Women, the Powerless Sex? #metoo and Us (2)

Frauen, das ohnmächtige Geschlecht? #metoo und wir (2)

Please, read part 1 of the argument.

From our “Wilde 13” section.


#Metoo: Interestingly, apart from a few exceptions, we’re not hearing anything related to Western religion, dominant culture, values. The audience is seemingly perplexed because the Weinsteins and Fritzchen Schmitzens are not “they”. They are not the ‘others’, the ‘savages’, the ‘uncivilized’ or the ‘patriarchally socialized men from North Africa’. They are us. How do we deal with this in a differentiated, nuanced way?

Decades Spent Under a Rock?

The metoo debate in 2017 began, as is well known, when sexual assaults on actresses by Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein came to public awareness. Under the hashtag #metoo, and thanks to the Twitter-turbo, hundreds of thousands of women came forward: they posted their experiences of sexual harassment, of assaults, and sometimes of sexualized violence. Some of them were celebrities, but to a large extent they were ‘the normal women’ like you and me. All of them, all of us, reported of partly forgotten, amusing or embarrassing, from terrible to traumatizing experiences with gropers in public, with men showing us their genitals unsolicitedly, and / or masturbating next to us on the bus; experiences with date-rape drugs in clubs, with suggestive remarks at the conference dinner, and so on and so forth.

Gradually, some men also came forward with their humiliating experiences of sexual harassment. The sexualized violence done to women by men has been well-articulated in feminist activism and in gender studies, it’s been researched for decades. But the sexualized violence against men and boys is less known and less researched. On the other hand, in recent years many ‘scandals’ at boarding schools, in clubs or in male institutions like the military, choirs or fraternities, have sparked broad attention. What is positively striking about the #metoo-debate as a whole, is that the undoubted ubiquity[1] of sexualized violence becomes clear: We see how it is part of the daily lives of the vast majority of women and also of many children and men. Worldwide. Across the board. In all areas, in all religious communities and also among atheists, among the left and right political spectrum, affecting all ages.

Anyone who was or is astonished or annoyed by this has spent the last few decades either under a rock or simply does not want to admit it. Incidentally, all studies on the subject point to the endemic extent of sexual violence and sexual assault and this has been the case for decades. Since the 1970s, a second wave women’s movement has hardly addressed anything as much as (sexualized) violence against women.[2] Thus, neither here, nor in the US, is this discussion about sexism happening for the first time, pointing out its connection to sexism, i.e. the inappropriate, contextually misplaced and power-saturated treatment of people as a sexualized gender.

A Permanent Fight for Dignity

Interestingly, apart from a few exceptions of those who want to belittle or sweep the problem under the carpet, we hardly hear anything about Western religion, dominant culture, values. The audience is seemingly perplexed because the Weinsteins and Fritzchen Schmitzens, the Pinchers (Tory in the British Commons) and Gonzáles of this world, who have been and are outed by Lieschen Müller to Gwyneth Paltrow for their inappropriate sexualizations are just not “they”. They are not the ‘others’, the ‘savages’, the ‘uncivilized’ or ‘patriarchally socialized men from North Africa’. They are us.

Unlike after the New Year’s Eve incident in Cologne 2015/16, the combination of power and sexuality cannot be dismissed by racist resentments, while ultimately leaving the elephant in the room. This impossibility is a great opportunity. And, actually, that is how the debate has been conducted to a large extent: as awareness and recognition – at least! – of the fact that we live in sexist structures worldwide. That for the vast majority of women in the world, the public and also the professional sphere is a permanent fight for dignity, sometimes also for physical integrity. Coupled with empirically well-founded concerns – that are nevertheless not taken seriously – is the reversal of the perpetrator and the victim, the latter of whom is held responsible for what others do to her.

However, it is important to not lump everything together. The debate around sexual violence must avoid some pitfalls for it to be productive and sustainable. This might also prove relevant for historical research and/or educational work within history.

Condemnation of Coercion, Assault, Violence

First, we must (finally) understand that sexualized violence or sexism does not equal sexual intimacy in and of itself. Sexual assaults – unwanted and misplaced groping, uninvited exposing of genitals, sexually suggestive remarks at the workplace, exploiting power relations e.g. in professional settings – is not about what people like to do when the situation is right for everyone involved (‘in bed’). It is also not about denying the connection between sexuality and interpersonal power. We have been thinking about this and its significance for the Modern Age since de Sade, incidentally, feminism too, and mainly, if amidst much controversy, with a lot of fun, exciting insights, or at least, good intentions.[3]

Rather, #metoo is about the problematization and condemnation of coercion, assault, and violence exerted by means of sexualization. Interestingly, some defense reactions to the #metoo campaign and its concerns that are occasionally voiced as an attack on the free will of lust follow a renewed pattern of sexualization. What kind of a dirty mind do you have to have, paired with self-righteousness and chutzpah, to see a comeback of the ‘prude 50s’ or a moral panic? What is so unbearable about the fact that people in structurally weaker positions – disproportionately women, but also men and children – now finally (but also frustratingly anew: boarding schools, clubs, women’s shelters, Tahir Square, Nunca Más, Niunaménos, … etc.) share their experiences en masse with people who, structurally, have the longer end of the stick? People who for their part do not want to distinguish between sexuality and power display beyond consensus? What is it that threatens eroticism or desire so much? Everyone is encouraged, if not obliged to think about this.

Differentiate!

Second, it is crucial to distinguish between sexism, sexual coercion, sexual assault and sexual violence. Even though this may not be easy even legally, it is by all means necessary. Such nuance will not be achieved without the experiences of those affected. The specific modern logic of subjugating ‘the Other’ to the hegemonic (rational) subject and the inherent naturalization and consequent devaluation of that Other may connect the diverse forms of sexism,[4] – but they still are not all the same. In fact, while it is absolutely acceptable to be critical if someone makes stupid remarks or comments about the look rather than the expertise of a female politician in public, and while such comments are telling regarding social notions of gender, such comments still are not the same as physical assaults or even violence – neither for perpetrators, nor for victims, and also not for our legal or cultural framings. Not every word equals a bad deed or should lead to legal consequences.

Meanwhile, it is wise to stay open-minded: words can in fact equal bad deeds, they do have a potential and a potentially causal – but not a coercive – connection with e.g. physical acts. Likewise, not every use of violence has always been ‘bad’ or has had legal consequences. Recall that rape as a criminal offence within marriage came into the Criminal Code in 1997, when paragraph 177 was introduced. Only in 1997? Yes. And the debate over its introduction is highly revealing even today.[5]

What Is Left?

With #metoo, as with so many political articulations, it is important to remain attentive and open to the suffering of those who are harmed by words and deeds, and especially to the suffering that may not be immediately obvious. The task that #metoo presents to us all is to see and show that sexualized violence and sexism are connected, and are both ubiquitous and context specific. That is what is needed, not more, but also not less. It would already be a big step forward. A step, I believe, we are actually able to take. The feel-good – because of its Christmas theme – yet thought-provoking history-film “The Glassblower” has done a rather good job in helping us take this step, despite its uneasy ambivalence.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Retkowski, Alexandra, Angelika Treibel, and Elisabeth Tuider, eds.. Handbuch Sexualisierte Gewalt und pädagogische Kontexte. Beltz: Juventa, 2018.
  • Loetz, Francisca. Sexualisierte Gewalt 1500 – 1850. Plädoyer für eine historische Gewaltforschung, Wiesbaden: Campus 2012.
  • Villa, Paula-Irene. “#metoo.“ Pop – Kultur und Kritik 12 2018 (forthcoming).

Web Resources

_____________________


[1] EU/UNO and Carol Hagemann-White, “Gewalt gegen Frauen – Ein Überblick deutschsprachiger Forschung,” Journal für Konflikt- und Gewaltforschung. 3 2001, no. 2: 23-44.
[2] Gewalt. Issue 56/57, beiträge zur feministischen theorie & praxis 24 2001, Ilse Lenz ed., Die Neue Frauenbewegung – Abschied vom kleinen Unterschied. Eine Quellensammlung (Wiesbaden: VS Springer 2009), Regina Dackweiler and Reinhild Schäfer, Gewalt-Verhältnisse. Feministische Perspektiven auf Geschlecht und Gewalt. (München: Campus 2002), Amanda Kaladelfos and Lisa Featherstone, “Sexual and gender-based violence: definitions, contexts, meanings,” Australian Feminist Studies Vol. 29, 81/2014: 233-237, Ulrike Müller, “Gewalt: Von der Enttabuisierung zur einflussnehmenden Forschung,” in: Handbuch Frauen- und Geschlechterforschung, ed. Beate Kortendiek und Ruth Müller (Wiesbaden: VS Springer 2004), 549-554.
[3] Simone de Beauvoir, Soll man de Sade verbrennen? Drei Essays zur Moral des Existenzialismus (Berlin: Rowohlt 1983), Lisa Duggan and Nan D. Hunter, Sex Wars: Sexual Dissent and Political Culture (New York: Routledge, 1995).
[4] In the Modern Age (possibly not only, but especially then) ultimately all living things and objects that are not considered rational, mature, autonomous, full subjects are more or less attributed to nature, i.e. naturalized. As such, they are considered as resources to be dominated and exploited. This applies in part to animals, children, women, ‘indigenous peoples’, ‘disabled people’, Jews in anti-Semitic discourse, ‘Gypsies’, etc. Such naturalization of all ‘Others’ – compared to the factual, white, heterosexual, European male – historically implied and often still implies that their bodies can be disposed of.  This dynamic of somatic dispossession has a sexualized dimension, but goes far beyond it to include slavery, medical studies without knowledge and / or consent, legal disenfranchisement, etc.
[5] Journalistically understandable, see Margrit Gerste, “Endlich: Vergewaltigung in der Ehe gilt künftig als Verbrechen” Die Zeit, 16 May 1997 (last accessed 16 January 2018) http://www.zeit.de/1997/21/ehe.txt.19970516.xml. Some readings on the topic: Ulrike Lembke ed., Regulierungen des Intimen. Sexualität und Recht im modernen Staat (Wiesbaden: Springer VS 2017).

_____________________

Image Credits
MeToo OLB in San Diego © 2017 Backbone Campaign, CC-BY 2.0.

Recommended Citation
Villa, Paula-Irene: Women, the Powerless Sex? #metoo and Us (2). In: Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 4, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-11099.

Editorial Responsibility
Moritz Hoffmann / Marko Demantowsky

Copyright (c) 2017 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

#Metoo: Bis auf wenige Ausnahmen hören wir interessanterweise kaum etwas zu westlicher Religion, Leitkultur, Werten. Das scheinbar verwunderte Publikum ist kleinlaut, denn die Weinsteins und Fritzchen Schmitzens sind eben nicht “die”. Sie sind nicht die ‘Anderen’, die ‘Wilden’, die ‘Unzivilisierten’ oder ‘patriarchal sozialisierten Männern aus Nordafrika’. Sie sind wir. Wie gehen wir differenziert damit um?

Jahrzehnte unter einem Stein verbracht?

Die metoo-Debatte des Jahres 2017 begann bekanntermaßen mit der öffentlichen Wahrnehmung von sexualisierten Übergriffen auf Schauspielerinnen durch den Hollywood-Produzenten Harvey Weinstein. Unter dem Hashtag #metoo äußerten sich, Twitter-Turbo sei Dank, Hunderttausende Frauen entsprechend: Sie posteten ihre Erfahrungen mit sexueller Belästigung, mit Übergriffigkeiten, zum Teil mit sexualisierter Gewalt. Rasch meldeten sich in Print und in den Social Media sehr viele, zum Teil auch prominente Frauen, zum großen Teil aber ‘die Frauen’ wie Du und ich. Sie alle, wir alle, berichteten von fast vergessenen, amüsanten oder peinlichen, von schlimmen bis zu traumatisierenden Erfahrungen mit Grabschern in der Öffentlichkeit, mit Männern die uns ungefragt ihre Genitalien zeigen, und/oder neben uns im Bus masturbieren; Erfahrungen mit K.O.-Tropfen im Club, mit anzüglichen Bemerkungen beim Conference Dinner usw.usf.

Nach und nach meldeten sich auch Männer mit ihren demütigenden Erfahrungen sexualisierter Belästigung. Im Gegensatz zur sexualisierten Gewalt von Männern an Frauen, die seit Jahrzehnten zentrales Thema frauenpolitischer Artikulationen sowie der Geschlechterforschung gewesen sind, ist sexualisierte Gewalt gegen Männer und (männliche) Kinder weniger bekannt und wird auch weniger erforscht. Andererseits haben in den letzten Jahren die vielen ‘Skandale’ an Internaten, in Vereinen oder in männerbündisch organisierten Institutionen wie Armeen, Chören oder Burschenschaften weithin Aufmerksamkeit generiert. Was nun an der ganzen #metoo-Debatte insgesamt positiv auffällt: Dass angesichts der unzweifelhaften Ubiquität[1] sexualisierter Gewalt klar wird: Sie gehören zum Alltag der allermeisten Frauen und auch vieler Kinder und Männer. Weltweit. Quer durch alle Schichten, in allen Brachen, bei allen religiösen Gemeinschaften und auch bei AtheistInnen, im linken wie rechtem Spektrum, in jedem Alter.

Wer hierüber erstaunt oder hiervon genervt war bzw. ist, der oder die hat die letzten Jahrzehnte entweder unter einem Stein verbracht oder will es einfach nicht wahrhaben. Auf das endemische Ausmaß sexualisierter Gewalt und sexueller Übergriffe verweisen im Übrigen alle Studien zum Thema. Im Übrigen seit Jahrzehnten. Die zweite Frauenbewegung hat seit den 1970ern kaum etwas so sehr thematisiert wie (sexualisierte) Gewalt gegen Frauen.[2] Wir diskutieren also weder hier noch in den USA das erste Mal über Sexismus, d.h. über die unangemessene, vom Kontext her deplatzierte und machtgetränkte Adressierung von Menschen als sexualisiertes Geschlecht.

Ein auf Dauer gestellter Nahkampf um Würde

Bis auf wenige Ausnahmen, die das Problem klein reden oder einhegen wollen, hören wir interessanterweise kaum etwas zu westlicher Religion, Leitkultur, Werten. Das scheinbar verwunderte Publikum ist kleinlaut, denn die Weinsteins und Fritzchen Schmitzens, die Pinchers’ (Tory im Britischen Unterhaus) und Gonzáles’ dieser Welt, die von Lieschen Müller bis hin zu Gwyneth Paltrow seit #metoo für ihre unangemessenen Sexualisierungen geoutet wurden und werden, die sind eben nicht “die”. Sie sind nicht die ‘Anderen’, die ‘Wilden’, die ‘Unzivilisierten’ oder ‘patriarchal sozialisierten Männern aus Nordafrika’. Sie sind wir.

Anders nun als nach der Silvesternacht von Köln 15/16 kann die Verknüpfung von Macht und Sexualität nicht durch rassistisch getönte Ressentiments des Raumes verwiesen werden – um letztlich doch als Elefant im Raum zu bleiben. Diese Unmöglichkeit ist eine große Chance. Und so ist die Debatte auch bislang weitestgehend geführt worden: als Wahrnehmung und Anerkennung, immerhin!, der Tatsache, dass wir weltweit in sexistischen Strukturen leben. Dass für die allermeisten Frauen dieser Welt die Öffentlichkeit und auch die professionelle/berufliche Sphäre ein auf Dauer gestellter Nahkampf um Würde ist, bisweilen auch um die körperliche Integrität. Gepaart mit der empirisch gut begründeten Sorge, dennoch nicht ernst genommen, ja überhaupt in einer Täter-Opfer-Umkehr verantwortlich gemacht zu werden für das, was ihnen andere antun.

Allerdings gilt es, nicht alles in einen Topf zu werfen. Die Auseinandersetzung mit sexualisierter Gewalt muss einige Fallstricke vermeiden, will sie produktiv und nachhaltig geführt werden. Dies ist auch für die historische bzw. geschichtsdidaktische Arbeit relevant.

Ächtung von Nötigung, Übergriffen, Gewalt

Erstens, müssen wir (endlich) verstehen, dass sexualisierte Gewalt oder der Sexismus nicht sexuelle Intimität an und für sich meint. Es geht bei sexualisierten Übergriffen – ungewolltes und deplatziertes Angrabschen, ungefragtes Entblößen von Genitalien, schlüpfrige Bemerkungen im Job oder auf dem Amt, Ausnutzen von Machtgefällen in z.B. professionellen Settings – nicht um das, was Menschen gern miteinander treiben, wenn die Situation für alle Beteiligten passt. Es geht auch nicht darum, den inneren Zusammenhang von Sexualität und zwischenmenschliche Macht zu leugnen. Über diesen und seiner Bedeutung für die Moderne denken wir seit de Sade nach, im Übrigen auch der Feminismus mit zum Teil viel Wohlwollen.[3]

Es geht vielmehr um die Problematisierung und Ächtung von Nötigung, Übergriffen, Gewalt, die mittels der Sexualisierung ausgeübt wird. Die hier und da formulierte Abwehr der #metoo-Kampagne und ihrer Anliegen als Angriff auf den freiheitlichen Eigensinn der Lust folgt interessanterweise einer erneuten Sexualisierung. Was für ein dirty mind, gepaart mit selbstherrlicher Chuzpe muss man haben, um nun die “prüden 50’er ”oder Moralterror aufziehen zu sehen? Was genau ist so unaushaltbar an der Tatsache, dass Menschen in strukturell schwächeren Positionen – überproportional Frauen, aber auch Männer oder Kinder – nun endlich (aber auch frustrierend erneut: Internate, Vereine, Frauenhäuser, Tahir Square, Nunca Más, Niunaménos; … usw.) massenhaft ihre Erfahrungen mit Menschen am strukturell längeren Hebel teilen, die ihrerseits Sexualität und Übermacht-Display jenseits des Konsenses nicht auseinanderhalten wollen? Was gefährdet Erotik oder Begehren so sehr? Hierüber darf, nein: soll jede und jeder nachdenken.

Differenzieren!

Zweitens ist es zentral wichtig, zwischen Sexismus, sexueller Nötigung, sexualisierten Übergriffen und sexualisierter Gewalt zu unterscheiden. Das ist nicht nur juristisch nicht leicht. Aber nötig. Ohne die Erfahrungen derjenigen, die betroffen sind, wird es nicht gehen. Es eint sie womöglich ein innerer Zusammenhang – die moderne Logik der Unterwerfung des/der Anderen zum hegemonialen (Vernunft-)Subjekt und die darin eingelagerte Naturalisierung sowie daraus folgende Abwertung dieses/dieser Anderen[4] –, aber es ist nicht alles dasselbe. Tatsächlich sind dumme Sprüche oder Anmerkungen zum Aussehen statt zur Expertise einer Politikerin im öffentlichen Raum kritisierbar, an ihnen lässt sich eine Menge über das Verständnis von Geschlecht und Gesellschaft ablesen. Aber solche Sprüche sind weder für Täter noch für Opfer und auch nicht für unsere Verfasstheit im rechtlichen oder kulturellen Sinne dasselbe wie körperliche Übergriffe oder gar handfeste Gewalt. Nicht jedes Wort ist gleich eine schlimme, gar justiziable Tat.

Gleichwohl gilt es offen zu bleiben: Worte können schlimme Taten sein, sie haben einen potenziellen und potenziell kausalen – aber nicht zwingenden – Zusammenhang mit z.B. körperlichen Taten. Ebenso gilt, dass nicht jede Gewaltanwendung immer schon ‘schlimm’ oder gar justiziabel war. Man erinnere sich, dass der Straftatbestand der Vergewaltigung in der Ehe 1997 ins Strafgesetzbuch kam, als dessen Paragraph 177 eingeführt wurde. 1997. Erst? Ja. Und die Debatte um dessen Einführung ist auch heute höchst aufschlussreich.[5]

Was bleibt?

Bei #metoo, wie bei so vielen politischen Artikulationen gilt es, aufmerksam und offen für das Leid derjenigen zu bleiben, die unter Worten und Taten leiden, auch und gerade für das Leid, das einem womöglich nicht unmittelbar einleuchtet. Zu sehen und zu zeigen, dass sexualisierte Gewalt und auch Sexismus offenbar ubiquitär und zugleich kontextspezifisch sind, das ist die Aufgabe, die #metoo uns allen aufgibt.

Nicht weniger, aber auch nicht zwingend mehr als das. Das wäre schon ein großer Fortschritt. Den wir in meinen Augen derzeit durchaus zu machen in der Lage sind. Der besinnliche, weil auf Weihnachten gemünzte, doch darüber hinaus nachdenklich stimmende Historienfilm “Die Glasbläserin” hat das jedenfalls ganz gut hinbekommen, wenn auch mit unbehaglicher Ambivalenz.

_____________________
Literaturhinweise

  • Retkowski, Alexandra, Angelika Treibel, and Elisabeth Tuider, eds.. Handbuch Sexualisierte Gewalt und pädagogische Kontexte. Beltz: Juventa, 2018.
  • Loetz, Francisca. Sexualisierte Gewalt 1500 – 1850. Plädoyer für eine historische Gewaltforschung, Wiesbaden: Campus 2012.
  • Villa, Paula-Irene. “#metoo.“ Pop – Kultur und Kritik 12 2018 (im Erscheinen).

Webressourcen

_____________________


[1] EU/UNO and Carol Hagemann-White, “Gewalt gegen Frauen – Ein Überblick deutschsprachiger Forschung,” Journal für Konflikt- und Gewaltforschung. 3 2001, no. 2: 23-44.
[2] Gewalt. Issue 56/57, beiträge zur feministischen theorie & praxis 24 2001, Ilse Lenz ed., Die Neue Frauenbewegung – Abschied vom kleinen Unterschied. Eine Quellensammlung (Wiesbaden: VS Springer 2009), Regina Dackweiler and Reinhild Schäfer, Gewalt-Verhältnisse. Feministische Perspektiven auf Geschlecht und Gewalt. (München: Campus 2002), Amanda Kaladelfos and Lisa Featherstone, “Sexual and gender-based violence: definitions, contexts, meanings,” Australian Feminist Studies Vol. 29, 81/2014: 233-237, Ulrike Müller, “Gewalt: Von der Enttabuisierung zur einflussnehmenden Forschung,” in: Handbuch Frauen- und Geschlechterforschung, ed. Beate Kortendiek und Ruth Müller (Wiesbaden: VS Springer 2004), 549-554.
[3] Simone de Beauvoir, Soll man de Sade verbrennen? Drei Essays zur Moral des Existenzialismus (Berlin: Rowohlt 1983), Lisa Duggan and Nan D. Hunter, Sex Wars: Sexual Dissent and Political Culture (New York: Routledge, 1995).
[4] In der Moderne (womöglich nicht nur, aber besonders dort) werden letztlich alle Lebewesen und Objekte, die nicht als rationales, mündiges, autonomes Vollsubjekt gelten, mehr oder minder zur Natur zugerechnet werden. Und damit auf der Seite der zu beherrschenden, ausbeutbaren ‘Ressourcen’. Dies betraf und betrifft zum Teil noch, neben Tieren, Kinder, Frauen, ‘Naturvölker’, ‘Behinderte’, Juden in antisemitischem Diskurs, ‘Zigeuner’ usw. Diese Naturalisierung aller ‘Anderen’ zum faktisch weißen, heterosexuellen europäischen Mann impliziert(e) empirisch auch die Verfügung über die Körper dieser. Das hat eine sexualisierte Dimension, geht aber weit darüber hinaus, wie sich z.B. an Sklaverei, medizinischen Studien ohne Wissen und/oder Einwilligung, rechtliche Entmündigung usw. nachvollziehen lässt.
[5] Journalistisch nachzuvollziehen u.a. Margrit Gerste, “Endlich: Vergewaltigung in der Ehe gilt künftig als Verbrechen” Die Zeit, 16 May 1997 (last accessed 16 January 2018) http://www.zeit.de/1997/21/ehe.txt.19970516.xml. Some readings on the topic: Ulrike Lembke ed., Regulierungen des Intimen. Sexualität und Recht im modernen Staat (Wiesbaden: Springer VS 2017).

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis
MeToo OLB in San Diego © 2017 Backbone Campaign, CC-BY 2.0.

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Villa, Paula-Irene: Frauen, das ohnmächtige Geschlecht? #Metoo und wir (2). In: Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 4, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-11099.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung
Moritz Hoffmann / Marko Demantowsky

Copyright (c) 2017 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.


Categories: 6 (2018) 4
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-11099

Tags: ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

Pin It on Pinterest