The End of Man?

Das Ende des Menschen?


Every present age considers itself as transitory. Predefined, traditionally effective means of cultural transmission tend to be appropriated and also often critically reviewed, even rejected. Today, this happens with the anthropological foundations of cultural studies and thus also of historical thinking. This thinking is specifically modern and contemporary insofar as it is anthropologically centred and reasoned.

“What is man?”

Immanuel Kant expressed this anthropological convergence of interpretation comprehensively by way of summarising the fundamental questions that human thought must answer:

“The field of philosophy […] can be summed up with the following questions: 1) What can I know? 2) What should I do? 3) What can I hope for? 4) What is man? The first question is answered by metaphysics, the second by morality, the third by religion, and the fourth by anthropology. Basically, however, all of them could be subsumed under anthropology because the first three questions refer to the last.”[1]

As the core determination of humanity, Kant emphasises man’s “dignity”, never only as a means to an end concerning others, but always also as an “end to himself”.[2]

Cultural studies as a discipline has followed this traditional view since its inception at the turn of the 19th century and has conceptualised it hermeneutically: In their understanding of man in his space-time world, cultural studies attribute man’s humanity to his self-constitution as a cultural being. This reference to humanity is exemplified in Droysen’s determination of the function of historical thinking: “History is the Gnothi Sauton [recognise yourself] of humanity, its conscience”.[3]

Cultural studies attribute to man the dignity to determine himself culturally. Herder has assigned this humanism to historical thinking as a task: to identify the respective path of self-determination as a central motive admits the abundance of cultural life forms of human history and to present it in its temporal dimensioning.

“Like a face in the sand”

This epistemological and hermeneutic humanism has more or less consciously and in a reflective way determined cultural studies (and thus also history) until the recent past.[4] Then, philosophy has fundamentally questioned it. Typical for this is Foucault’s assertion that the human face had disappeared from our interpretation of the world, “like a face in the sand on the seashore.”[5] This face is, of course, not fixed, but has changed its cultural-scientific appearance time and again and not insignificantly. But now it is in danger of disappearing altogether: This is what the posthumanistic, even posthuman tendencies stand for that have been asserting themselves quite strongly for some time now, with (increasingly?) significant appeal.

A striking symptom of this disappearance is an edited volume published recently by the Federal Agency for Civic Education under the title “The New Man”.[6] With its tendency to bring to light phenomena in contemporary political culture that are in need of interpretation, the Federal Agency has thus made an attempt to fathom the future of man in view of the profound changes resulting from his interaction with science and technology. Six contributions represent the range of such future concepts. While it is highly commendable to bring such educationally stimulating ideas into the field of political culture, it also raises some questions about the representativeness of such contributions. The sixth contribution entitled “Beyond Man: Posthumanism” by Rosi Braidotti [7] was honoured with such representativeness, reflecting some recognition of intellectual seriousness.

I would like to protest against this: I see in the text a radical revocation of the hermeneutic achievements and the political education creditable to cultural studies, as it destroys the core of the discipline which centres around the dignity of man. We have here before us a piece that intellectually destroys humanity itself (I call it homocide). What is this representative of?

I am not denying that there are posthuman and post-humanist trends in cultural studies.[8] But you don’t have to follow them blindly in all their forms, and certainly not when a broad audience (like that of the Federal Agency) is addressed. There isn’t an insignificant number of examples of writings with highly dubious content that have been taken seriously in cultural studies, only to show up this disgrace in hindsight.[9]

Complicit “Humanistic Ideals”

The following assertions by Braidotti deserve special attention:

• Reason and rationality are said to be accomplices of violence and terror.[10] With reference to the text itself, the question naturally arises whether it is therefore neither reasonable nor rational. According to its arguments, presumably the text aims for both. But then it does not belong to the circle of scientific discourses that have truth claims, with which the Federal Agency wants to ensure a reasonable and rational effect that political education is meant to have.

• “Lofty humanistic ideals” are said to be complicit in the reality of genocides. The author cites and agrees with someone who speaks – one can hardly believe it – of the “humanism of the Nazis”[11] and the grotesque blanket assertion is made that it is “almost impossible to think of a crime that was not committed in the name of humanity”.[12] If one compares these arguments with the writings of those authors who are representative of the humanism of modernity, such as Herder and Humboldt, then there is almost a compelling impression that the authors of the edited volume (quoted and quoting) have no idea about humanism as a real historical movement.

• Universal categories in the interpretation of the world are to be rejected. Yet the text is full of undifferentiated blanket assertions. Is the rejection of universal categories not itself universal? I see here a typical case of performative self-contradiction.

• No categorical distinction should be made between human life and the lives of animals and non-humans.[13] Thus, the dignity of human beings as agents of critical interpreters of the world and critical historical thinkers is trampled underfoot. Humanity is principally lost when mankind is ontologically equated with earthworms and prairie dogs or with robots and artificial creatures of technology.

Who is the target audience of this contribution and the edited volume as a whole? For Braidotti, the hegemonic subjects of the modern world- design that can be identified as the sources of all the misery are: “male, white, urban, speaking a standard language, heterosexually integrated into a reproductive context and conceived as full citizens of a recognised value-based community”.[14]

Whoever sees himself as a “full citizen of a recognised value-based community”, and that includes political education, must be rubbing his eyes. This is what is written in a volume published by the Federal Agency for Civic Education, which is aimed at a broad audience, and to most of whom the above characterisation of the perpetrators of modernity surely applies. They are called upon the re-barbarisation of the culture, to turn away from rationality and enlightenment and to return to myth. The application of such an ideology, supporting mythical world interpretation with the fundamental determination of the “vital force of life” – is this not a universal category? – has led to the very barbarism that posthumanism is meant to end. Instead, I believe that this prepares the soil for the intellectual growth of barbarism.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Kühne-Bertram, Gudrun, Hans-Ulrich Lessing, and Volker Steenblock, eds. Kultur verstehen. Zur Geschichte und Theorie der Geisteswissenschaften. Würzburg: Königshausen und Neumann, 2003.
  • Mazlish, Bruce. The Idea of Humanity in a Global Era. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.
  • Rüsen, Jörn, and Henner Laass, eds. Humanism in Intercultural Perspective. Experiences and Perspectives. Bielefeld: Transcript 2009.

Web Resources

  • Rüsen, Jörn: Post-ismus. Die Geisteswissenschaften, ver-rückt durch ihre Trends. In: Public History Weekly 4 (2016) 27, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-6895.

_____________________

[1] Immanuel Kant, “Logik,“ in Immanuel Kant. Werke in 10 Bänden, ed. Wilhelm Weischedel, (Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 1968), Bd. 5: Schriften zur Metaphysik und Logik 447-448 (A 25f.).
[2] Immanuel Kant, Metaphysik der Sitten (Königsberg: Nicolovius 1797), 93.
[3] Johann Gustav Droysen, Historik. Historisch-kritische Ausgabe, ed. Peter Leyh and Horst Walter Blanke (Stuttgart, Bad Cannstatt: Frommann-Holzboog, 1977), Vol. 1, 442.
[4] Explicitly in: Jörn Rüsen, Historik. Theorie der Geschichtswissenschaft (Köln: Böhlau, 2013).
[5] Michel Foucault, Die Ordnung der Dinge. Eine Archäologie der Humanwissenschaften, trans. Ulrich Köppen (Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp, 1974), 462.
[6] Bundeszentrale für politische Bildung, ed., Der Neue Mensch, Schriftenreihe Band 10247 (Bundeszentrale für politische Bildung: Bonn, 2018).
[7] Rosi Braidotti, “Beyond Man: Posthumanism,” in Der Neue Mensch, Schriftenreihe Band 10247, ed. Bundeszentrale für politische Bildung (Bundeszentrale für politische Bildung: Bonn, 2018), 153-163. See also: Rosi Braidotti, Posthumanismus. Leben jenseits des Menschen, trans. Thomas Laugstien (Frankfurt am Main: Campus, 2014).
[8] Examples: Cary Wolfe: What is Posthumanism? (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2010); Bernd Flessner, ed., Nach dem Menschen. Der Mythos einer zweiten Schöpfung und das Entstehen einer posthumanen Kultur (Freiburg im Breisgau: Rombach, 2000); Stefan Herbrechter, Posthumanismus. Eine kritische Einführung (Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 2009); Bernard Irrgang, Posthumanes Menschsein? Künstliche Intelligenz, Cyber Space, Roboter, Cyborgs und Designer-Menschen, Anthropologie des künstlichen Menschen im 21. Jahrhundert (Wiesbaden: Steiner, 2005); Martin Kurthen, Weißer und schwarzer Posthumanismus. Nach dem Bewusstsein und dem Unbewussten (Paderborn: Fink, 2011); Nick Bostrom, “In Defence of Posthuman Dignity,“ Bioethics 19 no. 3 (2005): 202-214.
[9] For example: Alan Sokal and Jean Bricmont, Fashionable Nonsense: Postmodern Intellectuals’ Abuse of Science (New York: Picador USA, 1998); Enrico Heitzer and Sven Schultze, eds., Chimära mensura? Die Human-Animal Studies zwischen Schäferhund-Science Hoax, kritischer Geschichtswissenschaft und akademischem Trendsetting (Berlin: Vergangenheitsverlag, 2018).
[10] Rosi Braidotti, Posthumanismus. Leben jenseits des Menschen, trans. Thomas Laugstien (Frankfurt am Main: Campus, 2014), 10.
[11] Rosi Braidotti, Posthumanismus. Leben jenseits des Menschen, trans. Thomas Laugstien (Frankfurt am Main: Campus, 2014), 157.
[12] Rosi Braidotti, Posthumanismus. Leben jenseits des Menschen, trans. Thomas Laugstien (Frankfurt am Main: Campus, 2014), 156.
[13] Rosi Braidotti, Posthumanismus. Leben jenseits des Menschen, trans. Thomas Laugstien (Frankfurt am Main: Campus, 2014), 162.
[14] Rosi Braidotti, Posthumanismus. Leben jenseits des Menschen, trans. Thomas Laugstien (Frankfurt am Main: Campus, 2014), 156. Functionally, this blaming of various people-categories for modernity’s misery corresponds to Jews in Nazi ideology and the bourgeoisie in communism. The consequences of such assigning of blame are well known.

_____________________

Image Credits

Border / 界 © 2005 David Hsu, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 via flickr.

Recommended Citation

Rüsen, Jörg: The End of Man? In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 8, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-13474.

Editorial Responsibility

Dominika Uczkiewicz / Krzysztof Ruchniewicz (Team Wrocław)
Translated by Dr. Katlin Morgan

Jede Gegenwart versteht sich als Übergang. Vorgegebene traditionell wirksame kulturelle Überlieferungen pflegen anverwandelt und oft auch kritisch überprüft, ja zurückgewiesen zu werden. Das geschieht heutzutage mit den anthropologischen Grundlagen der Kulturwissenschaften und damit auch des historischen Denkens. Neuzeitlich und spezifisch modern ist dieses Denken aber, insofern es anthropologisch zentriert und begründet ist.

“Was ist der Mensch?”

Diese anthropologische Deutungskonvergenz hat in umfassender Hinsicht Immanuel Kant in seiner zusammenfassenden Bestimmung der Grundfragen, die das menschliche Denken beantworten muss, so ausgedrückt:

“Das Feld der Philosophie […] lässt sich auf folgende Fragen bringen: 1) Was kann ich wissen? 2) Was soll ich tun? 3) Was darf ich hoffen? 4) Was ist der Mensch? Die erste Frage beantwortet die Metaphysik, die zweite die Moral, die dritte die Religion, und die vierte die Anthropologie. Im Grunde könnte man aber alles dieses zur Anthropologie rechnen, weil sich die drei ersten Fragen auf die letzte beziehen.”[1]

Als Kernbestimmung der Menschlichkeit des Menschen hebt Kant seine “Würde” hervor, nie nur Mittel zum Zweck anderer, sondern stets auch “Zweck an sich selbst zu sein”.[2]

Die Kulturwissenschaften sind dieser Devise seit ihrer Begründung um die Wende zum 19. Jahrhundert gefolgt und haben sich hermeneutisch verfasst: Im Verstehen der Menschenwelt in Raum und Zeit erschließen sie das, was den Menschen menschlich macht, seine Selbst-Hervorbringung als Kulturwesen. Dieser Menschheitsbezug wird beispielhaft deutlich in Droysens Funktionsbestimmung des historischen Denkens: “Geschichte ist das Gnothi Sauton [erkenne dich selbst] der Menschheit, ihr Gewissen”.[3]

Die Kulturwissenschaften sprechen dem Menschen die Würde zu, kulturell über sich selbst zu bestimmen. Herder hat diesen Humanismus dem historischen Denken als Aufgabe zugewiesen: in der Fülle der kulturellen Lebensformen der menschlichen Geschichte die jeweilige Selbstbestimmung als zentrales Motiv auszumachen und in seiner zeitlichen Dimensionierung darzulegen.

“Wie ein Gesicht im Sand”

Dieser erkenntnistheoretische und hermeneutische Humanismus hat die Kulturwissenschaften (und damit auch die Geschichte) bis in die jüngste Vergangenheit hinein mehr oder weniger bewusst und reflektiert bestimmt.[4] In der Philosophie wurde er dann grundsätzlich infragegestellt. Typisch ist dafür die Behauptung Foucaults, das Antlitz des Menschen verschwinde aus unserer Deutung der Welt “wie am Meeresufer ein Gesicht im Sand”.[5] Dieses Gesicht ist natürlich keine fixe Größe, sondern hat sein kulturwissenschaftliches Aussehen immer wieder und nicht unerheblich verändert. Aber nun droht es in der Tat zu verschwinden: Dafür stehen die posthumanistischen, ja posthumanen Tendenzen, die sich seit geraumer Zeit lautstark melden und offensichtlich (und immer mehr?) Gehör finden.

Ein markantes Symptom für dieses Verschwinden ist ein Sammelband, den die Bundeszentrale für politische Bildung jüngst unter dem Titel “Der Neue Mensch” veröffentlicht hat.[6] Mit ihrem sensiblen Gespür für deutungsbedürftige Erscheinungen in der politischen Kultur der Gegenwart hat sich die Bundeszentrale damit jüngsten Versuchen gestellt, die Zukunft des Menschen angesichts seiner tiefgreifende Veränderungen durch Wissenschaft und Technik auszuloten. Sechs Beiträge repräsentieren die Spannweite solcher Zukunftsentwürfe. Das ist zur Aufklärung und Anregung im Bereich der politischen Bildung höchst verdienstvoll, wirft aber zugleich die Frage der Repräsentativität solcher Entwürfe auf.

Dem sechsten Beitrag: “Jenseits des Menschen: Posthumanismus” von Rosi Braidotti [7] ist die Ehre einer solchen Repräsentativität, die ja auch ein Stück Anerkennung geistiger Seriosität enthält, widerfahren. Dagegen möchte ich protestieren: Ich sehe in dem Text einen radikalen Widerruf der hermeneutischen Leistungen und der politischen Aufklärung der Kulturwissenschaften, der den inneren Kern ihres Denkens, zentriert um die Würde des Menschen, vernichtet. Wir haben hier ein Stück geistiger Menschlichkeitsvernichtung (ich nenne es Homozid) vor uns. Wofür ist das repräsentativ?

Ich bestreite nicht, dass es posthumane und posthumanistische Trends in den Kulturwissenschaften gibt.[8] Aber man muss ihnen nicht in jeder Ausprägung folgen, und schon gar nicht, wenn ein breites Publikum (wie das der Bundeszentrale) angesprochen wird. Es gibt ja nicht wenige Beispiele dafür, dass Texte mit höchst zweifelhaftem Inhalt in den Kulturwissenschaften zu deren Blamage ernst genommen wurden.[9]

“Humanistische Ideale” in Komplizenschaft

Folgende Behauptungen von Braidotti verdienen besondere Aufmerksamkeit:

• Vernunft und Rationalität seien Komplizen von Gewalt und Terror.[10] Bezogen auf den Text selber, stellt sich damit natürlich die Frage, ob er daher weder vernünftig noch rational ist. Laut seiner Selbstaussage will er das wohl sein. Aber dann gehört er nicht in den Umkreis wissenschaftlicher Diskurse mit Wahrheitsanspruch, in dem die Bundeszentrale für eine vernünftige und rationale Auswirkung der politischen Bildung sorgt.

• “Erhabene humanistische Ideale” stünden in Komplizenschaft mit der Realität von Genoziden. Es wird zustimmend ein Autor zitiert, der – man glaubt es kaum – vom „Humanismus der Nazis”[11] spricht und das groteske Pauschalurteil fällt, es sei “beinahe unmöglich, an ein Verbrechen zu denken, das nicht im Namen der Humanität begangen wurde”.[12] Wenn man diese Urteile mit den Schriften repräsentativer humanistischer Autoren der Moderne wie Herder und Humboldt vergleicht, dann stellt sich geradezu zwingend der Eindruck her, dass die Autor*innen (die zitierten und die zitierende) keine Ahnung vom Humanismus als realer historischer Bewegung haben.

• Universale Kategorien in der Weltdeutung seien abzulehnen. Dabei strotzt der Text von undifferenzierten Pauschalurteilen. Ist seine Ablehnung von universalen Kategorien nicht selber universal? Ich sehe hier einen durchaus typischen performativen Selbstwiderspruch.

• Zwischen menschlichem Leben und dem Leben der Tiere und Nicht-Menschen sollten keine kategorische Unterscheidung getroffen werden.[13] Damit wird die Würde des Menschen als Gesichtspunkt kritischer Weltdeutung und kritischen Geschichtsdenkens mit Füßen getreten. Menschlichkeit geht in der ontologischen Gleichsetzung der Menschheit mit Regenwürmern und Präriehunden oder mit Robotern und künstlichen Gebilden der Technik verloren, und zwar prinzipiell.

An wen wenden sich der Text und der Sammelband? Für Braidotti sind die dominierenden Subjekte moderner Weltgestaltung als Quellen allen Übels auszumachen: “männlich, weiß, urban, eine Standardsprache sprechend, heterosexuell in einen Fortpflanzungszusammenhang eingebunden sowie als Vollbürger eines anerkannten Gemeinwesens gedacht”.

Wer immer sich als “Vollbürger eines anerkannten Gemeinwesens” versteht, und das schließt politische Bildung ein, reibt sich die Augen. So etwas steht in einem Band der Bundeszentrale für Politische Bildung, der sich an ein breites Publikum wendet, auf das die obige Charakterisierung der Übeltäter*innen der Moderne wohl ganz überwiegend zutreffen dürfte. Sie werden zur Rebarbarisierung der Kultur, zur Abkehr von Rationalität und Aufklärung und Rückkehr zum Mythos aufgerufen. Die Verwendung einer solchen Ideologie zur mythischen Weltdeutung mit der Fundamentalbestimmung der “vitalen Kraft des Lebens” – ist das keine universale Kategorie? – hat zu genau derjenigen Barbarei geführt, die posthumanistisch beendet werden soll. Ich glaube eher, dass sie auf diese Weise gefördert, dass ihr geistig der Boden bereitet wird.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Kühne-Bertram, Gudrun, Hans-Ulrich Lessing, and Volker Steenblock, eds. Kultur verstehen. Zur Geschichte und Theorie der Geisteswissenschaften. Würzburg: Königshausen und Neumann, 2003.
  • Mazlish, Bruce. The Idea of Humanity in a Global Era. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.
  • Rüsen, Jörn, and Henner Laass, eds. Humanism in Intercultural Perspective. Experiences and Perspectives. Bielefeld: Transcript 2009.

Webressourcen

  • Rüsen, Jörn: Post-ismus. Die Geisteswissenschaften, ver-rückt durch ihre Trends. In: Public History Weekly 4 (2016) 27, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-6895.

_____________________

[1] Immanuel Kant, “Logik,“ in Immanuel Kant. Werke in 10 Bänden, ed. Wilhelm Weischedel, (Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 1968), Bd. 5: Schriften zur Metaphysik und Logik 447-448 (A 25f.).
[2] Immanuel Kant, Metaphysik der Sitten (Königsberg: Nicolovius 1797), 93.
[3] Johann Gustav Droysen, Historik. Historisch-kritische Ausgabe, ed. Peter Leyh and Horst Walter Blanke (Stuttgart, Bad Cannstatt: Frommann-Holzboog, 1977), Vol. 1, 442.
[4] Explicitly in: Jörn Rüsen, Historik. Theorie der Geschichtswissenschaft (Köln: Böhlau, 2013).
[5] Michel Foucault, Die Ordnung der Dinge. Eine Archäologie der Humanwissenschaften, trans. Ulrich Köppen (Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp, 1974), 462.
[6] Bundeszentrale für politische Bildung, ed., Der Neue Mensch, Schriftenreihe Band 10247 (Bundeszentrale für politische Bildung: Bonn, 2018).
[7] Rosi Braidotti, “Beyond Man: Posthumanism,” in Der Neue Mensch, Schriftenreihe Band 10247, ed. Bundeszentrale für politische Bildung (Bundeszentrale für politische Bildung: Bonn, 2018), 153-163. See also: Rosi Braidotti, Posthumanismus. Leben jenseits des Menschen, trans. Thomas Laugstien (Frankfurt am Main: Campus, 2014).
[8] Beispiele: Cary Wolfe: What is Posthumanism? (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2010); Bernd Flessner, ed., Nach dem Menschen. Der Mythos einer zweiten Schöpfung und das Entstehen einer posthumanen Kultur (Freiburg im Breisgau: Rombach, 2000); Stefan Herbrechter, Posthumanismus. Eine kritische Einführung (Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 2009); Bernard Irrgang, Posthumanes Menschsein? Künstliche Intelligenz, Cyber Space, Roboter, Cyborgs und Designer-Menschen, Anthropologie des künstlichen Menschen im 21. Jahrhundert (Wiesbaden: Steiner, 2005); Martin Kurthen, Weißer und schwarzer Posthumanismus. Nach dem Bewusstsein und dem Unbewussten (Paderborn: Fink, 2011); Nick Bostrom, “In Defence of Posthuman Dignity,“ Bioethics 19 no. 3 (2005): 202-214.
[9] Beispielhaft: Alan Sokal and Jean Bricmont, Fashionable Nonsense: Postmodern Intellectuals’ Abuse of Science (New York: Picador USA, 1998); Enrico Heitzer and Sven Schultze, eds., Chimära mensura? Die Human-Animal Studies zwischen Schäferhund-Science Hoax, kritischer Geschichtswissenschaft und akademischem Trendsetting (Berlin: Vergangenheitsverlag, 2018).
[10] Rosi Braidotti, Posthumanismus. Leben jenseits des Menschen, trans. Thomas Laugstien (Frankfurt am Main: Campus, 2014), 10.
[11] Rosi Braidotti, Posthumanismus. Leben jenseits des Menschen, trans. Thomas Laugstien (Frankfurt am Main: Campus, 2014), 157.
[12] Rosi Braidotti, Posthumanismus. Leben jenseits des Menschen, trans. Thomas Laugstien (Frankfurt am Main: Campus, 2014), 156.
[13] Rosi Braidotti, Posthumanismus. Leben jenseits des Menschen, trans. Thomas Laugstien (Frankfurt am Main: Campus, 2014), 162.
[14] Rosi Braidotti, Posthumanismus. Leben jenseits des Menschen, trans. Thomas Laugstien (Frankfurt am Main: Campus, 2014), 156. Funktional entspricht diese Zuweisung der Schuld an der Misere der Moderne derjenigen der Juden in der Naziideologie und der Bourgeoisie im Kommunismus. Die Folgen solcher Zuweisungen sind bekannt.

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Border / 界 © 2005 David Hsu, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 via flickr.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Rüsen, Jörg: Ende des Menschen? In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 8, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-13474.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Dominika Uczkiewicz / Krzysztof Ruchniewicz (Team Wrocław)

Copyright (c) 2019 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 7 (2019) 8
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-13474

Tags: , ,

1 reply »

  1. To all our non-English speaking readers we recommend the automatic DeepL-Translator. Just copy and paste.

    “Then, philosophy has fundamentally questioned it.” This is plainly wrong. What is questioned by Foucault is not humanism founded on an ethical understanding of dignity – Foucault’s whole work circles around the question how dignity is possible in our world – but an anthropology which precisely loses this foundation on dignity by naturalizing and reifying possibilities of man to properties of man. What is at stake here is the ‘it’s human nature’-talk which tries to scientifically describe this ‘nature’, thereby establishing an authority of description which is insurmountable and intranscendable by the possibilities of self-explication (i. e. dignity).

    To the rest: Well, yeah. But then, the text of Braidotti isn’t convincing, is it? And then, it simply doesn’t meet scientific criteria. That’s what a scientific public is for: to scrutinize texts like this.

    And yes, one can leave the scientific perspektive and ask for the political / ideological dimension of the text and the circumstances of its publication. But then, the world is full of texts stating rubbish. Instead of going out from Kant and ringing the big bronze bell of humanism, one can easily keep calm and show by analysis that the argument of Braidotti isn’t fit. It isn’t fit because it is arguing with guilt by association, by discrimination, and by a conclusio non sequitur, as many other texts do in which the authors want to ‘overcome’ some injustice while presupposing the very same injustice they want to overcome. It is, to say it with a German word, “gedankenlos”.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest