Gender, Human Rights and Society in the EU

Gender, Menschenrechte und Gesellschaft in der EU

Abstract: Gender history has long since moved away from a focus on women and men and opened up research perspectives based on members of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex, and Queer community (LGBTIQ). The field “Gender, Law, and Society” must be remeasured. In the following, legal developments in the European Union (EU) to counteract discrimination on the basis of different sexual orientations shall be discussed. Heterosexuality is not subject to any social or legal discrimination and shall therefore not be addressed.
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-15144
Languages: English, German


Gender history has long since moved away from a focus on women and men and opened up research perspectives based on members of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex, and Queer community (LGBTIQ). The field “Gender, Law, and Society” must be remeasured. In the following, legal developments in the European Union (EU) to counteract discrimination on the basis of different sexual orientations shall be discussed. Heterosexuality is not subject to any social or legal discrimination and shall therefore not be addressed.

Aggression against LGBTIQ Persons

A survey[1] carried out by the EU Agency for Fundamental Rights in 2012 – with 93,079 people participating – among lesbians, gays, bisexuals, and transgender people in the EU documents that discrimination on the basis of people’s sexual orientation was and is widespread in social practice. This discrimination, which continues to be practiced in society to this day in 2020, is the starting point for the anti-LGBTIQ aggressiveness of the extreme right and national populist parties. The legal protection of various sexual orientations is progressing in the EU, is also however being undermined by some governments—especially those with dubious democratic identities (e.g. Poland and Hungary).

Legal Protection for Sexual Orientations?

To this day, the American Declaration of Rights[2] and the French Declaration of 1789[3] have the status of lighthouses, although they contained (or did not condemn) discrimination. They discriminated on the basis of gender in that they were predominantly male declarations of rights; they also discriminated on racist grounds. The different sexual orientations of people were not addressed in the context of the historical declarations of human rights. Founded in 1926, the Austrian League for Human Rights was one of the first non-governmental organizations (NGOs) that explicitly supported the human rights of homosexuals.[4] Nevertheless, this was still far from representing comprehensive recognition of a human right to different sexual orientations.

The legal protection of different sexual orientations and of gender identity is carried out today under the heading “Prohibition of Discrimination”.[5]

If one compares the interest in “sexual orientation”, “lgbt discrimination”, and “lgbtiq discrimination”[6] with the help of Google Trends (available throughout the world since 2004), it becomes clear that a general interest prevails regarding the subject “sexual orientation” and that discrimination on the basis of a non-heterosexual orientation is searched to a much lower degree. Of the 67 regions for which Google has data, the first EU country to appear in the list is Ireland, coming in 20th place.

The Yogyakarta Principles

In addition to several UN documents, the “Yogyakarta Principles” (“Principles on the Application of International Human Rights Law in Relation to Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity”)[7] of 2007 became important for the international discourse and were supplemented in 2017: “Additional Principles and State Obligations on the Application of International Human Rights in Relation to Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, Gender Expression and Sex Characteristics to Complement the Yogyakarta Principles.”[8]

The Fight of the EU

The EU is the broad-based attempt to regulate relations between states by law. The legalization of relations is extended to citizens. The comprehensive ban on discrimination in the EU today exists thanks to the efforts of the EU Parliament and some NGOs such as the European branch of the International Lesbian and Gay Association (ILGA)[9]. These approaches are supported by the EU Fundamental Rights Agency (FRA), where there is a page on LGBT people.[10]

The wording of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights expands the paradigmatic and even shorter canon regarding prohibition of discrimination as laid out in the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights of 1948[11], in which sexual orientation remains unmentioned, although sexual orientation as a legal question has long since had its place in the social discourse.

In the EU, the comprehensive ban on discrimination has developed from a historical core, equality and equal treatment of women and men, and from criticism of discrimination against homosexuals and transsexuals. Initially, the EU’s stance on equality and equal treatment between women and men followed the legal acquis of the UN and the Council of Europe, with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the European Convention on Human Rights playing a major role alongside other documents and covenants.

Discrimination Ban 2.0?

Since the Treaty of Amsterdam (1997, in force since 1 May 1999),[12] the EU has systematically extended the ban on discrimination. Ever since the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights only became legally binding in connection with the Treaty of Lisbon and its implementation in 2009, the Union has adopted corresponding directives, although these did not cover the entire world. The latter has only been the case since 2009 with the Charter of Fundamental Rights.

Allowing for the possibility to extend the prohibition of discrimination in the Amsterdam Treaty has given an overall boost to the debate on legal measures against discrimination, including on the grounds of sexual orientation. At the same time, the implementation of possibilities regarding EU legislation has gained momentum.

EU Directives Can Be Sexy

Directive 2000/78/EC of 27 November 2000 “establishing a general framework for equal treatment in employment and occupation” explicitly addresses the prohibition of discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. In sentence (11) of the Directive’s explanatory memorandum, it is stated that “discrimination based on religion or belief, disability, age or sexual orientation may undermine the achievement of the objectives of the EC [European Community] Treaty, in particular the attainment of a high level of employment and social protection, the raising of the standard of living and quality of life, economic and social cohesion and solidarity, and the free movement of persons.”[13]

The protection of various sexual orientations was thus linked to the raison dêtre of the EU and vice versa. Provisions have also been made for the practical enforcement of rights.

On 28 September 2008, the European Parliament adopted a resolution on “Human Rights, Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in the United Nations”, which also highlights fundamental problems in implementing the ban on discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Among other things, it states: “11. [regrets] that the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people are not yet always fully upheld in the European Union […]; 13. roundly condemns the fact that homosexuality, bisexuality or transsexuality are still considered as mental illnesses by some countries, including within the EU, and calls on states to combat it; calls in particular for depsychiatrisation of the transsexual, transgender, journey, for free choice of care providers, for changing identity to be simplified, and for costs to be met by social security schemes”.[14]

Despite the Populists

A model of society in which each person determines their sexual orientation and in which their decision is legally protected, has so far only been achieved to a limited extent in the EU. This is due less to the development of European law than to the fact that European society is divided on this issue. Discrimination against a person on the basis of their sexual orientation cannot be separated from further discrimination (on the basis of origin etc.). The extreme right-wing and national populist parties and movements try to teach the population that discrimination is a good thing. This must be resolutely counteracted.[15]

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Council of Europe. Combating discrimination on grounds of sexual orientation or gender identity. Strasbourg: Council of Europe, 2011.
  • Schmale, Wolfgang. Gender and Eurocentrism. A conceptual approach to European history. Stuttgart: Steiner Verlag, 2016.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] “EU LGBT survey. European Union lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender survey. Results at a glance,” FRA European Union Agency For Fundamental Rights, 17 May 2013, https://fra.europa.eu/sites/default/files/eu-lgbt-survey-results-at-a-glance_en.pdf (last accessed 6 February 2020).
[2] Cf. Virginia’s Declaration of Rights, 1776, which became the model for other declarations of rights in North America. “The Virginia Declaration of Rights,” National Archives. America’s Founding Documents, https://www.archives.gov/founding-docs/virginia-declaration-of-rights (last accessed 6 February 2020).
[3] “Déclaration des Droits de l’Homme et du Citoyen de 1789,” Legifrance.gouv.fr, https://www.legifrance.gouv.fr/Droit-francais/Constitution/Declaration-des-Droits-de-l-Homme-et-du-Citoyen-de-1789 (last accessed 6 February 2020).
[4] See also: Christopher Treiblmayr, “The Austrian League for Human Rights and its International Relations (19261938),” in Human Rights Leagues in Europe (1898-2016), ed. Wolfgang Schmale, Christopher Treiblmayr (Stuttgart: Franz Steiner, 2017), 223-256, here 242.
[5] “Charta Of Fundamental Rights Of The European Union,” Official Journal of the European Communities, 18 December 2000, https://www.europarl.europa.eu/charter/pdf/text_en.pdf (last accessed 6 February 2020), here Art. 21 (1).
[6] “Google Trends,” https://trends.google.de/trends/explore?date=all&q=sexual%20orientation,lgbtiq%20discrimination,lgbt%20discrimination (last accessed 6 February 2020).
[7] “Yogyakarta Principles,” International Commission of Jurists. Advocates for Justice and Human Rights, 1 March 2007, https://www.icj.org/yogyakarta-principles/ (last accessed 6 February 2020).
[8] “The Yogyakarta Principles,” https://yogyakartaprinciples.org/principles-en/ (last accessed 6 February 2020).
[9] Cf. “Nach Amsterdam: Sexuelle Orientierung und die Europäische Union,” ILGA Europa, http://www.hosiwien.at/img/pdf/Leitfaden.pdf (last accessed 6 February 2020).
[10] Cf. “Lgbt personen,” FRA European Union Agency For Fundamental Rights, https://fra.europa.eu/de/theme/lgbt-personen (last accessed 6 February 2020).
[11] “Universal Declaration of Human Rights,” United Nations, https://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/index.html (last accessed 6 February 2020).
[12] “European Union. Treaty of Amsterdam,” https://europa.eu/european-union/sites/europaeu/files/docs/body/treaty_of_amsterdam_en.pdf (last accessed 6 February 2020).
[13] “COUNCIL DIRECTIVE 2000/78/EC of 27 November 2000 establishing a general framework for equal treatment in employment and occupation,” Amtsblatt der Europäischen Gemeinschaft, 2 December 2000, https://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2000:303:0016:0022:en:PDF (last accessed 24 February 2020).
[14] “European Parliament resolution of 28 September 2011 on human rights, sexual orientation and gender identity at the United Nations”, European Parliament, 28 September 2011, https://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?pubRef=-//EP//TEXT+TA+P7-TA-2011-0427+0+DOC+XML+V0//EN (last accessed 6 February 2020).
[15] Note: The text represents a shortened and revised version of: Wolfgang Schmale, “Entwicklung der Menschenrechte in Bezug auf die sexuelle Orientierung,” Mein Europa, 31 May 2019, https://wolfgangschmale.eu/menschenrechte-und-sexuelle-orientierung/, (last accessed 13 February 2020). (Lecture on the Queer History Day, Vienna 31 May 2019).

_____________________

Image Credits

Rainbow Parade 2013, © HOSI Vienna, http://www.qwien.at/2019/05/13/festakt-10-jahre-qwien/ (last accessed 13 February 2020).

Recommended Citation

Schmale, Wolfgang: Gender, Human Rights and Society in the EU. In: Public History Weekly 8 (2020) 3, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-15144.

Editorial Responsibility

Isabella Schild / Thomas Hellmuth (Team Vienna)

Die Geschlechtergeschichte hat sich längst von der Fokussierung auf Frauen und Männer gelöst und sich Forschungsperspektiven auf der Grundlage von LGBTIQ geöffnet. Das Feld “Gender, Recht und Gesellschaft” muss neu vermessen werden. Im Folgenden wird von rechtlichen Entwicklungen in der EU ausgegangen, die der Diskriminierung diverser sexueller Orientierungen entgegenwirken sollen. Heterosexualität unterliegt keiner gesellschaftlichen oder rechtlichen Diskriminierung und wird daher nicht thematisiert.

Aggressionen gegen LGBTIQ Personen

Eine von der EU-Agentur für Grundrechte 2012 durchgeführte Erhebung[1] – bei Beteiligung von 93.079 Personen – unter Lesben, Schwulen, Bisexuellen und Transgender-Personen in der EU dokumentiert, dass in der gesellschaftlichen Praxis Diskriminierungen wegen der sexuellen Orientierung von Menschen weit verbreitet waren und sind. Diese bis heute, 2020, gesellschaftlich anhaltend praktizierte Diskriminierung ist der Ansatzpunkt für die anti-LGBTIQ-Aggressivität der rechtsextremen und nationalpopulistischen Parteien. Der rechtliche Schutz diverser sexueller Orientierungen schreitet in der EU zwar voran, wird aber von einigen Regierungen unterlaufen, vor allem solchen mit zweifelhafter demokratischer Identität (z.B. Polen, Ungarn).

Rechtschutz für die sexuelle Orientierung?

Bis heute haben die amerikanischen Rechte-Erklärungen[2] und die französische von 1789[3] den Status von Leuchttürmen, obwohl sie Diskriminierungen beinhalteten oder nicht ausschlossen. Sie diskriminierten aus Gründen des Geschlechts – sie waren überwiegend Männerrechtserklärungen; und sie diskriminierten auch aus rassistischen Gründen. Die unterschiedliche sexuelle Ausrichtung von Menschen wurde nicht im Zusammenhang der historischen Menschenrechtserklärungen thematisiert. Die 1926 gegründete Österreichische Liga für Menschenrechte war eine der ersten NGOs, die sich ausdrücklich für die Menschenrechte von Homosexuellen einsetzte.[4] Trotzdem war dies noch weit entfernt von einer umfassenden Anerkennung eines Rechts bzw. Menschenrechts auf unterschiedliche sexuelle Orientierungen.

Der rechtliche Schutz verschiedener sexueller Orientierungen und von Gender Identity wird heute unter der Überschrift “Verbot von Diskriminierung” ausgeführt.[5]

Vergleicht man mit Hilfe von Google Trends (weltweit 2004 bis heute) das Interesse an “sexual orientation” “lgbt discrimination”, und “lgbtiq discrimination”[6], zeigt sich, dass innerhalb des Betreffs “sexual orientation”, eher ein allgemeines Interesse vorherrscht und viel weniger nach Diskriminierung aufgrund einer nicht-heterosexuellen Orientierung gesucht wird. Unter den 67 Regionen, für die Google Daten besitzt, kommt erst an 20. Stelle ein EU-Land, nämlich Irland.

Die Yogyakarta-Prinzipien

Wichtig für die internationale Diskussion wurden außer mehreren UN-Dokumenten die “Yogyakarta-Prinzipien” (“Principles on the Application of International Human Rights Law in Relation to Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity”[7]) von 2007, die 2017 ergänzt wurden: “Additional Principles and State Obligations on the Application of International Human Rights in Relation to Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, Gender Expression and Sex Characteristics to Complement the Yogyakarta Principles”.[8]

Der Kampf der EU

Die EU ist der breit angelegte Versuch, die Beziehungen zwischen Staaten verbindlich durch Recht zu regeln. Die Verrechtlichung der Beziehungen reicht bis zu den Bürger*innen. Das umfassende Diskriminierungsverbot heute in der EU ist dem Einsatz des EU-Parlaments und einiger NGOs wie dem Europa-Ableger der International Lesbian and Gay Association (ILGA)[9] zu verdanken. Unterstützt werden diese Ansätze durch die EU-Grundrechteagentur (FRA), dort gibt es die Seite “LGBT-Personen”.[10]

Die Formulierungen in der EU-Grundrechte-Charta erweitern den paradigmatischen und (1948) noch kürzeren Kanon an Diskriminierungsverboten aus der Allgemeinen Erklärung der Menschenrechte der Vereinten Nationen[11], wo die sexuelle Orientierung noch nicht genannt wird, obwohl diese als rechtliche Frage im gesellschaftlichen Diskurs längst ihren Platz hatte.

In der EU hat sich das umfassende Diskriminierungsverbot aus einem historischen Kern heraus entwickelt, der Gleichstellung und Gleichbehandlung von Frauen und Männern sowie aus der Kritik der Diskriminierung von Homosexuellen und Transsexuellen. Anfangs – bei der Gleichstellung und Gleichbehandlung von Frauen und Männern – folgte dies dem Rechtsbestand der UN und des Europarats, wobei die Allgemeine Erklärung der Menschenrechte und die EMRK (Europäische Menschenrechtskonvention) eine tragende Rolle neben weiteren Dokumenten und Pakten spielten.

Diskriminierungsverbot 2.0?

Seit dem Vertrag von Amsterdam (1997, in Kraft 1. Mai 1999)[12] baut die EU das Diskriminierungsverbot systematisch aus. Da die EU-Grundrechte-Charta Rechtsverbindlichkeit erst in Verbindung mit dem Vertrag von Lissabon und seiner Inkraftsetzung 2009 erhielt, verabschiedete die Union in der Zwischenzeit entsprechende Richtlinien, die allerdings nicht die gesamte Lebenswelt erfassten. Letzteres ist erst seit 2009 mit der Grundrechte-Charta der Fall.

Die Eröffnung der Möglichkeit einer Ausweitung des Diskriminierungsverbots im Vertrag vom Amsterdam hat der Debatte um rechtliche Vorkehrungen gegen Diskriminierungen, auch wegen einer sexuellen Orientierung, insgesamt Auftrieb gegeben. Zugleich nahm die Umsetzung der Möglichkeit zu einer EU-Gesetzgebung Fahrt auf.

Richtlinien der EU können sexy sein

Die Richtlinie 2000/78/EG vom 27. November 2000 “zur Festlegung eines allgemeinen Rahmens für die Verwirklichung der Gleichbehandlung in Beschäftigung und Beruf” spricht das Verbot der Diskriminierung wegen der sexuellen Ausrichtung explizit an. In Satz (11) der Begründung der Richtlinie lautet es: “Diskriminierungen wegen der Religion oder der Weltanschauung, einer Behinderung, des Alters oder der sexuellen Ausrichtung können die Verwirklichung der im EG-Vertrag festgelegten Ziele unterminieren, insbesondere die Erreichung eines hohen Beschäftigungsniveaus und eines hohen Maßes an sozialem Schutz, die Hebung des Lebensstandards und der Lebensqualität, den wirtschaftlichen und sozialen Zusammenhalt, die Solidarität sowie die Freizügigkeit.”[13]

Der Schutz diverser sexueller Orientierungen wurde dadurch an die raison d’être der EU gebunden und umgekehrt. Außerdem wurde Vorsorge für die praktische Durchsetzung der Rechte getroffen.

Am 28. September 2008 verabschiedete das Europäische Parlament eine Entschließung zu “Menschenrechten, sexueller Orientierung und Geschlechtsidentität im Rahmen der Vereinten Nationen”, in der auch auf Grundprobleme bei der Umsetzung des Diskriminierungsverbots aufgrund der sexuellen Orientierung deutlich hingewiesen wird. U.a. heißt es dort: “11. [es wird bedauert], dass die Rechte von Lesben, Schwulen, Bisexuellen und Transgender-Personen in der Europäischen Union nicht immer umfassend gewahrt werden […]; 13. verurteilt aufs Schärfste die Tatsache, dass Homosexualität, Bisexualität oder Transsexualität von manchen Staaten, auch in der EU, noch immer als psychische Krankheit angesehen werden, und fordert diese Staaten auf, dem ein Ende zu bereiten; fordert insbesondere, dass Transsexuelle und Transgender-Personen nicht in der Psychiatrie behandelt werden […] sowie dass die Änderung der Identität vereinfacht wird und die Sozialversicherungen die Kosten übernehmen.”[14]

Den Populisten zum Trotz

Ein Gesellschaftsmodell, in dem jeder Mensch seine sexuelle Orientierung selber bestimmt und diese Entscheidung rechtlich geschützt wird, ist auch in der EU bisher nur bedingt verwirklicht. Das liegt weniger an der Entwicklung des europäischen Rechts, sondern daran, dass die europäische Gesellschaft in dieser Frage gespalten ist. Die Diskriminierung eines Menschen aufgrund der sexuellen Orientierung ist nicht zu trennen von weiteren Diskriminierungen (aufgrund der Herkunft etc.). Die rechtsextremen und nationalpopulistischen Parteien und Bewegungen versuchen der Bevölkerung beizubringen, dass Diskriminierungen eine gute Sache sind. Dem gilt es entschieden entgegenzuwirken.[15]

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Council of Europe. Combating discrimination on grounds of sexual orientation or gender identity. Strasbourg: Council of Europe, 2011.
  • Schmale, Wolfgang. Gender and Eurocentrism. A conceptual approach to European history. Stuttgart: Steiner Verlag, 2016.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] “LGBT-Erhebung in der EU – Erhebung unter Lesben, Schwulen, Bisexuellen und Transgender-Personen in der Europäischen Union auf einen Blick,” FRA European Union Agency for fundamental rights, 17. Mai 2013, https://fra.europa.eu/de/publication/2014/lgbt-erhebung-der-eu-erhebung-unter-lesben-schwulen-bisexuellen-und-transgender (letzter Zugriff am 6. Februar 2020).
[2] Vgl. z.B. Virginia’s Declaration of Rights 1776, die zum Vorbild weiterer Rechte-Erklärungen in Nordamerika wurde. “The Virginia Declaration of Rights,” National Archives. America’s Founding Documents, https://www.archives.gov/founding-docs/virginia-declaration-of-rights (letzter Zugriff 6. Februar 2020).
[3] “Déclaration des Droits de l’Homme et du Citoyen de 1789,” Legifrance.gouv.fr, https://www.legifrance.gouv.fr/Droit-francais/Constitution/Declaration-des-Droits-de-l-Homme-et-du-Citoyen-de-1789 (letzter Zugriff 6. Februar 2020).
[4] Siehe auch Christopher Treiblmayr, “The Austrian League for Human Rights and its International Relations (19261938),” in Human Rights Leagues in Europe (1898-2016), ed. Wolfgang Schmale, Christopher Treiblmayr (Stuttgart: Franz Steiner, 2017), 223-256, here 242.
[5] “Charta Of Fundamental Rights Of The European Union,” Official Journal of the European Communities, 18 December 2000, https://www.europarl.europa.eu/charter/pdf/text_en.pdf (letzter Zugriff 6. Februar 2020), here Art. 21 (1).
[6] “Google Trends,” https://trends.google.de/trends/explore?date=all&q=sexual%20orientation,lgbtiq%20discrimination,lgbt%20discrimination (letzter Zugriff 6. Februar 2020).
[7] “Yogyakarta Principles,” International Commission of Jurists. Advocates for Justice and Human Rights, 1 March 2007, https://www.icj.org/yogyakarta-principles/ (letzter Zugriff 6. Februar 2020).
[8] “The Yogyakarta Principles,” https://yogyakartaprinciples.org/principles-en/ (letzter Zugriff 6. Februar 2020).
[9] “Nach Amsterdam: Sexuelle Orientierung und die Europäische Union,” ILGA Europa, http://www.hosiwien.at/img/pdf/Leitfaden.pdf (letzter Zugriff 6. Februar 2020).
[10] “Lgbt personen,” FRA European Union Agency For Fundamental Rights, https://fra.europa.eu/de/theme/lgbt-personen (letzter Zugriff 6. Februar 2020).
[11] “Universal Declaration of Human Rights,” United Nations, https://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/index.html (letzter Zugriff 6. Februar 2020).
[12] “European Union. Treaty of Amsterdam,” https://europa.eu/european-union/sites/europaeu/files/docs/body/treaty_of_amsterdam_en.pdf (letzter Zugriff 6. Februar 2020).
[13] “Richtlinie 2000/78/EG des Rates vom 27. November 2000. Zur Festlegung eines allgemeinen Rahmens für die Verwirklichung der Gleichbehandlung in Beschäftigung und Beruf,” Amtsblatt der Europäischen Gemeinschaft, 2. Dezember 2000, https://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2000:303:0016:0022:en:PDF (letzter Zugriff 24. Februar 2020).
[14] “Entschließung des Europäischen Parlaments vom 28. September 2011 zu Menschenrechten, sexueller Orientierung und Geschlechtsidentität im Rahmen der Vereinten Nationen,” Europäisches Parlament, 28. September 2011, https://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?pubRef=-//EP//TEXT+TA+P7-TA-2011-0427+0+DOC+XML+V0//EN (letzter Zugriff 6. Februar 2020).
[15] Hinweis: Der Text stellt eine gekürzte und überarbeitete Version dar von: Wolfgang Schmale, “Entwicklung der Menschenrechte in Bezug auf die sexuelle Orientierung,” Mein Europa, 31. Mai 2019, https://wolfgangschmale.eu/menschenrechte-und-sexuelle-orientierung/, (letzter Zugriff 13. Februar 2020). (Lecture on the Queer History Day, Vienna 31 May 2019).

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Rainbow Parade 2013, © HOSI Vienna, http://www.qwien.at/2019/05/13/festakt-10-jahre-qwien/.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Schmale, Wolfgang: Gender, Menschenrechte und Gesellschaft in der EU. In: Public History Weekly 8 (2020) 3, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-15144.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Isabella Schild / Thomas Hellmuth (Team Vienna)

Copyright (c) 2020 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 8 (2020) 3
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-15144

Tags: , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

I accept that my given data and my IP address is sent to a server in the USA only for the purpose of spam prevention through the Akismet program.More information on Akismet and GDPR.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest