Late Awareness, Vigorous Remembrance: Austria Today

Späte Einsicht, intensives Erinnern: Österreich heute


In Austria, the memory of the Nazi era and the Holocaust remains closely related to the “victim thesis” and the Second Republic’s history policy. Austria was officially regarded as the first victim of National Socialist aggression, which made it difficult to deal with the Nazi past. Austria may often seem unteachable, not least because of numerous right-wing extremist scandals. Nevertheless, several institutions — the Mauthausen memorial, the House of Austrian History (hdgö) and the association “erinnern.at” — and their committed staff are promoting a critical culture of remembrance.

Austria: Country of Slow Motion

The four phases of confrontation with the history of National Socialism[1] took place in Austria with some delay or persisted longer: The phase of legal persecution (1945-1949/50) coincided with the establishment of the Federal Republic of Germany. However, the phase of history policy in Austria extended into the 1980s. The phase of coming to terms with the past did not even begin until the mid-1980s, beginning with the Waldheim affair and followed by the election of right-wing populist Jörg Haider, who had an ambivalent relationship with National Socialism, as chairman of the FPÖ. As a result, the “victim thesis” came under increasing scrutiny. The events initiated the phase of preserving the past, as reflected, for example, by the long-standing dispute over Alfred Hrdlicka’s “Memorial against War and fascism.”

Didactics without Moralizing

Around the turn of the millennium, a new, fifth phase began: the phase of remembrance teaching, which is no longer marked by prescribed consternation and moralizing, but by historical-political education. The discussion about the adequate didactics of the “Never Again” replaced the discussion about whether and how to remember.

Didactics focus on referring to the present and on involving the living environment (according to Alfred Schütz). Therefore, it is no longer just a matter of providing factual knowledge about National Socialism and the Holocaust. Rather, students’ emotions and needs are taken into account in order to develop democratic mindsets and to enable critical reflection on contemporary society. Such didactics examines socialization and education from a critical perspective or rather with the influence of “collective identities” to the (individual) perception of the present. The use and (political) functionalization of “history” must be uncovered and learners’ social context taken into account. The learning subject is understood as an “active subject,” i.e. one that can contribute to social change. In this context, alternative mindsets must be developed and political participation promoted.

Such memory learning is primarily oriented towards self-learning. It concentrates not only on the victims, but also on the perpetrators. Moreover, it takes into account larger social contexts, makes use of individualization and filters out mechanisms of exclusion and persecution. In doing so, however, the differences between past and present society must be worked out in order to avoid simple and impermissible comparisons with current phenomena.

The institutions mentioned above are oriented towards this concept of historical-political learning, even if their goals, tasks and methods diverge. Below, I discuss the association erinnern.at, which offers educational concepts for schools and for extracurricular activities, as an example of committed remembrance work.

Diversity as Principle: erinnern.at

In 2000, the Austrian Ministry of Education launched a project to enable Austrian teachers to attend seminars at the Yad Vashem Memorial in Jerusalem. Following these seminars, an association —  erinnern.at  — was finally established in 2009. It is still based at the Austrian Federal Ministry of Education, Science and Research.

The work of erinnern.at is remarkable: On a regional level, staff members organize further training in cooperation with other institutions, such as the university colleges of teacher education or the Jewish Museum in Vienna. Furthermore, they develop learning materials, often taking into account the respective regional context. The learning website www.alte-neue-heimat.at serves as an example. It includes interviews with Tyrolean Jews who experienced the National Socialist era and appropriate teaching materials. Also worth mentioning is the history book series “National Socialism in the Federal States,” which has been designed specially for young people. At the national level, so-called “Central Seminars” take place every year, each with its own focus. erinnern.at also offers so-called “Eyewitness Seminars” and organizes interviews with eyewitnesses in schools.

On an international level, two university courses in Upper Austria and Salzburg are worth mentioning. Offerings also include two-week seminars in Israel, run in cooperation with Yad Vashem. erinnern.at also cooperates with the “Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education of the University of Southern California”: The project “IWitness – Video Interviews with Contemporary Witnesses” makes available the first German-language video collection with eyewitnesses on a multimedia learning website.

The example of erinnern.at shows that in Austria the memory of National Socialism and the Shoa is not simply ambivalent. No, it can in fact also be quite remarkable: Those who still sing in songbooks about gassing another million Jews[3] are confronted with a democratic culture of remembrance that places the “Never Again” on a modern didactic basis.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Gautschi, Peter, Béatrice Ziegler, and Meik Zülsdorf-Kersting (eds.). Shoa und Schule. Lehren und Lernen im 21. Jahrhundert. Zürich: Chronos 2013.
  • Matthes, Eva, and Elisabeth Meilhammer (eds.). Holocaust Education in the 21th Century. Bad Heilbrunn: Klinkhardt, 2015.
  • Völkel, Bärbel. Stolpern ist nicht schlimm. Materialien zur Holocaust-Education. Schwalbach/Ts.: Wochenschau Verlag, 2015.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] Norbert Frei, 1945 und Wir: Das Dritte Reich im Bewusstsein der Deutschen(München: dtv 2005), 26; Aleida Assmann, “Die Erinnerung an den Holocaust: Vergangenheit und Zukunft,” in Handbuch Nationalsozialismus und Holocaust, eds. Hanns-Fred Rathenow, Birgit Wenzel and Norbert Weber (Schwalbach/Ts.: Wochenschau Verlag, 2002), 71.
[2] Jakob Benecke, “‘Erziehung nach Auschwitz’: Theoretische Klärung und Analyse ihrer schulischen Realisierungsmöglichkeiten,” in Holocaust Education in the 21th Century, eds. Eva Matthes and Elisabeth Meilhammer (Bad Heilbrunn: Klinkhardt, 2015), 196; Barbara Fenner, “‘Jetzt kapier’ ich, was Geschichte ist, da geht’s ja um mich.’ Didaktische Möglichkeiten, Schülerinnen und Schülern den Holocaust nahezubringen,” in Holocaust Education in the 21th Century, eds. Eva Matthes and Elisabeth Meilhammer (Bad Heilbrunn: Klinkhardt, 2015), 199-213.
[3] During the Lower Austrian state election campaign at the beginning of 2017, a songbook of the Wiener Neustädter Burschenschaft “Germania,” a fraternity whose members included the leading FPÖ candidate, came to public knowledge. It includes a passage praising the murdering of another million Jews. See, for example:https://www.sn.at/politik/innenpolitik/antisemitisches-lied-fpoe-kandidat-landbauer-unter-druck-23345584 (last accessed 13 November 2018).

_____________________

Image Credits

By Unknown- Germany- WWII – An album in the private collection of H. Blair Howell, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=53429983 

Recommended Citation

Hellmuth, Thomas: Late Awareness, Vigorous Remembrance: Austria Today. In: Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 38, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-13048.

Editorial Responsibility

Marco Zerwas / Marko Demantowsky (Team Basel)

Wer sich mit der Erinnerung an die NS-Zeit und den Holocaust in Österreich beschäftigt, hat immer auch die “Opferthese“ und somit die Geschichtspolitik der Zweiten Republik zu berücksichtigen. Der Staat Österreich galt offiziell als das erste Opfer der nationalsozialistischen Aggressionspolitik, womit die Aufarbeitung der NS-Vergangenheit erschwert wurde. Österreich mag, nicht zuletzt auch wegen zahlreicher rechtsextremer Skandale, als ewig gestrig erscheinen. Dennoch setzen sich mehrere Institutionen – etwa der Lern- und Gedenkort Mauthausen, das erst kürzlich eröffnete Haus der Geschichte Österreich (hdgö) und der Verein “erinnern.at“ – und deren engagierten Mitarbeiter*innen für eine kritische Erinnerungskultur ein.

Österreich: Land der Zeitlupe

Die vier Phasen der Auseinandersetzung mit dem Nationalsozialismus[1] fanden in Österreich zumeist verspätet statt oder dauerten länger: Die Phase der gerichtlichen Verfolgung (1945-1949/50) erfolgte noch zeitgleich mit der Bundesrepublik Deutschland. Allerdings erstreckte sich die Phase der Vergangenheitspolitik in Österreich gleich bis in die 1980er-Jahre. Die Phase der Vergangenheitsbewältigung setzte überhaupt erst Mitte der 1980er Jahre ein, beginnend mit der Waldheim-Affäre und gefolgt von der Wahl des Rechtspopulisten Jörg Haider, der dem Nationalsozialismus ambivalent gegenüberstand, zum Obmann der FPÖ. Die bis dato kaum aufgearbeitete NS-Vergangenheit störte plötzlich die “Insel der Seligen“ und die “Opferthese“ wurde zunehmend in Frage gestellt. Nun wurde auch die Phase der Vergangenheitsbewahrung eingeleitet, die sich etwa um den langjährigen Streit über das Mahnmal gegen Krieg und Faschismus von Alfred Hrdlicka spiegelte.

Jenseits des “moralischen Zeigefingers“

Um die Jahrtausendwende setzte eine neue, eine fünfte Phase ein: die Phase des Erinnerungslernens, die nicht mehr von Betroffenheitspädagogik und vom “moralische Zeigefinger“ geprägt ist, sondern durch historisch-politische Bildung. Die Diskussion, ob überhaupt und auf welche Weise erinnert werden soll, ist einer Diskussion über die adäquate fachdidaktische Fundierung des “Nie wieder“ gewichen.

Gegenwartsorientierung und Lebensweltbezug (Alfred Schütz) und damit auch der Lernende selbst sind dabei zentral. Es geht nicht mehr nur um Faktenwissen über den Nationalsozialismus und den Holocaust, sondern auch um die Emotionen und Bedürfnisse von Schüler*innen, um die Entwicklung demokratischer Verhaltensdispositionen sowie um kritische Reflexion der gegenwärtigen Gesellschaft.[2] So wird die Rolle von Sozialisation und Erziehung, d.h. die Frage der Bedeutung “kollektiver Identitäten“ für die (individuelle) Wahrnehmung der Gegenwart kritisch reflektiert. Dabei ist die Verwendung und (politische) Funktionalisierung von “Geschichte“ aufzudecken sowie der gesellschaftliche Kontext der Lernenden zu berücksichtigen. Das lernende Subjekt wird als “aktives Subjekt“ verstanden, das zur gesellschaftlichen Veränderung beitragen kann. In diesem Zusammenhang sollte auch die Entwicklung alternativer demokratischer Orientierungs- und Handlungsmöglichkeiten und somit auch politische Partizipation gefördert werden.

Methodisch ist ein solches Erinnerungslernen vor allem auf selbsttätiges Lernen ausgerichtet. Inhaltlich konzentriert es sich nicht allein auf die Opfer, sondern auch auf die Täter, setzt die Ereignisse in einem größeren Zusammenhang, individualisiert das Geschehen und filtert Mechanismen von Ausgrenzung und Verfolgung heraus. Dabei müssen aber auch die Unterschiede zwischen der damaligen und heutigen Gesellschaft herausgearbeitet werden, um simple Vergleiche bzw. unzulässige Gleichsetzungen mit gegenwärtigen Phänomenen zu vermeiden.

Die oben erwähnten Institutionen orientieren sich an diesem Konzept historisch-politischen Lernens, wobei deren Ziele, Aufgaben und Methoden freilich divergieren. Im Folgenden soll der Verein erinnern.at, der sowohl schulische als auch außerschulische Bildungskonzepte bietet, als Beispiel für die engagierte Erinnerungsarbeit hervorgehoben werden.

Vielfalt als Prinzip: erinnern.at

Im Jahr 2000 startete das österreichische Bildungsministerium ein Projekt, das Seminare für österreichische Lehrer*innen an der Gedenkstätte Yad Vashem ermöglichte. Um diese Seminare etablierte sich schließlich 2009 ein Verein, der bis heute im Bundesministeriums für Bildung, Wissenschaft und Forschung (BMBWF) angesiedelt ist.

Die Arbeit von erinnern.at ist bemerkenswert vielfältig: Auf regionaler Ebene organisieren Mitarbeiter*innen in Kooperation mit anderen Institutionen, u.a. den Pädagogischen Hochschulen oder dem Jüdischen Museum in Wien, Fortbildungsveranstaltungen. Ferner entwickeln sie Lernmaterialien und berücksichtigen dabei den jeweiligen regionalen Kontext. Hervorzuheben ist hier etwa die Lernwebsite www.alte-neue-heimat.at, auf der Zeitzeug*innen-Interviews mit Tiroler Juden und Jüdinnen und entsprechende Unterrichtsmaterialien abrufbar sind, sowie die für Jugendliche gestaltete Sachbuchreihe „Nationalsozialismus in den Bundesländern“. Auf nationaler Ebene finden alljährlich so genannte “Zentrale Seminare“ mit jeweils eigenen Schwerpunkten statt. Zudem werden “Zeitzeug*innen-Seminare“ angeboten sowie Zeitzeug*innen an Schulen vermittelt.

International sind zwei Hochschullehrgänge in Oberösterreich und Salzburg zu erwähnen, die auch zweiwöchigen Seminare umfassen, die in Israel in Kooperation mit Yad Vashem stattfinden. Mit dem Projekt “IWitness – Video-Interviews mit Zeitzeug*innen“ kooperiert erinnern.at zudem mit dem “Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education der University of Southern California“ und bietet auf einer multimedialen Lernwebsite die erste deutschsprachige Videosammlung mit Zeitzeug*innen an.

Das Beispiel erinnern.at zeigt, dass in Österreich die Erinnerung an den Nationalsozialismus und die Shoa nicht nur ambivalent ist, sondern auch durchaus bemerkenswert sein kann: Jenen, die noch immer in Liederbüchern davon singen “Gas“ zu geben, um noch “die siebte Million zu schaffen“,[3] tritt eine demokratische Erinnerungskultur gegenüber, die das “Nie Wieder“ auf eine fundierte didaktische Grundlage stellt.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Gautschi, Peter, Béatrice Ziegler, and Meik Zülsdorf-Kersting (Hrsg.). Shoa und Schule. Lehren und Lernen im 21. Jahrhundert. Zürich: Chronos 2013.
  • Matthes, Eva, and Elisabeth Meilhammer (eds.). Holocaust Education in the 21th Century. Bad Heilbrunn: Klinkhardt, 2015.
  • Völkel, Bärbel. Stolpern ist nicht schlimm. Materialien zur Holocaust-Education. Schwalbach/Ts.: Wochenschau Verlag, 2015.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] Norbert Frei, 1945 und Wir: Das Dritte Reich im Bewusstsein der Deutschen(München: dtv 2005), 26; Aleida Assmann, “Die Erinnerung an den Holocaust: Vergangenheit und Zukunft,” in Handbuch Nationalsozialismus und Holocaust, eds. Hanns-Fred Rathenow, Birgit Wenzel and Norbert Weber (Schwalbach/Ts.: Wochenschau Verlag, 2002), 71.
[2] Jakob Benecke, “‘Erziehung nach Auschwitz’: Theoretische Klärung und Analyse ihrer schulischen Realisierungsmöglichkeiten,” in Holocaust Education in the 21th Century, eds. Eva Matthes and Elisabeth Meilhammer (Bad Heilbrunn: Klinkhardt, 2015), 196; Barbara Fenner, “‘Jetzt kapier’ ich, was Geschichte ist, da geht’s ja um mich.’ Didaktische Möglichkeiten, Schülerinnen und Schülern den Holocaust nahezubringen,” in Holocaust Education in the 21th Century, eds. Eva Matthes and Elisabeth Meilhammer (Bad Heilbrunn: Klinkhardt, 2015), 199-213.
[3] Während des niederösterreichischen Landtagswahlkampfes Anfang 2017 tauchte ein Liederbuch der Wiener Neustädter Burschenschaft “Germania”, der der FPÖ-Spitzenkandidat angehörte, mit antisemitischen Texten auf. Darin fand sich u.a. eine antisemitische Textstelle: „Da trat in ihre Mitte der Jude Ben Gurion: “’Gebt Gas, ihr alten Germanen, wir schaffen die siebte Million.‘ “ Siehe dazu u.a. https://www.sn.at/politik/innenpolitik/antisemitisches-lied-fpoe-kandidat-landbauer-unter-druck-23345584 (letzter Zugriff 13. November 2018).

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

By Unknown- Germany- WWII – An album in the private collection of H. Blair Howell, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=53429983

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Hellmuth, Thomas: Späte Einsicht, intensives Erinnern. Österreich heute. In: Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 38, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-13048.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Marco Zerwas / Marko Demantowsky (Team Basel)

Copyright (c) 2018 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 6 (2018) 38
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-13048

Tags: , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest