Collecting Ego-Documents and Democratisation

Selbstzeugnisse sammeln und Demokratisierung

 

Abstract: Women’s History and Gender History pursue an essentially socio-political demand. This aspect shall be illustrated in this article by using the example of collections, which archive ego-documents such as diaries, letter exchanges, or photo albums. The author explains the connection to “public history” and suggests that those who donate ego-documents to archives should be called “citizen scientists”.
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-15175.
Languages: English, German


“Each everyday life story contains world history,” stated the social historian Michael Mitterauer nearly 30 years ago.[1] With this, he described the schedule of the often-quoted paradigm shift in the social and historical sciences in the 1970s and 1980s. The protagonists of these academic fields embarked on a mission to create nothing less than a new egalitarian official view of history. Amongst many others, one question was: Which sources would they use to establish this?

Storing Knowledge Sustainably

Up until the 1970s und 1980s, the thematisation of ‘great events’ and ‘important men’ had an effect on which people were not documented in archives or museums: Women in general, but also men from middle und lower-class backgrounds, as well as members of so-called minorities were barely mentioned—except in official sources such as court documents. The researchers were therefore required to be inventive. Conversations with contemporary witnesses and oral-history interviews were just two examples of methods which were developed.[2] Simultaneously, popular ego-documents such as memoirs, diaries, or letters were ‘discovered’ as sources for research. In recent times, ‘private’ film and video recordings have also been used.

Nowadays, these are all collected in special collections which have been established regarding specific interests. One of these collections is the Sammlung Frauennachlässe (Collection of Women’s Personal Papers) at the Department of History at the University of Vienna. The historian who initiated that collection, Edith Saurer, revealed in an interview that, from the outset, the aim did not comprise a systematic plan to establish an archive. In fact, it was the “interest in the history of women and gender, and this made us want to look for sources such as these. [And it was sources] which we required by all means.”[3] The same applied to the Dokumentation lebensgeschichtlicher Aufzeichnungen (Documentation of Biographical Records) which was initiated by Michael Mitterauer at the Department of Economic and Social History at the University of Vienna. Its founding had been preceded by various initiatives such as a discussion group which had taken place as part of a university course at the Volkshochschule Ottakring, an adult education center in the district of Ottakring in Vienna in 1984.

These non- (or ‘semi-)university’ contexts of history workshops etc. adhered to the motto “Dig where you’re standing” (Sven Lindqvist) and are remembered as constituting a “new historical movement”.[4] The now commonly used keyword “public history” was not yet used at the time.

The Chicken and the Egg

Popular formats on television were able to attract a wide audience. These are likely to have significantly contributed to the distribution of the idea that “each everyday life story” also contains “world history”. In this vein, the German filmmaker Heinrich Breloer singled out histories from “more than 1,000 private diaries” for the television series Mein Tagebuch [“My Diary”], “[which he] then adapted into [a] very personal and moving history lesson”.[5] The series was broadcast in ten parts on ARD’s regional programming from 1980 onwards, accompanied by a book, and received prominent accolades.[6] A comparable project would be the internationally co-produced docudrama series 14 – Tagebücher des Ersten Weltkriegs (“14 – Diaries of the Great War”) by director Jan Peter, which was broadcast for the first time in 2014 to commemorate the beginning of the First World War.[7] Evidently, interest in such forms of presentation continues to persist. Which source inventories are available to us?

A Colorful Landscape

Meanwhile, various special collections for written self-testimonies have emerged. In 2015, an exchange platform called the European Ego-Documents Archive and Collections Network (EDAC) was founded. On the other hand however, nearly all established collections now also possess special inventories of personal papers in their repertoire.

Examples from the German-speaking countries include the Handschriftensammlung, a collection of manuscripts at the Vienna City Library in the City Hall, the Wiener Video Rekorder (“Viennese Video Recorder”) collection of the Österreichische Mediathek, an Austrian archive for sound recordings and videos, the German emigrant letters collection of the Gotha Research Library at the University of Erfurt, and the war letters collection in the Museum for Communication Berlin.

As different as these initiatives are, their freely chosen sole purpose is just as similar. On the one hand, they are scientifically motivated: The sources that had previously not been systematically collected should be made available. On the other hand, they are tied to a clearly sociopolitical pretense: Places should be made available where those interested can submit sources which had previously been regarded as ‘not worth the research’. In this sense, this work is to be understood as a “civic engagement”.[8] But who is involved in getting written self-testimonies into the collections? And why?

Who Pursues Which Interests?

The composition of a collection of ego-documents depends on decisions which are made by various people who also have to rely on each other respectively. The writers, descendants, or other authorised persons come up with letters, diaries, etc., which the curators and archivists collect and manage systematically, whilst the researchers analyse them.

The handing over of personal recordings is very likely based on the interest in remembering a person or a certain event. The authors are able to “continue living in this way”, as was put by a woman who handed over the personal documents of her mother to the Sammlung Frauennachlässe.[9] Amongst significant parts of the population, the boom regarding (popular) scientific publications in the book and media market has apparently led to a new kind of auto-/biographical consciousness, which in turn may do preliminary work for the collections. The fact that results are also expected for all intents and purposes is something that had been made clear by the same woman who had contributed to the collection several years before: “It’s a pity that the stuff isn’t being researched yet!”[10]

After the fundamental decision to offer something, the next thing to ponder is what. Even a fairly comprehensive personal estate either by a deceased person or someone still living requires certain choices. Everything ever written or photographed by a person would hardly be possible to hand over. This is why a specifically arranged compilation such as a certain exchange of letters (preferably war letters or love letters), a series of housekeeping books—or even just a simple diary—are used.

In this way, those who have had personal papers recorded actively determine what kind of information and format even gets documented—and therefore have research conducted on it. Accordingly, I suggest that their roles be termed ‘citizen scientists’—even if possibly they are not at all aware of it. However, what does this have to do with the category of gender?

The Democratization of Scientific Life

The questions centering on the History of Everyday Life, Women’s History and, later, Gender History and Cultural History (etc.) targeted a democratisation of the scientific community. One indicator for a successful implementation can be the gender-specific and class-specific composition of collections.

In the early stages of the History of Everyday Life and Social History, attention was paid particularly to people from poorly educated, rural backgrounds. Indeed, the Dokumentation lebensgeschichtlicher Aufzeichnungen was able to collect numerous such memories. This was then partially released to the public in the book series Damit es nicht verloren geht (“Lest we forget”), which has been published since 1983 – from which the volume Hartes Brot. Aus dem Leben einer Bergbäuerin (“Hard Bread. From the life of a female mountain farmer”) by Barbara Passruger (née Hofer, 1901–2001)[11] became a bestseller. Since then, the social diversification of the authors has steadily increased.[12]

The gender-specific representation of the writers in the collections can also be backed up by specific figures. Of course, the substantial lack of women in historiographies was a catalyst for early Women’s History—and also the motive for the initiative to establish the Sammlung Frauennachlässe, which as the only feminist-oriented institution in the German-speaking world, has explicitly specialized in personal papers. In contrast, what is the case in collections without a gender-specific emphasis?

Revealing Trends

The Verzeichnis der künstlerischen, wissenschaftlichen und kulturpolitischen Nachlässe in Österreich (index of artistic, scientific, and cultural-political legacies in Austria), a database, which was established by the Literaturarchiv, the literary archive of the Austrian National Library, reveals a general impression of the unequal representation amongst genders. In the online “people lexicon” which was created to accompany the database, biographical notes on 3,473 recorded people (out of “roughly 6,100” altogether) are available at this current time (early 2020). 384 of those are women. This represents a share of 11%.

Such results led the library scientist Dagmar Jank to come up with the pessimistic prognosis that even the radically different archiving methods which had recently been established could not compensate for the previous “failures of a male-dominated world of libraries and archiving”.[13] This seems to remain a great concern for the written legacies of artists.

Conversely, history-oriented collections reveal a completely different picture, as the following two examples show: In the collection of the Deutsches Tagebucharchiv (German diary archive) in Emmendingen, 1,666 of the 4,043 writers documented in 2017 were women (41%). In the Dokumentation lebensgeschichtlicher Aufzeichnungen, 1,882 out of 3,326 were women (57%). These numbers are exemplary and tendentious. However, they clearly show that women and men are much more evenly represented in collections which showcase the History of Everyday Life than those which deal with creative artists. The democratisation of the scientific life was one of the priorities of the “new historical movement”. The collecting of personal papers has proven to be a successful way of achieving that.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • The contents of this essay shall be further outlined in the following text, which shall be published in Spring 2020:: Gerhalter, Li. “Selbstzeugnisse sammeln. Eigensinnige Logiken und vielschichtige Interessenslagen.” In Logiken der Sammlung. Das Archiv zwischen Strategie und Eigendynamik, eds. Petra-Maria Dallinger, Georg Hofer, in collaboration with Stefan Maurer. Berlin: De Gruyter, 2020. Available online in open access: https://www.degruyter.com/view/serial/491282 (last accessed 24 February 2020).
  • Gerhalter, Li, and Christa Hämmerle. Krieg – Politik – Schreiben. Tagebücher von Frauen (1918-1950). Wien/Köln/Weimar: Böhlau Verlag, 2015.
  • Adamski, Theresa, Blake, Doreen, Duma, Veronika, Helfert, Veronika, Neuwirth, Michaela, Rütten, Tim, and Waltraud Schütz. Geschlechtergeschichten vom Genuss. Zum 60. Geburtstag von Gabriella Hauch. Wien: Mandelbaum, 2019.

Web Resources

_____________________
[1] Michael Mitterauer, “Lebensgeschichten sammeln. Probleme um Aufbau und Auswertung einer Dokumentation zur popularen Autobiographik,” in Biographieforschung. Gesammelte Aufsätze der Tagung des Fränkischen Freilandmuseums am 12. und 13. Oktober 1990, ed. Hermann Heidrich (Neustadt a.d. Aisch: Fränkisches Freilandsmuseum, 1991), 17-35, here 18.
[2] Amongst others, see: Peter Gautschi, “Wie soll die Geschichte des eigenen Landes vermittelt werden?,” in Public History Weekly 2 (2014) 27, https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/5-2017-13/how-should-history-of-ones-own-country-be-taught (last accessed 16 February 2020).
[3] Edith Saurer, “For Women, the Act of Writing – Whether Letters or Diaries – Expresses their Identity, their Life’s Ambition, the Will to Survive,” in Women and Minorities: Ways of Archiving, eds. Kristina Popova, Marijana Piskova, Margareth Lanzinger, Nikola Langreiter, and Petar Vodenicharov (Sofia / Vienna: 2009), 16-19, here 16. My gratitude goes to Margareth Lanzinger for providing the interview’s German manuscript.
[4] Hanne Lessau, “Sammlungsinstitutionen des Privaten. Die Entstehung von Tagebucharchiven in den 1980er und 1990er Jahren,” in Selbstreflexionen und Weltdeutungen. Tagebücher in der Geschichte und der Geschichtsschreibung des 20. Jahrhunderts, eds. Janosch Steuwer, and Rüdiger Graf (Göttingen: Wallstein Verlag, 2015), 336-365, here 338.
[5] “Mein Tagebuch. D.1980,” fernsehserien.de, www.fernsehserien.de/mein-tagebuch (last accessed 16 February 2020).
[6] Lessau, “Sammlungsinstitutionen des Privaten,” 354.
[7] “Tagebücher des Ersten Weltkriegs,” Bayerischer Rundfunk. Anstalt des öffentlichen Rechts, http://www.14-tagebuecher.de (last accessed 16 February 2020).
[8] Patrizia Gabrielli, “Tagebücher, Erinnerungen, Autobiografien. Selbstzeugnisse von Frauen im Archivio Diaristico Nazionale in Pieve Santo Stefano,” in L’Homme. Europäische Zeitschrift für Feministische Geschichtswissenschaft 15, no. 2 (2004): 345-352, here 346.
[9] Christina O.: in a mail, August 2016. Due to data protection rules, the name of the contributor is abbreviated.
[10] Christina O.: in a mail, January 2008.
[11] Barbara Passrugger, Hartes Brot. Aus dem Leben einer Bergbäuerin (Wien: Böhlau Verlag, 1989).
[12] Günter Müller, “Dokumentation lebensgeschichtlicher Aufzeichnungen,” in Briefe – Tagebücher – Autobiographien. Studien und Quellen für den Unterricht, eds. Peter Eigner, Christa Hämmerle, and Günter Müller (Innsbruck / Vienna / Bolzano: Studien Verlag, 2006), 140-146, here 141.
[13] Dagmar Jank, “Frauennachlässe in Archiven, Bibliotheken und Spezialeinrichtungen. Beispiele, Probleme und Erfordernisse,” in Die Kunst des Vernetzens. Festschrift für Wolfgang Hempel, ed. Botho Brachmann (Berlin: Verlag für Berlin-Brandenburg, 2006), 411-419, here 411.

_____________________

Image Credits

Individual documents from the estate of Martha Teichmann (1888-1977) in the Sammlung Frauennachlässe, photo: Li Gerhalter.

Recommended Citation

Gerhalter, Li: Collecting Ego-Documents and Democratisation. In: Public History Weekly 8 (2020) 3, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-15175.

Editorial Responsibility

Isabella Schild / Thomas Hellmuth (Team Vienna)

“In jeder Lebensgeschichte steckt Weltgeschichte”, stellte der Sozialhistoriker Michael Mitterauer vor nunmehr knapp 30 Jahren fest.[1] Damit beschrieb er den Fahrplan des vielzitierten Paradigmenwechsels in den Sozial- und Geschichtswissenschaften der 1970er- und 1980er-Jahre. Dessen Akteur*innen machten sich auf, um nichts weniger zu schaffen, als ein neues egalitäres offizielles Geschichtsbild. Alleine: Auf welchen Quellen sollte dieses aufgebaut werden?

Nachhaltige Wissensspeicher

Die bis in die 1970er Jahre übliche Schwerpunktsetzung auf ‘große Ereignisse’ und ‘bedeutende Männer’ hatte auch Auswirkungen darauf, welche Menschen in Archiven oder Museen nicht dokumentiert wurden: Frauen im Allgemeinen, aber auch Männer aus den mittleren und unteren Gesellschaftsschichten sowie Angehörige sogenannter Minderheiten konnten hier kaum Spuren hinterlassen – ausgenommen in Herrschaftsquellen wie etwa Gerichtsakten. Die Forscher*innen waren also gefordert, erfinderisch zu sein. Als eine Methode wurden Zeitzeug*innengespräche und Oral-History-Interviews entwickelt.[2] Gleichzeitig wurden populäre Selbstzeugnisse wie Lebenserinnerungen, Tagebücher oder Briefe als Wissensressourcen ‘entdeckt’. In jüngster Zeit kamen ‘private’ Film- und Videoaufnahmen dazu.

Gesammelt werden diese inzwischen in eigens etablierten Spezialsammlungen. Eine davon ist die Sammlung Frauennachlässe am Institut für Geschichte der Universität Wien. Wie deren Initiatorin Edith Saurer in einem Interview berichtet hat, stand dabei zu Beginn nicht der systematische Plan, ein Archiv aufzubauen. Vielmehr war es das “Interesse an der Frauen- und Geschlechtergeschichte und das hat uns sensibilisiert für Quellen dieser Art. [Und Quellen] haben wir auf jeden Fall benötigt.”[3] Ähnlich verlief die Geschichte der von Michael Mitterauer initiierten Dokumentation lebensgeschichtlicher Aufzeichnungen am Institut für Wirtschafts- und Sozialgeschichte der Universität Wien. Der Gründung waren verschiedene Initiativen wie etwa ein Gesprächskreis vorangegangen, der im Rahmen einer Universitätslehrveranstaltung 1984 an der Volkshochschule Ottakring stattgefunden hat.

Diese außer- oder ‘semiuniversitären’ Kontexte von Geschichtswerkstätten etc. folgten dem Motto “Grabe, wo du stehst” (Sven Lindqvist) und werden als “neue Geschichtsbewegung” erinnert.[4] Das aktuell verwendete Schlagwort “Public History” wurde dafür damals noch nicht gebraucht.

Von Hennen und Eiern

Eine breite Öffentlichkeit fanden populare Formate im Fernsehen. Diese dürften wesentlich zur Streuung der Idee, dass in “jeder Lebensgeschichte” auch “Weltgeschichte” stecken würde, beigetragen haben. So “suchte sich” der deutsche Filmemacher Heinrich Breloer für die Fernsehreihe “Mein Tagebuch” aus “über 1000 privaten Tagebüchern […] Geschichten heraus, [die er] zu [einem] sehr persönlichen, bewegenden Geschichtsunterricht adaptierte.”[5] Die Reihe wurde ab 1980 in zehn Teilen in den regionalen Programmen der ARD ausgestrahlt, durch eine Buchpublikation erweitert und erhielt prominente Auszeichnungen.[6] Ein vergleichbares Projekt war die international koproduzierte dokumentarische Dramaserie “14 – Tagebücher des Ersten Weltkriegs” von Regisseur Jan Peter, die aus Anlass des Gedenkens an den Beginn des Ersten Weltkriegs 2014 erstausgestrahlt wurde.[7] Das Interesse an solchen Darstellungsformen ist also anhaltend. Welche Quellenbestände stehen dabei zur Verfügung?

Eine bunte Landschaft

Inzwischen sind verschiedene Spezialsammlungen für Selbstzeugnisse entstanden. Mit dem European Ego-Documents Archives and Collections Network (EDAC) wurde 2015 auch eine Austauschplattform gegründet.

Gleichzeitig haben aber mittlerweile so gut wie alle Sammlungseinrichtungen auch Spezialbestände von Selbstzeugnissen im Repertoire. Als solche ausgewiesen sind etwa die Handschriftensammlung der Wienbibliothek im Rathaus, die Sammlung “Wiener Video Rekorder” der Österreichischen Mediathek, die Deutsche Auswandererbriefsammlung Gotha an der Universität Erfurt oder die Feldpostsammlung im Kommunikationsmuseum Berlin.

So unterschiedlich diese Initiativen sind – so ähnlich ist ihr frei gewählter Selbstzweck. Dieser ist einerseits wissenschaftlich motiviert: Es sollen Quellen verfügbar gemacht werden, die zuvor nicht systematisch gesammelt worden sind. Daran geknüpft ist andererseits ein klarer gesellschaftspolitischer Anspruch: Es sollen Orte zur Verfügung gestellt werden, wo Interessierte jene Quellen abgeben können, die zuvor als ‘nicht beforschenswert’ galten. In dem Sinne ist diese Arbeit als “zivilgesellschaftliches Engagement” zu verstehen.[8] Wer bringt nun aber Selbstzeugnisse in die Sammlungen? Und warum?

Wer verfolgt welche Interessen?

Der Aufbau eines Sammlungsbestandes von Selbstzeugnissen setzt Entscheidungen voraus, die von verschiedenen Akteur*innen getroffen werden, die dabei jeweils aufeinander angewiesen sind: Die Schreiber*innen, Nachfahr*innen oder sonstigen Befugten stellen die Briefe, Tagebücher etc. zur Verfügung, die Sammlungsbetreuer*innen und Archivar*innen sammeln und verwalten diese systematisch, die Forscher*innen werten sie aus.

Der Übergabe persönlicher Aufzeichnungen liegt insgesamt wohl das Interesse zugrunde, an eine Person oder an ein bestimmtes Ereignis zu erinnern. Die Verfasser*innen können “in dieser Form weiterleben”, wie es eine Nachlassgeberin gegenüber der Sammlung Frauennachlässe formuliert hat.[9] Die Konjunktur (populär-)wissenschaftlicher Publikationen auf dem Buch- und Medienmarkt hat in breiten Teilen der Bevölkerung offenbar zu einer Art von neuem auto/biografischem Selbstbewusstsein geführt, was wiederum den Sammlungseinrichtungen zuarbeitet. Dass dabei durchaus auch Ergebnisse erwartet werden, hatte dieselbe Nachlassgeberin schon einige Jahre zuvor klargemacht: “Schade, dass der Stoff noch nicht beforscht wird!”[10]

Nach der grundsätzlichen Entscheidung, etwas abzugeben, ist als nächstes abzuwägen: was. Auch ein noch so umfangreicher Nach- oder Vorlass setzt eine gewisse Auswahl voraus. Alles abzugeben, was ein Mensch jemals geschrieben oder fotografiert hat, wäre wohl kaum möglich. Demnach handelt es sich meistens um konkret gestaltete Zusammenstellungen wie etwa einen bestimmten Briefwechsel (bevorzugt Feldpost- oder Paarkorrespondenzen), eine Serie von Haushaltsbüchern – oder auch nur um ein einziges Tagebuch.

Dadurch bestimmen die Nachlassgeber*innen aktiv mit, welche Art von Informationen überhaupt dokumentiert – und damit beforscht werden können. Entsprechend schlage ich vor, ihre Position als die von Citizen Scientists zu bezeichnen – auch wenn sie sich dessen womöglich gar nicht gewahr sind. Was hat das aber mit der Kategorie Geschlecht zu tun?

Die Demokratisierung des Wissenschaftsbetriebes

Die alltags- und frauen-, später die geschlechter- und kulturgeschichtlichen (etc.) Fragestellungen zielten und zielen auf eine Demokratisierung des Wissensbetriebes ab. Ein Gradmesser für eine gelungene Umsetzung kann die geschlechter- oder schichtspezifische Zusammensetzung von Sammlungsbeständen sein.

Das Interesse der frühen Alltags- und Sozialgeschichte lag besonders auf Personen aus bildungsfernen ländlichen Zusammenhängen. Tatsächlich konnte etwa die Dokumentation lebensgeschichtlicher Aufzeichnungen zahlreiche entsprechende Erinnerungen sammeln. Diese wurden dann teilweise in der seit 1983 herausgegebenen Buchreihe “Damit es nicht verloren geht” veröffentlicht. Besonders der Band “Hartes Brot. Aus dem Leben einer Bergbäuerin” von Barbara Passrugger (geb. Hofer, 1910–2001)[11] entwickelte sich dabei zu einem Verkaufsschlager. Mittlerweile ist die soziale Streuung der Autor*innen zunehmend breiter geworden.[12]

Die geschlechterspezifische Repräsentanz der Schreiber*innen in den Sammlungsbeständen lässt sich auch mit konkreten Zahlen belegen. Das weitgehende Fehlen von Frauen in der Geschichtsschreibung war ja der Motor für die frühe Frauengeschichte – und auch der Anlass für die Initiative zur Sammlung Frauennachlässe, die sich als einzige feministisch ausgerichtete Einrichtung im deutschsprachigen Raum konkret auf Selbstzeugnisse spezialisiert hat. Wie sieht es aber in Sammlungen ohne geschlechterspezifischen Fokus aus?

Aussagekräftige Tendenzen

Einen tendenziellen Eindruck der nach Geschlecht ungleichen Repräsentanz ermöglicht die vom Literaturarchiv der Österreichischen Nationalbibliothek erstellte Datenbank “Verzeichnis der künstlerischen, wissenschaftlichen und kulturpolitischen Nachlässe in Österreich”. In dem dazu online verfügbaren “Personenlexikon” stehen derzeit (Anfang 2020) von 3.473 (der insgesamt “rund 6.100”) erfassten Personen auch biografische Notizen zur Verfügung. 384 davon sind Frauen. Das ist ein Anteil von 11 Prozent.

Solche Ergebnisse veranlassten die Bibliothekswissenschafterin Dagmar Jank zu der pessimistischen Prognose, dass auch die radikal veränderten Archivierungspraktiken der jüngeren Vergangenheit die bisherigen “Versäumnisse einer männlich geprägten Archiv- und Bibliothekswelt nicht wieder wett machen” könnten.[13] Für Künstler*innennachlässe bleibt das wohl zu befürchten.

In den historisch ausgerichteten Sammlungen zeigt sich hingegen ein ganz anderes Bild, wie die folgenden zwei Beispiele belegen: Im Bestand des Deutschen Tagebucharchivs in Emmendingen waren von den im Jahr 2017 4.043 dokumentierten Schreiber*innen 1.666 Frauen (41 Prozent). In der Dokumentation lebensgeschichtlicher Aufzeichnungen waren es 1.882 von 3.326 (57 Prozent). Diese Zahlen sind exemplarisch und veranschaulichen lediglich eine Tendenz. Dennoch zeigen sie klar, dass Frauen und Männer in alltagshistorisch ausgerichteten Sammlungen bei weitem ausgeglichener vertreten sind, als in jenen, die sich mit Kulturschaffenden beschäftigen. Die Demokratisierung des Wissenschaftsbetriebes war eines der Anliegen der “neuen Geschichtsbewegung”. Selbstzeugnisse zu sammeln hat sich als ein erfolgreicher Weg dorthin erwiesen.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Die Inhalte dieses Beitrages werden weiterführend dargestellt in dem folgenden Text, welcher im Frühling 2020 erscheint: Gerhalter, Li. “Selbstzeugnisse sammeln. Eigensinnige Logiken und vielschichtige Interessenslagen.” In Logiken der Sammlung. Das Archiv zwischen Strategie und Eigendynamik, edited by Petra-Maria Dallinger, Georg Hofer, unter Mitarbeit von Stefan Maurer. Berlin: De Gruyter, 2020. Im Open Access online verfügbar unter: https://www.degruyter.com/view/serial/491282 (letzter Zugriff am 24. Februar 2020).
  • Gerhalter, Li, und Christa Hämmerle. Krieg – Politik – Schreiben. Tagebücher von Frauen (1918-1950). Wien, Köln, Weimar: Böhlau Verlag, 2015.
  • Adamski, Theresa, Blake, Doreen, Duma, Veronika, Helfert, Veronika, Neuwirth, Michaela, Rütten, Tim, und Waltraud Schütz. Geschlechtergeschichten vom Genuss. Zum 60. Geburtstag von Gabriella Hauch. Wien: Mandelbaum, 2019.

Webressourcen

_____________________
[1] Michael Mitterauer, “Lebensgeschichten sammeln. Probleme um Aufbau und Auswertung einer Dokumentation zur popularen Autobiographik,” in Biographieforschung. Gesammelte Aufsätze der Tagung des Fränkischen Freilandmuseums am 12. und 13. Oktober 1990, ed. Hermann Heidrich (Neustadt a.d. Aisch: Fränkisches Freilandsmuseum, 1991), 17-35, here 18.
[2] Amongst others, see: Peter Gautschi, “Wie soll die Geschichte des eigenen Landes vermittelt werden?,” in Public History Weekly 2 (2014) 27, https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/5-2017-13/how-should-history-of-ones-own-country-be-taught (last accessed 16 February 2020).
[3] Edith Saurer, “For Women, the Act of Writing – Whether Letters or Diaries – Expresses their Identity, their Life’s Ambition, the Will to Survive,” in Women and Minorities: Ways of Archiving, eds. Kristina Popova, Marijana Piskova, Margareth Lanzinger, Nikola Langreiter, and Petar Vodenicharov (Sofia / Vienna: 2009), 16-19, here 16. My gratitude goes to Margareth Lanzinger for providing the interview’s German manuscript.
[4] Hanne Lessau, “Sammlungsinstitutionen des Privaten. Die Entstehung von Tagebucharchiven in den 1980er und 1990er Jahren,” in Selbstreflexionen und Weltdeutungen. Tagebücher in der Geschichte und der Geschichtsschreibung des 20. Jahrhunderts, eds. Janosch Steuwer, and Rüdiger Graf (Göttingen: Wallstein Verlag, 2015), 336-365, here 338.
[5] “Mein Tagebuch. D.1980,” fernsehserien.de, www.fernsehserien.de/mein-tagebuch (last accessed 16 February 2020).
[6] Lessau, “Sammlungsinstitutionen des Privaten,” 354.
[7] “Tagebücher des Ersten Weltkriegs,” Bayerischer Rundfunk. Anstalt des öffentlichen Rechts, http://www.14-tagebuecher.de (last accessed 16 February 2020).
[8] Patrizia Gabrielli, “Tagebücher, Erinnerungen, Autobiografien. Selbstzeugnisse von Frauen im Archivio Diaristico Nazionale in Pieve Santo Stefano,” in L’Homme. Europäische Zeitschrift für Feministische Geschichtswissenschaft 15, no. 2 (2004): 345-352, here 346.
[9] Christina O.: in a mail, August 2016. Due to data protection rules, the name of the contributor is abbreviated.
[10] Christina O.: in a mail, January 2008.
[11] Barbara Passrugger, Hartes Brot. Aus dem Leben einer Bergbäuerin (Wien: Böhlau Verlag, 1989).
[12] Günter Müller, “Dokumentation lebensgeschichtlicher Aufzeichnungen,” in Briefe – Tagebücher – Autobiographien. Studien und Quellen für den Unterricht, eds. Peter Eigner, Christa Hämmerle, and Günter Müller (Innsbruck / Vienna / Bolzano: Studien Verlag, 2006), 140-146, here 141.
[13] Dagmar Jank, “Frauennachlässe in Archiven, Bibliotheken und Spezialeinrichtungen. Beispiele, Probleme und Erfordernisse,” in Die Kunst des Vernetzens. Festschrift für Wolfgang Hempel, ed. Botho Brachmann (Berlin: Verlag für Berlin-Brandenburg, 2006), 411-419, here 411.

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Einzelne Dokumente aus dem Nachlass von Martha Teichmann (1888-1977) in der Sammlung Frauennachlässe, Foto: Li Gerhalter.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Gerhalter, Li: Selbstzeugnisse sammeln und Demokratisierung. In: Public History Weekly 8 (2020) 3, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-15175.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Isabella Schild / Thomas Hellmuth (Team Vienna)

Copyright (c) 2020 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 8 (2020) 3
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-15175

Tags: , , ,

Pin It on Pinterest