. 100-124, in particular p. 120f. Fort he following arguments, cf. also Thünemann, Holger: Probleme und Perspektiven der geschichtsdidaktischen Kompetenzdebatte. In: Handro, Saskia / Schönemann, Bernd (Eds.): Aus der Geschichte lernen? Weiße Flecken der Kompetenzdebatte, Berlin 2015 (in print). [7] Rüsen, Jörn: Historisches Lernen. Grundlagen und Paradigmen. Mit einem Beitrag von Ingetraud Rüsen. 2nd rev. ed., Schwalbach/Ts. 2008, p. 9. Our translation. [8] Pellegrino, James W. et al. (eds.): Knowing what Students Know. The Science and Design of Educational Assessment. 2nd ed. Washington, DC 2003, p. 27. Emphases added. [9] Cf. Gautschi, Peter: History Education Research in Switzerland. In: Köster, Manuel et al. (eds.): Researching History Education. International Perspectives and Disciplinary Traditions, Schwalbach/Ts. 2014, pp. 104-132, particularly pp. 122-125.


Abbildungsnachweis
© berwis / pixelio.de

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Thünemann, Holger: Historisches Denken. Lernprozessdiagnose statt Leistungsmessung. In: Public History Weekly 2 (2014) 19, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2014-2058.

Copyright (c) 2014 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: julia.schreiner (at) degruyter.com.

“If you wish to improve teaching and learning, you have to attend to teaching and learning.” Mit diesem Statement regt Bruce A. VanSledright dazu an, eine einseitige Fixierung auf Fragen der Leistungsüberprüfung und Kompetenzmessung im Large-Scale-Format zugunsten einer stärkeren Fokussierung auf Aspekte der Lernprozessbeschreibung und -diagnostik zu durchbrechen. Nur auf diese Weise, so VanSledright, könne man Lehrer und Schüler erfolgreich darin unterstützen, Geschichte zu lehren und zu lernen, und nur auf diese Weise lasse sich Geschichtsunterricht substantiell verbessern.

Fragebögen als Basis didaktischer Handlungsempfehlungen?

VanSledrights Position[1] ist zwar nicht vollkommen neu, aber sie ist ‒ gerade in ihrer Zuspitzung ‒ zweifellos relevant. Verdeutlichen lässt sich das u.a. an den Publikationen des Berliner Politikwissenschaftlers Klaus Schroeder. Eigentlich ist zu den Schroeder-Studien seit langem alles gesagt: Theoriedefizite, Methodenmonismus, eindimensionale und daher apodiktisch anmutende Befunde.[2] Trotzdem versucht Schroeder, LehrerInnen zu erklären, „wie guter Geschichtsunterricht gelingen kann“. Über dieses Thema diskutierte er vor kurzem im Deutschlandfunk mit Peter Droste und Alfons Kenkmann.[3] Genau genommen war es gar keine Diskussion, denn Schroeder beschränkte sich auf ein zuvor aufgezeichnetes Eingangsstatement, das sich als “Sternstunde” geschichtsdidaktischer Reflexion erwies.[4] Beispielsweise schlägt er vor, den Anteil zeitgeschichtlicher Themen deutlich zu erhöhen ‒ und das, obwohl Antike und Mittelalter in den meisten Lehrplänen ohnehin schon deutlich an Gewicht verloren haben und obwohl Zeitgeschichte (je nach Definition) klar dominiert. Außerdem setzt Schroeder auf Wiederholungen (“Wenn ein Stoff […] wiederholt wird […], [bleibt] mehr hängen […].”). Repetitio est mater studiorum. Diese auf Cassiodor zurückgehende Einsicht findet man auch bei Wikipedia ‒ in der “Liste lateinischer Phrasen/R”.[5] Und mit Blick auf Gedenkstättenbesuche empfiehlt Schroeder eine gründliche Vor- und Nachbereitung. Die Aufzählung der Binsenweisheiten ließe sich mühelos verlängern. Das eigentliche Problem besteht jedoch darin, dass Schroeder und sein Team Geschichtsunterricht als solchen gar nicht untersucht haben. Ihr Haupterhebungsinstrument sind geschlossene Fragebögen (Multiple-Choice; Likert-Skalen). Allein auf dieser Grundlage beruhen die Messergebnisse und die daraus abgeleiteten didaktischen Handlungsempfehlungen.

Messeuphorie nach PISA: Cui bono?

Ebenso wie andere Fachdidaktiken hat auch Teile der Geschichtsdidaktik im Gefolge von PISA eine bemerkenswerte Messeuphorie erfasst.[6] Jörn Rüsen definiert Geschichtsdidaktik bekanntlich als “Wissenschaft vom historischen Lernen”,[7] nicht ‒ so könnte man zugespitzt formulieren ‒ als Wissenschaft der historischen Leistungsmessung. Das ist zwar keine grundsätzliche Absage an Versuche, historische Lernleistungen bzw. Kompetenzen empirisch zu erfassen, aber es ergeben sich doch wichtige Fragen: Lassen sich zentrale historische Kompetenzen im Large-Scale-Modus zuverlässig messen und graduieren? Gibt es dafür entsprechende Aufgabenformate? Und, wenn ja, welche Vorteile hat diese Form des Assessments? Aufschlussreich sind in diesem Zusammenhang die Ausführungen der US-amerikanischen Bildungswissenschaftler James Pellegrino, Naomi Chudowsky und Robert Glaser:

“A second issue concerns the usefulness of current assessments for improving teaching and learning – the ultimate goal of education reforms. On the whole, most current large-scale tests provide very limited information that teachers and educational administrators can use to identify why students do not perform well or to modify the conditions of instruction in ways likely to improve student achievement. […] Tests do not reveal whether students are using misguided strategies to solve problems or fail to understand key concepts within the subject matter being tested. They do not show whether a student is advancing toward competence or is stuck at a partial understanding of a topic that could seriously impede future learning. Indeed, it is entirely possible that a student could answer certain types of test questions correctly and still lack the most basic understanding of the situation being tested, as a teacher would quickly learn by asking the student to explain the answer.”[8]

Unterrichtsverbesserung durch Lernprozessdiagnose

Messung im Large-Scale-Modus allein reicht also nicht aus. LehrerInnen und GeschichtsdidaktikerInnen haben die mindestens ebenso wichtige Aufgabe, historische Lehr-Lernprozesse zu verbessern (“improving teaching and learning”). Dazu müssen sie wissen, an welchen Hürden diese Prozesse immer wieder scheitern (“identify why students do not perform well”). Zu diesem Zweck wiederum bedarf es offener Aufgabenformate. Und nicht zuletzt sollte man mit SchülerInnen über die “Ergebnisse” ihrer Aufgaben ins Gespräch kommen (“learn by asking the student to explain the answer”). Nur auf diese Weise lässt sich nämlich in Erfahrung bringen, vor welchen Herausforderungen sie stehen, wenn sie historisch denken wollen oder sollen. Und erst auf dieser Grundlage wiederum ist ein Beitrag zur Verbesserung von Lehr-Lernprozessen und Geschichtsunterricht möglich. Das ist die zentrale Aufgabe praxisrelevanter geschichtsdidaktischer Forschung. Messung und Quantifizierung im Large-Scale-Format sind zwar möglicherweise nicht vollkommen überflüssig. Wer aber dafür sorgen will, dass Unterricht gelingt, der muss ‒ anders als Klaus Schroeder ‒ auf individuelle Diagnose und die Analyse von Lehr-Lernprozessen setzen. “If you wish to improve teaching and learning, you have to attend to teaching and learning.”[9]

Literatur

  • Köster, Manuel et al. (eds.): Researching History Education. International Perspectives and Disciplinary Traditions, Schwalbach/Ts. 2014.
  • Pellegrino, James W. et al. (eds.): Knowing what Students Know. The Science and Design of Educational Assessment. 2nd ed. Washington, DC 2003.
  • VanSledright, Bruce A.: Assessing Historical Thinking and Understanding. Innovative Designs for New Standards, New York/London 2014.

Externer Link


[1] VanSledright, Bruce A.: Assessing Historical Thinking and Understanding. Innovative Designs for New Standards, New York/London 2014, S. 114. [2] Abgesehen von Markus Bernhardts Beitrag und Saskia Handros sowie Christoph Hamanns Antworten in diesem Blog-Journal vgl. bereits Handro, Saskia / Schaarschmidt, Thomas (Hrsg.): Aufarbeitung der Aufarbeitung. Die DDR im geschichtskulturellen Diskurs, Schwalbach/Ts. 2011, darin u.a. die Beiträge der Herausgeberin, S. 84-107, v.a. S. 90 und von Bodo von Borries, S. 121-139. [3] Siehe http://www.deutschlandfunk.de/schwerpunktthema-was-tun-gegen-historischen-analphabetismus.1180.de.html?dram:article_id=282015 (zuletzt am 08.05.2014). Für den Hinweis danke ich Jochen Pahl. [4] Vgl. Anm. 3. [5] Siehe http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_lateinischer_Phrasen/R. (zuletzt am 08.05.2014). [6] Vgl. Sander, Wolfgang: Im Land der kompetenten Säuglinge. Wie Legitimationsfloskeln vom Kindergarten bis zur Hochschule den Kompetenzbegriff aushöhlen. In: FAZ, Nr. 97 vom 26.04.2013, S. 7. Vgl. ders.: Die Kompetenzblase – Transformationen und Grenzen der Kompetenzorientierung. In: Zeitschrift für Didaktik der Gesellschaftswissenschaften 4 (2013), 1, S. 100-124, hier u.a. S. 120f. Vgl. zum Folgenden mit weiterer Literatur Thünemann, Holger: Probleme und Perspektiven der geschichtsdidaktischen Kompetenzdebatte. In: Handro, Saskia / Schönemann, Bernd (Hrsg.): Aus der Geschichte lernen? Weiße Flecken der Kompetenzdebatte, Berlin 2014 (im Druck). [7]  Rüsen, Jörn: Historisches Lernen. Grundlagen und Paradigmen. Mit einem Beitrag von Ingetraud Rüsen. 2., überarb. u. erw. Aufl., Schwalbach/Ts. 2008, S. 9. [8] Pellegrino, James W. et al. (eds.): Knowing what Students Know. The Science and Design of Educational Assessment. 2nd ed. Washington, DC 2003, S. 27. Meine Hervorhebungen. [9] Vgl. auch Gautschi, Peter: History Education Research in Switzerland. In: Köster, Manuel et al. (eds.): Researching History Education. International Perspectives and Disciplinary Traditions, Schwalbach/Ts. 2014, S. 104-132, v.a. S. 122-125.


Abbildungsnachweis
© berwis  / pixelio.de

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Thünemann, Holger: Historisches Denken. Lernprozessdiagnose statt Leistungsmessung. In: Public History Weekly 2 (2014) 19, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2014-2058.

Copyright (c) 2014 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: julia.schreiner (at) degruyter.com.


Categories: 2 (2014) 19
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2014-2058

Tags: , , , ,

3 replies »

  1. Holger Thünemann weist im letzten Abschnitt richtigerweise auf die Grenzen des Large-Scale-Modus bei der Leistungsmessung hin. Ob verknüpfendes historisches Lernen bei den SchülerInnen erzielt werden konnte, kann so sicher nicht wirklich nachgeprüft werden. Offene Aufgabenformate, wie Herr Thünemann vorschlägt, zu entwickeln ist aber gar nicht so einfach, hier liegt der didaktische Hund nämlich aus meiner Sicht begraben. Im Rahmen der Kompetenzorientierung werden immer wieder “besonders kreative” Ideen postuliert, die – so zeigt die Praxis aus der Sekundarstufe I – meine SchülerInnen überfordern, da ihnen auch die nötige Sachkompetenz fehlt, um diese gewinnbringend bearbeiten zu können. Ein Beispiel: Mauerbau. Aufgabe: “Du bist ein Jugendlicher in Ostberlin – Schreibe einen Brief an deinen Cousin im Westen. Wie fühlst du dich?” Dafür gibt es dann übrigens vier Punkte in einer Stegreifaufgabe! Wie man das bewerten soll? Ich weiß es nicht. Wie das den Unterricht verbessert und z. B. Urteilskompetenz aufbaut? Schleierhaft.

    Es bedarf vieler Anstrengungen seitens der Lehrer und der Fachdidaktiker – offene Aufgabenstellungen sind leichter eingefordert als konzipiert! Meistens sind diese Aufgabentypen, wie man sie z. B. in Schulbüchern findet, dem Kreativen Schreiben entlehnt. Ob dadurch wirklich “Geschichtskompetenz” vermittelt werden soll / wird, bleibt offen. Viel fruchtbarer wäre es, die Schüler über fiktive Fragestellungen debattieren zu lassen. Ist Karl der Große der Vater Europas? Heißt meine Schule zurecht Sophie-Scholl-Gymnasium? War der Merkantilismus eine erfolgreiche Wirtschaftsform? Ich denke, dass es hier noch viel zu tun gibt, um Abwechslung in die an sich wünschenswerten offenen Fragestellungen zu bringen und nicht immer nur Schriftkompetenz abzufragen, was zudem Jungen oft benachteiligt.

  2. Unterrichtshandeln und Historisches Denken

    Der Beitrag Holger Thünemanns ist zu begrüßen, da er den Blick für den Zusammenhang von Unterrichtshandeln und Historischem Denken schärft.
    Sein deutsches Pendant findet der Ansatz VanSlendrights wohl in Uwe Uffelmanns Konzept des Problemorientierten Geschichtsunterrichts [1]. Dieser setzt auf forschend-entdeckendes Lernen und individualisierte Lernwege statt auf „Fertigkost“ [2]. Die konstitutiven Elemente dieses Konzepts (Entwicklung einer den Untersuchungsgang strukturierende Leitfrage, Hypothesenbildung, Erarbeitungsphasen, Hypothesenmodifikation, Präsentations-, Urteils-, Diskurs- und Reflexionsphasen) erlauben einerseits die Integration des Vorwissens der Lernenden in den Lernprozess und andererseits Lernprozessdiagnosen sowie das „Gespräch über Ergebnisse“.
    Deutlich wird: Sowohl Uffelmann als auch VanSlendright fokussieren Problemlöseprozesse. Ihre Ansätze sind damit in hohem Maße an das gegenwärtige Postulat eines kompetenzorientierten Geschichtsunterrichts anschlussfähig.
    Aus dieser Perspektive sind zwei Aspekte Thünemanns Beitrag besonders interessant:
    Erstens sein Fingerzeig, etwaige Hürden der Lernenden in historischen Lehr-Lernprozessen zu identifizieren. Denn darauf aufbauend stellt sich die Frage, wie solche Hürden sinnvoll abgebaut und die Lernenden im Sinne eines Scaffolding bei Bedarf in ihren Lernprozessen konstruktiv unterstützt werden können. Denn dass z.B. die Artikulation von Sach- und Werturteilen notwendigerweise anderer Unterstützungsgerüste bedarf als metakognitive und metareflexive Operationen (z.B. die Reflexion der Standortgebundenheit eigener Arbeitsergebnisse/Urteile oder epistemologischer Grenzen und Chancen der gewählten Methode/des Quellenkorpus), Operationen der Quellenkritik und -interpretation oder „basale“ Operationen mit dem Ziel der Anbahnung eines Text- oder Begriffsverständnisses liegt auf der Hand. Entsprechende Unterstützungsmaßnahmen sind jedoch ein Desiderat [3]. Im englischsprachigen Raum ist der Begriff des Scaffolding vor allem mit dem Namen Pauline Gibbons verknüpft [4]. Das Potenzial ihres Zugangs liegt vor allem in der an den Lernenden orientierten, mögliche Hürden des Lernprozesses antizipierenden sprachsensiblen Konstruktion von Lehr-Lernarrangements.
    Zweitens die zentrale Bedeutung von Aufgabenformaten. Ohne Zweifel sind Aufgabenformate die Stellschrauben des Geschichtsunterrichts. Sie können allerdings auch dazu verleiten, entsprechende Arbeitsaufträge lediglich „abzuarbeiten“, ohne dass Lernenden die Prozesse des historischen Erkenntnisverfahrens bewusst werden. Indem sie Sach- und Werturteilsdiskussionen anregen, (Leit-)Fragen an die Vergangenheit provozieren oder metareflexive Diskussionen initiieren, erlauben gut situierte multimediale Impulse den Lernenden, sich in Ergänzung zu Aufgabenformaten diskursiv und fragend in ein Verhältnis zur Vergangenheit zu setzen. Es wäre schade, wenn multimediale Impulse als Denk- und Diskussionsanstöße bei der Entwicklung kompetenzorientierter Aufgabenformate gänzlich aus dem Blick gerieten.

    Anmerkungen
    [1] Uffelmann, Uwe: Problemorientierter Geschichtsunterricht. In: Bergmann, Klaus u.a. (Hrsg.): Handbuch der Geschichtsdidaktik. 5. überarb. Aufl. Seelze-Velber 1997, S. 282-287; dazu auch Hensel-Grobe, Meike : Problemorientierung und problemlösendes Denken. In: Barricelli, Michaele / Lücke, Martin (Hrsg.): Handbuch Praxis des Geschichtsunterrichts. Band 2. Schwalbach/Ts. 2012, S. 50-63.
    [2] Uffelmann, 1997, S. 282.
    [3] In Günther-Arndt, Hilke (Hrsg.): Geschichtsmethodik. Handbuch für die Sekundarstufe I und II. 4. Aufl. Berlin 2012 werden solche Unterstützungsgerüste grundsätzlich thematisiert. Birgit Wenzel sensibilisiert im Handbuch Praxis des Geschichtsunterrichts für dieses Desiderat. Siehe Wenzel, Birgit : Heterogenität und Inklusion – Binnendifferenzierung und Individualisierung. In: Barricelli, Michele / Lücke, Martin (Hrsg.): Handbuch Praxis des Geschichtsunterrichts. Band 2. Schwalbach/Ts. 2012, S. 238-254; Dies.: Aufgaben(kultur) und neue Prüfungsformen. In: Michele Barricelli/Martin Lücke (Hrsg.): Handbuch Praxis des Geschichtsunterrichts. Band 2. Schwalbach/Ts. 2012, S. 23-36. Mit Blick auf die Domänenspezifik kritisch Thünemann, Holger : Historische Lernaufgaben – Theoretische Überlegungen, empirische Befunde und forschungspragmatische Perspektiven. In: Zeitschrift für Geschichtsdidaktik 12 (2013), S. 141-155. Eine domänenspezifische Wendung versuchen Kühberger, Christoph / Windischbauer, Elfriede : Individualisierung und Differenzierung im Geschichtsunterricht. Offenes Lernen in Theorie und Praxis. Schwalbach/Ts. 2012. Ihre anregenden Vorschläge beziehen sich jedoch primär auf einzelne Teil-Kompetenzen des FUER-Modells. Das diskursive Moment sowie die progressive Verknüpfung von Wissen bleiben unberücksichtigt. Vgl. auch die Rezension von Christian Heuer in Zeitschrift für Geschichtsdidaktik 11 (2012), S. 284f.
    [4] Vgl. z.B. Gibbons, Pauline : Scaffolding Language, Scaffolding Learning. Teaching Second Language Learners in the Mainstream Classroom. Portsmouth 2010; Dies.: Englisch Learners, Academic Literacy and Thinking. Learning in the challange Zone. Portsmouth 2009.

  3. Replik
    Ich bedanke mich für die interessanten Kommentare. Sie machen deutlich, dass wir im Bereich der Aufgabenkonstruktion noch vor großen Herausforderungen stehen. Diese Herausforderungen werden sich nur meistern lassen, wenn Geschichtsdidaktiker, Lehrer, pädagogische Psychologen und Schüler – als Experten für Unterricht – bei der Aufgabenkonstruktion eng zusammenarbeiten.

    Zum Kommentar von Kai Wörner: In der Tat können die genannten Beispiele Schüler überfordern. Aber ist es wirklich leichter, mit ihnen die Frage zu diskutieren, ob Karl “der Große” der Vater Europas ist?

Pin It on Pinterest