The Digital Archive: An In-school Place of Learning

Das digitale Archiv als innerschulischer Lernort


Digitisation projects in the humanities have democratised access to sources in recent years. Museums, libraries and archives place their holdings of texts, films and images on the scanner and put them — available to everyone — online. However, this cost-intensive process only makes sense if teaching the skills required to break down digital offerings keeps pace with technological developments.

The Gap between Production and Use

In recent years, digitisation has advanced much more dynamically in many collection-holding institutions than it has in the German education system. Through a constantly increasing number of individual projects, central institutions such as the German Federal Archive,[1] but also regional providers such as university libraries[2] and state archives[3] now provide a range of resources and digital data. Their merging and usability is being discussed primarily in the context of research. Schools and history didactics in Germany understand archives and historical museums mainly as out-of-school places of learning.[4] By contrast, their Open Access policies receive little attention when it comes to historical learning in a digital world. Most of the efforts to develop new educational services flow into learning platforms and digital textbooks.

Googling Sources

Instead, digitally available sources are unsystematically googled: whether for teaching or university seminars, the collection of material for examinations and central grammar school examinations or for home assignments in history studies. At the same time, German teachers are highly skeptical about the educational benefits of digital media: according to the Bertelsmann Stiftung’s current “Digital Education Monitor” (2017), only one in four teachers believe that digital media contribute to improving student learning. School principals and teachers see the chances of digital change chiefly in being able to cope better with administrative tasks. On the other hand, the majority of students are interested in changes being made in schools. Eighty-two percent recommend that their teachers “try out something new with digital media more frequently.”[5] So how about holding a class in the digital archive or the digital library?

Teaching source criticism in the digital age has long since concerned the subject as a whole, not least affected teaching and research at universities. The debates on the “digital turn” initiated by the Association of German Historians have also been exploring for some time how “more and more in-depth competencies in both classical source criticism and media criticism” can be attained under the conditions of Open Access. [6]

Digitised Sources in the Classroom

Targeted research and indexing digitised sources can easily be carried out in the computer pool or by tablet in the class- and seminar room. Access to digital collections meaningfully complements the handling of sources in history textbooks or the scientific paper, which usually requires no reproduction of sources. Digitised sources create greater proximity to the original and are thus conducive to conveying history in a way that is critical of sources and traditions. Following the concept of out-of-school places of learning, archives, libraries and history museums could now also be visited as In-school Places of Learning. Their collections, “displayed” on-screen, could also enable explorative learning in the classroom.[7]

Rescuing Curiosity and Interest

The targeted use of digital collections can also rescue a research interest that is currently suffering from and being damaged massively by unguided search requests. These frustrate pupils because of the vast amount of irrelevant or surplus Google hits. In my university seminars and through a pilot project at two grammar schools, however, I have found that research in digital image archives once again leads university students and schoolchildren back to questions about the context in which sources originated and were handed down. Holding classes in the digital archive also opened their eyes to the availability and subsequent treatment of photographs in textbooks and other media. Fruitful discussions arose on how the selection of sources can shape historical ideas and obscure perception.

Ideally, everyone should also get to know a physical archive. However, even at universities in Germany, the reality is often that there is a lack of financial resources, time and opportunities. Working with digitised tradition will most probably not close this gap, but will at least help to narrow it by providing students with the skills needed to research sources and develop a critical understanding of history.[8]

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Nygren, Thomas. “Students Writing History Using Traditional and Digital Archives,” Human IT 12, no. 3 (2014): 78-116.
  • Pallaske, Christoph. “Digital anders? Geschichtslernen mit digitalen Medien – ein Zwischenstand nach zwanzig Jahren,” Geschichte für heute 10, no. 1 (2017): 10-25.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] See, among others, the digital image archive of the German Federal Archives: http://www.bild.bundesarchiv.de. See also the Netherlands Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies (NIOD): https://beeldbankwo2.nl/nl/ (last accessed 25 May 2018).
[2] See, for instance, the digital collections at Regensburg University: http://digital.bib-bvb.de//R/DXC7FKSAIHEPRETG7IK6J44PS5EMN31Y7TAAGSR1UE3FBIF848-00717?local_base=UBR&pds_handle=GUEST and at the Bavarian State Library: https://www.digitale-sammlungen.de (last accessed 25 May 2018).
[3] One example is the State Archive of Thuringia: https://archive.thulb.uni-jena.de/staatsarchive/templates/master/template_stat2/index.xml (last accessed 25 May 2018).
[4] On the typology of out-of-school places of learning, see most recently Christian Kuchler, Historische Orte im Geschichtsunterricht (Methoden historischen Lernens) (Schwalbach/Ts: Wochenschau, 2012).
[5] Bertelsmann Stiftung, ed., Monitor Digitale Bildung. Die Schulen im digitalen Zeitalter, pp. 6 and 15. http://www.bertelsmann-stiftung.de/de/publikationen/publikation/did/monitor-digitale-bildung-9/ (last accessed 25 May 2018).
[6] Frank Bösch and Eva Schlotheuber, “Historisches Handwerkszeug im Digitalen Zeitalter,” in Historische Grundwissenschaften und die digitale Herausforderung (Historisches Forum 18) ed. Rüdiger Hohls, Claudia Prinz, and Eva Schlotheuber (Berlin: Humboldt-Universität, 2016), 7-15, esp. 15. https://edoc.hu-berlin.de/bitstream/handle/18452/19491/HistFor_18-2016.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y (last accessed 25 May 2018).
[7] Anke John, “’Ich brauche ein Titelbild für meine Mappe.’ Bildgestützte Internetrecherche und historisches Bildverstehen,” in Medien machen Geschichte. Neue Anforderungen an den geschichtsdidaktischen Medienbegriff im digitalen Wandel (Geschichtsdidaktische Studien 2)  ed. Christoph Pallaske (Berlin: Logos, 2015), 115-131. https://www.academia.edu/21442715/Anke_John_Ich_brauche_ein_Titelbild_für_meine_Mappe._Bildgestützte_Internetrecherche_und_historisches_Bildverstehen._In_Christoph_Pallaske_Hrsg_Medien_machen_Geschichte._Neue_Anforderungen_an_den_geschichtsdidaktischen_Medienbegriff_im_digitalen_Wandel._Berlin_2015_S._115-131 (last accessed 25 May 2018).
[8] See also John Rosinbum’s report on his experiences: Teaching with Digital Archives. http://blog.historians.org/2017/11/teaching-with-digital-archives/ (last accessed 25 May 2018).

_____________________

Image Credits

The magnificent choir book of Albrecht V. on the scanner at the Bavarian State Library © Bavarian State Library Munich 2018, use credited at 29 May 2018.

Recommended Citation

John, Anke: The Digital Archive: An In-school Place of Learning. In: Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 22, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-12235

Editorial Responsibility

Marco Zerwas / Marko Demantowsky (Team Basel)

Copyright (c) 2018 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

Digitalisierungsprojekte in den Geisteswissenschaften haben den Zugang zu Quellen in den letzten Jahren demokratisiert. Museen, Bibliotheken und Archive legen ihre Bestände an Texten, Filmen und Bildern auf den Scanner und stellen diese – für jedermann verfügbar – ins Netz. Das kostenintensive Verfahren erscheint jedoch nur dann sinnvoll, wenn auch die Vermittlung der Fähigkeiten Schritt hält, die zur Aufschlüsselung des digitalen Angebots notwendig sind.

Kluft zwischen Produktion und Nutzung

In vielen sammlungshaltenden Institutionen ist die Digitalisierung in den letzten Jahren sehr viel dynamischer verlaufen als im deutschen Bildungssystem. Durch eine beständig gestiegene Zahl von Einzelprojekten stellen zentrale Einrichtungen wie das Deutsche Bundesarchiv,[1] aber auch regionale Anbieter wie Universitätsbibliotheken[2] und Landesarchive[3] eine Reihe von Ressourcen und digitale Daten zur Verfügung. Deren Zusammenführung und Nutzbarkeit wird hierzulande vor allem forschungsorientiert diskutiert. Schule und Geschichtsdidaktik in Deutschland verstehen Archive und historische Museen in erster Linie als zu besuchende außerschulische Lernorte.[4] Deren Open-Access-Politik findet dagegen kaum Beachtung, wenn es um historisches Lernen in einer digitalen Welt geht. Die meisten Anstrengungen in der Entwicklung neuer Vermittlungsangebote fließen in Lernplattformen und digitale Schulbücher.

Quellen googeln

Allerorten werden stattdessen digital zur Verfügung gestellte Quellen unsystematisch gegoogelt: ob für den Unterricht oder das Universitätsseminar, die Materialsammlung für Prüfungen und Zentralabitur oder für die Hausarbeit im Geschichtsstudium. Zugleich ist die Skepsis unter deutschen Lehrer*innen bei der Beurteilung des pädagogischen Nutzens digitaler Medien besonders groß: Nur jeder vierte glaubt dem aktuellen “Monitor Digitale Bildung” der Bertelsmann Stiftung (2017) zufolge, dass digitale Medien dazu beitragen, die Lernergebnisse ihrer Schüler*innen zu verbessern. Schulleiter*innen und Lehrkräfte sehen die Chancen des digitalen Wandels hauptsächlich darin, administrative Aufgaben besser bewältigen zu können. Dagegen steht ein mehrheitliches Interesse der Schüler*innen an Veränderung in der Schule. 82 Prozent empfehlen ihren Lehrer*innen “häufiger etwas Neues mit digitalen Medien auszuprobieren”.[5] Wie wäre es also mit einem Unterrichtsgang ins digitale Archiv oder in die digitale Bibliothek?

Die Ausbildung von Quellenkritik in digitalen Zeiten betrifft dabei mit Lehre und Forschung an den Universitäten längst das Fach als Ganzes. So wird auch in den vom Deutschen Historikerverband angestoßenen Debatten zur “digitalen Wende” seit längerem diskutiert, wie unter den Bedingungen von Open Access “mehr und vertiefte Kompetenzen sowohl in der klassischen Quellenkritik als auch der Medienkritik”[6] zu erreichen sind.

Digitalisate im Klassenzimmer

Eine gezielte Recherche und Erschließung digitalisierter Quellen ist im Computerpool oder per Tablet im Klassen- und Seminarraum leicht zu bewerkstelligen. Der Zugang zu digitalen Sammlungen ergänzt die Quellenbearbeitung im Schulgeschichtsbuch oder den in der Regel ohne Quellenabdruck auskommenden wissenschaftlichen Aufsatz auf eine sinnvolle Art und Weise. Digitalisate schaffen eine größere Nähe zum Original und sind insofern einer quellen- und überlieferungskritischen Geschichtsvermittlung förderlich. Im Anschluss an das Konzept der außerschulischen Lernorte könnten Archive, Bibliotheken und historische Museen daher nun ebenfalls als innerschulische Lernorte aufgesucht werden. Ihre am Bildschirm “ausgestellten“ Bestände ermöglichen forschend-entdeckendes Lernen auch im Klassenzimmer.[7]

Neugier und Interesse retten

Die gezielte Nutzung digitaler Sammlungen vermag auch ein Rechercheinteresse zu retten, das derzeit massiv unter nicht angeleiteten Suchaufträgen leidet und beschädigt wird. Diese frustrieren die Schüler*innen aufgrund der Unmengen an irrelevanten oder überzähligen Google-Treffern. In meinen Seminaren an der Universität und durch ein Pilotprojekt an zwei Gymnasien konnte ich dagegen feststellen, dass Recherchen in digitalen Bildarchiven Student*innen und Schüler*innen wieder zum Fragen nach dem Entstehungs- und Überlieferungskontext von Quellen hinführten. Der Unterrichtsgang ins digitale Archiv öffnete auch ihren Blick für die Verfügbarkeit und nachträgliche Bearbeitung von Fotos in Schulbüchern und anderen Medien. Es ergaben sich gute Diskussionen darüber, wie die Auswahl von Quellen Geschichtsvorstellungen prägen und Wahrnehmung verstellen kann.

Idealerweise sollte jeder auch ein physisches Archiv kennenlernen. Die Realität jedoch sieht selbst an Universitäten in Deutschland oft so aus, dass es dafür an finanziellen Mitteln, an Zeit und an Gelegenheiten mangelt. Die Arbeit mit digitalisierter Überlieferung könnte diese Lücke zwar nicht schließen, aber wenigstens verkleinern helfen, indem sie Schüler*Innen und Student*innen Fähigkeiten vermittelt, die sie für Quellenrecherchen und ein kritisches Geschichtsverständnis benötigen.[8]

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Nygren, Thomas. “Students Writing History Using Traditional and Digital Archives,” Human IT 12, no. 3 (2014): 78-116.
  • Pallaske, Christoph. “Digital anders? Geschichtslernen mit digitalen Medien – ein Zwischenstand nach zwanzig Jahren,” Geschichte für heute 10, no. 1 (2017): 10-25.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] So u.a. das digitale Bildarchiv des Bundesarchivs: http://www.bild.bundesarchiv.de oder des Niederländischen Instituts für Kriegs-, Holocaust- und Genozidstudien (NIOD): https://beeldbankwo2.nl/nl/ (letzter Zugriff 25.5.2018).
[2] Wie beispielsweise die digitalen Sammlungen der Universität Regensburg: http://digital.bib-bvb.de//R/DXC7FKSAIHEPRETG7IK6J44PS5EMN31Y7TAAGSR1UE3FBIF848-00717?local_base=UBR&pds_handle=GUEST und der Bayerischen Staatsbibliothek: https://www.digitale-sammlungen.de (letzter Zugriff 25.5.2018).
[3] Exemplarisch etwa das Landesarchiv Thüringen: https://archive.thulb.uni-jena.de/staatsarchive/templates/master/template_stat2/index.xml (letzter Zugriff 25.5.2018).
[4] Zur Typologie außerschulischer Lernorte zuletzt Christian Kuchler, Historische Orte im Geschichtsunterricht (Methoden historischen Lernens) (Schwalbach/Ts: Wochenschau, 2012).
[5] Bertelsmann Stiftung, ed., Monitor Digitale Bildung. Die Schulen im digitalen Zeitalter, pp. 6 and 15. http://www.bertelsmann-stiftung.de/de/publikationen/publikation/did/monitor-digitale-bildung-9/ (letzter Zugriff 25.5.2018).
[6] Frank Bösch and Eva Schlotheuber, “Historisches Handwerkszeug im Digitalen Zeitalter,” in Historische Grundwissenschaften und die digitale Herausforderung (Historisches Forum 18) ed. Rüdiger Hohls, Claudia Prinz, and Eva Schlotheuber (Berlin: Humboldt-Universität, 2016), 7-15, zit. 15. https://edoc.hu-berlin.de/bitstream/handle/18452/19491/HistFor_18-2016.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y (letzter Zugriff 25.5.2018).
[7] Anke John, “’Ich brauche ein Titelbild für meine Mappe.’ Bildgestützte Internetrecherche und historisches Bildverstehen,” in Medien machen Geschichte. Neue Anforderungen an den geschichtsdidaktischen Medienbegriff im digitalen Wandel (Geschichtsdidaktische Studien 2)  ed. Christoph Pallaske (Berlin: Logos, 2015), 115-131. https://www.academia.edu/21442715/Anke_John_Ich_brauche_ein_Titelbild_für_meine_Mappe._Bildgestützte_Internetrecherche_und_historisches_Bildverstehen._In_Christoph_Pallaske_Hrsg_Medien_machen_Geschichte._Neue_Anforderungen_an_den_geschichtsdidaktischen_Medienbegriff_im_digitalen_Wandel._Berlin_2015_S._115-131 (letzter Zugriff 25.5.2018).
[8] Siehe auch den Erfahrungsbericht von John Rosinbum: Teaching with Digital Archives. http://blog.historians.org/2017/11/teaching-with-digital-archives/ (letzter Zugriff 25.5.2018).

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Das Prachtchorbuch Albrechts V. auf dem Scanner der Bayerischen Staatsbibliothek © Bayerische Staatsbibliothek München 2018, Nutzung gewährt am 29. Mai 2018. 

Empfohlene Zitierweise

John, Anke: Das digitale Archiv als innerschulischer Lernort. In: Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 22, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-12235.

Translated by Mark Kyburz

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Marco Zerwas / Marko Demantowsky (Team Basel)

Copyright (c) 2018 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.


Categories: 6 (2018) 22
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-12235

Tags: , ,

Pin It on Pinterest