Understanding Empire in the 21st Century

“Empire” verstehen im 21. Jahrhundert


Empires are an important phenomenon in history. If we believe that a historical education can have an impact on people’s views and beliefs, they should have some understanding of what empires are, and what effect they have on people’s and nations’ lives. What questions are worth asking about the concept of Empire at this point in the 21st century? And what should people know and understand about Empire?

Controversy and Contest

Debates about empire in the UK have had a prominent public profile in recent years.[1] Several historians and politicians have argued that schools do not teach about the British Empire, or that they do so in an anti-British way.[2] In order to explore these claims about the teaching of the British Empire in schools, I did a small exploratory survey about the teaching of empire.

All the departments consulted reported that they did teach the topic, although some spent more time on it than others. Nearly all of the respondents said that they encouraged discussion and debate about the extent to which the British Empire was ‘a good thing’. Hardly any departments taught about the decline of the empire in the twentieth century. Treatment of empire tended to be almost entirely backwards-looking, pre-dating British imperial decline.[3]

Going Outside

People do not just learn about empires in the classroom; they learn through television programmes, newspaper articles, Facebook and films (the film Zulu, for example, remains an iconic film in the UK). As with the treatment of empire within schools, consideration of empire tends to be nostalgic, national and backwards looking, to the time of the big pink map, and the time when Britain was at the zenith of its power and influence.

A recent YouGov poll found that 59% of those polled thought that the British Empire was something to be proud of (against 19% who disagreed with this statement), and 49% or respondents felt that those colonised were better off for having been part of the British Empire (against 15% who disagreed with this statement).[4] If British history teachers are trying to inculcate a negative view of the British Empire, as some politicians have argued, they do not seem to be doing a very good job.

Ideas about empire in the UK have fluctuated over time (we no longer have “Empire Day” in schools), influenced by the break-up of the British Empire, the presentation of empire in the popular media, and changes in the ways that young people get their information and knowledge about empire. What are the implications of these changes; what should young people know and understand about empire?

What to Know

In his book, Empire: a very short introduction, Stephen Howe makes the point that over the course of the past century, empires have been transformed in form and nature, and in recent times, empires have become transnational in terms of the ways in which influence and power are exercised beyond sovereign boundaries. Empires today take many forms, cultural, economic and ideological, they are no longer national phenomena, and they cannot be easily visualised or presented on a conventional map, as was the case with earlier empires.[5]

First, “empire” was not something that mainly happened in the past: there have always been empires in history, and there are empires today. Young people need to understand that like wars, empires are a recurring and prevalent feature of the past and present. Developing young people’s awareness of the existence of non-European empires, may help to remedy the misconception that ‘empire’ was something that Europeans invariably inflicted on “lesser” civilisations.

As I have argued elsewhere, “young people also need to understand that empires are generally susceptible to rise, decline and fall. Nations, city states and empires are not inexorably and permanently superior to the peoples they subjugate and incorporate into their orbit”.[6]

Perhaps most importantly, people should understand that different forms of empire have evolved over time. In the twenty first century, it is no longer primarily a question of big countries taking over smaller countries and physically annexing them. As well as the sort of ideological imperialism evidenced in Soviet Russia’s control of its satellite states, modern times have seen the emergence of cultural forms of imperialism,  and economic power exercised by large corporations, and multi-national agencies. In terms of understanding the world they live in, it is more important that grown-ups have an understanding of phenomena such as the Gerasimov Doctrine[7], Astroturfing[8], and the implications of the Cambridge Analytica Scandal.[9] If we think of empire as the exercise of extending  power and influence beyond one’ s own territorial boundaries, in the 21st Century, empires are often transnational rather than national in nature. Rupert Murdoch has an empire, Goldman Sachs has an empire, ISIS has an empire (even though it now has no territory), the White Supremacist movement has an empire in the sense of an international network of influence. Empires are “run” from places like 55 Tufton Street London,  55 Savushkina Street St Petersburg, and troll factories somewhere in Macedonia. It is important that young people understand these new (less transparent and more insidious) forms of empire.

Power and Dissolution

One further point might be made.  Young people need to understand the role which power plays in the creation and dissolution of empires. It is misleading to suggest that the motives of those responsible for the building of the British Empire (or any other of the great empires in history) were principally evangelical and philanthropic. The history of decolonisation suggests that on the whole, nations and peoples prefer to govern themselves rather than being governed by others. The chronicler of British invasions of Afghanistan, William Dalrymple, suggests that the United States and England should perhaps not have been so surprised when occupying troops were not welcomed with flowers and cheering crowds.[10]

It is important that people understand these developments and changes in the nature of empire in the twenty first century if they are to have a mature and well informed understanding of the world that they live in.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Dorling, Danny and Sally Tomlinson. Rule Brittania: Brexit and the end of empire. London: Biteback, 2019.
  • Howe, Stephen.  Empire: a very short introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] Amit Chaudhuri, “The real meaning of Rhodes Must Fall,” The Guardian, 16 March 2016.
[2] William Dalrymple, “Apologising for Amritsar is pointless. Better redress is to never forget,” The Guardian, 23 february 2013.
[3] Terry Haydn, “How is ‘Empire’ taught in English schools? An exploratory study,” in Teaching Colonialism. The Challenge of Post-Colonialism to History Education, eds. Susanne Popp, Katya Gorbahn and Susanne Grindel, (Berlin: Peter Lang, 2019), 277–296.
[4] Jon Stone, “British people are proud of colonialism and the British Empire, poll finds,” The Independent 19 january 2016.
[5] Stephen Howe, Empire: a very short introduction. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002).
[6] Terry Haydn, “How and what should we teach about the British Empire in English schools?” in Handbook of the International Society of History Didactics (Schwalbach: Wochenschau Verlag, 2014), 23–40.
[7] Molly Mckew, “The Gerasimov Doctrine,” Politico 9 may 2017, https://www.politico.eu/article/new-battles-cyberwarfare-russia/ (last accessed 8 April 2019).
[8] Adam Bienkov, “Astroturfing: what is it and why does it matter?” The Guardian 8 february 2012.
[9] Robinson Mayer,  “The Cambridge Analytica Scandal, in Three Paragraphs,” The Atlantic, 20 march 2018.
[10] William Dalrymple, Return of a king: the battle for Afghanistan (London: Bloomsbury, 2013).

_____________________

Image Credits

Robert Clive and Mir Jafar after the Battle of Plassey, 1757 © 1760 Francis Hayman, Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Recommended Citation

Haydn, Terry: Understanding Empire in the 21st Century. In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 13, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-13695.

Editorial Responsibility

Moritz Hoffmann / Marko Demantowsky (Team Basel)

Imperien sind ein wichtiges historisches Phänomen. Wenn wir glauben, dass historische Bildung einen Einfluss auf Ansichten und Überzeugungen hat, dann sollten wir verstehen, was Imperien sind und welche Auswirkungen sie auf das Leben von Völkern und Nationen haben. Welche Fragen lohnt es sich diesbezüglich im 21. Jahrhundert zu stellen? Und was sollten wir über Imperien wissen und verstehen?

Kontrovers und umstritten

In Großbritannien haben die Debatten über Imperien in den letzten Jahren ein starkes öffentliches Interesse geweckt.[1] Einige Historiker*innen und Politiker*innen behaupten, dass das Britische Weltreich nicht im Geschichtsunterricht vorkomme oder auf antibritische Weise dargestellt werde. Um diese Behauptungen über den Stellenwert des britischen Empires an Schulen zu erforschen, habe ich einen kleinen explorativen Überblick zu diesem Thema unternommen.

Alle befragten Schulen berichteten, dass sie das Thema unterrichten würden, obwohl einige mehr Zeit dafür aufwendeten als andere. Fast alle Befragten gaben an, dass sie die Diskussion und Debatte über das Ausmaß, in dem das britische Imperium “eine gute Sache” gewesen sei, fördern. Kaum eine Schule behandelte jedoch den Untergang des British Empire im 20. Jahrhundert. Stattdessen war der entsprechende Unterricht in der Regel fast vollständig rückwärts gewandt und betrachtete die Zeit vor dem Niedergang.[3]

Außerhalb des Klassenzimmers

Es ist ja nicht so, dass wir nur im Klassenzimmer etwas über Imperien lernen, sondern auch durch Fernsehsendungen, Zeitungsartikel, Facebook und Filme (der Film Zulu zum Beispiel bleibt ein Kultfilm in Großbritannien). Wie bei der Behandlung dieses Themas im Unterricht, neigt die Betrachtung des Imperiums dazu, nostalgisch, national und rückwärtsgewandt zu sein, ausgerichtet auf die Zeit der großen rosafarbenen Weltkarte und auf die Zeit, als Großbritannien auf dem Höhepunkt seiner Macht und seines Einflusses war.

Eine kürzlich durchgeführte YouGov-Umfrage ergab, dass 59 Prozent der Befragten der Meinung waren, dass das British Empire etwas ist, worauf sie stolz sein können (gegenüber 19 Prozent, die dieser Aussage nicht zustimmen). 49 Prozent waren der Meinung, dass es den Kolonisierten besser damit gehe, Teil des British Empire zu sein (gegenüber 15 Prozent, die dieser Aussage nicht zustimmten).[4] Wenn britische Geschichtslehrer*innen versuchen, eine negative Sicht auf das britische Empire zu vermitteln, wie einige Politiker*innen behauptet haben, scheinen sie keine sehr gute Arbeit zu leisten.

Die Vorstellungen vom Empire in Großbritannien haben sich im Laufe der Zeit geändert (wir haben keinen “Empire Day” mehr in den Schulen), beeinflusst durch die Auflösung des British Empire, die Präsentation des Empire in den populären Medien und Veränderungen in der Art und Weise, wie junge Menschen ihre Informationen und ihr Wissen über das Empire erhalten. Was sind die Auswirkungen dieser Veränderungen? Was sollten junge Menschen über das Imperium wissen und verstehen?

Was es zu wissen gilt

In seinem Buch Empire: a very short introduction weist Stephen Howe darauf hin, dass sich Imperien im Laufe des letzten Jahrhunderts gewandelt haben. In jüngster Zeit sind sie transnational geworden, was die Art und Weise betrifft, wie Einfluss und Macht über souveräne Grenzen hinweg ausgeübt werden. Weltreiche nehmen heute viele Formen an, kulturelle, wirtschaftliche und ideologische, sie sind keine nationalen Phänomene mehr, und sie lassen sich nicht leicht visualisieren oder auf einer konventionellen Karte darstellen, wie es bei früheren Imperien der Fall war.[5]

Erstens ist “Empire” nicht etwas, was hauptsächlich in der Vergangenheit geschah: Es gab schon immer Imperien in der Geschichte, und es gibt sie noch heute. Junge Menschen müssen verstehen, dass Imperien wie Kriege ein wiederkehrendes und weit verbreitetes Merkmal der Vergangenheit und Gegenwart sind. Die Entwicklung des Bewusstseins junger Menschen für die Existenz außereuropäischer Reiche kann dazu beitragen, das Missverständnis zu beseitigen, dass “Empire” etwas war, das die Europäer den “kleineren” Zivilisationen immer wieder aufgezwungen haben.

Wie ich bereits an anderer Stelle argumentiert habe, “müssen auch junge Menschen verstehen, dass Reiche im Allgemeinen anfällig für Aufstieg, Niedergang und Fall sind. Nationen, Stadtstaaten und Reiche sind den Völkern, die sie unterwerfen und in ihre Umlaufbahn integrieren, nicht unaufhaltsam und dauerhaft überlegen.”[6]

Vielleicht am wichtigsten ist, dass wir verstehen sollten, dass sich verschiedene Formen des Imperiums im Laufe der Zeit entwickelt haben. Im 21. Jahrhundert geht es nicht mehr in erster Linie darum, dass große Länder kleinere Länder übernehmen und physisch annektieren. Neben der Art von ideologischem Imperialismus, der sich in der Kontrolle der Satellitenstaaten durch Sowjetrussland zeigte, sind in der Neuzeit kulturelle Formen des Imperialismus und die wirtschaftliche Macht großer Konzerne und multinationaler Organisationen entstanden. Im Hinblick auf das Verständnis der Welt, in der sie leben, ist es wichtiger, dass Erwachsene Phänomene wie die Gerasimov-Doktrin[7], Astroturfing[8] und die Auswirkungen des Cambridge-Analytica-Skandals verstehen. Wenn wir Empire als die Ausübung von Macht und Einfluss über die eigenen Territorialgrenzen hinaus betrachten, sind die Imperien im 21. Jahrhundert oft eher transnational als national geprägt. Rupert Murdoch hat ein Imperium, Goldman Sachs hat ein Imperium, der IS hat ein Imperium (obwohl es jetzt kein Territorium mehr hat), die WhiteSupremacy-Bewegung hat ein Imperium im Sinne eines internationalen Einflussnetzwerkes. Imperien werden von Orten wie 55 Tufton Street London, der 55 Savushkina Street in St. Petersburg und Trollfabriken irgendwo in Mazedonien “geführt.” Es ist wichtig, dass junge Menschen diese neuen (weniger transparenten und heimtückischeren) Formen des Imperiums verstehen.

Macht und Auflösung

Ein weiterer Punkt könnte noch angesprochen werden. Junge Menschen müssen die Rolle verstehen, die die Macht bei der Schaffung und Auflösung von Imperien spielt. Es ist irreführend zu behaupten, dass die Motive derjenigen, die für den Aufbau des British Empire (oder eines anderen der großen Reiche der Geschichte) verantwortlich sind, hauptsächlich missionarisch und philanthropisch waren. Die Geschichte der Dekolonisation legt nahe, dass Nationen und Völker es im Großen und Ganzen vorziehen, sich selbst zu regieren, anstatt von anderen regiert zu werden. Der Chronist der britischen Invasionen in Afghanistan, William Dalrymple, schlägt vor, dass die Vereinigten Staaten und England vielleicht nicht hätten so überrascht gewesen sein sollen, als die Besatzungstruppen nicht mit Blumen und jubelnden Menschenmassen begrüßt wurden.[10]

Es ist wichtig, dass die Menschen diese Entwicklungen und Veränderungen in der Seinsweise des Imperiums im 21. Jahrhundert verstehen, wenn sie ein reifes und gut informiertes Verständnis der Welt, in der sie leben, haben sollen.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Dorling, Danny and Sally Tomlinson. Rule Brittania: Brexit and the end of empire. London: Biteback, 2019.
  • Howe, Stephen.  Empire: a very short introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] Amit Chaudhuri, “The real meaning of Rhodes Must Fall,” The Guardian, 16 March 2016.
[2] William Dalrymple, “Apologising for Amritsar is pointless. Better redress is to never forget,” The Guardian, 23 february 2013.
[3] Terry Haydn, “How is ‘Empire’ taught in English schools? An exploratory study,” in Teaching Colonialism. The Challenge of Post-Colonialism to History Education, eds. Susanne Popp, Katya Gorbahn and Susanne Grindel, (Berlin: Peter Lang, 2019), 277–296.
[4] Jon Stone, “British people are proud of colonialism and the British Empire, poll finds,” The Independent 19 january 2016.
[5] Stephen Howe, Empire: a very short introduction. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002).
[6] Terry Haydn, “How and what should we teach about the British Empire in English schools?” in Handbook of the International Society of History Didactics (Schwalbach: Wochenschau Verlag, 2014), 23–40.
[7] Molly Mckew, “The Gerasimov Doctrine,” Politico 9 may 2017, https://www.politico.eu/article/new-battles-cyberwarfare-russia/ (letzter Zugriff 8. April 2019).
[8] Adam Bienkov, “Astroturfing: what is it and why does it matter?” The Guardian 8 february 2012.
[9] Robinson Mayer,  “The Cambridge Analytica Scandal, in Three Paragraphs,” The Atlantic, 20 march 2018.
[10] William Dalrymple, Return of a king: the battle for Afghanistan (London: Bloomsbury, 2013).

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Robert Clive and Mir Jafar after the Battle of Plassey, 1757 © 1760 Francis Hayman, Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Haydn, Terry: “Empire” verstehen im 21. Jahrhundert. In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 13, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-13695.

Translated by Mark Kyburz

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Moritz Hoffmann / Marko Demantowsky (Team Basel)

Copyright (c) 2019 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 7 (2019) 13
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-13695

Tags: , , ,

Pin It on Pinterest