The Moral of the Story: Red Dead Redemption 2

Die Moral von der Geschichte: Red Dead Redemption 2

From our “Wilde 13” section.


Almost nine years ago, the video game Red Dead Redemption took the Western genre into the 21st century. While the recently published sequel only very cautiously breaks with the audience’s expectations of the world of the American frontier, it does so quite emphatically with gamers’ ethical autarky: Moral decisions have concrete effects, meaning that it is no longer so much fun to lay tied-up nuns on railway tracks.

High Noon

Red Dead Redemption 2 sold over ten million copies worldwide within three days of its release on October 26, 2018[1]. It follows the same mechanisms as all major titles from the Rockstar studio, which is best known for its Grand Theft Auto series: Players steer the main character, either from an ego- or from an over-the-shoulder perspective, through a vast game world, which this time probably extends beyond 75 square kilometres.

The main character can move on foot or horseback, in carriages and trains. He can speak with all human figures in the game or exercise violence. Despite offering unbridled freedom of movement, the game follows a relatively static but well-formulated overall narrative. This is driven by numerous film sequences as soon as players start one of the so-called story missions, which are located at different places in the game world.

Honor, Killings

The tale of Red Dead Redemption 2 takes place in 1899, which is relatively late for the Western genre. The main character is Arthur Morgan, a 36-year-old member of a gang of outlaws fleeing the police through various regions of a fictionalized version of the USA. Following the title-giving moment of “Redemption,” Morgan discovers cracks in his criminal outlook and readjusts his value system over at least 60 hours of playing time. This is visualized by the “honor system,” a graph of the character’s morale: It rises when greeting people friendly, when throwing small fish back into the water while fishing or when bringing people who were thrown of their horses back to the next city. It falls, however, if one lets Arthur Morgan shoot uninvolved people, steal horses or rob businesses. In the first game, many players felt a sense of malicious glee when lassoing nuns, putting them on the tracks and waiting for the 12 o’clock train. Now, however, the “honor system” reminds us that such behavior is socially undesirable.

The honor system is thus — besides the rather harmless policemen — the only possibility for the developer studio to sanction player behavior in the game world and to convey moral precepts beyond the actual goals of the game. The great freedom of the game mechanics is only blocked deliberately at one point: It is not possible to shoot at children. All other computer-controlled characters, however, can be greeted friendly, insulted, robbed, tied up, shot or stabbed by the players.

This freedom led to the first major controversy about the game: Historically correct, yet quite surprisingly for computer games, Red Dead Redemption 2 deals with the struggle for women’s voting rights: In story missions, the protagonist first has to protect a group of suffragettes and later bring one of them to a safer state. One of these suffragettes is constantly in the open game world, demonstrating for her rights in the New Orleans-esque town of St. Denis. As a non-player character, she can be treated like the farmer in the mountains, the wealthy lady in the city, the former slave on the plantation or the prostitute in the desert city — with corresponding consequences for the players’ honor meter.

Great Freedom and Great Responsibility

Inevitably consistent with part of the gamer scene, this non-exception led to YouTube and Twitch, the central game-video organ, accumulating films of the slightly anachronistic “feminist” character being killed in ever more creative ways.[3] Quickly, Rockstar was blamed for these actions and their aggressive misogyny, or at least for granting players the freedom to actively behave in this way:

“This means that despite any thoughts that Rockstar Games might have about Shirrako’s video, the ability to punch and kill a suffragette in Red Dead Redemption 2 is something that the studio deliberately chose to put into the game.”[4]

The matter illustrates a problem that computer games with increasing game worlds and freedom of choice have to solve anew, and which was recently also negotiated in the HBO series Westworld[5]: If we grant humans complete freedom without real or virtual sanction threats, this will promote disinhibition in this game world for a small part of gamers — and perhaps even structurally beyond the game world into their own resonance chambers.

For a Handful of Meta More

This freedom is even stronger as Red Dead Redemption 2 plays out in a setting codified by clear pop-cultural reference points. As the most American of all genres, the Western draws its content structure from the frontier, from a classical notion of chivalry and from a traditional male image.[7] In Red Dead Redemption 2, this is no different. As a “meta-narrative,” as an amalgam, and also as a parody of established Western tropes, its character will probably remain unrecognized by most players. It is an outstandingly well crafted, tightly narrated, but ultimately not a particularly courageous game. It hardly adds surprising facets to the classical image of the Western. Its “honor system,” the systematization of the moral concepts created by Rockstar, turns out to be largely reminiscent of the myth of the “Code of the West,” an idealization of lawlessness.[8] With one very contemporary exception: During some nights, the Ku Klux Klan meets in the in-game woods. Killing its members has no negative effects on the honor meter.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Humphries, Sara. “Rejuvenating ‘Eternal Inequality’ on the Digital Frontiers of Red Dead Redemption.” Western American Literature Vol. 47, No. 2: 200-215.
  • Mattioli, Aram. Verlorene Welten. Eine Geschichte der Indianer Nordamerikas 1700-1920. Stuttgart: Klett-Cotta, 2017.
  • Pallant, Chris. “‘Now I Know I’m a Lowlife‘: Controlling Play in GTA: IV, Red Dead Redemption, and LA Noire.” In Ctrl-Alt-Play: Essays on Control in Video Gaming, edited by Matthew Wysocki, 133-145. Jefferson: McFarland, 2013.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] Peter Steinlecher, “17 Millionen Red Dead Redemption 2 ausgeliefert,” Golem November 8 2018, https://www.golem.de/news/rockstar-games-17-millionen-red-dead-redemption-2-ausgeliefert-1811-137583.html (last accessed April 1 2019).
[2] ppguy323436, “How big EXACTLY is the new map? A detailed analysis,” reddit October 26 2019, https://www.reddit.com/r/reddeadredemption/how_big_exactly_is_the_new_map_a_detailed_analysis/ (last accessed April 1 2019).
[3] Emanuel Maiberg, “’RDR 2′-Gamer feiern, dass sie im Spiel Feministinnen töten können,” Motherboard November 7 2018, https://motherboard.vice.com/de/article/59vzyk/rdr-2-gamer-feiern-dass-sie-feministinnen-toeten-koennen-youtube (last accessed April 1 2019).
[4] Emanuel Maiberg, “‘Red Dead Redemption 2’ Players Are Excited to Attack and Kill Feminists in the Game,” Motherboard November 7 2018, https://motherboard.vice.com/red-dead-redemption-2-players-are-excited-to-attack-and-kill-feminists-in-the-game (last accessed April 1 2019).
[5] Jennifer Siebel Newsom, “Westworld, A Utopia for Toxic Masculinity?,” The Representation Project April 20 2019, http://therepresentationproject.org/westworld-a-utopia-for-toxic-masculinity/ (last accessed April 1 2019).
[6] There are clear connections between an initially latent misogynist part of the gamer scene and the emergence of the so-called “Alt Right” movement in the USA, cf. Ian Sherr and Erin Carsson, “GamerGate to Trump: How video game culture blew everything up,” cnet November 27 2017, https://www.cnet.com/news/gamergate-donald-trump-american-nazis-how-video-game-culture-blew-everything-up/ (last accessed April 1 2019).
[7] The Western was already once further developed, namely in the 1950s; cf. Andrew C. Isenberg, “The Code of the West. Sexuality, Homosexuality, and Wyatt Earp,” Western Historical Quarterly 40 2009: 139-157.
[8] “The code of the West will justify sheer idiocy so long as it is valiant,” Brian Dippie, Custer’s Last Stand: The Anatomy of an American Myth (Bozeman: University of Montana Press, 1974), 68.

_____________________

Image Credits

What an unbranded cow has cost © 1895 Frederic Remington, Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons

Recommended Citation

Hoffmann, Moritz: The Moral of the Story: Red Dead Redemption 2. In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 12, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-13608.

Editorial Responsibility

Moritz Hoffmann / Marko Demantowsky (Team Basel)

Vor knapp neun Jahren führte das Videospiel Red Dead Redemption das Western-Genre in das 21. Jahrhundert. Der nun veröffentlichte Nachfolger bricht wieder nur sehr behutsam mit den Erwartungen des Publikums an die Welt der amerikanischen Frontier, dafür aber umso mehr mit der ethischen Autarkie der Spielenden: Moralische Entscheidungen haben konkrete Auswirkungen. Oder: Es macht nicht mehr so viel Spaß, gefesselte Nonnen auf die Eisenbahngleise zu legen.

High Noon

Das Spiel Red Dead Redemption 2, von dem innerhalb von drei Tagen nach Erscheinen am 26. Oktober 2018 weltweit über zehn Millionen Exemplare abgesetzt wurden[1], folgt denselben Mechanismen wie alle großen Titel des Herstellerstudios Rockstar, das vor allem für die Reihe Grand Theft Auto bekannt ist: Wahlweise aus der Ego- oder der Über-Schulter-Perspektive steuern die Spieler*innen den Hauptcharakter durch eine enorm große Spielwelt, hier wohl über 75 Quadratkilometer groß.[2]

Die Hauptfigur kann sich zu Fuß, auf Pferden, in Kutschen und Zügen bewegen, mit allen im Spiel auftretenden menschlichen Figuren sprechen oder Gewalt ausüben. Bei aller Bewegungsfreiheit folgt das Spiel einer verhältnismäßig statischen, dafür aber wohlformulierten Gesamterzählung, die durch zahlreiche Filmsequenzen vorangetrieben wird, sobald die Spieler*innen eine der sogenannten Story-Missionen starten, die sich an verschiedenen Orten der Spielwelt befinden.

Ehre, Morde

Die Erzählung von Red Dead Redemption 2 spielt im Jahr 1899, also verhältnismäßig spät für das Genre des Westerns. Die zu steuernde Hauptfigur ist Arthur Morgan, ein 36 Jahre alter Angehöriger einer Gang von Outlaws, die vor dem Zugriff der Polizei durch verschiedene Regionen einer fiktiven Version der USA flieht. Dem titelgebenden Moment der “Redemption” (Erlösung) folgend entdeckt Morgan Risse in seinem kriminellen Weltbild und sortiert über die mindestens 60 Stunden Spielzeit sein Wertesystem neu. Visualisiert wird dies durch das “Ehrsystem”, einem Graphen der Moral der Spielfigur: Sie steigt, wenn man Menschen freundlich grüßt, beim Angeln kleine Fische wieder zurück ins Wasser wirft oder vom Pferd geworfene Passant*innen zurück in die nächste Stadt bringt. Sie sinkt hingegen, wenn man Arthur Morgan Unbeteiligte erschießen lässt, Pferde stiehlt oder Geschäfte überfällt. Hatten viele Spieler*innen im ersten Teil noch mit diebischer Freude Nonnen mit dem Lasso gefesselt, auf die Gleise gelegt und auf den 12-Uhr-Zug gewartet, erinnert nun das “Ehrsystem” daran, dass solches Verhalten sozial unerwünscht ist.

Das Ehrsystem ist somit – neben den eher harmlosen Polizisten – die einzige Möglichkeit für das Entwicklerstudio, das Verhalten der Spieler*innen in der Spielwelt zu sanktionieren und damit ein moralisches Regelwerk neben dem eigentlichen Spielzweck zu transportieren. Denn die größtmögliche Freiheit der Spielmechanik wird nur an einer Stelle absichtsvoll blockiert: Es ist nicht möglich, auf Kinder zu schießen. Alle anderen computergesteuerten Charaktere hingegen können die Spieler*innen freundlich grüßen, beleidigen, ausrauben, fesseln, erschießen oder abstechen.

Diese Freiheit führte zur ersten großen Kontroverse um das Spiel: Historisch durchaus korrekt, für Computerspiele aber überraschend, wird in Red Dead Redemption 2 der Kampf um das Wahlrecht für Frauen thematisiert: In Story-Missionen muss der Protagonist erst eine Gruppe Suffragetten beschützen und später eine von ihnen in einen sichereren Bundesstaat bringen. Eine dieser Suffragetten befindet sich konstant in der offenen Spielwelt und demonstriert im an New Orleans angelegten Ort St. Denis für ihre Rechte. Als Nichtspieler-Charakter kann mit ihr alles angestellt werden, was man auch dem Farmer in den Bergen, der wohlhabenden Dame in der Stadt, dem früheren Sklaven auf der Plantage oder der Prostituierten in der Wüstenstadt antun kann – mit entsprechenden Folgen für das Ehrkonto der Spieler*innen.

Große Freiheit und große Verantwortung

Dem Wesen eines Teils der Gamerszene logisch folgend führte diese Nichtausnahme dazu, dass sich auf YouTube und dem Spielvideozentralorgan Twitch die Filmchen davon häuften, wie diese leicht anachronistisch “Feministin” genannte Figur auf immer kreativere Weisen umgebracht wurde.[3] Schnell wurde Rockstar die Verantwortung für diese Handlungen und die dort zum Ausdruck gebrachte aggressive Misogynie angelastet, zumindest jedoch die Freiheit der so agierenden Spieler als aktive Entscheidung bezeichnet:

“Das bedeutet, dass, unabhängig davon was Rockstar Games von Shirrakos Video hält, die Möglichkeit, in Red Dead Redemption 2 eine Suffragette zu schlagen und zu töten etwas ist, was das Studio absichtlich ins Spiel implementierte.”[4]

Die Angelegenheit verdeutlicht eine Problematik, die Computerspiele mit zunehmenden Dimensionen von Spielwelt und Entscheidungsfreiheit stets von neuem zu lösen haben und die zuletzt auch in der HBO-Serie Westworld verhandelt wurde[5]: Wenn wir Menschen völlige Freiheit ohne reale oder virtuelle Sanktionsandrohung zugestehen, wird dies bei einem kleinen Teil der Spielenden zu einer Enthemmung innerhalb dieser Spielwelt führen – und womöglich strukturell auch über die Spielwelt hinaus in die eigenen Echoräume.[6]

Für eine Handvoll Meta mehr

Diese Freiheit äußert sich umso stärker, als Red Dead Redemption 2 in einem durch eindeutige popkulturelle Referenzpunkte kodifizierten Setting spielt. Der Western als amerikanischstes aller Genres zieht seine inhaltliche Struktur aus der Frontier, aus einer klassischen Vorstellung von Ritterlichkeit und einem traditionellen Männerbild.[7] Bei Red Dead Redemption 2 ist das nicht anders, sein Charakter als “Meta-Erzählung”, als Amalgam und auch Parodie etablierter Western-Tropoi wird den meisten Spieler*innen wohl verschlossen bleiben. Es ist ein handwerklich herausragendes, erzählerisch dichtes, aber letztlich nicht besonders mutiges Spiel, das dem klassischen Bild vom Western kaum überraschende Facetten hinzufügt. Sein “Ehrsystem”, also die Systemisierung der Moralvorstellungen der von Rockstar erschaffenen Welt, entpuppt sich aber weitgehend als Reminiszenz an den Mythos vom “Code of the West”, einer Idealisierung der Gesetzlosigkeit.[8] Mit einer sehr gegenwartsnahen Ausnahme: Töten Spieler*innen die sich nachts im Wald treffenden Mitglieder des Ku-Klux-Klan, hat dies keine negativen Auswirkungen auf ihr Ehrkonto.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Humphries, Sara. “Rejuvenating ‘Eternal Inequality’ on the Digital Frontiers of Red Dead Redemption.” Western American Literature Vol. 47, No. 2: 200-215.
  • Mattioli, Aram. Verlorene Welten. Eine Geschichte der Indianer Nordamerikas 1700-1920. Stuttgart: Klett-Cotta, 2017.
  • Pallant, Chris. “‘Now I Know I’m a Lowlife‘: Controlling Play in GTA: IV, Red Dead Redemption, and LA Noire.” In Ctrl-Alt-Play: Essays on Control in Video Gaming, edited by Matthew Wysocki, 133-145. Jefferson: McFarland, 2013.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] Peter Steinlecher, “17 Millionen Red Dead Redemption 2 ausgeliefert,” Golem November 8 2018, https://www.golem.de/news/rockstar-games-17-millionen-red-dead-redemption-2-ausgeliefert-1811-137583.html (letzter Zugriff 1. April 2019).
[2] ppguy323436, “How big EXACTLY is the new map? A detailed analysis,” reddit October 26 2019, https://www.reddit.com/r/reddeadredemption/how_big_exactly_is_the_new_map_a_detailed_analysis/ (letzter Zugriff 1. April 2019).
[3] Emanuel Maiberg, “’RDR 2′-Gamer feiern, dass sie im Spiel Feministinnen töten können,” Motherboard November 7 2018, https://motherboard.vice.com/de/article/59vzyk/rdr-2-gamer-feiern-dass-sie-feministinnen-toeten-koennen-youtube (letzter Zugriff 1. April 2019).
[4] Emanuel Maiberg, “‘Red Dead Redemption 2’ Players Are Excited to Attack and Kill Feminists in the Game,” Motherboard November 7 2018, https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/ev3gmm/red-dead-redemption-2-players-are-excited-to-attack-and-kill-feminists-in-the-game (letzter Zugriff 1. April 2019).
[5] Jennifer Siebel Newsom, “Westworld, A Utopia for Toxic Masculinity?,” The Representation Project April 20 2019, http://therepresentationproject.org/westworld-a-utopia-for-toxic-masculinity/ (letzter Zugriff 1. April 2019).
[6] Zwischen einem zunächst latent misogynen Teil der Gamerszene und dem Aufkommen der sogenannten “Alt Right”-Bewegung in den USA gibt es klare Verbindungen, siehe Ian Sherr and Erin Carsson, “GamerGate to Trump: How video game culture blew everything up,” cnet November 27 2017, https://www.cnet.com/news/gamergate-donald-trump-american-nazis-how-video-game-culture-blew-everything-up/ (letzter Zugriff 1. April 2019).
[7] Der Western war schon einmal weiter, nämlich in den 1950er Jahren, vgl. Andrew C. Isenberg, “The Code of the West. Sexuality, Homosexuality, and Wyatt Earp,” Western Historical Quarterly 40 2009: 139-157.
[8] “The code of the West will justify sheer idiocy so long as it is valiant,” Brian Dippie, Custer’s Last Stand: The Anatomy of an American Myth (Bozeman: University of Montana Press, 1974), 68.

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

What an unbranded cow has cost © 1895 Frederic Remington, Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Hoffmann, Moritz: Die Moral von der Geschichte: Red Dead Redemption 2. In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 12, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-13608.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Moritz Hoffmann / Marko Demantowsky (Team Basel)

Copyright (c) 2019 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 7 (2019) 12
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-13608

Tags: ,

Pin It on Pinterest

1