Women, the Powerless Sex? #metoo and Us (1)

Frauen, das ohnmächtige Geschlecht? #metoo und wir (1)

From our “Wilde 13” section.


Thuringian Forest, 1890: Everyday sexism as texture of modern society, rape as its culmination point, and as an experience any women should expect at some point. But also: the emancipation from such violence and the right to love and happiness with the right man as modern female empowerment. This is how a history film presents it. And that has a lot to do with us and the #metoo debate.

Ordinary People

On 24 December 2017, Christmas Eve in Germany, during family viewing time at 10am, the educational-cultural TV channel arte is running a so-called history documentary teased as:

“Thuringian Forest, Christmas 1890: Marie and Johanna Steinmann are left with nothing after their father’s sudden death. Marie, the younger one, would like to take over her father’s glassblowing workshop and could do so, but the guild order does not allow it. Thus, the sisters are forced to keep themselves above water with poorly paid service work: Johanna as a helper of the glass dealer Friedhelm Strobel, Marie as a glass painter for Wilhelm Heimer. But these are tough times for women”[1]

Interesting! The film is well-crafted. The costumes and equipment are a bit cheesy, but they seem consistent. The focus is on the characters, their loving but also conflictual relationships, and especially their historical, i.e. social conditionality. The movie reconstructs a morally uplifting social drama despite its cookie-cutter style. The protagonists are meaningfully contoured (expressly including some male secondary characters) who present central social dynamics of early bourgeois society: new bourgeois class versus trade structure, rural versus urban, poor versus rich, tradition in community versus change in society.

At the End, Snowflakes Are Fluttering

It is noteworthy that all this is negotiated along gender lines. Not as a typical love-story that runs on the side-line of that which actually counts, i.e. the all-important “serious mens’ games” [2]; men who affirm their status by conquering females. Rather, in “the Glassblower” (D, 2016, directed by Christiane Balthasar), the fate of the two sisters remains the narrative centre-piece. They take their lives into their own hands after a few setbacks, frustrations and naiveties. They transform their material and emotional hardship into the modern virtue of self-assertion – even though their “female virtue” in the narrower sense is taken from them by male brutes .

The sisters, Marie and Johanna, ultimately prevail against violent drunkards, paternalistic-licentious bosses, against adverse circumstances and seemingly immutable traditions; they assert themselves as independent individuals. The self-empowered woman of the Modern Age is the modern subject – that is what the film is teaching us, even in the dark, threatening, cold backwoods of a Saxony forest 130 years ago. Even the ending, as it -sigh – apparently still has to be – is one of a happy, bourgeois (double!) romantic heterosexual love-marriage. It overcomes class and national divides, even though the film would most probably not pass the Bechdel test[3]. In short: even if the actual happiness of the woman is realised in marriage, these are genuinely modern women who also ‘stand by their men’ professionally and in everyday life. In the end, the snow is fluttering about the modern couples, who come together romantically and rationally to help each other with bourgeois self-realisation. Lovely.

The Point Is Made When …

It is interesting, however, that the film treats the male-dominant gender relationship as a symptomatic problem of the young bourgeois in the same way as that of the old rural artisan world. It does away with showing their specificities: Whether a glass factory in the village or an office in the city, whether a ‘whole house’ in the countryside or a bourgeois-urban family idyll: The disrespect for women and the deprivation of their rights surfaces in many situations; it is acted out in blatantly obvious ways. In private as well as in public, at work and at the family dinner table. Sexism, also its paternalistic version, is the Leitmotif of the film. This sexism is unjust, it discriminates – despite all the promises of modernity and its rational, meritocratically-founded social positioning – by ascribing certain deficits and abilities to women as such.

The modern Western-European discourse on “sexual characters”[4] construct women as the “opposite sex”[5] to the actual human subject by defining women mainly via their childbearing ability. Such a social construction projects women as closer to nature, at the same time glorifying them and portraying them as unsuitable for inclusion into all public aspects of modern society such as employment, education, legal status, autonomy. In the movie, these constructions are clearly identified as the breeding ground for the concrete discrimination in their material and symbolic forms. This includes physical violence. When the wife does not obey, she’ll be beaten into place. The film makes clear that violence is one of the strategies used to keep women in the places that are socially intended for them. According to much sociological and historical research, this is quite accurate.

Getting Raped

What tripped me up several times while watching the film, however, is the drastic and symptomatic portrayal of rape. Both sisters, Marie and Johanna, are each raped once, and this is shown in rather graphic ways. The rapes in their drastic portrayal consolidate all that has been and is being debated at #metoo since October 2017. This is what makes these scenes in the film so gripping, revealing – and also so dubious.

Proceeding logically from the more or less enlightened present, these rape scenes stand for the complete powerlessness of the woman. The rape forms the negative side of the social position of women, which remains potentially powerless as long as they do not take their fate into their own hands in a self-determining way. Otherwise, as the film portrays, rape is an inevitable part of a women’s life. That is rather crass.

Is this historically correct? And what would be the yard stick? In what context?

Read the second part of the article next week.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Retkowski, Alexandra, Angelika Treibel, and Elisabeth Tuider, eds.. Handbuch Sexualisierte Gewalt und pädagogische Kontexte. Beltz: Juventa, 2018.
  • Loetz, Francisca. Sexualisierte Gewalt 1500 – 1850. Plädoyer für eine historische Gewaltforschung, Wiesbaden: Campus 2012.
  • Villa, Paula-Irene. “#metoo.“ Pop – Kultur und Kritik 12 (2018), (forthcoming).

Web Resources

_____________________


[1] “Die Glasbläserin”, Film trailer on arte TV, https://www.arte.tv/de/videos/065291-000-A/die-glasblaeserin/ (last accessed 15 January 2018) .
[2] Pierre Bourdieu, „Die männliche Herrschaft“ in Ein alltägliches Spiel. Geschlechterkonstruktion in der sozialen Praxis, ed. Irene Dölling and Beate Krais (Frankfurt a.M.: Suhrkamp, 1997), 153–217, here 203.
[3] The Bechdel-Test (for the presence of women in movies), named after the cartoonist Alison Bechdel, consists of three questions that are put to a movie. These questions are an easy way to check whether women play an independent role that goes beyond that of being the attaché to the male actor who carries the real plot and character: 1) Are there at least two central female characters? (And possibly in addition: Do they have names?) 2) Do these women talk to each other in the movie? 3) Do they talk to each other about something other than a man or men? This is explained quite well in this video from 2009 (last accessed 16 January 2018).
[4] Karin Hausen, „Die Polarisierung der „Geschlechtscharaktere” – Eine Spiegelung der Dissoziation von Erwerbs-  und Familienleben,“ in Sozialgeschichte der Familie in der Neuzeit Europas, Neue Forschungen, ed.   Werner Conze (Stuttgart: Klett Cotta 1976), 363-393.
[5] Simone de Beauvoir, Das andere Geschlecht. Sitte und Sexus der Frau, trans. Uli Aumüller and Grete Oswald. (Reinbek: Rowohlt Taschenbuch 1992).

_____________________

Image Credits

GlassBlowing © 2009 _J_D_R_ CC-BY 2.0 via flickr

Recommended Citation

Villa, Paula-Irene: Women, the powerless sex? #Metoo and us (1). In: Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 3, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-11070.

Editorial Responsibility

Moritz Hoffmann / Marko Demantowsky

Copyright (c) 2018 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

Thüringer Wald 1890: Alltagssexismus als Textur der modernen Gesellschaft, Vergewaltigung als dessen Kulminationspunkt, und als prinzipiell immer mögliche Erfahrung im Leben einer Frau. Doch auch: die Befreiung aus dieser Gewalt und das richtige Liebesglück mit dem richtigen Mann als Selbst-Verwirklichung der modernen Frau. So präsentiert es ein Historienfilm. Das hat eine Menge mit uns und der #metoo Debatte zu tun.

Gewöhnliche Leute

Am 24.12.2017, Heiligabend in Deutschland, läuft im bildungsbürgerlichen Kultursender arte um 10 Uhr, also zur Kinderfernsehzeit, ein folgendermaßen angekündigter so genannter Historienfilm:

“Thüringer Wald, Weihnachten 1890: Nach dem plötzlichen Tod des Vaters stehen Marie und Johanna Steinmann vor dem Nichts. Marie, die Jüngere, möchte dessen Glasbläserwerkstatt gerne übernehmen und könnte das auch, doch die Zunftordnung lässt dies nicht zu. So sind die Schwestern gezwungen, sich mit schlecht entlohnten Hilfsarbeiten über Wasser zu halten: Johanna als Gehilfin des Glashändlers Friedhelm Strobel, Marie als Glasmalerin bei Wilhelm Heimer. Doch es sind harte Zeiten für Frauen.”[1]

Interessant! Der Film ist handwerklich solide gemacht, Kostüme und Ausstattung sind kitschig, wirken aber stimmig. Im Mittelpunkt stehen die Figuren, ihre liebevollen wie konfliktreichen Beziehungen, insbesondere aber deren historische, also soziale Bedingtheit. Der Film stellt entlang seiner zwar holzschnittartigen, aber für ein moralisch erbauliches Sozialdrama wiederum sinnvoll konturierten Protagonistinnen (einige männliche Nebenfiguren sind ausdrücklich mitgemeint) zentrale soziale Dynamiken der frühen bürgerlichen Gesellschaft nach: Bürgertum versus Handwerk, Land versus Stadt, arm versus reich, Tradition in Gemeinschaft versus Wandel der Gesellschaft.

Am Ende rieselt der Schnee

Bemerkenswert ist, dass dies alles entlang der Geschlechterfrage verhandelt wird. Und zwar nicht als filmübliches Liebesnebenher zu den eigentlich wichtigen “ernsten Spielen der Männer”[2] die ihren Status auch entlang von Fraueneroberungen klarmachen. Nein, in “Die Glasbläserin” (D, 2016, Regie: Christiane Balthasar) ist das Schicksal der beiden Schwestern das narrative Herzstück, die eben dieses Schicksal nach einigen Rückschlägen, Frustrationen und Naivitäten selbst in die Hand nehmen. Sie machen aus ihrer materiellen Not eine moderne Selbst-Behauptungs-Tugend – wenngleich ihnen die ‘weibliche Tugend’ im engeren Sinne durch männliche Rohlinge genommen wird.

Marie und Johanna setzen sich letztlich gegen gewalttätige Trunkenbolde, paternalistisch-willkürliche Chefs, gegen widrige Umstände und nur scheinbar unveränderliche Traditionen durch, sie behaupten sich als selbständige Individuen. Selbst ist die Frau in der Moderne, das lehrt uns der Film, selbst im dunkeldräuenden, kalten provinziellem Waldland des vorletzten Jahrhunderts. Auch wenn am Ende, so muss das dann – seufz – eben immer noch sein, das bürgerliche Happy End der (doppelten!) romantischen heteronormativen Liebesehe steht, die Klassen- und Landesgrenzen überwindet, und auch wenn der Film höchstwahrscheinlich den Bechdel-Test nicht bestehen würde,[3] kurzum: auch wenn das eigentliche Filmglück der Frau in der Ehe liegt, so sind dies genuin moderne Frauen, die auch beruflich und in der alltäglichen Lebensführung ‘ihren Mann stehen’. Am Ende rieselt der Schnee auf die modernen Ehepaare, die romantisch-rational zusammenkommen, um sich wechselseitig bei der bürgerlichen Selbstverwirklichung zu helfen. Schön.

Es setzt was, wenn …

Interessant ist aber, dass der Film das herrschaftsförmige Geschlechterverhältnis zum symptomatischen Problem der jungen bürgerlichen wie der alten ländlich-handwerklichen Welt gleichermaßen macht. Und doch auf das Zeigen von deren Spezifika nicht verzichtet: Ob Glasmanufaktur im Dorf oder Kontor in der Stadt, ob ‘ganzes Haus’ auf dem Land oder bürgerlich-urbanes Familienidyll: Die Entrechtung und Missachtung von Frauen scheint in vielen Situationen auf, sie wird überdeutlich inszeniert. Im Privaten wie im Öffentlichen, bei der Arbeit wie beim Familienessen. Sexismus, auch in seiner paternalistischen Variante, ist der rote Faden des Films. Dieser Sexismus ist ungerecht, er diskriminiert – entgegen aller Versprechen der Moderne auf rationale, meritokratisch begründete soziale Positionierung – er unterstellt Frauen an und für sich bestimmte Defizite und Fähigkeiten.

Die ‘bürgerlichen Geschlechtscharaktere'[4], die Frauen zum ‘anderen Geschlecht'[5] des eigentlichen Menschen machen, indem sie es entlang der (imaginierten oder realen) Gebärfähigkeit als ungeeignet für alle öffentlichen und inklusionsrelevanten Aspekte der modernen Gesellschaft (Erwerbsarbeit, Bildung, Rechtsstatus, Autonomie) erachtet, sie dabei als näher an der Natur projiziert und glorifiziert. Diese Konstruktionen werden als Nährboden der konkreten Diskriminierungen in ihren materiellen und symbolischen Formen ausgewiesen. Dazu gehört auch körperliche Gewalt. Im Film “setzt es was”, wenn die Ehefrau nicht gehorcht. Klar wird: Gewalt gehört zu den Strategien, Frauen an den gesellschaftlich für sie vorgesehenen Orten zu halten. Das ist historisch wie soziologisch völlig korrekt.

Vergewaltigungen

Worüber ich beim Schauen allerdings mehrfach gestolpert bin, ist die drastische und symptomatische Darstellung von Vergewaltigung. Beide Schwestern, Marie und Johanna, werden jeweils einmal vergewaltigt, filmisch diesseits aller Zweideutigkeit. Die Vergewaltigungen verdichten in ihrer Drastik all das, worüber im Rahmen von #metoo seit Oktober 2017 debattiert wurde und wird. Das macht diese Szenen im Historienfilm so spannend, aufschlussreich – und auch so dubios.

Im Film stehen, logisch der mehr oder minder aufgeklärten Gegenwart folgend, diese Vergewaltigungen für eine völlige Ohnmacht der Frau. Die Vergewaltigung bildet die Negativfolie der sozialen Position von Frauen, die solange potenziell ohnmächtig bleibt, wie diese ihr Schicksal nicht in die selbstbestimmten Hände nimmt. Ansonsten, so inszeniert es der Film, gehören Vergewaltigungen durch Männer dazu, zu einem solchen Frauenleben, unausweichlich. Das ist schon auch ‘krass’.

Ist das denn auch historisch richtig? Und was wäre der Maßstab? In welchem Kontext?

Lesen Sie den zweiten Teil des Artikels in der kommenden Woche.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Retkowski, Alexandra, Angelika Treibel, and Elisabeth Tuider, eds.. Handbuch Sexualisierte Gewalt und pädagogische Kontexte. Beltz: Juventa, 2018.
  • Loetz, Francisca. Sexualisierte Gewalt 1500 – 1850. Plädoyer für eine historische Gewaltforschung, Wiesbaden: Campus 2012.
  • Villa, Paula-Irene. “#metoo.“ Pop – Kultur und Kritik 12 (2018), (im Erscheinen).

Webressourcen

_____________________


[1] “Die Glasbläserin”, Filmankündigung bei arte TV, https://www.arte.tv/de/videos/065291-000-A/die-glasblaeserin/ (letzter Zugriff 27. Januar 2018) .
[2] Pierre Bourdieu, „Die männliche Herrschaft“ in Ein alltägliches Spiel. Geschlechterkonstruktion in der sozialen Praxis, ed. Irene Dölling and Beate Krais (Frankfurt a.M.: Suhrkamp, 1997), 153–217, here 203.
[3] Der Bechdel-Test (for women in movies), benannt nach der Cartoon-Autorin Alison Bechdel, besteht aus drei Fragen an einen Film. Mit diesen lässt sich sehr einfach überprüfen, ob Frauen eine eigenständige Rolle spielen, die über das Dekor zu den eigentlichen männlichen Handlungs- und Personenträgern des Films hinausgeht. 1) Gibt es mindestens zwei zentrale Frauenrollen? (Eventuell zusätzlich: Haben diese einen Namen?) 2) Sprechen diese Frauenrollen im Film miteianander? 3) Sprechen sie dabei über etwas Anderes als Männer/einen Mann? Schön erklärt in diesem Video von 2009 (letzter Zugriff 27. Januar 2018).
[4] Karin Hausen, “Die Polarisierung der ‘Geschlechtscharaktere’ – Eine Spiegelung der Dissoziation von Erwerbs-  und Familienleben,“ in Sozialgeschichte der Familie in der Neuzeit Europas, Neue Forschungen, ed. Werner Conze (Stuttgart: Klett Cotta 1976), 363-393.
[5] Simone de Beauvoir, Das andere Geschlecht. Sitte und Sexus der Frau, trans. Uli Aumüller and Grete Oswald. (Reinbek: Rowohlt Taschenbuch 1992).

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

GlassBlowing © 2009 _J_D_R_ CC-BY 2.0 via flickr

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Villa, Paula-Irene: Frauen, das ohnmächtige Geschlecht? #metoo und wir (1). In: Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 3, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-11070.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Moritz Hoffmann / Marko Demantowsky

Copyright (c) 2018 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.


Categories: 6 (2018) 3
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-11070

Tags: , ,

2 replies »

  1. Werte Autorin, die Frage nach der historischen Korrektheit einer solchen Darstellung habe ich mir ebenfalls vor kurzem gestellt. Die Doku-Reihe des ZDF “Ein Tag im Jahr…” stellt in der Episode “Ein Tag im Jahr 1900” ähnliche Phänomene dar. Eine arme junge Frau aus Schlesien nimmt dort einen Posten in der Hauswirtschaft eines reichen Bürgers an. Dieser vergewaltigt sie ebenfalls.

    Ich denke es ist historisch korrekt, dass die jeweiligen Protagonistinnen geschlagen werden, gefügig gemacht werden (man denke an die preußische Gesindeordnung), etc. – waren aber auch Vergewaltigungen an der Tagesordnung? Oder gab es nicht auch ein moralisches Bewusstsein, zumindest bei den meisten Menschen?

    Um die Dramatik einer arm geborenen Existenz in jener Zeit darzustellen dürfte eine drastische Darstellung aber sicher geeignet sein.

    ———————–

    Dear author, I also recently asked myself the question of the historical correctness of such a representation. The ZDF’s documentary series “A Day in the Year…” presents similar phenomena in the episode “A Day in 1900”. A poor young woman from Silesia takes up a position in the home economics of a wealthy citizen. He also rapes her.

    I think it’s historically correct that the respective protagonists are beaten, brought down (remembering Prussian rule), etc. – but were rapes also the order of the day? Or was there not also a moral consciousness, at least among most people?

    In order to depict the drama of a poor-born existence at that time, however, a drastic portrayal is certainly appropriate.

    Translated with http://www.DeepL.com/Translator

    • Lieber Herr Frisch, danke für Ihren Kommentar.
      Inwiefern Vergewaltigungen “an der Tagesordnung” waren, ist eine kaum völlig eindeutig zu beantwortende Frage. Dafür ist sexualisierte Gewalt im Allgemeinen viel zu stark mit Scham und Stigmatiserung der Opfer belegt. Allerdings weisen vielfache historische Studien doch auf das endemische und strukturelle Ausmaß auch von Vergewaltigung hin. So etwa die Studie von Tanja Hommen (1999) zum Kaiserreich. Sicher gab es auch ein moralisches Bewusstsein, wie Sie schreiben. Aber auch hier ist wieder der offene empirische Blick wichtig. Dieser zeigt, dass Moral vor Gericht, im Alltag, in Familien, im Beruflichen usw. sehr unterschiedlich in Anschlag gebracht wird.

      Was die Notwendigkeit einer ‘Vergewaltigung-Szene” um der Dramatik willen betritt .. ich bin mir da nicht sicher. Mich überzeugt jedenfalls das Narrativ von der Zwangsläufigkeit nicht. Und auch die konkreten Bilder veropferter Frauen finde ich problematisch. Ich grüble noch.

      ————————————————

      Dear Mr. Frisch, thank you for your comment.
      The extent to which rapes were “on the agenda” is a question that can hardly be answered in a completely unambiguous way. In general, sexualised violence is much too much of a source of shame and stigmatisation for the victims. However, many historical studies point to the endemic and structural extent of rape. For example, Tanja Hommen’s (1999) study on the German Empire. I’m sure there was also a moral conscience, as you write. But here again the open empirical view is important. This shows that morals in court, in everyday life, in families, in the professional world, etc. are brought into line in very different ways.

      As for the necessity of a’ rape scene’ for drama’s sake… I am not sure. In any case, the narrative doesn’t convince me of the necessity. And I also find the specific images of sacrificed women problematic. I’m still pondering.

      Translated with http://www.DeepL.com/Translator

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

Pin It on Pinterest