“Of Monsters and Men” – Shoah in Digital Games

“Of Monsters and Men“ – Shoah in digitalen Spielen


D-Day 1944, charging out of the landing-craft right into the chaotic hell of Omaha Beach. After only a few metres the screen goes dark, I have been shot – and not for the last time. Millions of players have had similar experiences recently. In only six months, the video game Call of Duty: World War II[1] has earned $1 billion in global sales.[2] This is because World War II functions well as a brand.[3]

Well-established “Bad Guys”

Players worldwide can easily orient themselves in these settings – the good and the bad are clearly defined, and we immediately recognize our allies and enemies. What is more, the Nazis are the well-established “bad guys” of our popular culture. Nothing personifies evil like an SS-officer.  It might therefore come as a surprise that the crimes of the Nazi regime are never mentioned in video games. This, however, is not noticed by the player as an omission, it just quietly rewrites the history of World War II in almost all video games using this theme.[4] Brett Robbins, creative director of Call of Duty: World War II intended, however, to change this by addressing those “very dark things”,[5] that distinguish this war from all others. Although he has partially succeeded in including, for example, the latent antisemitism of many American G.I.s, on the whole he has failed. Reference to the Holocaust is reduced to a short eleven second glimpse of a photograph of concentration camp prisoners.[6] The narrator does not even mention the Holocaust. A playable epilogue clearly evokes images of concentration camps but is explicitly staging a POW-camp. The protagonist of the game later mourns his dead comrades: “These were our guys – Take out your camera. The world ought to know”.

No Perpetual Consensus

World War II was not only the “deadliest conflict” in human history,[7] it was also a massive traumatic experience for millions of people, a colossal breach of taboo on so many levels, a moment of “absolute evil”.  And if you thought that the condemnation of the National Socialist regime and its crime would always remain a perpetual consensus, the European far right have proved that wrong: Alexander Gauland, leader of Alternative for Germany (AfD) recently dismissed the Nazi era as a “speck of bird poop” in German history and the Austrian minister of the interior, Herbert Kickl, sought – among other lapses – to “concentrate” refugees in centres. This shows the importance of a continuous process of collective remembrance. This commemoration is no longer restricted to schoolbooks, documentaries and memorial sites but also takes place in our popular culture. In an ideal situation, memory is kept alive in feature films, novels and plays on a regular basis, as modern societies negotiate their values and norms through popular culture.[8] Today, movies and graphic novels are accepted media for the memory of the Shoah. This has not always been the case. Steven Spielberg’s Schindler’s List (1993) was criticised massively at the time of its release in a similar way to the TV-Series ‘Holocaust’ (1978). It was feared that fiction films would trivialize and monetarize the Holocaust. Claude Lanzmann, director of the Shoah-series (1985) rejected Spielberg’s film in particular – their “fetishism of style and glamour”.[9] The dismissal of video games as an adequate media to depict the Holocaust has been argued along similar lines by others. James Hoberman once asked – relating to films: “Is it possible to make a feel-good entertainment about the ultimate feel-bad experience of the 20th century?”[10] The same can be asked about video games.

The line of decency

American film critic, Jordan Hoffman, summed this up as follows:

“Where the line of decency is drawn is somewhat dependent on whether you consider video games art, storytelling or a braindead way to kill time, blasting pixels in increasingly gross ways while memorizing movement patterns.”[11]

It is, of course, unthinkable to design a level in computer games, where players would storm a concentration camp with guns blazing and for good reason.[12] There are, however, other ways to remember the Holocaust in games,[13] even in first person shooters. These passages do not have to be interactive. To deny agency could be a powerful didactic instrument.

But we have on our hands an even more urgent question: What happens when the holocaust and the crimes against humanity of the Nazi regime and its allies are constantly omitted in video games set during World War II? The story-campaigns of such games tend to centre on tales of destruction and death, but even more importantly on heroes and camaraderie, which is similar to war movies of the immediate post-war period (such as “The longest day”). Worse still is the continuous trend to add multiplayer-modes to every first person shooter game, where players from around the globe can compete against each other in what appear to be sporting competitions. Here there is a danger that the Nazi regime can become depoliticized. The creators of Call of Duty: World War II must also have their doubts, because Michael Condrey of Sledgehammer Games declared: “You’ll never play as a Nazi, you will play as a German or other members of the Allied or Axis force.”[14]

“You will never play as a Nazi”: Call of Duty WWII, © 2017 Activision.

Good Wehrmacht vs. evil Nazis?

This naive distinction between “evil” Nazis and normal German soldiers clearly shows the limited reach of measures to educate people on the history of World War II, such as the German Wehrmachtausstellung, an exhibition that toured in Germany and Austria in 1995-1999 and 2001-2005 focussing on the crimes committed by the German army during World War II. Potentially, a lack of understanding and knowledge of historical events can dangerously depoliticise the events of  World War II.[15] While the Wehrmacht is still the traditional antagonist of first person shooters – the same cannot be said for strategic simulation games such as the Hearts of Iron series.  In this game, no player ever has to confront the crimes against humanity committed in the name of an inhuman ideology. World War II is effectively whitewashed. This is not only alarming, it is also a wasted opportunity. NGO’s worldwide and memorial sites are debating the future of our commemorative culture, seeking new ways to educate people who cannot be reached by traditional means, i.e. memorial sites, eyewitness discussions etc. especially the young.[16] Such games could be a way to reach them.

Digital games set during World War II must therefore find a new critical approach to the topic. With an ever-increasing reach, this new mass media wields increasing influence in our culture, and confers a certain responsibility on those producing it regarding our collective memory.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Chapman, Adam, and Jonas Linderoth. „Exploring the Limits of Play. A Case Study of Representations of Nazism in Games.“ In The Dark Side of Game Play: Controversial Issues in Playful Environments, edited by Torill Elvira Mortensen, Jonas Linderoth, and Ashley ML Brown, 137-153. London: Routledge, 2015.
  • Pfister, Eugen. „Das Unspielbare spielen – Imaginationen des Holocaust in Digitalen Spielen.“ Zeitgeschichte 4 (2016): 250-263.
  • Pfister, Eugen. „Ein ganz gewöhnlicher Krieg.“ WASD 13 (Juni 2018): 94-103.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] Call of Duty: World War II (Activision/Sledgehammer Games: US 2017).
[2] Charlie Hall, “Activision says Call of Duty: WWII sold twice as many copies as Infinite Warfare,“ polygon.com, 08.11.2017, https://www.polygon.com/2017/11/8/16625428/call-of-duty-wwii-sales-versus-infinite-warfare-activision> (last accessed 15 June 2018).
[3] Eugen Pfister, “Cold War Games™ Der Kalte -Krieg -Diskurs im digitalen Spiel,“ http://portal-militaergeschichte.de/pfister_coldwargames (last accessed 15 June 2018).
[4] Concerning the Alternate History Timeline of the actual Wolfenstein-games see my essay in the actual WASD magazine: Eugen Pfister, “Ein ganz gewöhnlicher Krieg,“ WASD Juni 2018, 94-103. A comprehensive analysis of previous attempts to imagine the holocaust in video games see Eugen Pfister, “Das Unspielbare spielen – Imaginationen des Holocaust in Digitalen Spielen,“ Zeitgeschichte 4 (2016), 250-263.
[5] Adam Rosenberg, “It looks like Jewish identity is a big piece of the ‘Call of Duty: WWII’ story,“ mashable.com, 18.09.2017 https://mashable.com/2017/09/18/call-of-duty-wwii-story-trailer/?europe=true#ChIwyCyXGiqR (last accessed 15 June 2018).
[6] See also Iris Traumann, “Kritik: Call of Duty: WWII – Der Soldat James Ryan und die kurze Lehrstunde über den Holocaust,“ historyinvideogames.com, 10.06.2018, https://historyinvideogames.com/2018/06/10/kritik-call-of-duty-wwii-der-soldat-james-ryan-und-die-kurze-lehrstunde-ueber-den-holocaust/ (last accessed 15 June 2018).
[7] From the Intro of Call of Duty: World War II.
[8] Concerning ideological transfers in video games see Eugen Pfister, “Der Politische Mythos als diskursive Aussage im digitalen Spiel. Ein Beitrag aus der Perspektive der Politikgeschichte,” Digitale Spiele im Diskurs, ed. Thorsten Junge, Claudia Schumacher (Hagen 2018), https://ub-deposit.fernuni-hagen.de/DSiD_Eugen_Pfister_politische_Mythos_digitale_Spiele_2018.pdf (last accessed 15 June 2018). Also see Thomas Sandkühler, “In Search of the Digital Past: ‘Historical Desire’ revisited,” Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 21, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-12190.
[9] Miriam Hansen, “‘Schindler’s List’ is not ‘Shoah’: the Second Commandement, Popular Modernism, and Public Memory,” Critical Inquiry 22/2 (Winter 1996), 292-312, 296.
[10] Ibid 297.
[11] Jordan Hoffman, “Major new game set at Nazi concentration camp is top seller,” timesofisrael.com 17.06.2014, http://www.timesofisrael.com/major-new-game-set-at-nazi-concentration-camp-is-top-seller (last accessed 15 June 2018).
[12] Michael McWerthor, “Concentration Camp Game was meant to be ‘Fun’,“ kotaku.com 10.12.2010, http://kotaku.com/5711317/concentration-camp-game-was-meant-to-be-fun  (last accessed 15 June 2018).
[13] See e.g. Gonzalo Frasca, “Ephemeral games: Is it barbaric to design videogames after Auschwitz?,“ http://www.ludology.org/articles/ephemeralFRASCA.pdf (last accessed 15 June 2018). Two recent video games, namely  “Attentat 1942: A World War II game through the eyes of survivors“ and “Through the darkest of Times: a historical resistance strategy game“ also show new ways to remember the crimes oft he Nazi regime in video games. See also: Felix Zimmermann, “Wider die Selbstzensur – Entwickler Jörg Friedrich und Johannes Kristmann im Interview,“ https://gespielt.hypotheses.org/1568 (last accessed 15 June 2018).
[14] “Call of Duty: Players Will Fight as Germans, Not Nazis in New WWII Game, Creators Say,“ haaretz.com 03.09.2017. https://www.haaretz.com/life/call-of-duty-players-will-fight-as-germans-not-nazis-1.5447872 (last accessed 15 June 2018).
[15] Steffen Bender, Virtuelles Erinnern. Kriege des 20. Jahrhunderts in Computerspielen (Bielefeld: transcript 2012), 144-152.
[16] Steffi de Jong, “Vortrag: ‘Von Hologrammen und sprechenden Füchsen – Holocausterinnerung 3.0’,” http://erinnern.hypotheses.org/465  (last accessed 15 June 2018).

_____________________

Image Credits

Besucher blicken am 08.05.2017 auf der re:publica (#rp17) in Berlin durch VR-Brillen © re:publica/Gregor Fischer, CC-BY-SA 2.0.

Recommended Citation

Pfister, Eugen:“Of Monsters and Men” – Shoah in Digital Games. In: Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 23, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-12271.

Editorial Responsibility

Moritz Hoffmann / Marko Demantowsky (Team Basel)

Copyright (c) 2018 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

Omaha Beach, D-Day 19 44: Todesmutig stürze ich mich aus dem Landungsboot, nur um nach wenigen Metern schon von einer Kugel tödlich getroffen zu werden. Millionen Spieler*innen tun und taten es mir gleich. Innerhalb nur eines halben Jahres erwirtschaftete Call of Duty: World War II[1] so einen Umsatz von einer Milliarde Dollar.[2] Der Zweite Weltkrieg funktioniert in der Populärkultur eben als historische Marke.[3] 

Intuitives Feindbild

Die Spieler*innen finden sich im Setting schnell zurecht – Gut und Böse sind klar definiert. Unmittelbar kann Freund*in von Feind*in unterschieden, der Antagonist bzw. die Antagonistin muss nicht umständlich eingeführt werden. Die Verbrechen des NS-Regimes, die industrialisierte Ermordung mehrerer Millionen Menschen, werden nicht erwähnt. Das Ungeheure des Zweiten Weltkriegs wird ausgespart, weggelassen, ebenso wie in allen anderen bisherigen Computerspielen, die den Zweiten Weltkrieg als Setting nutzten.[4] Dabei wollte Creative Director Brett Robbins diesmal explizit die “very dark things“,[5] die den Zweiten Weltkrieg von allen anderen Kriegen abhoben, im Spiel wissen. Und man muss ihm auch zugestehen, dass Call of Duty: World War II sich positiv von den Vorgänger-Spielen abhebt, indem es beispielsweise den latenten Antisemitismus innerhalb der amerikanischen Truppen thematisiert. Tatsächlich beschränkt sich die Erwähnung des Holocaust aber auf das Herzeigen einer (unkommentierten) Photographie eines KZ-Gefangenen mit aufgenähtem Judenstern in einer Cut-Scene.[6] Ein spielbarer Epilog nimmt dann zwar ganz eindeutige Anleihen an der Ikonographie eines Konzentrationslagers, im Spiel wird es aber als Kriegsgefangenenlager ausgewiesen. Während der Tod von Millionen Jüd*innen, Roma, Homosexuellen, und weiteren nicht einmal am Rande Erwähnung findet, wird im Spiel der Tod der eigenen Kameraden offen betrauert: “These were our guys – Take out your camera. The world ought to know“.

Keine historische Konstante

Der Zweite Weltkrieg war aber nicht nur der “deadliest conflict“[7] in der Geschichte der Menschheit, er war ein nie zuvor gesehener Tabubruch, das “wirklich Böse“ (Hannah Arendt). Der leichtfertige bis fahrlässige Umgang rechtspopulistischer Parteien mit dieser Vergangenheit zeigt uns auf erschreckende Weise, dass es sich bei der Verurteilung des Nationalsozialismus nicht um eine historische Konstante handelt, wenn der deutsche AFD-Politiker Gauland “Hitler und die Nazis […] nur [als] Vogelschiss in über 1.000 Jahren erfolgreicher deutscher Geschichte“ bezeichnet und in den Burschenschaften österreichischer Regierungsmitglieder nach wie vor deutsche Reichkriegsfahnen hängen und antisemitische Lieder gegrölt werden.

Das notwendige kollektive Erinnern geschieht nicht alleine in Schulbüchern, Gedenkstätten und Fernsehdokumentationen, es reproduziert sich vor allem in unserer Populärkultur, in welcher wir auf täglicher Basis unsere kollektiven Werte diskursiv verhandeln.[8] Jedes Jahr erscheinen Filme, Romane und Theaterstücke, die so die Erinnerung an die Shoah im kollektiven Gedächtnis wach halten. Das war nicht immer so. Schindlers Liste (1993) wurde – wie schon zuvor der NBC-Serie Holocaust (1978) – eine Trivialisierung des Themas vorgeworfen. Claude Lanzmann – Regisseur von Shoah (1985) – war einer der vehementesten Kritiker von Spielbergs Film. Kritikpunkt war vor allem das Medium Spielfilm und seine Unterhaltungslogik.[9] Die Ablehnung von Darstellungen des Holocaust in Spielen stößt zumeist in eine ähnliche Richtung. Frei nach James Hoberman[10] lässt sich fragen: Kann es möglich sein, dass ein Unterhaltungsprodukt, das Spaß machen soll, den Holocaust würdig thematisieren kann?

Der Journalist Jordan Hoffman fasst den zentralen Kritikpunkt in einem Artikel plakativ zusammen:

“Where the line of decency is drawn is somewhat dependent on whether you consider video games art, storytelling or a braindead way to kill time, blasting pixels in increasingly gross ways while memorizing movement patterns.”[11]

Interaktiv Auschwitz befreien?

Die “Befreiung“ eines KZ als waffenstrotzender First Person Shooter ist aus gutem Grund unvorstellbar.[12] Aber – auch wenn der anhaltende Trend zu FPS es nicht glauben  lässt – das Potenzial alternativer spielerischer Möglichkeiten ist noch nicht ausgeschöpft.[13] Eine Thematisierung des Holocaust in Spielen zum Zweiten Weltkrieg müsste nicht notgedrungen in interaktiven Passagen geschehen, denn gerade eine vorübergehende Aufhebung der spielerischen Agency könnte einen starken didaktischen Moment darstellen.

Dringender noch als die Frage, ob sich der Holocaust verantwortungsvoll in Spielen thematisieren lässt, ist aktuell aber die Frage, was denn passiert, wenn er ausgespart wird. Ähnlich den Kriegsfilmen der unmittelbaren Nachkriegszeit (z.B. “Der längste Tag“) wird heute in den “Story“-Kampagnen der Spiele bildgewaltig von Tod und Zerstörung erzählt, vor allem aber von tapferen Helden und Kameradschaft. Noch bedenklicher ist, dass mittlerweile jedes Spiel mit einem Multiplayer-Modus ausgestattet wird: Das heißt, dass Spieler*innen online als Deutsche und Alliierte in kurzen virtuellen Gefechten gegeneinander antreten. Hier entsteht der Eindruck eines entpolitisierten sportlichen Wettkampfes. Ganz wohl bei dem Gedanken dürfte den Entwickler*innen nicht gewesen sein, denn Michael Condrey von Sledgehammer Games erklärte dazu: “You’ll never play as a Nazi, you will play as a German or other members of the Allied or Axis forces.“[14]

“You will never play as a Nazi”: Call of Duty WWII, © 2017 Activision.

30 Jahre Latenz

Daran zeigt sich, dass die Reichweite der Wehrmachtausstellung und der daran anschließenden Diskussionen bisher vor allem auf den deutschsprachigen Raum beschränkt blieb. Was geschieht ist eine bewusste oder unbewusste “Entpolitisierung“[15] des Zweiten Weltkriegs. Zwar ist die Wehrmacht weiterhin Antagonist in vielen Spielen (für Strategiesimulationen wie die Hearts of Iron-Reihe gilt diese Regel schon nicht mehr), aber mit den Verbrechen des NS-Regimes müssen sich die Spieler*innen zu keinem Zeitpunkt kritisch auseinandersetzen. Das ist nicht nur bedenklich, es ist auch eine verschenkte Chance. Denn innerhalb der Gedenkarbeit wird in den letzten Jahren eifrig diskutiert, wie die Zukunft der Erinnerungskultur aussehen könne.[16] Gesucht werden vor allem Möglichkeiten, jene anzusprechen, die auf herkömmlichen Wege nicht erreicht wurden, insbesondere Jugendliche.

Digitale Spiele, die den Zweiten Weltkrieg als Hintergrund verwenden, müssten deshalb in Zukunft einen neuen kritischen Zugang zur Darstellung des NS-Regimes und seiner Verbrechen finden, abseits von der simplen Zensurierung von NS-Symbolik. Mit der ständig wachsenden Reichweite des Massenmediums Digitales Spiel wächst nämlich auch sein Einfluss auf unsere kollektiven Geschichtsbilder.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Chapman, Adam, and Jonas Linderoth. “Exploring the Limits of Play. A Case Study of Representations of Nazism in Games.“ In The Dark Side of Game Play: Controversial Issues in Playful Environments, edited by Torill Elvira Mortensen, Jonas Linderoth, and Ashley ML Brown, 137-153. London: Routledge, 2015.
  • Pfister, Eugen. “Das Unspielbare spielen – Imaginationen des Holocaust in Digitalen Spielen.“ Zeitgeschichte 4 (2016): 250-263.
  • Pfister, Eugen. “Ein ganz gewöhnlicher Krieg.“ WASD 13 (Juni 2018): 94-103.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] Call of Duty: World War II (Activision/Sledgehammer Games: US 2017).
[2] Charlie Hall, “Activision says Call of Duty: WWII sold twice as many copies as Infinite Warfare,“ polygon.com, 08.11.2017, https://www.polygon.com/2017/11/8/16625428/call-of-duty-wwii-sales-versus-infinite-warfare-activision> (letzter Zugriff 15. Juni 2018).
[3] Eugen Pfister, “Cold War Games™ Der Kalte -Krieg -Diskurs im digitalen Spiel,“ http://portal-militaergeschichte.de/pfister_coldwargames (letzter Zugriff 15. Juni 2018).
[4] Zur Alternativweltgeschichte der jüngsten Wolfenstein-Spiele siehe meinen Essay im aktuellen WASD-Magazin: Eugen Pfister, “Ein ganz gewöhnlicher Krieg,“ WASD Juni 2018, 94-103. Eine ausführlichere Behandlung bisheriger Versuche den Holocaust in Spiele einzubauen findet sich hier: Eugen Pfister, “Das Unspielbare spielen – Imaginationen des Holocaust in Digitalen Spielen,“ Zeitgeschichte 4 (2016), 250-263.
[5] Adam Rosenberg, “It looks like Jewish identity is a big piece of the ‘Call of Duty: WWII’ story,“ mashable.com 18.09.2017 https://mashable.com/2017/09/18/call-of-duty-wwii-story-trailer/?europe=true#ChIwyCyXGiqR (letzter Zugriff 15. Juni 2018).
[6] Siehe auch Iris Traumann, “Kritik: Call of Duty: WWII – Der Soldat James Ryan und die kurze Lehrstunde über den Holocaust,“ historyinvideogames.com 10.06.2018, https://historyinvideogames.com/2018/06/10/kritik-call-of-duty-wwii-der-soldat-james-ryan-und-die-kurze-lehrstunde-ueber-den-holocaust/ (letzter Zugriff 15. Juni 2018).
[7] Aus dem Intro von Call of Duty: World War II.
[8] Zu Ideologien in digitalen Spielen siehe Eugen Pfister, “Der Politische Mythos als diskursive Aussage im digitalen Spiel. Ein Beitrag aus der Perspektive der Politikgeschichte,” Digitale Spiele im Diskurs, ed. Thorsten Junge, Claudia Schumacher (Hagen 2018), https://ub-deposit.fernuni-hagen.de//DSiD_Eugen_Pfister_politische_Mythos_digitale_Spiele_2018.pdf (letzter Zugriff 15. Juni 2018). Siehe auch Thomas Sandkühler, “In Search of the Digital Past: ‘Historical Desire’ revisited,” Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 21, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-12190.
[9] Miriam Hansen, “‘Schindler’s List’ is not ‘Shoah’: the Second Commandement, Popular Modernism, and Public Memory,” Critical Inquiry 22/2 (Winter 1996), 292-312, 296.
[10] Ibid 297.
[11] Jordan Hoffman, “Major new game set at Nazi concentration camp is top seller,” timesofisrael.com 17.06.2014, http://www.timesofisrael.com/major-new-game-set-at-nazi-concentration-camp-is-top-seller (letzter Zugriff 15. Juni 2018).
[12] Michael McWerthor, “Concentration Camp Game was meant to be ‘Fun’,“ kotaku.com 10.12.2010, http://kotaku.com/5711317/concentration-camp-game-was-meant-to-be-fun  (letzter Zugriff 15. Juni 2018).
[13] Siehe z.B. Gonzalo Frasca, “Ephemeral games: Is it barbaric to design videogames after Auschwitz?,“ http://www.ludology.org/articles/ephemeralFRASCA.pdf (letzter Zugriff 15. Juni 2018). Zwei rezente Spiele, nämlich “Attentat 1942: A World War II game through the eyes of survivors“ and “Through the darkest of Times: a historical resistance strategy game“ zeigen neue Wege, die Verbrechen des NS-Regime verantwortungsvoll in digitalen Spielen zu thematisieren. Siehe dazu auch: Felix Zimmermann, “Wider die Selbstzensur – Entwickler Jörg Friedrich und Johannes Kristmann im Interview,“ https://gespielt.hypotheses.org/1568 (letzter Zugriff 15. Juni 2018).
[14] “Call of Duty: Players Will Fight as Germans, Not Nazis in New WWII Game, Creators Say,“ haaretz.com 03.09.2017. https://www.haaretz.com/life/call-of-duty-players-will-fight-as-germans-not-nazis-1.5447872 (letzter Zugriff 15. Juni 2018).
[15] Steffen Bender, Virtuelles Erinnern. Kriege des 20. Jahrhunderts in Computerspielen (Bielefeld: transcript 2012), 144-152.
[16] Steffi de Jong, “Vortrag: ‘Von Hologrammen und sprechenden Füchsen – Holocausterinnerung 3.0’,” http://erinnern.hypotheses.org/465  (letzter Zugriff 15. Juni 2018).

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Zwei Besucher blicken am 08.05.2017 auf der re:publica (#rp17) in Berlin durch VR-Brillen © re:publica/Gregor Fischer, CC-BY-SA 2.0.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Pfister, Eugen: “Of Monsters and Men“ – Shoah in digitalen Spielen. In: Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 23, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-12271.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Moritz Hoffmann / Marko Demantowsky (Team Basel)

Copyright (c) 2018 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.


Categories: 6 (2018) 23
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-12271

Tags: , , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest