“historgs” – History as Multiple Identification

“historgs“ – Geschichte als mehrfache Identifikation


Similar to “cyborgs,” ”historgs” already exist, too. These biological forms of life constitute “HISTorical ORGanisms” that result from the fusion of the present and past. These synthetic forms of world representation and exploration appear in various ways in public history. The world of sports is certainly only one area of society where the example presented here can be found. 

Identity: Past

It is a widespread phenomenon that certain groups, but also individuals, identify with certain moments of the past. Without addressing the macro-political level, such identification can also be observed in companies. Some bakeries, for example, see themselves as upholding the tradition of medieval bakers.  While a few companies can actually look back at a centuries-old genesis of economic activity or place individual products in a historical series, and thus inscribe themselves in (dis)continuity, others delve into the wardrobe or storehouse. History is then often activated as a prop.[1] This awakens reminiscences, imaginary patterns, or values in order to evoke presumed or known reactions among buyers. In the process, arbitrary patterns also emerge, such as a dragon-slaying knight advertising coffee.[2]

The History Machine

Sports clubs have also discovered this approach for themselves. Instead of considering the broad discussion on mascots in North America,[3] I present an example from Austria. The Austrian record-holding Greco-Roman wrestling club “A. C. Wals” catapults itself into the “past” with its public iconography.[4] It is hardly surprising that this recourse to the past brings into play Greco-Roman imagery. Club posters feature photomontages with antique-looking warriors who are half-naked and armed with spears, swords, and round shields. These aesthetics — blazing flames, shattering glass, and flashes of lightning —come from a post-modern film language. The proximity to movies like “300” (USA/ Zack Snyder, 2006) and “Gladiator” (U.K.; USA/ Ridley Scott, 2000) is obvious. The brutal martial masculinity of these photographs is offered as a means of identification both for the club’s athletes and for its fans. Such depictions enable club members to align themselves with the (fantastic) heroes of the past, to whom the dignity of ancient times clings.

The historian Wolfgang Schmale has commented on this kind of masculinity as follows: “Design and styling — like the muscular torso as a partial aspect — convey the message that work is done on the body, which means that the body is the ‘bearer’ of a consciously made masculinity, of a certain individually chosen masculinity among many others.” [5]

Thus, the club deploys a special masculinity. However, the iconographic line also unmistakably ignores questions of intersectionality and gender, which — when considering the club’s squad — would be obvious.

Are We Human?

However, such identification is not simply receptive. The athletes themselves posed as warriors and imitated “gladiators” for the shooting. This cross-fade was supposed to dissolve the boundaries between present and past on the occasion of the record-winning 50th title in 2015.[6] This event was captured in the photographs and has been used to this day. History is not only prop or masquerade in this context, but also a staged reincarnation of the past, or perhaps even merely an instance of cinematographic history. However, comparing past and present phenomena amounts to more than a classical, exemplary construction of meaning. It is instead a far more extreme form, one in which iconographic interweaving is shown. The muscular winners of the present are stripped of their modern sports equipment and enveloped in the ideal red Roman cloak. Superficial and dripping wounds refer to the fighters’ willingness to spill run, just as their aggressive facial expressions attest to their unbroken readiness to fight. The weapons raised to attack opponents indicate the irrepressible will to attack the unidentifiable other. Although this staging is not a simple re-enactment, it is difficult to speak of “fictitious authenticity.”[7]

However, the playful interweaving of the present and references to the past is clearly reinforced. The use of cinematic images involves an intermediate level, one whose popular patterns of ideas brings recipients into the presence of ancient warriors.[8] This strategy contributes to the formers’ specific normative interpretation while at the same time increasing the warriors’ credibility. However, this does not do proper justice to the human past. Depicted thus, the wrestlers do not represent “gladiators” but need to be considered adept distortions of the film industry. They blend contemporary expectations, facets of the past, and influential historical images of popular culture.

Or Are We Historgs?

The Multidimensional products of public history demand more differentiated consideration than is possible here. We also need to account for dimensions that are often ignored. Such examinations of history often lack knowledge about those involved, i.e. who place themselves in such a historical line: How do they feel? How important are the self- and group images thereby created, as well as the reactions of others? Which forms of staged or cognitive blending of the present and the “past” can be discerned? How are people included or excluded? etc. Yet sheer observation, without entering these anthropological and subjective spheres, seems too little to me and should therefore be increasingly perceived and researched in public history. This would probably enable us to provide far more human(e) explanations of “historgs.”

_____________________

Further Reading

  • de Groot, Jerome. Consuming History. Historians and heritage in contemporary popular culture. Abington: Routledge, 2009.
  • Jucker, Michael. „Sports History as Threatened Public History,“ Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 4, dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-13304.
  • Kühberger, Christoph, Andreas Pudlat (Eds.). Vergangenheitsbewirtschaftung. Public History zwischen Wirtschaft und Wissenschaft. Innsbruck, Wien: Studien Verlag, 2012.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] Kühberger, Christoph, ”Geschichtsmarketing als Teil der Public History. Einführende Sondierungen zwischen Wissenschaft und Wirtschaft,” in Vergangenheitsbewirtschaftung. Public History zwischen Wirtschaft und Wissenschaft, ed. Christoph Kühberger and Andreas Pudlat (Innsbruck, Wien: Studien Verlag, 2012), 13-53, https://zeithistorische-forschungen.de/sites/default/files/medien/material/2009-3/Kuehberger_2012.pdf (last accessed 15 april 2019).
[2] See https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ljPZwmnGOT4 (letzter Zugriff 15. April 2019).
[3] See James V. Fenelon, Redskins? Sports Mascots, Indian Nations, and White Racism (New York: Routledge, 2017); Andrew C. Billings, Jason Edward Black, Mascot Nation: The Controversy over Native American Representations in Sports (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2018).
[4] https://www.ac-wals.com/ (last accessed 15 april 2019).
[5] Wolfgang Schmale, Geschichte der Männlichkeit in Europa (1450-2000) (Wien: Böhlau, 2003), 264-265.
[6] https://www.bildsymphonie.at/blog/portfolio/mysterious-nature/ (last accessed 15 april 2019).
[7] Tim Neu, “Vom Nachstellen zum Nacherleben? Vormoderne Rituale im Geschichtsunterricht,” in Echte Geschichte. Authentizitätsfiktionen in populären Geschichtskulturen, ed. Eva U. Pirker, Marc Rüdiger et al. (Münster: transcript, 2010), 66.
[8] Martin Zimmermann, “Der Historiker am Set,” in Alles authentisch? Popularisierung der Geschichte im Fernsehen, ed. Thomas Fischer and Rainer Wirtz (Konstanz: UVK, 2008), 144.

_____________________

Image Credits

Bus with a picture of A. C. Wals in Baderluck/Hof near Salzburg © 2018 Christoph Kühberger.

Recommended Citation

Kühberger, Christoph: “historgs” – History as multiple identification. In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 14, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-13743.

Editorial Responsibility

Moritz Hoffmann / Marko Demantowsky (Team Basel)

Ähnlich wie “Cyborgs” existieren bereits “Historgs”, also biologische Lebensformen, die aufgrund einer Verschmelzung zwischen Gegenwart und Geschichte “HISTorical ORGanisms” ausbilden. Es steht zu vermuten, dass diese synthetischen Formen der Weltdarstellung und Welterschließung auf vielfältige Weise in Bereichen der Public History auftauchen. Die Welt des Sports ist hierfür sicherlich nur ein gesellschaftlicher Teilbereich, aus dem das hier vorgestellte Beispiel stammt. 

Identität: Vergangenheit

Es ist ein weit verbreitetes Phänomen, dass bestimmte Gruppen, aber auch Individuen, sich mit bestimmten Momenten aus der Vergangenheit identifizieren. Ohne hier gleich die makropolitische Ebene ansprechen zu wollen, kann dies etwa auch bei Unternehmen beobachtet werden. So verstehen sich etwa Bäckereien in der Tradition von mittelalterlichen Backstuben. Während einige wenige Unternehmen tatsächlich auf eine jahrhundertealte Genese des wirtschaftlichen Treibens zurückblicken können oder einzelne Produkte in eine historische Reihe stellen und sich so in (Dis-)Kontinuitätslinien einschreiben, greifen andere in die Klamottenkiste. Geschichte wird dann nicht selten als Requisite aktiviert.[1] Damit werden Reminiszenzen, Vorstellungsmuster oder Wertehaltungen geweckt, um vermutete oder gewusste Reaktionen bei Käufer/innen wachzurufen. Dabei zeigen sich auch arbiträre Muster, indem etwa ein drachentötender Ritter für Kaffee wirbt.[2]

Geschichtsmaschine

Auch Sportvereine haben diesen Zugang für sich entdeckt. Ich möchte hier nicht auf die breite Diskussion zu Maskottchen eingehen, die in Nordamerika geführt wird,[3] sondern auf ein Beispiel aus Österreich. Der österreichische Rekordmeister im Ringen “A. C. Wals” katapultiert sich mit seiner öffentlichen Ikonografie in die “Vergangenheit”.[4] Es verwundert wenig, dass dabei römisch-griechische Bildwelten aktiviert werden. Gezeigt werden Fotomontagen mit antik anmutenden Kriegern. Sie sind halbnackt und mit Speer, Schwert und Rundschild bewaffnet. Die verwendete Ästhetik zwischen lodernden Flammen, zerberstendem Glas und aufleuchtenden Blitzen entspringt einer postmodernen Filmsprache. Die Nähe zu Inszenierungen aus den Filmen “300” und “Gladiator” sind unverkennbar. Die in den Fotografien arrangierte brutale kriegerische Männlichkeit wird als Identifikation für Sporttreibenden und Fans des Vereins feilgeboten. Sie ermöglicht es, sich in eine Reihe zu stellen mit den (fantastischen) Heroen der Vergangenheit, an denen die Würde der antiken Vorzeit klebt.

Der Historiker Wolfgang Schmale stellt zu einer derartigen Männlichkeit fest: “Design und Styling beinhalten – wie der muskulöse Torso als Teilaspekt – die Botschaft, dass am Körper gearbeitet wird, was meinen soll, dass der Körper ‚Träger‘ einer bewusst gemachten Männlichkeit ist, einer bestimmten individuell gewählten Männlichkeit unter vielen.”[5]

Damit positioniert der Verein eine besondere Männlichkeit. Die ikonographische Linie blendet damit aber auch unverkennbar Fragen der Intersektionalität und der Geschlechter aus, die – blickt man in die Kampfkader des Vereins – aber anwesend wären.

Sind wir Menschen?

Die Identifikation ist jedoch nicht nur eine rezeptive. Es waren die Sportler des Vereins selbst, die in die Rollen der Krieger schlüpften und für das Shooting “Gladiatoren” mimten. Es handelt sich um eine Überblendung, die die Grenzen zwischen Gegenwart und Geschichte anlässlich des 50. Titelsieges 2015 aufheben sollte[6]. In den Fotografien wurde dies festgehalten und bis heute genutzt. Geschichte ist dabei nicht nur Requisit oder Maskerade, sondern eine inszenierte Reinkarnation der Vergangenheit, vielleicht auch nur einer kinematographischen Geschichte. Es ist jedoch mehr als eine klassische exemplarische Sinnbildung, in der Phänomene der Vergangenheit mit der Gegenwart verglichen werden. Es ist eine weit extremere Form, indem ein ikonographisches Ineinander gezeigt wird. Die muskulösen Gewinner der Gegenwart werden dabei ihrer modernen Sportausstattung entkleidet und in den idealtypischen, roten Umhang eines Römers gehüllt. Oberflächliche Blessuren und triefende Wunden verweisen auf die Bereitschaft Blut zu lassen, aggressive Mimik auf die anhaltende Bereitschaft zum Kampf. Die Waffen zum Angriff erhoben, deuten auf den unbändigen Willen hin, das nicht identifizierbare Andere angreifen zu wollen. Wenngleich diese Inszenierung kein simples Reenactment ist, kann man hier auch nur schwerlich von “fingierter Authentizität”[7] sprechen.

Das spielerische Ineinander von Gegenwart und Bezügen auf Vergangenheit verstärken sich aber eindeutig. Die Nutzung von filmischen Bildern zieht diesbezüglich eine Zwischenebene ein. Diese Ebene spielt den Rezipient*innen eine Annäherung über populäre Vorstellungsmuster zu antiken Kriegern zu[8] und trägt zu deren spezifischen normativen Ausdeutung bei gleichzeitiger Steigerung der Glaubwürdigkeit bei. Die durchlebte menschliche Vergangenheit kommt dabei aber nicht zu ihrem Recht. Die so dargestellten Ringer des “A. C. Wals” stellen in diesem Sinn keine “Gladiatoren” dar, sondern sind als geschickt genutzte Zerrbilder der Filmindustrie zu klassifizieren. Eine Mischung aus zeitgeistigen Erwartungen, Facetten der Vergangenheit und einflussreichen populärhistorischen Bildern.

Sind wir Historgs?

Vieldimensionale Produkte einer Public History müssen noch viel differenzierter betrachtet werden, als dies hier möglich ist. Es sollten dabei auch Dimensionen in den Blick kommen, die oft ignoriert werden. Es fehlt nämlich bei derartigen Auseinandersetzungen mit Geschichte das Wissen um die involvierten Menschen, die sich in derartige historische Reihen stellen: Wie fühlen sie sich? Wie wichtig sind ihnen die damit erzeugten Bilder vom Selbst, von der Gruppe und die Reaktion der anderen? Welche Formen der inszenierten oder kognitiven Verschmelzung zwischen Gegenwart und “Vergangenheit” können ausgemacht werden? Wie werden damit Menschen inkludiert bzw. exkludiert etc.? Nur die Phänomene zu beobachten, ohne in diese anthropologischen und subjektiven Sphären einzudringen, scheint mir zu wenig und sollte daher verstärkt im Programm der Public History wahrgenommen und beforscht werden. “historgs” würden so vermutlich wieder in weit menschlichere Erklärungsansätze zurückgeholt werden.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • de Groot, Jerome. Consuming History. Historians and heritage in contemporary popular culture. Abington: Routledge, 2009.
  • Jucker, Michael. „Sports History as Threatened Public History,“ Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 4, dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-13304.
  • Kühberger, Christoph, Andreas Pudlat (Eds.). Vergangenheitsbewirtschaftung. Public History zwischen Wirtschaft und Wissenschaft. Innsbruck, Wien: Studien Verlag, 2012.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] Kühberger, Christoph, ”Geschichtsmarketing als Teil der Public History. Einführende Sondierungen zwischen Wissenschaft und Wirtschaft,” in Vergangenheitsbewirtschaftung. Public History zwischen Wirtschaft und Wissenschaft, ed. Christoph Kühberger and Andreas Pudlat (Innsbruck, Wien: Studien Verlag, 2012), 13-53, https://zeithistorische-forschungen.de/sites/default/files/medien/material/2009-3/Kuehberger_2012.pdf (letzter Zugriff 15. April 2019).
[2] Vgl. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ljPZwmnGOT4 (letzter Zugriff 15. April 2019).
[3] Vgl. James V. Fenelon, Redskins? Sports Mascots, Indian Nations, and White Racism (New York: Routledge, 2017); Andrew C. Billings, Jason Edward Black, Mascot Nation: The Controversy over Native American Representations in Sports (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2018).
[4] https://www.ac-wals.com/ (letzter Zugriff 15. April 2019).
[5] Wolfgang Schmale, Geschichte der Männlichkeit in Europa (1450-2000) (Wien: Böhlau, 2003), 264-265.
[6] https://www.bildsymphonie.at/blog/portfolio/mysterious-nature/ (letzter Zugriff 15. April 2019).
[7] Tim Neu, “Vom Nachstellen zum Nacherleben? Vormoderne Rituale im Geschichtsunterricht,” in Echte Geschichte. Authentizitätsfiktionen in populären Geschichtskulturen, ed. Eva U. Pirker, Marc Rüdiger et al. (Münster: transcript, 2010), 66.
[8] Martin Zimmermann, “Der Historiker am Set,” in Alles authentisch? Popularisierung der Geschichte im Fernsehen, ed. Thomas Fischer and Rainer Wirtz (Konstanz: UVK, 2008), 144.

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Bus mit Foto des A. C. Wals in Baderluck/ Hof bei Salzburg © 2018 Christoph Kühberger.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Kühberger, Christoph: “historgs” – Geschichte als mehrfache Identifikation. In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 14, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-13743.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Moritz Hoffmann / Marko Demantowsky (Team Basel)

Copyright (c) 2019 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 7 (2019) 14
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-13743

Tags: , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest