Austrian Democracy

Österreichische Demokratie


Austria has a new government: a transitional government of civil servants and experts. Following a political scandal which blew up the coalition of ÖVP and FPÖ, many Austrians seem to be largely satisfied. For the first time a woman is in the position of head of the state, and it seems as if the political squabbling has come to an end. The former constitutional judge and chancellor Brigitte Bierlein, who is still largely unknown, already ranks just behind the young “Altkanzler” Sebastian Kurz in the popularity charts. Once again we may ponder the Austrian idea of democracy, which is sometimes confused with harmony.

Harmony Only

When Sebastian Kurz started the National Council elections in 2017, he promised a new political style: no conflict, just harmony. He did not mention that, as some critics claim, he had not pursued his political career in the conservative Austrian People’s Party (ÖVP) so harmoniously.[1] His electoral success ultimately led to a coalition with the right-wing populist “Austrian Freedom Party” (FPÖ), which many experts describe as partially right-wing extremist [2]. The government lasted 516 days – the shortest coalition in the Second Republic – and was characterized by its constant emphasis on harmony. The coalition climate was of course not always so harmonious, and message control played a central role in external communications. This became clear on 18 May 2019, when Kurz ended the coalition as a result of the well-known “Ibiza Gate”[3]. The many right-wing extremist “individual cases” – from which the FPÖ had to distance itself permanently – had obviously not significantly disturbed the previous harmony. Kurz was probably dazzled by the charm of the FPÖ.

Harmony as a Tradition

The need for political harmony is rooted in the Austrian post-war period.  Following the events of February 1934, when conflict democracy broke out in a civil war and led to National Socialism, political conflict became considered with ambivalence. Critical citizens and political participation in political elections were hardly in demand. Above all, it was assumed that citizens should identify with the Second Republic.

The “victim thesis”, which defined Austria as the first victim of National Socialist aggression, required the construction of a new identity based on the dichotomy of “civilization” and “barbarism”. Peacefulness, good-naturedness, and harmony, which were considered to have their roots in the Habsburg past, became a part of the Austrian identity.[4] A textbook from 1955 claimed that over centuries, the “peaceful coexistence” of different peoples had shaped the “essence and character of the Austrian.” Austria was considered to have always “fully understood how to unite peoples peacefully.” Therefore, the population in “little Austria” would also try to “bridge contrasts.”[5]

Since then, the ideal state of democracy has been defined by a harmonious coexistence of (more or less) different parties. Until today it has been ignored that democracy means the conflict of different and rational positions. Harmony as an essential component of democracy was supplemented by an almost religious “bravery which lies in self-abandonment.”[6] Another aspect of democratic society – finding the proper balance between individual and collective interests – is simply ignored.

New Terms for Absolute Power?

Sebastian Kurz was able to benefit from the above assumptions. While preaching about harmony, he blamed the alleged “standstill” of the previous coalition of SPÖ and ÖVP (to which he also belonged) on constant quarrelling. Moreover, the “most holy Sebastian 2.0”[7] still presents himself today as one who sacrifices himself for Austria: He renounces the continued payment of his salary (to which he is not entitled in any case)[8]; suffers because of “individual cases” and from the break-up of the coalition (which he entered despite warnings and probably was well aware of). He wants to work only for “our beautiful country”,[9] but the political opposition prevents him from doing so.

All this delights many voters who believe in and wish for the Austrian version of democracy. However, they overlook the fact that the harmony, self-expression, and martyrdom which they praise stands for absolute power. The political parties that do not share the political views of the former Chancellor cannot be coalition partners. For example, the “Austrian Social Democratic Party” (SPÖ) did not share his political approaches and would therefore not qualify as a coalition partner.[10] His, Kurz’, idea of democracy is defined by the implementation of his own political ideas and it denies basic democratic principles based on an open discussion between different political approaches and consensus-building. In this context it is worrying that Kurz has expressed his mistrust of the parliament after he and his government were dismissed: “Today the parliament has decided, but in the end it is always the people who decide”.[11]

Myth and Reality

The harmony emphasized by Sebastian Kurz and the “new ÖVP” is nothing more than a myth which corresponds to the Austrian mentality. Kurz’s government argued behind closed doors and presented itself to the public as being in harmony. In fact the Austrian public is probably more divided than ever before. Not all Austrians invoked by the “former chancellor” wish to see him as a political “messiah”. It is therefore not surprising that many Austrians breathed a sigh of relief when the new transitional government of civil servants and experts began its work.

At the same time, it should be noted that the new ministers also have political opinions and are not neutral beings. Moreover, this new harmony can only be temporary. The political situation may calm down for a short time, but democracy is not possible without diversity of opinion and consensus-building, and thus also not possible without politicians. Perhaps this insight will one day become part of the collective memory of Austrians.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Hellmuth, Thomas. “Harmonie als demokratisches Prinzip? Politische Bildung in Österreich und der Schweiz seit 1945,” in Politische Bildung mit klarem Blick. Festschrift für Wolfgang Sander, edited by Anja Besand and Susann Gessner. Frankfurt am Main: Wochenschau Verlag, 2018, 158-166.
  • Horaczek, Nina, and Barbara Tóth. Sebastian Kurz. Österreichs neues Wunderkind? Salzburg: Residenz Verlag, 2017.
  • Rathkolb, Oliver. Die paradoxe Republik. Österreich 1945-2005. Wien: Zsolnay, 2007.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] “Strolz zum Abschied: Kurz hat sich brutal an die Macht geputscht,” Die Presse,  Juni 2018, https://diepresse.com/home/innenpolitik/5454266/Strolz-zum-Abschied_Kurz-hat-sich-brutal-an-die-Macht-geputscht (last accessed 9 June 2019); “Ex-ÖVP-Chef Mitterlehner: ‚Kurz hat die Rechten salonfähig gemacht‘,” Der Standard,  April 16, 2019, https://derstandard.at/2000101499200/Ex-OeVP-Chef-Mitterlehner-Sebastian-Kurz-hat-die-Rechten-salonfaehig (last accessed 9 June 2016).
[2] Brigitte Bailer, Wolfgang Neugebauer, and Heribert Schiedel, “Die FPÖ auf dem Weg zur Regierungspartei. Zur Erfolgsgeschichte einer rechtsextremen Partei,” in Österreich und die rechte Versuchung, ed. Hans-Henning Scharsach (Reinbek: Rohwohlt, 2000), 105–127; Eckhard Jesse, Tom Thieme, “Extremismus in den EU-Staaten. Theoretische und konzeptionelle Grundlagen,” in Extremismus in den EU-Staaten, eds. Eckhard Jesse, Tom Thieme (Wiesbaden: VS, 2011), 29; Samuel Salzborn, Angriff der Antidemokraten. Die völkische Rebellion der Neuen Rechten (Weinheim: Beltz Juventa, 2017), 135. Hans Rauscher, “Kurz ist mit der FPÖ gescheitert – und will trotzdem unser Vertrauen,” Der Standard, 18. Mai 2019, https://www.derstandard.at/2000103378024/Wer-sich-mit-der-FPOe-einlaesst-bekommt-eine-Staatskrise (last accessed 9 June 2019).
[3] See the information about “Ibiza-Gate” in: https://www.falter.at/strache (last accessed 9 June 2019).
[4] Oliver Rathkolb, Die paradoxe Republik. Österreich 1945-2005 (Wien: Zsolnay, 2005), 17-59; Susanne Breuss and Karin Liebhart, Inszenierungen: Stichwörter zu Österreich (Wien: Sonderzahl, 1995); Thomas Hellmuth, Historisch-politische Sinnbildung. Geschichte – Geschichtsdidaktik – Politische Bildung (Schwalbach/Ts.: Wochenschau Verlag, 2014), 89-90.
[5] Arbeitsgemeinschaft, Unser Österreich 1945-1955. Zum 10. Jahrestag der Wiederherstellung der Unabhängigkeit der Republik Österreich. Der Schuljugend gewidmet von der österreichischen Bundesregierung (Wien: ÖBV, 1955), 6-7.
[6] Franz Heilsberg, Friedrich Korger, Staatsbürgerkunde (Wien: Hölder-Pichler-Tempsky, 1960), 50.
[7] Günther Draxler, “Einer stiehlt sich davon,” Der Standard, May 29, 2019, https://derstandard.at/2000104097929/Einer-stiehlt-sich-davon?_blogGroup=1 (last accessed  9 June 2019).
[8] “,Verzichten wie Kurz‘: Netz lacht über ‚großzügigen‘ Ex-Kanzler,” Der Standard, 30. Mai 2019, https://derstandard.at/2000104016539/Verzichten-wie-Kurz-Twitter-lacht-ueber-grosszuegigen-Ex-Kanzler (last accessed 9 June 2019).
[9] Sebastian Kurz (@sebastiankurz), “Die FPÖ schadet mit ihrem Verhalten dem Weg der Veränderung,” Twitter, https://twitter.com/sebastiankurz/status/1129825808543911936 (last accessed 11 June 2019).
[10] “Sebastian Kurz: Genug ist genug,” Wiener Zeitung, May 18, 2019, https://www.wienerzeitung.at/nachrichten/politik/oesterreich/2010035-Genug-ist-genug.html (last accessed 9 June 2019).
[11] Quoted in: Hans Rauscher, “Kurz geht nicht ins Parlament, er startet seine Wiederauferstehung,” Der Standard, May 29, 2019, https://derstandard.at/2000103988638/Kurz-geht-nicht-ins-Parlament-er-startet-seine-Wiederauferstehung (last accessed 9 May 2019)

_____________________

Image Credits

Berkeley Art Museum © 2018 Mike and Lara Wolfe, Public Domain via flickr.

Recommended Citation

Hellmuth, Thomas: Austrian Democracy. In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 26, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-14123.

Editorial Responsibility

Dominika Uczkiewicz / Krzysztof Ruchniewicz (Team Wrocław)

Österreich hat eine neue Regierung: eine Übergangsregierung aus Beamt*innen und Fachleuten, die voraussichtlich bis Herbst im Amt sein wird. Nachdem ein politischer Skandal die Koalition aus ÖVP und FPÖ gesprengt hat, scheinen die Österreicher*innen weitgehend zufrieden. Erstmals steht eine Frau an der Spitze des Staates, endlich scheint die Politik von politischem Hickhack befreit. In Umfragen rangiert die noch weitgehend unbekannte Kanzlerin Brigitte Bierlein, eine ehemalige Verfassungsrichterin, bei den Beliebtheitswerten bereits hinter dem juvenilen “Altkanzler” Sebastian Kurz. Wieder einmal ist der in Österreich gängigen Vorstellung von Demokratie, die mit Harmonie verwechselt wird, Genüge getan. 

Harmonie, nur du allein …

Als Sebastian Kurz 2017 in die Nationalratswahlen startete, versprach er einen neuen politischen Stil: kein Streit, sondern Gemeinsamkeit, sozusagen Politik auf Augenhöhe. Dass er, wie manche böse Zungen behaupten, seine politische Karriere in der konservativen Österreichischen Volkspartei (ÖVP) so gar nicht harmonisch betrieben habe,[1] blieb im Wahlkampf ausgeklammert. Sein Wahlerfolg führte schließlich zur Koalition mit der rechtspopulistischen – von vielen Wissenschaftler*innen und Journalist*innen[2] auch als partiell rechtsextrem bezeichneten – Freiheitlichen Partei Österreichs (FPÖ). Die Regierungsverhandlungen waren bezeichnend: Nichts davon drang nach außen, die Verhandlungspartner versuchten, in der Öffentlichkeit den Eindruck von Gemeinsamkeit zu wecken. Und auch die Regierungszeit – mit 516 Tagen die bislang kürzeste Koalition in der Zweiten Republik – war durch die ständige Betonung der Harmonie geprägt. Das Koalitionsklima war freilich nicht immer so harmonisch, der Schein der Gemeinsamkeit zum Teil durch teure “message control” erkauft. Dies zeigte sich spätestens am 18. Mai 2019, als Kurz infolge des bekannten “Ibiza Gate”[3] die Koalition aufkündigte. Die vielen rechtsextremen “Einzelfälle”, von denen sich die FPÖ immer wieder distanzieren musste, hatten die Harmonie zuvor offenbar nicht maßgeblich getrübt. Kurz war wohl vom Charme der FPÖ geblendet.

… bist nicht seit Kurzem in Österreich daheim

Das politische Harmoniebedürfnis wurzelt in der österreichischen Nachkriegszeit. Infolge des Februar 1934, als sich die Konfliktdemokratie in einem Bürgerkrieg entlud, und der nationalsozialistischen Herrschaft galt politischer Konflikt – damals durchaus verständlich – als ambivalent. Kritische “Aktivbürger*innen” waren kaum gefragt, sondern vielmehr “brave” Staatsbürger*innen, die sich mit der Zweiten Republik identifizierten.

Die “Opferthese”, die Österreich als erstes Opfer der nationalsozialistischen Aggression definierte, verlangte nach einer neuen Identitätsbasis, die sich in der Dichotomie von “Zivilisation” und “Barbarei” bzw. dem Faschismus verortete. Vermeintliche Wesensmerkmale wie Friedfertigkeit, Gutmütigkeit und Harmonie wurden dabei in der – vor allem habsburgischen – Vergangenheit verankert.[4] Über Jahrhunderte habe – wie in einem Schulbuch aus dem Jahr 1955 zu lesen ist – das “friedliche Zusammenleben” verschiedener Völker das “Wesen” und den “Charakter des Österreichers geformt”. Österreich habe es “immer verstanden, Völker friedlich zu vereinen”, weshalb sich auch die Bevölkerung im “kleinen Österreich” bemühe, “Gegensätze zu überbrücken”.[5]

Der Idealzustand von Demokratie wird seitdem mit einem harmonischen Miteinander von (mehr oder weniger) unterschiedlichen Parteien definiert. Dass Demokratie aber letztlich das Aufeinanderprallen unterschiedlicher, freilich rational begründeter Positionen bedeutet, blieb damit bis heute in der öffentlichen Meinung vergessen oder besser: nie erinnert. Garniert wurde dieses defizitäre Demokratieverständnis noch durch eine geradezu religiös anmutende “Tapferkeit, die in der Selbstentäußerung liegt”[6]. Damit bleibt ein weiterer Aspekt der bürgerlich-demokratischen Gesellschaft, der Ausgleich zwischen individuellen und kollektivem Interesse, einfach ausgeklammert.

Neue Begriffe für absolutes Machtstreben?

Sebastian Kurz konnte letztlich von beidem profitieren: Während er von Harmonie predigte, begründete er den vermeintlichen “Stillstand” der vorherigen Koalition aus SPÖ und ÖVP (der im Übrigen auch er angehörte) mit ständiger “Streiterei”. Zudem präsentiert sich der “allerheiligste Sebastian 2.0”[7] bis heute als Märtyrer, der sich gleichsam für Österreich opfere: Er verzichtet öffentlich auf eine Gehaltsfortzahlung (die ihm gar nicht zusteht),[8] leidet an den rechtsextremen “Einzelfällen” und am Zerbrechen der Koalition (die er trotz Warnungen und wohl auch besseren Wissens eingegangen ist). Er wolle doch nur für “unser wunderschönes Land”[9] arbeiten. Daran würden ihn nicht nur die üblichen politischen Gegner, sondern nun auch die ehemaligen Koalitionspartner hindern.

Das klingt alles sehr erbaulich und erfreut vieler Wähler*innen Seele, die sich nach der österreichischen Version der Demokratie sehnen. Dabei übersehen sie aber, dass die beschworene Harmonie, die Selbstentäußerung und das Märtyrertum möglicherweise für absolutes Machtstreben stehen. Wer nicht die politischen Zugänge des jungen “Altkanzlers” teilt, kann daher auch kein Koalitionspartner sein, wie beispielsweise die Sozialdemokratische Partei Österreichs (SPÖ).[10] Kurz’ Vorstellungen von Demokratie erschöpfen sich offenbar in der Durchsetzung der eigenen politischen Ideen und verneinen demokratische Grundprinzipien: das Diskutieren unterschiedlicher politischer Zugänge und Konsensfindung. Es beruhigt in diesem Zusammenhang nicht, dass Kurz nach dem erfolgreichen Misstrauensantrag gegen seine Regierung der repräsentativen Demokratie sein Misstrauen, wenn nicht seine Verachtung ausdrückte: “Heute hat das Parlament entschieden, aber am Ende entscheidet immer das Volk.”[11]

Mythos und Realität

Die Harmonie, die Sebastian Kurz und die “neue ÖVP” beschwören, erweist sich als Mythos und als Spiel mit österreichischen Mentalitäten. Zwar wurde in der Regierung vor allem hinter geschlossenen Türen gestritten und nach außen hin die Harmonie vermittelt. Die österreichische Öffentlichkeit ist aber wahrscheinlich gespaltener als je zuvor. Nicht alle vom “Altkanzler” beschworenen Österreicher*innen wollen in ihm einen politischen “Messias” sehen. Es verwundert daher nicht, dass die neue Übergangsregierung aus Beamten und Fachleuten ein spürbares Aufatmen bei Teilen der in Österreich lebenden Menschen auslöste.

Zum Nachdenken sei allerdings angemerkt: Auch die neuen Minister*innen haben politische Meinungen und sind letztlich nicht neutrale Wesen. Und die neue Harmonie, nach dem sich die Österreicher*innen offenbar so sehnen, kann nur eine vorübergehende sein. Zwar mögen die politischen Turbulenzen nun ein wenig abflauen. Demokratie ist allerdings ohne Meinungsvielfalt und Konsensbildung und somit auch ohne Politiker*innen nicht möglich. Vielleicht verankert sich diese Einsicht auch einmal im kollektiven Gedächtnis der Österreicher*innen.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Hellmuth, Thomas. “Harmonie als demokratisches Prinzip? Politische Bildung in Österreich und der Schweiz seit 1945,” in Politische Bildung mit klarem Blick. Festschrift für Wolfgang Sander, edited by Anja Besand and Susann Gessner. Frankfurt am Main: Wochenschau Verlag, 2018, 158-166.
  • Horaczek, Nina, and Barbara Tóth. Sebastian Kurz. Österreichs neues Wunderkind? Salzburg: Residenz Verlag, 2017.
  • Rathkolb, Oliver. Die paradoxe Republik. Österreich 1945-2005. Wien: Zsolnay, 2007.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] “Strolz zum Abschied: Kurz hat sich brutal an die Macht geputscht,” Die Presse,  Juni 2018, https://diepresse.com/home/innenpolitik/5454266/Strolz-zum-Abschied_Kurz-hat-sich-brutal-an-die-Macht-geputscht (letzter Zugriff 9. Juni 2019); “Ex-ÖVP-Chef Mitterlehner: ‚Kurz hat die Rechten salonfähig gemacht‘,” Der Standard,  April 16, 2019, https://derstandard.at/2000101499200/Ex-OeVP-Chef-Mitterlehner-Sebastian-Kurz-hat-die-Rechten-salonfaehig (letzter Zugriff 9. Juni 2016).
[2] Brigitte Bailer, Wolfgang Neugebauer, and Heribert Schiedel, “Die FPÖ auf dem Weg zur Regierungspartei. Zur Erfolgsgeschichte einer rechtsextremen Partei,” in Österreich und die rechte Versuchung, ed. Hans-Henning Scharsach (Reinbek: Rohwohlt, 2000), 105–127; Eckhard Jesse, Tom Thieme, “Extremismus in den EU-Staaten. Theoretische und konzeptionelle Grundlagen,” in Extremismus in den EU-Staaten, eds. Eckhard Jesse, Tom Thieme (Wiesbaden: VS, 2011), 29; Samuel Salzborn, Angriff der Antidemokraten. Die völkische Rebellion der Neuen Rechten (Weinheim: Beltz Juventa, 2017), 135. Hans Rauscher, “Kurz ist mit der FPÖ gescheitert – und will trotzdem unser Vertrauen,” Der Standard, 18. Mai 2019, https://www.derstandard.at/2000103378024/Wer-sich-mit-der-FPOe-einlaesst-bekommt-eine-Staatskrise (letzter Zugriff 9. Juni 2019).
[3] Siehe dazu die Informationen über zum Ibiza-Skandal in: https://www.falter.at/strache (letzter Zugriff 9. Juni 2019).
[4] Oliver Rathkolb, Die paradoxe Republik. Österreich 1945-2005 (Wien: Zsolnay, 2005), 17-59; Susanne Breuss and Karin Liebhart, Inszenierungen: Stichwörter zu Österreich (Wien: Sonderzahl, 1995); Thomas Hellmuth, Historisch-politische Sinnbildung. Geschichte – Geschichtsdidaktik – Politische Bildung (Schwalbach/Ts.: Wochenschau Verlag, 2014), 89-90.
[5] Arbeitsgemeinschaft, Unser Österreich 1945-1955. Zum 10. Jahrestag der Wiederherstellung der Unabhängigkeit der Republik Österreich. Der Schuljugend gewidmet von der österreichischen Bundesregierung (Wien: ÖBV, 1955), 6-7.
[6] Franz Heilsberg, Friedrich Korger, Staatsbürgerkunde (Wien: Hölder-Pichler-Tempsky, 1960), 50.
[7] Günther Draxler, “Einer stiehlt sich davon,” Der Standard, May 29, 2019, https://derstandard.at/2000104097929/Einer-stiehlt-sich-davon?_blogGroup=1 (letzter Zugriff 9. Juni 2019).
[8] “,Verzichten wie Kurz‘: Netz lacht über ‚großzügigen‘ Ex-Kanzler,” Der Standard, 30. Mai 2019, https://derstandard.at/2000104016539/Verzichten-wie-Kurz-Twitter-lacht-ueber-grosszuegigen-Ex-Kanzler (letzter Zugriff 9. Juni 2019).
[9] Sebastian Kurz (@sebastiankurz), “Die FPÖ schadet mit ihrem Verhalten dem Weg der Veränderung,” Twitter, https://twitter.com/sebastiankurz/status/1129825808543911936 (letzter Zugriff 11. Juni 2019).
[10] “Sebastian Kurz: Genug ist genug,” Wiener Zeitung, May 18, 2019, https://www.wienerzeitung.at/nachrichten/politik/oesterreich/2010035-Genug-ist-genug.html (letzter Zugriff 9. Juni 2019).
[11] Zitiert bei: Hans Rauscher, “Kurz geht nicht ins Parlament, er startet seine Wiederauferstehung,” Der Standard, May 29, 2019, https://derstandard.at/2000103988638/Kurz-geht-nicht-ins-Parlament-er-startet-seine-Wiederauferstehung (letzter Zugriff 9.Mai 2019)

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Berkeley Art Museum © 2018 Mike and Lara Wolfe, Public Domain via flickr.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Hellmuth, Thomas: Österreichische Demokratie. In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 26, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-14123.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Dominika Uczkiewicz / Krzysztof Ruchniewicz (Team Wrocław)

Copyright (c) 2019 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 7 (2019) 26
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-14123

Tags: , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest