What Do We Mean by “Public”?

Was heißt hier “public?”


These days, Public History is the standard name for both a range of institutional frameworks and various working practices that seek to propagate historical knowledge beyond academy and school history lessons. A closer look at the concept reveals that it is precisely the emphasis on the ‘public’ component that marks the essential difference from other fields of activity in the historical sciences.

Who or What Is a “Broad” Public?

If one considers Public History not to be its own academic discipline but rather a generally open and interdisciplinary field of writing and research, it is necessary to delineate more precisely what terms such as ‘the public’ and ‘the public sphere’ conceptually contain, i.e. how they should be understood. The qualifiers that people like to use in contemporary publications on Public History such as ‘broad’, ‘popular’, ‘interested’, ‘non-academic’, or—in the best case of collaborative working processes—even ‘participatory’ are unlikely to help us in our search. This vagueness, this very general approach is productive of a general lack of clarity that reaches beyond Public History in the German-speaking world, as most recently demonstrated by the keynotes and presentations at the international conference on “The Public in Public and Applied History” held by the Jean Monnet Network for “Applied European Contemporary History” in Wrocław in March 2019.[1]

Tailor-Made History?

Attempts to define a specific public in advance are comparatively simple when it comes to individual projects—be it for cultural-historical exhibitions, dramatized readings, or living-history performances. While it is of course ultimately impossible to determine in advance what the public will be attracted to and whether it will finally attend a given event, it is possible when planning a project not only to take into account various groups but also to actively accommodate them and to enact appropriate measures to ensure that they feel spoken to. Traditionally, museums and historical sites offer special programmes for children and teenagers, as well as for an older public. Projects that adopt the “shared authority approach” generally seek to involve members of definable local communities, such as a city district.[2] Yet even in such specific situations, what public precisely feels itself addressed by the project can only be determined more exactly and reflected upon theoretically at the end of the project, i.e. when the results are presented or at the performance itself in the case of an event. Uncertainties of this kind cannot simply be eliminated. That is why in the following I wish to formulate a series of thoughts that should at least suggest the direction a possible solution could take.

Rethinking the Public

In considering the general meaning of “the public” and “the public sphere”, the inevitable association with the “bourgeois public” (“das bürgerliche Publikum”) has, in Europe at least, since the 18th century pointed to an educated, cultured, and above all (politically) active social class. Sociology, communication science, and pedagogy have developed and discussed widely varying concepts of the public sphere in recent decades. These discourses focused on certain specific “public arenas” or restricted “partial publics”. Jürgen Habermas’ work on “The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere”[3] can be considered paradigmatic not only for the discussion in the German-speaking world. However, whether these approaches could help to define the public spheres for strategies that aim to propagate historiographical knowledge must remain an open question. Here, I wish to briefly consider another line of thought.

Public Sphere” Is Trending

In the current issue of the German intellectual history journal “Zeitschrift für Ideengeschichte,” the German art historian Wolfgang Kemp tackles what he considers to be the current ubiquity of antonyms in the humanities:

“[F]ashionable concepts can only be said to have arrived when they have an established counterpart on the other side: inclusion vs exclusion, resonance vs alienation, transversality vs tangentiality.”[4]

Against this background it is worth mulling over what the potential antonyms of ‘public’ could be. In the history of the concept, two interpretive “wave peaks” can be identified: on the one hand, ‘public’ in the sense of the Latin ‘publicus’ meaning ‘of the state’, and on the other hand, ‘public’ in relation to Enlightenment views of the role of reason. In both the German and the English speaking world, furthermore, there is another meaning of the term alongside the socio-political one that invokes an intellectual culture.[5] How many conceivable antonyms to ‘public’ are there? Is it ‘private’ and ‘privacy’? Wouldn’t ‘secret’ fit equally well? The German ‘intim’, which overlaps with the English words ‘intimate’, ‘domestic’, and ‘personal’, has also been proposed as an antonym of ‘public’ in works on the history of ideas.[6] Or is there perhaps no suitable antonym because our profession assumes the public a priori and therefore takes it to be ‘completely normal’?

What Are We Actually Talking About?

It is interesting that in the history of ideas, the concepts of ‘public’ and ‘the public sphere’ are frequently associated with active participation in socio-political processes: practical action as rational, led by reason, and yet a self-critical activity. Public Historians can consider this association both as a matter of academic interest and in terms of their desire to promote democratic participation.

Even the well-founded scientific claims of Public History, which go beyond these socio-political processes, were more or less anticipated in an interpretation of ‘public sphere’ from 1875, according to which the public sphere is “the spread of socially useful ideas beyond that circle whose task it is to perform the relevant intellectual labour.”[7] If we ignore for the moment the undertone of criticism of the idea of a rational public sphere, we find in the history of the concept many different ways of reading it that appear compatible with contemporary Public History. Since a convincing understanding of the public sphere is a key criterion for defining Public History as a field of writing and research, this opens – not least because there has been too little discussion so far – what will hopefully be a fruitful debate.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Habermas, Jürgen. The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere. Cambridge: Polity Press, 1989.
  • Hölscher, Lucien. “Öffentlichkeit.” In Geschichtliche Grundbegriffe. Historisches Lexikon zur politischen sozialen Sprache in Deutschland, edited by Otto Brunner, Werner Conze, and Reinhart Koselleck, Vol. 4, 413–467. Stuttgart: Klett Cotta, 1978.
  • Nieto-Galan, Agustí. Science in the Public Sphere. A History of Lay Knowledge and Expertise. London/New York: Routledge, 2016.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] Jerome de Groot, “Public in Public History,” Cord Arendes, “Between Desire and Reality – The Public in Public History,” and David Dean, “Publics and Public History – Moving beyond representation,” Call for Papers, online at: https://www.hsozkult.de/event/id/termine-37264 (last accessed 1 March 2019); Programme available at http://aec-history.uni-jena.de/?attachment_id=282 (last accessed 1 April 2019).
[2] Cherstin M. Lyon, Elizabeth M. Nix, and Rebecca K. Shrum, Public History. Interpreting the Past, Engaging Audiences (American Association for State and Local History), (Lanham et al.: Rowan & Littlefield, 2017), 113–161.
[3] Jürgen Habermas, The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere (Cambridge: Polity Press, 1989) (translation, originally published in 1962).
[4] Wolfgang Kemp, “Gegenbegriffe, gegengelesen,” Zeitschrift für Ideengeschichte 13 (January 2019): 65–84, here 67. Cf. also Reinhart Koselleck’s earlier considerations: Reinhart Koselleck, “Zur historisch-politischen Semantik asymmetrischer Gegenbegriffe,” in Vergangene Zukunft. Zur Semantik geschichtlicher Zeiten, ed. Reinhart Koselleck (Frankfurt a. M.: Suhrkamp, 2013), 211–259.
[5] Lucian Hölscher, (Art.) “Öffentlichkeit,” in Geschichtliche Grundbegriffe, Historisches Lexikon zur politischen sozialen Sprache in Deutschland, ed. Otto Brunner, Werner Conze, and Reinhart Koselleck (Stuttgart: Klett Cotta, 1978), 413–467, here 413.
[6] Lucian Hölscher, (Art.) “Öffentlichkeit,” in Geschichtliche Grundbegriffe, Historisches Lexikon zur politischen sozialen Sprache in Deutschland, ed. Otto Brunner, Werner Conze, and Reinhart Koselleck (Stuttgart: Klett Cotta, 1978), 413–467, here 414.
[7] Albert E., Fr. Schäffle, Bau und Leben des Socialen Körpers. Encyclopädischer Entwurf einer realen Anatomie, Physiologie und Psychologie der menschlichen Gesellschaft mit besonderer Rücksicht auf die Volkswirthschaft als socialen Stoffwechsel, (Tübingen: Laupp, 1875) 446; cited in Hölscher, Öffentlichkeit, 464.

_____________________

Image Credits

Pinheads (#cc) © 2012 marfis75 CC BY-SA 2.0 via flickr.

Recommended Citation

Arendes, Cord: What Do We Mean by “Public”? In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 27, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-14181.
Proofread by Stefanie und Paul Jones (paul.stefanie@outlook.at)

Editorial Responsibility

Isabella Schild / Thomas Hellmuth (Team Vienna)

Public History ist heute die geläufige Bezeichnung für sowohl verschiedene institutionelle Rahmen als auch unterschiedliche praktische Arbeitsprozesse bei der öffentlichen Vermittlung von Geschichte jenseits von Wissenschaft und Schulunterricht. Betrachtet man den Begriff genauer, so erweist sich dabei gerade der Bestandteil ‘public’ für die Unterscheidung von anderen Arbeitsgebieten der Geschichtswissenschaft als essentiell.

Was verbirgt sich hinter der “breiten” Öffentlichkeit?

Versteht man Public History nicht als eine eigene akademische Disziplin, sondern als ein insgesamt offenes und fachübergreifendes Forschungs- und Arbeitsfeld, so ist es notwendig, genauer einzugrenzen, was sich auf konzeptioneller Ebene hinter Termini wie ‘die Öffentlichkeit’ oder ‘das Publikum’ verbirgt bzw. unter diesen Begriffen verstanden werden soll. Die in aktuellen Publikationen zur Public History gern genutzten Zusätze zur Öffentlichkeit wie ‘breit’, ‘populär’, ‘interessiert’, ‘nichtakademisch’ oder im besten Falle an gemeinsamen Arbeitsprozessen ‘partizipierend’, dürften allerdings kaum dazu angetan sein, diese Suche weiter voranzubringen. Dass ihre Unschärfe bzw. ihr sehr allgemein gehaltener Anspruch nicht nur in der deutschsprachigen Public History eher für allgemeine Unklarheiten sorgt, haben Anfang März 2019 nicht zuletzt die Keynotes und Vorträge auf der internationalen Konferenz “The Public in Public and Applied History” des Jean Monnet Netzwerkes für “Applied European Contemporary History” in Wrocław gezeigt.[1]

Maßgeschneiderte Geschichte?

Als vergleichsweise einfach erweisen sich Versuche, für einzelne Projekte – seien es kulturgeschichtliche Ausstellungen, szenische Lesungen, oder Living-History-Aufführungen – ein konkretes Publikum im Voraus zu bestimmen. Zwar lässt sich auch hier grundsätzlich nur schwer planen, welches Publikum sich am Ende genau angesprochen fühlt oder aktiv die Veranstaltungen besucht. Es ist aber möglich, bei der Projektkonzeption unterschiedliche Gruppen nicht nur zu berücksichtigen, sondern einzuplanen oder durch gezielte Maßnahmen anzusprechen. Traditionell bieten beispielsweise Museen oder auch Gedenkstätten spezielle Programme für Kinder und Jugendliche oder auch für ein älteres Publikum an. Projekte, die dem “shared authority approach” folgen, zielen zumeist auf Angehörige eingrenzbarer lokaler Gemeinschaften, zum Beispiel eines Stadtviertels.[2] Aber auch in solchen konkreten Fällen kann das Publikum, welches sich durch das Projekt angesprochen gefühlt hat, erst bei Projektende, das heißt bei der Ergebnispräsentation bzw. Aufführung, genauer bestimmt und theoretisch reflektiert werden. Unklarheiten, wie die gerade beschriebenen, lassen sich nicht einfach ausräumen. Deshalb möchte ich im Folgenden einige Gedankenanstöße formulieren, die zumindest in Richtung einer Lösung weisen.

Öffentlichkeit (anders) denken

Bei einer allgemeinen Beschreibung der Öffentlichkeit bildet die Umschreibung ‘bürgerliches Publikum’ im Europa seit dem 18. Jahrhundert eine entscheidende Referenz auf eine gebildete und vor allem (politisch) aktive soziale Schicht. Die Soziologie, die Kommunikations- oder auch die Erziehungswissenschaft haben in den letzten Jahrzehnten ganz unterschiedliche Öffentlichkeitskonzepte erarbeitet und diskutiert. Dabei standen einzelne “Arenen der Öffentlichkeit” oder abgrenzbare “Teilöffentlichkeiten” im Zentrum. Jürgen Habermas‘ Werk zum “Strukturwandel der Öffentlichkeit”[3] kann hierbei nicht nur für die deutschsprachige Diskussion als paradigmatisch gelten. Ob diese Ansätze helfen können, Öffentlichkeiten geschichtswissenschaftlicher Vermittlungsstrategien zu spezifizieren, darf als offen gelten. Ich werde hier in aller Kürze einen ganz anderen Gedanken verfolgen.

“Öffentlichkeit” als Trendbegriff

Im aktuellen Heft der “Zeitschrift für Ideengeschichte” widmet sich der deutsche Kunsthistoriker Wolfgang Kemp der aus seiner Sicht in den Geisteswissenschaften aktuell allgegenwärtigen “Arbeit am Gegenbegriff”:

“Trendbegriffe sind heute erst so richtig angekommen, wenn sie ein fundiertes Gegenüber auf der anderen Seite wissen: Inklusion vs. Exklusion, Resonanz vs. Entfremdung, Transversalität vs. Tangentialität.”[4]

Vor diesem Hintergrund lohnt es sich, auch kurz über mögliche Gegenbegriffe von ‘Öffentlichkeit’ nachdenken. In der Begriffsgeschichte werden zwei “Bedeutungswellen” hervorgehoben: zum einen ‘öffentlich’, abgeleitet vom lateinischen ‘publicus’ im Sinne von staatlich, zum anderen ‘öffentlich’ in Beziehung zum Vernunftanspruch der Aufklärung. Für den deutschen Sprachraum findet sich zudem neben dem “politisch-sozialen” immer auch ein eher kulturell-intellektuelles Moment des Begriffes.[5]. Welche Gegenbegriffe zu ‘Öffentlichkeit’ bzw. zu ‘Public’ sind nun denkbar? Ist es ‘Privatheit’? Würde nicht auch ‘Geheimnis’ passen? Auch ‘intim’ als Antonym zu ‘öffentlich’ findet sich als Vorschlag in ideengeschichtlichen Abhandlungen.[6] Oder gibt es vielleicht gar keinen treffenden Gegenbegriff, weil wir Öffentlichkeit für unsere Profession als grundsätzlich gegeben und damit als ‘völlig normal’ voraussetzen?

Wovon reden wir eigentlich?

Es ist interessant, dass in der Ideengeschichte mit ‘öffentlich’ bzw. ‘Öffentlichkeit’ immer auch der Aspekt einer aktiven Teilhabe an politisch-sozialen Prozessen verbunden wird: Praktisches Handeln als rationale, vernunftgeleitete und sich zugleich kritisch verstehende Aktivität. Für Public Historians ist diese Verbindung sowohl von ihrem wissenschaftlichen Hintergrund als auch ihrem demokratisch-partizipativen Anspruch her ‘lesbar’. Und auch der über einen solchen Anspruch hinausgehende fundierte wissenschaftliche Anspruch der Public History wird in einer Lesart von ‘Öffentlichkeit’ aus dem Jahr 1875 quasi schon vorweggenommen: Öffentlichkeit sei “eine Ausbreitung sozial wirksamer Ideen über die Grenzen jenes Kreises hinaus, welcher berufsmäßig die betreffende geistige Arbeit durchzuführen hat”.[7] Lassen wir die hier mitschwingende Kritik an der rationalen Öffentlichkeit einmal beiseite, so finden wir in der Ideengeschichte viele unterschiedliche Lesarten von Öffentlichkeit, die sich für heutige Public Historians als kompatibel bzw. als anschlussfähig erweisen. Da eine überzeugende Konzeption von Öffentlichkeit aber ein wichtiges Unterscheidungskriterium für die Public History als Forschungs- und Arbeitsfeld darstellt, eröffnet sich hier – auch weil ein entsprechender Gedankenaustausch bisher nicht stattgefunden hat – eine hoffentlich fruchtbare Diskussion.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Habermas, Jürgen. The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere. Cambridge: Polity Press, 1989.
  • Hölscher, Lucien. “Öffentlichkeit.” In Geschichtliche Grundbegriffe. Historisches Lexikon zur politischen sozialen Sprache in Deutschland, edited by Otto Brunner, Werner Conze, and Reinhart Koselleck, Vol. 4, 413–467. Stuttgart: Klett Cotta, 1978.
  • Nieto-Galan, Agustí. Science in the Public Sphere. A History of Lay Knowledge and Expertise. London/New York: Routledge, 2016.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] Jerome de Groot, “Public in Public History,” Cord Arendes, “Between Desire and Reality – The Public in Public History,” and David Dean, “Publics and Public History – Moving beyond representation,” Call for Papers, online at: https://www.hsozkult.de/event/id/termine-37264 (letzter Zugriff 1. April 2019); Programme available at http://aec-history.uni-jena.de/?attachment_id=282 (letzter Zugriff 1. April 2019).
[2] Cherstin M. Lyon, Elizabeth M. Nix, and Rebecca K. Shrum, Public History. Interpreting the Past, Engaging Audiences (American Association for State and Local History), (Lanham et al.: Rowan & Littlefield, 2017), 113–161.
[3] Jürgen Habermas, The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere (Cambridge: Polity Press, 1989) (Übersetzung, erstmals 1962 publiziert).
[4] Wolfgang Kemp, “Gegenbegriffe, gegengelesen,” Zeitschrift für Ideengeschichte 13 (January 2019): 65–84, here 67. Vergleiche auch die älteren Überlegungen von Reinhart Koselleck’s earlier considerations: Reinhart Koselleck, “Zur historisch-politischen Semantik asymmetrischer Gegenbegriffe,” in Vergangene Zukunft. Zur Semantik geschichtlicher Zeiten, ed. Reinhart Koselleck (Frankfurt a. M.: Suhrkamp, 2013), 211–259.
[5] Lucian Hölscher, (Art.) “Öffentlichkeit,” in Geschichtliche Grundbegriffe, Historisches Lexikon zur politischen sozialen Sprache in Deutschland, ed. Otto Brunner, Werner Conze, and Reinhart Koselleck (Stuttgart: Klett Cotta, 1978), 413–467, hier 413.
[6] Lucian Hölscher, (Art.) “Öffentlichkeit,” in Geschichtliche Grundbegriffe, Historisches Lexikon zur politischen sozialen Sprache in Deutschland, ed. Otto Brunner, Werner Conze, and Reinhart Koselleck (Stuttgart: Klett Cotta, 1978), 413–467, hier 414.
[7] Albert E., Fr. Schäffle, Bau und Leben des Socialen Körpers. Encyclopädischer Entwurf einer realen Anatomie, Physiologie und Psychologie der menschlichen Gesellschaft mit besonderer Rücksicht auf die Volkswirthschaft als socialen Stoffwechsel, (Tübingen: Laupp, 1875) 446; zitiert nach Hölscher, Öffentlichkeit, 464.

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Pinheads (#cc) © 2012 marfis75 CC BY-SA 2.0 via flickr.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Arendes, Cord: Was heißt hier “public?”. In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 27, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-14181.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Isabella Schild / Thomas Hellmuth (Team Vienna)

Copyright (c) 2019 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 7 (2019) 27
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-14181

Tags: ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest