National Socialism: What We Can Learn Today

Nationalsozialismus: Was wir heute lernen können


In recent times, it is far from unspeakable in Germany to be sick of the intense confrontation with the Nazi past.[1] To be honest, this holds true even for universities. Many historians have refrained from exploring National Socialism, attributing no more than marginal value to it when it comes to explaining current developments. Histories of today’s present, right now, begin in the 1970s.[2]

There is Nothing Left to Learn?

As far as the commemorative culture of the Federal Republic of Germany is concerned, this seems disastrous. For decades its official self-conception was based on delimiting itself unmistakably from the crimes of the Nazi dictatorship. But if the counter-image of National Socialism fades away and history, intended as moral admonition, fails to find its audience, democracy is compelled to offer its own positive identities to stand its ground in terms of the politics of memory. The anniversary celebration year of 2019 show that the government and public history actors are trying to invent national democratic traditions in Germany.[3] However, it remains to be seen if places of remembrance and heroic stories told on behalf of parliamentary democracy will provide new identificatory impetus in times of growing skepticism against its representativity.

In contrast, today’s historians of National Socialism are best placed to narrate the Nazi past without regressing into a naive mode of coming to terms with the past (“Vergangenheitsbewältigung”). Now this does of course not mean ignoring the millions of victims. In fact, current historiography amounts to investigating a society which was transformed into a declared alternative to liberal democracy, and which was therefore shaped by the principle of homogeneity instead of the principle of plurality. In times when democracy falls into crisis, the historiography of Nazi dictatorship may therefore also serve as a means for observing its historical alternative.

Sold as Better Democracy

Following the research consensus, public examination ought to stop conceptualizing both National Socialism and the Weimar Republic as isolated national phenomena. German history can only be conceived of in a transnational context, as it exemplified a global problem evident between the 1920s and the 1940s: Could democracy or dictatorship better cope with the coeval desires for national sovereignty, political participation, and social justice when global capitalism was afflicted by an unprecedented crisis?[4]

As the answer was anything but clear, Western democracies frequently looked spellbound at Nazi Germany, which sought to sell itself as a better democracy. In some respects, Western governments took similar measures to overcome the world economic crisis.[5] Embedding National Socialism in a history of competitive capitalist social orders does not mean relativizing it. Instead, this perspective reveals how the problems of the world economy and those of legitimacy in representative democracies managed to attract people at the time to authoritarian experiments, at a time when history was unable to provide a deterrent to dictatorship.

A Community That Never Was

Nazi German society may be regarded as the historically most radical attempt to shape the chimeara of an ethnically, socially, and culturally homogeneous people. It never proved to be homogeneous in fact, despite constantly striving to achieve this objective. Two mechanisms in particular served this goal: the active exclusion of minorities by means of physical violence on the one hand, and the active classification to a people’s community (“Volksgemeinschaft”) on the other, which was constantly evolving.[6]

Without practicing persistent exclusion and assignment, the majority society of Nazi Germany lacked the specific dynamics required to camouflage its inner diversity. As a complex, highly differentiated modern mass society, German society in the 1930s and 1940s was characterized by the widespread perception and awareness of social differences and by a constantly communicated discontent with the ruling elite, despite every suggestive mass rally and social utopia.[7] Arguably, the regime skillfully orchestarted the organized care of its fellow racial Germans while at the same time fuelling their individual cost-benefit calculus through a profound ideology of achievement. Widespread denunciation and social control, in local communities and enterprises, reveal a society that remained differentiated, but that leveraged the imperatives of community and homogeneity to satisfy self-interest. Precisely therein lay the attractiveness of dictatorship for many.[8]

A Polity That One Could Not Escape

Compared to democracy, Nazi dictatorship enforced uniformity, whose ramifications in everyday life have only recently began to be fully grasped. Living in a system that eradicated liberal values entailed a permanent confrontation with politics even in private spheres, for the convinced and the non-convinced alike. Social relationships, biographical self-images, and bodily perception all became subject to negotiation in the Third Reich because by creating the “German man” the regime meant to pursue an unbounded educational project. Hence, for the individual member of the “people’s community,” rejecting pluralism resulted in stress, conscious role-playing, and self-scrutiny for the common good.[9]

Put briefly, the artificial production of similarity turned everyday life in Nazi Germany into a highly politicized, complicated, and violence-prone affair. The current state of research provides such deep insights into the transformations of the everyday through banishing pluralism that museums or schools might consider staging reenactments — if dismay at past injustices no longer suffices to appraise liberal freedoms.

Current historiographical scholarship on National Socialism offers insights into a pluralistic and individualistic society that was forced to adjust to suit a ruling elite’s phantasm of homogeneity.[10] It also enables us to grasp political reasoning amid the mistrust in the mass media. And it reveals how dictatorship was observed from below as an alternative to democracy.[11]

For all these reasons, National Socialism is still part of our epoch.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Mergel, Thomas. “Dictatorship and Democracy 1918-1939.” In The Oxford Handbook of Modern German History, edited by Helmut Walser Smith, 423-452. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.
  • Föllmer, Moritz. “The Subjective Dimension of Nazism.” Historical Journal 56 (2013): 1107-1132.
  • Wildt, Michael. Volk, Volksgemeinschaft, AfD. Hamburg: Hamburger Edition, 2017.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] For a discussion of these developments, see Norbert Frei, Franka Maubach, Christina Morina, Maik Tändler, Zur rechten Zeit. Wider die Rückkehr des Nationalismus (Berlin: Ullstein, 2019).
[2] Frank Bösch, Zeitenwende 1979. Als die Welt von heute begann (München: C.H. Beck, 2019); Andreas Rödder, 21.0. Eine kurze Geschichte der Gegenwart (München: C.H. Beck 2015); Anselm Doering-Manteuffel und Lutz Raphael, Nach dem Boom. Perspektiven auf die Zeitgeschichte seit 1970 (Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2010).
[3] See the programme of the recent conference on “German History of Democracy – A Task for Commemorative Work,” organized by the Deutsche Gesellschaft e.V. on behalf of the Federal Commissioner for Culture and Media: https://www.deutsche-gesellschaft-ev.de/images/pdf/2019/2019-Demokratiegeschichte/EK-Demokratiegeschichte_final.pdf (last accessed 25 march 2019).
[4] Cf. Mark Mazower, Dark Continent. Europe’s Twentieth Century (London: Random House, 1999), Chapter 1 and 4; Thomas Mergel, “Dictatorship and Democracy 1918-1939,” in The Oxford Handbook of Modern German History, ed. Helmut Walser Smith (Oxford/New York: Oxford University Press, 2011), 423-452.
[5] Kiran Klaus Patel, “‘All of this helps us in planning‘: Der “New Deal“ und die NS-Sozialpolitik,“ in Vom Gegner lernen. Feindschaften und Kulturtransfers im Europa des 19. und 20. Jahrhunderts, ed. Martin Aust (Frankfurt am Main/New York: Campus, 2007), 234-252; Wolfgang Schivelbusch, Entfernte Verwandtschaft: Faschismus, Nationalsozialismus, New Deal 1933–1939 (München/Wien: Fischer, 2005); Frank Bajohr and Christoph Strupp (Eds.), Fremde Blicke auf das “Dritte Reich“. Berichte ausländischer Diplomaten über Herrschaft und Gesellschaft in Deutschland 1933-1945 (Göttingen: Wallstein 2012).
[6] Among others, see Michael Wildt, “Gewalt als Partizipation. Der Nationalsozialismus als Ermächtigungsregime,“ in Staats-Gewalt: Ausnahmezustand und Sicherheitsregimes. Historische Perspektiven, ed. Alf Lüdtke (Göttingen:Wallstein, 2008), 215-240; Hanne Leßau und Janosch Steuwer: “‘Wer ist ein Nazi? Woran erkennt man ihn?‘ Zur Unterscheidung von Nationalsozialisten und anderen Deutschen,“ Mittelweg 36 2014: 30-51; Frank Bajohr und Michael Wildt (eds.): Volksgemeinschaft. Neue Forschungen zur Gesellschaft des Nationalsozialismus (Frankfurt am Main: Fischer, 2009); Dietmar von Reeken und Malte Thießen (Eds.): ‚Volksgemeinschaft‘ als soziale Praxis. Neue Forschungen zur NS-Gesellschaft vor Ort (Paderborn: Ferdinand Schöningh, 2013).
[7] See Frank Bajohr, Parvenüs und Profiteure. Korruption in der NS-Zeit (Frankfurt am Main: S. Fischer, 2001); Ian Kershaw: “‘Volksgemeinschaft‘. Potenzial und Grenzen eines neuen Forschungskonzepts,“ Vierteljahrshefte für Zeitgeschichte 59 (2011): 1-17; Paul Corner, “The Party and the People: Totalitarian States and Popular Opinion,” Contemporary European History 24 (2015): 303-308.
[8] Robert Gellately, Hingeschaut und weggesehen. Hitler und sein Volk (Stuttgart: dtv 2002); Henrik Eberle (ed.): Briefe an Hitler. Ein Volk schreibt seinem Führer. Unbekannte Dokumente aus Moskauer Archiven – zum ersten Mal veröffentlicht (Bergisch Gladbach: Bastei Lübbe, 2007).
[9] For a more extensive discussion, see Janosch Steuwer, “Ein Drittes Reich, wie ich es auffasse“. Politik, Gesellschaft und privates Leben in Tagebüchern, 1933-1939 (Göttingen: Wallstein, 2017); Daniel Mühlenfeld, “Die Vergesellschaftung von “Volksgemeinschaft“ in der sozialen Interaktion. Handlungs- und rollentheoretische Überlegungen zu einer Gesellschaftsgeschichte des Nationalsozialismus,“ Zeitschrift für Geschichtswissenschaft 61 (2013): 826-846.
[10] For a more extensive discussion, see Thomas Mergel, “Die Sehnsucht nach Ähnlichkeit und die Erfahrung der Verschiedenheit. Überlegungen zu einer Europäischen Gesellschaftsgeschichte im 20. Jahrhundert,“ Archiv für Sozialgeschichte 49 (2009): 417-434.
[11] Janosch Steuwer, “Ein Drittes Reich, wie ich es auffasse“. Politik, Gesellschaft und privates Leben in Tagebüchern, 1933-1939 (Göttingen: Wallstein, 2017).

_____________________

Image Credits

Holocaust Memorial Berlin, White Clouds, 2017 © CC-0/Free License via Pxhere, Pexels 

Recommended Citation

Gatzka, Claudia: National Socialism: What We Can Learn Today. In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 14, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-13731.

Editorial Responsibility

Moritz Hoffmann / Marko Demantowsky (Team Basel)

Es gehört zu den neuen deutschen Sagbarkeiten, der intensiven Auseinandersetzung mit dem Nationalsozialismus überdrüssig zu sein.[1] Wenn wir ehrlich sind, ist das selbst an den Universitäten der Fall. Viele Zeithistoriker*innen halten “den NS“ für weitgehend ausgeforscht und kaum für relevant, um aktuelle gesellschaftliche Entwicklungen zu verstehen. Geschichten der Gegenwart beginnen derzeit in den 1970er Jahren.[2]

Nichts mehr zu lernen?

Für die Erinnerungskultur der Bundesrepublik mag dies verheerend erscheinen. Schließlich ruhte ihr offizielles Selbstverständnis über Jahrzehnte auf dem Fundament der Abgrenzung von der NS-Diktatur und ihren Verbrechen. Wenn das Gegenbild des Nationalsozialismus verblasst, weil die moralische Ökonomie des 21. Jahrhunderts von den Mahnungen historischer Bildung unbeeindruckt bleibt, muss die Demokratie eigene positive Identitäten anbieten, um sich erinnerungspolitisch zu behaupten. Das Jubiläumsjahr 2019 zeigt, dass Bundesregierung und Wissenschaft versuchen, nationale demokratische Traditionen zu erfinden.[3] Allerdings bleibt abzuwarten, ob Erinnerungsorte und Held*innengeschichten der parlamentarischen Demokratie in Anbetracht einer wachsenden Skepsis gegenüber ihrer Repräsentativität neue Identifikationsimpulse auslösen.

Demgegenüber können Historiker*innen heute vom Nationalsozialismus erzählen, ohne auf den Pfaden einer naiven Vergangenheitsbewältigung zu wandeln. Das heißt freilich nicht, die Millionen Opfer zu vergessen. Vielmehr bedeutet es, eine Gesellschaft zu erkunden, die als Alternative zur liberalen Demokratie nach dem Prinzip der Homogenität geformt wurde. NS-Historiographie ist in Zeiten der Demokratiekritik auch ein Stück Gegner*innenbeobachtung.

Als bessere Demokratie verkauft

Eine am Forschungsstand orientierte Auseinandersetzung mit dem Nationalsozialismus müsste aufhören, ihn als isoliertes Phänomen und die Weimarer Republik als seine nationalgeschichtliche Ouvertüre zu betrachten. Denn die deutsche Entwicklung verweist auf ein Problem, das sich zwischen den 1920er und 1940er Jahren im größeren Format stellte: War es die Demokratie oder die Diktatur, die der Sehnsucht nach nationaler Souveränität, politischer Teilhabe und sozialer Gerechtigkeit in Krisenzeiten des Kapitalismus besser begegnen konnte?[4]

Weil das mitnichten klar war, blickte man in den westlichen Demokratien immer wieder wie gebannt auf NS-Deutschland, das sich als die bessere Demokratie verkaufte. In mancher Hinsicht griffen sie nach der Weltwirtschaftskrise zu ähnlichen Maßnahmen wie das ‘Dritte Reich’.[5] Den Nationalsozialismus als Teil einer Konkurrenzgeschichte kapitalistischer Gesellschaftsordnungen zu verstehen, bedeutet nicht, ihn zu relativieren. Vielmehr verweist diese Perspektive darauf, wohin Strukturprobleme der Weltökonomie und Legitimationsprobleme der repräsentativen Demokratie führen konnten, als das Schreckbild der Diktatur die Zeitgenossen noch nicht davon abhielt, autoritäre Experimente zu wagen.

Eine Gemeinschaft, die nie war

Die NS-Gesellschaft kann als der historisch radikalste Versuch gelten, der Schimäre eines ethnisch, sozial und kulturell homogenen Staatsvolks Gestalt zu geben. Homogen war die NS-Gesellschaft zu keiner Zeit, sie strebte nur beständig danach, es zu werden. Dazu dienten im Wesentlichen zwei Mechanismen: zum einen die aktive Ausgrenzung von Minderheiten unter Anwendung physischer Gewalt, zum anderen die aktive Zuordnung zu einer “Volksgemeinschaft“, die ebenfalls beständig im Werden begriffen war.[6]

Ohne die permanente Praxis des Ausgrenzens und des Zuordnens fehlte der Mehrheitsgesellschaft die Dynamik, um ihre inneren Unterschiede zu camouflieren. Als eine komplexe, hoch differenzierte moderne Massengesellschaft zeichnete sich die nationalsozialistische, aller suggestiven Massenerlebnisse und sozialen Utopien zum Trotz, durch die Alltagswahrnehmung sozialer Unterschiede und eine konstant kommunizierte Unzufriedenheit mit den Führungseliten aus.[7] Darüber hinaus wusste das Regime zwar die organisierte Fürsorge für die “Volksgenossen“ geschickt zu inszenieren, schürte jedoch durch seine Leistungsideologie zugleich das Nutzenkalkül des Einzelnen. Denunziationen und soziale Kontrolle in Nachbarschaft und Betrieb verweisen auf eine Gesellschaft, die differenziert blieb, aber das Gebot der Gemeinschaftlichkeit und die Utopie der Homogenität dem individuellen Selbstinteresse nutzbar machte. Gerade darin lag die Attraktivität der Diktatur für viele.[8]

Eine Politik, der man nicht entkam

Im Vergleich zur Demokratie kennzeichnete die NS-Diktatur ein massiv gestiegener Uniformitätsdruck, der die Verhaltensweisen im sozialen Alltag ihrer Spontaneität beraubte und erst jüngst in seiner vollen Tragweite erforscht wird. In einem System zu leben, das den liberalen Werten entsagte, bedeutete für überzeugte wie nicht überzeugte Zeitgenoss*innen eine permanente Konfrontation mit der Politik auch in privaten Räumen. Soziale Beziehungen, das biographische Selbstbild, die eigene Körperwahrnehmung – all dies konnte im ‘Dritten Reich’ beständig zur Disposition stehen, weil das Regime mit der Schaffung des “deutschen Menschen” ein Erziehungsprojekt verfolgte, das keine Grenzen kannte. Aus der Abkehr vom Pluralismus resultierten Stress, bewusstes Rollenspiel und ständige Selbsthinterfragung des Einzelnen im Dienst des sozialen Ganzen.[9]

Kurzum machte die künstliche Herstellung von Ähnlichkeit den Alltag der Mehrheitsgesellschaft zu einem hochpolitisierten, komplizierten und gewaltaffinen Geschäft. Auf der Grundlage der aktuellen Forschungslage ließe sich in Klassenzimmer oder Museum zum reenactment greifen, um zu veranschaulichen, welche konkreten Zumutungen sich aus der Abkehr vom Pluralismus ergeben. Vielleicht braucht es diese schonungslose Konfrontation, um die Vorzüge liberaler Freiheiten vor Augen zu führen, wenn heute der Schrecken allein nicht mehr genügt.

Für das innerakademische Weiterdenken bietet die neueste NS-Historiographie Innenansichten einer Gesellschaft, die genötigt war, ihre faktische Pluralität in das Phantasma der Homogenität einzupassen.[10] Sie lehrt etwas über die Alltagspraxis politischer Urteilsfindung, wenn die Massenmedien nicht mehr als vertrauenswürdig galten, und über die Art, wie Zeitgenossen die Diktatur als Alternative zur Demokratie beobachteten.[11]

Auch deshalb zählt der Nationalsozialismus durchaus noch zu unserer Epoche.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Mergel, Thomas. “Dictatorship and Democracy 1918-1939.” In The Oxford Handbook of Modern German History, edited by Helmut Walser Smith, 423-452. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.
  • Süß, Dietmar. “Ein Volk, ein Reich, ein Führer“. Die deutsche Gesellschaft im Dritten Reich. München: C.H. Beck, 2017.
  • Wildt, Michael. Volk, Volksgemeinschaft, AfD. Hamburg: Hamburger Edition, 2017.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] Unter anderem aus diesem Anlass jüngst erschienen: Norbert Frei, Franka Maubach, Christina Morina, Maik Tändler, Zur rechten Zeit. Wider die Rückkehr des Nationalismus (Berlin: Ullstein, 2019).
[2] Frank Bösch, Zeitenwende 1979. Als die Welt von heute begann (München: C.H. Beck, 2019); Andreas Rödder, 21.0. Eine kurze Geschichte der Gegenwart (München: C.H. Beck 2015); Anselm Doering-Manteuffel und Lutz Raphael, Nach dem Boom. Perspektiven auf die Zeitgeschichte seit 1970 (Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2010).
[3] Im Februar 2019 veranstaltete die Deutsche Gesellschaft e. V. im Auftrag der Bundesbeauftragten für Kultur und Medien eine wissenschaftliche Konferenz zum Thema “Deutsche Demokratiegeschichte – Eine Aufgabe der Erinnerungsarbeit“, um sich der Erarbeitung einer “Konzeption zur Förderung der Orte deutscher Demokratiegeschichte“ zu widmen, wie sie der Koalitionsvertrag von CDU/CSU und SPD vorsieht. Siehe das Tagungsprogramm unter https://www.deutsche-gesellschaft-ev.de/images/pdf/2019/2019-Demokratiegeschichte/EK-Demokratiegeschichte_final.pdf (letzter Zugriff 25. März 2019).
[4] Vgl. Mark Mazower, Dark Continent. Europe’s Twentieth Century (London: Random House, 1999), Kap. 1 und 4; Thomas Mergel, “Dictatorship and Democracy 1918-1939,” in The Oxford Handbook of Modern German History, ed. Helmut Walser Smith (Oxford/New York: Oxford University Press, 2011), 423-452.
[5] Vgl. Kiran Klaus Patel, “‘All of this helps us in planning‘: Der “New Deal“ und die NS-Sozialpolitik,“ in Vom Gegner lernen. Feindschaften und Kulturtransfers im Europa des 19. und 20. Jahrhunderts, ed. Martin Aust (Frankfurt am Main/New York: Campus, 2007), 234-252; Wolfgang Schivelbusch, Entfernte Verwandtschaft: Faschismus, Nationalsozialismus, New Deal 1933–1939 (München/Wien: Fischer, 2005); Frank Bajohr und Christoph Strupp (Eds.), Fremde Blicke auf das “Dritte Reich“. Berichte ausländischer Diplomaten über Herrschaft und Gesellschaft in Deutschland 1933-1945 (Göttingen: Wallstein 2012).
[6] Vgl. u.a. Michael Wildt, “Gewalt als Partizipation. Der Nationalsozialismus als Ermächtigungsregime,“ in Staats-Gewalt: Ausnahmezustand und Sicherheitsregimes. Historische Perspektiven, ed. Alf Lüdtke (Göttingen:Wallstein, 2008), 215-240; Hanne Leßau und Janosch Steuwer: “‘Wer ist ein Nazi? Woran erkennt man ihn?‘ Zur Unterscheidung von Nationalsozialisten und anderen Deutschen,“ Mittelweg 36 2014: 30-51; Frank Bajohr und Michael Wildt (eds.): Volksgemeinschaft. Neue Forschungen zur Gesellschaft des Nationalsozialismus (Frankfurt am Main: Fischer, 2009); Dietmar von Reeken und Malte Thießen (Eds.): ‚Volksgemeinschaft‘ als soziale Praxis. Neue Forschungen zur NS-Gesellschaft vor Ort (Paderborn: Ferdinand Schöningh, 2013).
[7] Vgl. Frank Bajohr, Parvenüs und Profiteure. Korruption in der NS-Zeit (Frankfurt am Main: S. Fischer, 2001); Ian Kershaw: “‘Volksgemeinschaft‘. Potenzial und Grenzen eines neuen Forschungskonzepts,“ Vierteljahrshefte für Zeitgeschichte 59 (2011): 1-17; Paul Corner, “The Party and the People: Totalitarian States and Popular Opinion,” Contemporary European History 24 (2015): 303-308.
[8] Vgl. Robert Gellately, Hingeschaut und weggesehen. Hitler und sein Volk (Stuttgart: dtv 2002); Henrik Eberle (ed.): Briefe an Hitler. Ein Volk schreibt seinem Führer. Unbekannte Dokumente aus Moskauer Archiven – zum ersten Mal veröffentlicht (Bergisch Gladbach: Bastei Lübbe, 2007).
[9] Vgl. umfassend Janosch Steuwer, “Ein Drittes Reich, wie ich es auffasse“. Politik, Gesellschaft und privates Leben in Tagebüchern, 1933-1939 (Göttingen: Wallstein, 2017); Daniel Mühlenfeld, “Die Vergesellschaftung von “Volksgemeinschaft“ in der sozialen Interaktion. Handlungs- und rollentheoretische Überlegungen zu einer Gesellschaftsgeschichte des Nationalsozialismus,“ Zeitschrift für Geschichtswissenschaft 61 (2013): 826-846.
[10] Vgl. umfassender Thomas Mergel, “Die Sehnsucht nach Ähnlichkeit und die Erfahrung der Verschiedenheit. Überlegungen zu einer Europäischen Gesellschaftsgeschichte im 20. Jahrhundert,“ Archiv für Sozialgeschichte 49 (2009): 417-434.
[11] Janosch Steuwer, “Ein Drittes Reich, wie ich es auffasse“. Politik, Gesellschaft und privates Leben in Tagebüchern, 1933-1939 (Göttingen: Wallstein, 2017).

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Holocaust Memorial Berlin, White Clouds, 2017 © CC-0/Free License via Pxhere, Pexels 

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Gatzka, Claudia: Nationalsozialismus: Was wir heute lernen können. In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 14, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-13731.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Moritz Hoffmann / Marko Demantowsky (Team Basel)

Copyright (c) 2019 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 7 (2019) 14
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-13731

Tags: , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest