Black Suffering as Profitable Art

Schwarzes Leid als profitabler Kunstgegenstand

From our “Wilde 13” section.


On 25 September 2018, the BBZ London collective published three photos of a protest at Tate Britain on its Instagram account.[1] Members of the collective can be seen wearing T-shirts with the words “BLACK PAIN IS NOT FOR PROFIT.” The protest was a reaction to Luke Willis Thompson’s nomination for the prestigious Turner Prize. Specifically, it took aim at his “autoportrait,” an 8:50 minute video from 2017, showing in the “2018 Turner Prize” exhibition at Tate Britain until 6 January 2019.[2] At the opening, a group of artists identifying as (Black) People of Colour gathered to demonstrate that the suffering and death of blacks is being exploited for profit.

BLACK PAIN IS NOT FOR PROFIT

The Instagram posting on @bbz_london’s protest action features an excerpt from an Instagram story by sociologist and historian Emma Dabiri.[3] Dabiri had photographed a sign on Thick/er Black Lines, an interdisciplinary research collective that deals with British Black Art history, among other things — and with which Tate collaborates.[4] It reads:

“Our cultural institutions are built on Western (read: almost exclusively white cis-hetero male) art practices. These inform an agenda rooted in white supremacy, disguised as culture and taste. We need to reconstruct and decentralise our cultural spaces to include those who have been overlooked or willfully excluded.”[5]

Thompson’s “autoportrait” seems to be related to this statement not only for the members of BBZ London. The work was created in cooperation with Diamond Reynolds. Her partner, Philando Castile, was shot dead by police in 2016 during a routine traffic check. Reynolds, who witnessed the shooting as a passenger, documented the immediate aftermath via a Facebook live stream.[6] The video spread virally in social media and brought Reynolds’s highly traumatic experience to widespread public attention. Thompson’s “autoportrait” places Reynolds in the spotlight — albeit silently. Since the work was created during the (then ongoing) court case about the killing of Philando Castile, the witness was not allowed to make any statements.[7]

The White Man Shall Win a Prize

The reasons for criticising Thompson’s “autoportrait” are numerous. Various BPoC and PoC artists and art critics have in recent months criticised the fact that although the work was created in cooperation with Reynolds [8], she is not mentioned as a co-author. If Thompson really intended to draw attention to racist violence against blacks, wouldn’t Reynolds also deserve credit as part of the creative process? Instead, the art world is now focusing entirely on Luke Willis Thompson: a white, cis-hetero male artist.

Besides the lack of co-authorship, which the man denies the woman, the criticism also refers to the artist’s ethnic affiliation. Diamond Reynolds is black and the circumstance under which she gained fame is racist violence against blacks. The artist, who studied with Willem de Rooij at the Städelschule in Frankfurt am Main in 2013/14, is not black. This fact is undeniable despite a statement published by the Tate on artnet in September 2018:

“Luke Willis Thompson does not identify as white, he is originally from New Zealand, of Polynesian heritage and is mixed race. This trilogy of work by Luke Willis Thompson reflects his ongoing enquiry into questions of race, class and social inequality, which is informed by his own experience growing up as a mixed-race person in New Zealand. These films were made in the shadow of the Black Lives Matter movement and the artist sees his works as acts of solidarity with his subjects. He links his own position as a New Zealander of Fijian descent, treated as a person of colour in his home country, to that of other marginalised and disempowered communities. He finds ways of suggesting connections while also acknowledging the limits of what we can know of another’s pain, and how it can be represented.” [9]

Now the artist, who was born in 1988 in Auckland, can identify as non-white. For others, though, he is “passing for white.” His “Caucasian” appearance means he is less likely to make structural experiences of discrimination, as black people regularly do. This raises questions among his critics about the extent to which Thompson, from his privileged position, is capitalising on the trauma of others as an artist.[10]

Who Benefits in the End?

In itself, “autoportrait” is a very powerful work of art. The viewer is forced to engage with Diamond Reynolds, who remains silent for several minutes or sings inaudibly to the viewer. Art critic Alex Quicho describes the work as “a silent response to the expectations of the media to perform, to articulate, to recreate one’s own trauma in order to preserve public compassion and credibility.”[11] Thompson’s artwork is the opposite of a so-called “witness video,” like that published by Reynolds on Facebook Live. A short, fast and blurred snapshot is juxtaposed with “autoportrait,” a minute-long, staged and timeless work of art. A work that cannot spread uncontrollably through social media because this video is not available online.

Diamond Reynolds might also regain some degree of interpretive sovereignty over her own image through the recording Thompson made of and in cooperation with her. Through “autoportrait,” the public no longer perceives Reynolds as a powerless victim, but as a strong person — a kind of modern Renaissance Madonna.[12] But the fact is that she was not (co-)nominated for the Turner Prize. Nor will she profit (also financially) from the long-term success of this work of art. Instead, others in the art world (will) benefit — primarily Thompson, who has already been awarded for the 2018 Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize for “autoportrait.”[13]

For Thompson, Black suffering is a profitable art object, as artist Rene Matić stresses in her commentary on his nomination. She criticises that BPoC and PoC artists often cause frowns when their works focus on racism and structural discrimination, while artists like Thompson are celebrated as geniuses because they address “the most pressing political issues of our time.”[14] White voices and perspectives are still favoured in the art world — even when it comes to issues that specifically affect non-White communities, according to Matić.[15]

BBZ London’s protest at least succeeded in drawing the attention of the international art press to the controversy surrounding Thompson and his “autoportrait.” At last, the more conservative art critics also took up or at least referred to the dissenting voices on the artwork and the artist, for example the Observer.[16] The case shows that not only the object of art can reflect social and political grievances, but also that the production and marketing conditions of such art are themselves worth discussing.

On December 4th 2018 the 34th Turner Prize was awarded to Charlotte Prodger. The prize is accompanied by a monetary award: £25,000 goes to the winner and £5,000 each goes to the other shortlisted artists.

_____________________

Further Reading & Web Resources

_____________________

 [1] @bbz_london, 25.09.2018 – BLACK PAIN IS NOT FOR PROFIT – https://www.instagram.com/p/BoJQKUkn9bD/
[2] Tate: Turner Prize 2018, 26.09.2018 – 06.01.2019 – https://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/turner-prize-2018
[3] Emma Dabiri: „Don’t Touch My Hair“. Allen Lane, Mai 2019 – https://www.penguin.co.uk/authors/131786/emma-dabiri.html?tab=penguin-books
[4] In 2018, Thick/ er Black Lines was selected as the founding artist collective for the pilot project “(un)common space” at Tate Britain. This is a new experimental co-working space and an artist development programme. Both are intended to bring young artists, freelancers, students and creative people from underrepresented backgrounds into contact with employees of the Tate, the museum and its collection: – Thick/er Black Lines: Projects – http://thickerblacklines.com/projects
[5] „Our cultural institutions are built on Western (read: almost exclusively white cis-hetero male) art practices. These inform an agenda rooted in white supremacy, disguised as culture and taste. We need to reconstruct and decentralise our cultural spaces to include those who have been overlooked or willfully excluded.” – @bbz_london, 25.09.2018 – BLACK PAIN IS NOT FOR PROFIT – https://www.instagram.com/p/BoJQKUkn9bD/
[6] Wikipedia: Shooting of Philando Castile – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shooting_of_Philando_Castile
[7] Hettie Judah: Diamond Reynolds: the woman who streamed a police shooting becomes a Renaissance Madonna. The Guardian, 26.06.2017 – https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2017/jun/26/luke-willis-thompson-philando-castile-autoportrait
[8] ibid.
[9] „Luke Willis Thompson does not identify as white, he is originally from New Zealand, of Polynesian heritage and is mixed race. This trilogy of work by Luke Willis Thompson reflects his ongoing enquiry into questions of race, class and social inequality, which is informed by his own experience growing up as a mixed-race person in New Zealand. These films were made in the shadow of the Black Lives Matter movement and the artist sees his works as acts of solidarity with his subjects. He links his own position as a New Zealander of Fijian descent, treated as a person of colour in his home country, to that of other marginalised and disempowered communities. He finds ways of suggesting connections while also acknowledging the limits of what we can know of another’s pain, and how it can be represented.” – Sarah Cascone: ‘Black Pain Is Not for Profit’: An Activist Collective Protests Luke Willis Thompson’s Turner Prize Nomination. artnet, 25.09.2018 –https://news.artnet.com/exhibitions/luke-willis-thompson-turner-prize-1356151
[10] K. Emma Ng: Hey, You There! Tactics of Refusal in the Work of Luke Willis Thompson. The Pantograph Punch, 26.09.2017 – http://pantograph-punch.com/post/tactics-of-refusal-LWT
[11] “That it [the artwork] must be viewed in the context it was created for – in a darkened room, with one’s entire attention given over to it – is a quiet riposte to the demands of media to perform, articulate, and re-enact one’s trauma in exchange for public sympathy and belief.” – Alex Quicho: Luke Willis Thompson Autoportrait at Chisenhale. ArtReview – https://artreview.com/reviews/online_review_aug_2017_luke_willis_thompson/
[12] Hettie Judah: Diamond Reynolds: the woman who streamed a police shooting becomes a Renaissance Madonna. The Guardian, 26.06.2017 – https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2017/jun/26/luke-willis-thompson-philando-castile-autoportrait
[13] Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation: Luke Willis Thompson mit dem Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2018 ausgezeichnet, 18.05.2018 – http://deutsche-boerse.com/dbg-de/presse/pressemitteilungen/Luke-Willis-Thompson-mit-dem-Deutsche-Boerse-Photography-Foundation-Prize-2018-ausgezeichnet/3405176
[14] In fact, the phrase occurs in the reasons given by the jury for awarding Thompson the 2018 Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize: “This year’s decision of the jury followed long and far-reaching discussions about what distinguishes photography today. This includes its almost unique strength to draw public attention to some of the most pressing social and political issues of our time” (Brett Rogers, Director, “The Photographers Gallery”) – Ibid.
[15] Rene Matić: Luke Willis Thompson’s Turner Prize nomination is a blow to artists of colour. gal-dem, 03.05.2018 – http://gal-dem.com/luke-willis-thompsons-turner-prize-nomination-is-a-blow-to-artists-of-colour/
[16] Laura Cumming: Turner prize 2018; Space Shifters review – from the momentous to the miraculous. The Observer, 30.09.2018 – https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2018/sep/30/turner-prize-2018-review-best-in-years-space-shifters-hayward-gallery

_____________________

Image Credits

Tate Britain © 2018 Angelika Schoder. All Rights reserved.

Recommended Citation

Schoder, Angelika: Schwarzes Leid als profitabler Kunstgegenstand. In: Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 38, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-12762.

Editorial Responsibility

Moritz Hoffmann / Marko Demantowsky (Team Basel)

Am 25. September 2018 veröffentlichte das Kollektiv BBZ London auf seinem Instagram-Account drei Fotos einer Protestaktion in der Tate Britain.[1] Mitglieder des Kollektivs sind mit T-Shirts zu sehen, auf denen der Schriftzug „BLACK PAIN IS NOT FOR PROFIT“ zu lesen ist. Die Protestaktion war eine Reaktion auf die Nominierung von Luke Willis Thompson für den renommierten Turner Prize. Konkret geht es um das Werk „autoportrait“. Die Arbeit, ein 8:50 Minuten langes Video aus dem Jahr 2017, ist Teil der Ausstellung “Turner Prize 2018”, die noch bis zum 6. Januar 2019 in der Londoner Tate Britain zu sehen ist.[2] Zur Ausstellungseröffnung versammelte sich die Gruppe von sich als (Black) People of Color identifizierenden Künstler*innen, um dagegen zu demonstrieren, dass das Leid und der Tod von Schwarzen ausgenutzt wird, um daraus Profit zu schlagen.

BLACK PAIN IS NOT FOR PROFIT

Im Instagram-Posting zur Protestaktion von @bbz_london ist ein Auszug aus einer Instagram-Story der Soziologin und Historikerin Emma Dabiri abgebildet.[3] Dabiri hatte hier ein Hinweisschild zu Thick/er Black Lines fotografiert, einem interdisziplinären Forschungskollektiv, das sich u.a. mit britischer Schwarzer Kunstgeschichte beschäftigt – und mit dem die Tate eigentlich kollaboriert.[4] Hier ist zu lesen:

„Unsere Kulturinstitutionen basieren auf westlichen (d.h. fast ausschließlich weißen cis-hetero männlichen) Kunstpraktiken. Diese bilden eine Agenda, die auf weißer Vorherrschaft basiert, die aber als Kultur und Geschmack ausgegeben wird. Wir müssen unsere Kulturräume rekonstruieren und dezentralisieren, um auch diejenigen mit einzuschließen, die bisher übersehen oder absichtlich ausgegrenzt wurden.“[5]

Nicht nur für die Mitglieder des Kollektivs BBZ London scheint das Werk “autoportrait” in Bezug zu dieser von Thick/er Black Lines getroffenen Aussage zu stehen. Das Kunstwerk entstand in Kooperation mit Diamond Reynolds. Ihr Lebensgefährte Philando Castile war 2016 von der Polizei bei einer Routine-Verkehrskontrolle erschossen worden. Reynolds, die als Beifahrerin alles mit ansehen musste, hatte die unmittelbare Situation nach den Schüssen via Facebook-Live-Stream dokumentiert.[6] Das Video verbreitete sich viral in Sozialen Medien und brachte die Amerikanerin mit diesem für sie höchst traumatischen Erlebnis in den Fokus der Öffentlichkeit. Mit “autoportrait” stellt der Künstler Luke Willis Thompson nun Reynolds selbst in den Mittelpunkt – allerdings wortlos. Da das Werk während des laufenden Gerichtsprozesses um die Tötung von Philando Castile entstand, durfte die Zeugin hier keine Aussagen machen.[7]

Der Weiße Mann soll einen Preis gewinnen

Die Gründe für eine Kritik an Thompsons Werk “autoportrait” sind zahlreich. Verschiedene BPoC- und PoC-Künstler*innen und Kunstkritiker*innen bemängelten in den vergangenen Monaten, dass die Arbeit zwar in Kooperation mit Reynolds entstand,[8] sie selbst aber nicht als Mit-Urheberin genannt wird. Würde es Thompson wirklich darum gehen, auf rassistische Gewalt gegenüber Schwarzen aufmerksam zu machen, müsste nicht auch Reynolds als Akteurin des künstlerischen Schaffensprozesses kommuniziert werden? Im Fokus der Kunstwelt steht aber nun allein der Künstler Luke Willis Thompson – weiß, cis-hetero und männlich.

Neben der fehlenden Mit-Urheberschaft, die der Mann der Frau verwehrt, bezieht sich die Kritik auch auf die ethnische Zugehörigkeit des Künstlers. Diamond Reynolds ist schwarz und der Umstand, unter dem sie Bekanntheit erlangte, ist rassistische Gewalt gegen Schwarze. Der Künstler, der u.a. 2013/14 an der Städelschule in Frankfurt am Main bei Willem de Rooij studierte, ist nicht schwarz. Das ist eine Tatsache, die sich auch nicht durch ein von der Tate veröffentlichtes Statement vernachlässigen lässt. Das Museum teilte im September 2018 gegenüber artnet mit:

„Luke Willis Thompson identifiziert sich nicht als Weiß. […] Er fühlt sich aus seiner eigenen Position als Neuseeländer mit Fijianischer Abstammung, der in seinem Heimatland als Nicht-Weiße Person angesehen wurde, verbunden mit anderen marginalisierten und entrechteten Gemeinschaften.“[9]

Nun kann der 1988 in Auckland geborene Künstler sich selbst als Nicht-Weiß identifizieren. Er ist aber für andere „Passing for White“, wird also aufgrund seines „kaukasischen“ Aussehens eher weniger strukturelle Diskriminierungserfahrungen machen, wie sie Schwarze regelmäßig erfahren. Dies wirft bei seinen Kritiker*innen Fragen danach auf, inwieweit er aus einer privilegierten Position heraus als Künstler aus dem Trauma Anderer Kapital schlägt.[10]

Wer profitiert am Ende?

Für sich genommen, ist “autoportrait” ein sehr eindringliches Kunstwerk. Die Betrachter*innen werden gezwungen, sich mit Diamond Reynolds auseinanderzusetzen, wie sie stumm minutenlang verharrt oder unhörbar für die Betrachter*innen singt. Kunstkritikerin Alex Quicho beschreibt das Werk als “eine stille Entgegnung auf die Erwartungshaltung der Medien, zu performen, sich zu artikulieren, das eigene Trauma nachzubilden, um dafür öffentliches Mitgefühl und Glaubhaftigkeit zu erhalten.”[11] Thompsons Kunstwerk ist das Gegenteil eines sogenannten “Zeugenvideos”, wie es Reynolds via Facebook Live veröffentlicht hatte. Einer kurzen, schnellen und verwackelten Momentaufnahme steht “autoportrait” als minutenlanges, inszeniertes und zeitloses Kunstwerk gegenüber. Ein Werk, das sich über Soziale Medien nicht unkontrolliert verbreiten kann, da dieses Video online nicht verfügbar ist.

Es mag sein, dass Diamond Reynolds durch die Aufnahme, die Thompson von und in Kooperation mit ihr angefertigt hat, auch ein Stück weit die Deutungshoheit über ihr eigenes Bild zurückerhält. Durch “autoportrait” wird sie von der Öffentlichkeit nicht mehr nur als machtloses Opfer wahrgenommen, sondern als starke Person – eine Art moderne Renaissance-Madonna.[12] Fakt ist aber, dass nicht sie für den Turner Prize (mit-)nominiert wurde. Und es ist auch nicht sie, die am Ende langfristig (auch finanziell) vom Erfolg dieses Kunstwerks profitieren wird. Stattdessen profitieren andere im Kunstbetrieb – in erster Linie Thompson, der für “autoportrait” bereits mit dem Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2018 ausgezeichnet wurde.[13]

Für Thompson ist schwarzes Leid ein profitabler Kunstgegenstand, wie Rene Matić in ihrem Kommentar zu dessen Turner-Prize-Nominierung betont. Die Künstlerin kritisiert, dass BPoC- und PoC-Künstler*innen oft mit einem Augenrollen konfrontiert würden, wenn sich ihre Werke auf Rassismus und strukturelle Diskriminierung konzentrieren, während Künstler wie Thompson als Künstlergenies gefeiert würden, weil sie “die drängendsten politischen Fragen unserer Zeit” thematisierten[14]. Es seien weiße Stimmen und Perspektiven, die noch immer in der Kunstwelt favorisiert würden – auch wenn es um Themen geht, die spezifisch nicht-weiße Gemeinschaften betreffen, so Matić.[15]

Durch die Protestaktion von BBZ London konnte immerhin erreicht werden, dass auch die internationale Kunstpresse auf die Kontroverse um Thompson und sein Werk “autoportrait” aufmerksam wurde. Endlich griff auch die eher konservative Kunstkritik die Gegenstimmen zu Kunstwerk und Künstler auf oder verwies zumindest auf diese, etwa der Observer.[16] Der Fall zeigt, dass nicht nur der Gegenstand von Kunst soziale und politische Missstände reflektieren kann, sondern dass auch die Produktions- und Vermarktungsbedingungen dieser Kunst selbst diskussionswürdig sind.

Am 4. Dezember 2018 gewann Charlotte Prodger den mit £25,000 dotierten 34. Turner Prize. Die übrigen nominierten Künstler erhalten je £5,000.

_____________________

Webressourcen

_____________________

 [1] @bbz_london, 25.09.2018 – BLACK PAIN IS NOT FOR PROFIT – https://www.instagram.com/p/BoJQKUkn9bD/
[2] Tate: Turner Prize 2018, 26.09.2018 – 06.01.2019 – https://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/turner-prize-2018
[3] Emma Dabiri: „Don’t Touch My Hair“. Allen Lane, Mai 2019 – https://www.penguin.co.uk/authors/131786/emma-dabiri.html?tab=penguin-books
[4] Im Jahr 2018 wurde Thick/ er Black Lines als Gründungs-Künstlerkollektiv für das Pilotprojekt „(un)common space“ in der Tate Britain ausgewählt. Hierbei handelt es sich um einen neuen, experimentellen Co-Working Space und um ein Künstlerentwicklungsprogramm. Beides soll junge Künstler, Freiberufler, Studenten und Kreative von unterrepräsentierten Hintergründen in Kontakt bringen mit Mitarbeitern der Tate, dem Museum und seiner Sammlung. – Thick/er Black Lines: Projects – http://thickerblacklines.com/projects
[5] „Our cultural institutions are built on Western (read: almost exclusively white cis-hetero male) art practices. These inform an agenda rooted in white supremacy, disguised as culture and taste. We need to reconstruct and decentralise our cultural spaces to include those who have been overlooked or willfully excluded.” – @bbz_london, 25.09.2018 – BLACK PAIN IS NOT FOR PROFIT – https://www.instagram.com/p/BoJQKUkn9bD/
[6] Wikipedia: Shooting of Philando Castile – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shooting_of_Philando_Castile
[7] Hettie Judah: Diamond Reynolds: the woman who streamed a police shooting becomes a Renaissance Madonna. The Guardian, 26.06.2017 – https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2017/jun/26/luke-willis-thompson-philando-castile-autoportrait
[8] Ebd.
[9] „Luke Willis Thompson does not identify as white, he is originally from New Zealand, of Polynesian heritage and is mixed race. This trilogy of work by Luke Willis Thompson reflects his ongoing enquiry into questions of race, class and social inequality, which is informed by his own experience growing up as a mixed-race person in New Zealand. These films were made in the shadow of the Black Lives Matter movement and the artist sees his works as acts of solidarity with his subjects. He links his own position as a New Zealander of Fijian descent, treated as a person of colour in his home country, to that of other marginalised and disempowered communities. He finds ways of suggesting connections while also acknowledging the limits of what we can know of another’s pain, and how it can be represented.” – Sarah Cascone: ‘Black Pain Is Not for Profit’: An Activist Collective Protests Luke Willis Thompson’s Turner Prize Nomination. artnet, 25.09.2018 –https://news.artnet.com/exhibitions/luke-willis-thompson-turner-prize-1356151
[10] K. Emma Ng: Hey, You There! Tactics of Refusal in the Work of Luke Willis Thompson. The Pantograph Punch, 26.09.2017 – http://pantograph-punch.com/post/tactics-of-refusal-LWT
[11] “That it [the artwork] must be viewed in the context it was created for – in a darkened room, with one’s entire attention given over to it – is a quiet riposte to the demands of media to perform, articulate, and re-enact one’s trauma in exchange for public sympathy and belief.” – Alex Quicho: Luke Willis Thompson Autoportrait at Chisenhale. ArtReview – https://artreview.com/reviews/online_review_aug_2017_luke_willis_thompson/
[12] Hettie Judah: Diamond Reynolds: the woman who streamed a police shooting becomes a Renaissance Madonna. The Guardian, 26.06.2017 – https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2017/jun/26/luke-willis-thompson-philando-castile-autoportrait
[13] Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation: Luke Willis Thompson mit dem Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2018 ausgezeichnet, 18.05.2018 – http://deutsche-boerse.com/dbg-de/presse/pressemitteilungen/Luke-Willis-Thompson-mit-dem-Deutsche-Boerse-Photography-Foundation-Prize-2018-ausgezeichnet/3405176
[14] Tatsächlich ist dies auch eine Formulierung, die sich in der Begründung für die Verleihung des Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2018 wieder findet. Hier heißt es: “Die diesjährige Entscheidung der Jury folgte langen und tiefgreifenden Diskussionen darüber, was die Fotografie heute maßgeblich auszeichnet. Dazu zählt ihre nahezu einzigartige Stärke, die öffentliche Aufmerksamkeit auf einige der dringlichsten sozialen und politischen Themen unserer Zeit zu lenken.” (Brett Rogers, Direktorin “The Photographers” Gallery) – Ebd.
[15] Rene Matić: Luke Willis Thompson’s Turner Prize nomination is a blow to artists of colour. gal-dem, 03.05.2018 – http://gal-dem.com/luke-willis-thompsons-turner-prize-nomination-is-a-blow-to-artists-of-colour/
[16] Laura Cumming: Turner prize 2018; Space Shifters review – from the momentous to the miraculous. The Observer, 30.09.2018 – https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2018/sep/30/turner-prize-2018-review-best-in-years-space-shifters-hayward-gallery

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Tate Britain © 2018 Angelika Schoder. Alle Rechte vorbehalten.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Schoder, Angelika: Schwarzes Leid als profitabler Kunstgegenstand. In: Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 38, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-12762.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Moritz Hoffmann / Marko Demantowsky (Team Basel)

Copyright (c) 2018 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 6 (2018) 38
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-12762

Tags: , ,

2 replies »

  1. To all our non-German speaking readers we recommend the automatic DeepL-Translator. Just copy and paste.

    Das ist ein sehr spannendes Thema und im Grunde streift es auch ganz viele Aspekte des Kunstmarktes. Denn darum geht es ja auch. Wenn der Künstler nicht die entsprechenden Einnahmen und natürlich auch den Ruhm einheimsen würde, dann würde man ihn vielleicht wegen seines Engagements loben.

    Andererseits finde ich es irgendwie auch befremdlich, wenn man jetzt Nachweise über die ethnische Zugehörigkeit erbringen muss, um legitimiert zu sein, bestimmte Themen zu bearbeiten. Das gruselt mich ein wenig!

    Aber es ist sehr wichtig, dass mehr Vielfalt im Kunstbetrieb Einzug hält. Es kann nicht sein, dass es am Ende immer nur der weiße Hetero-Mann ist, der oben ankommt.

    Was die Rolle der Geschichte von Diamond Reynolds angeht, so frage ich mich, wie man insgesamt mit der Rolle von Modellen und deren Erfahrungen umgehen muss. Führt es nicht dazu, dass Künstler nicht mehr frei sind, aktuelle Ereignisse aufzugreifen?

    Vielen Dank für diesen spannenden Artikel.

    • To all our non-German speaking readers we recommend the automatic DeepL-Translator. Just copy and paste.

      Im ersten Moment scheint es wirklich befremdlich, warum nur jemand einer bestimmten Gruppe sich mit den Erfahrungen dieser Gruppe auseinandersetzen sollte. Aber darum geht es nicht generell bei der Kritik an Thompson, sondern wirklich um ihn als individuellen Künstler und seinen Umgang mit dem Thema, für das er sich als Schwerpunkt entschieden hat. Rene Matic berichtet z.B. in ihrem Artikel (http://gal-dem.com/luke-willis-thompsons-turner-prize-nomination-is-a-blow-to-artists-of-colour/) von einem Vortrag am Central Saint Martins. Als der Künstler gefragt wurde, warum seine Werke keinen Begleittext haben, antwortete er, es sei ja nicht seine Aufgabe Menschen zu belehren. Matic fragt sich deshalb zu Recht, warum man dann das Thema Gewalt gegen Schwarze aufgreift, wenn es nicht darum geht, damit z.B. aufzuklären. Sie berichtet weiter, dass Thompson auch keinen Verweis darauf macht, ob er die Akteure mit denen er arbeitet in irgend einer Weise unterstützt oder dass er sich Gedanken machen würde, ob seine Arbeit für diese positive Auswirkungen hat. Kein Wunder, dass sie zu dem Schluss kommt: “For me, Thompson’s work does not feel like a sensitive awareness-raising project, but a process of extraction, sensationalism and commodification.” Sicherlich wäre die Kritik anders, wenn Thompson seine Werke anders kontextualisieren würde und sich z.B. explizit gegen die Gewalt einsetzen würde, die er thematisiert. Zudem problematisiert er auch nicht seinen Zugang als white passing, was definitiv eine andere Perspektive ist, sondern beansprucht für sich, die gleiche Perspektive zu haben. Insofern finde ich die Kritik völlig verständlich.

      Was Reynolds angeht, muss man berücksichtigen, dass sie bei “autoportrait” nicht nur Modell war, sondern das Werk mit gestaltet hat. Im Guardian (https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2017/jun/26/luke-willis-thompson-philando-castile-autoportrait) wird das erwähnt: “Reynolds spent time behind the lens, switching places with the cinematographer to check the effects of the lighting and adjust her position.” Tatsächlich reiht sie sich in der Kunstgeschichte damit in eine Reihe an Frauen ein, die Kunstwerke von Männern mitgestaltet haben, ohne am Ende dafür Anerkennung zu finden. Mich hat es jedenfalls sehr irritiert, dass in der Tate eine Beschreibung zum Film alle Akteure von der Kamera bis zum Licht auflistet, außer Reynolds. Sie wird in einem anderen Wandtext genannt – an der anderen Seite des Raumes unter “Danksagung”.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest

1