Stamps Influence and Mirror Public History

Briefmarken beeinflussen und spiegeln Public History

"Basler Taube"

History is everywhere – but it is not always easy to perceive it. A sharpened view is needed as the example of the “stamp” illustrates. Stamps are in fact an ideal window into history. But now they are slowly disappearing from our daily lives. Emailing takes the place of the writing of letters. Value prints made by machine replace the artfully designed stamps. The latter themselves become history. It is thus high time to call back into memory the cultural asset “stamp”.

Exciting History

And indeed, these days stamps have again become a topic of discussion in history sciences[1] as well as in Public History[2] or in school history lessons.[3] There we get to know that the recepient originally had to pay the postman, but the former did not always do so and therefore the idea came up that the sender should pay for the costs in advance, and this by means of a stick-on postal stamp. From the very beginning they showed people. Thus, in Great Britain in 1840 the first stamp ever issued in the world portrayed the 21-year-old Queen Victoria.[4]

Very soon the emerging nation states in Europe recognized the importance of stamps for the dissemination of identity-creating motifs, and to the present day stamps have been carriers of propaganda.[5] Stamps also influence how the broad public deals with history, if, for example, selected cultural heritages such as castles or historical monuments are depicted and thus made known more widely.[6] And of particular interest in this context are the questions about the institutions or actors: Who, in what way, decides what is printed onto the stamp?

Expensive Passion

Already soon many people were captivated by the aesthetics and symbolism of stamps. The postage stamps became collectible items which could be sorted according to different aspects, for example by motifs, countries – and, of course, along the chronology, which makes it obvious that stamps can be used as historical sources. The passion for collecting let the prices of rare stamps explode so that nowadays for certain selected stamps – like for the “Basle Pigeon” (pictured in the top middle of the Swiss map above) – high six-digit Swiss franc and euro amounts, respectively, are paid.

Attracting Attention

If something is expensive, it automatically attracts attention – that is also the case with Public History, and the Berne Museum for Communication plays with this notion when entitling its new stamp exhibition “Extreme”:

“Extremely expensive! At the Museum for Communication a show of the superlative can be watched from 2 March to 8 July 2018: The 50 most important pearls from the first years of issuing Swiss stamps are exhibited. Altogether they are worth several million Swiss Francs.”[7]

Now, also in Public History there is, of course, only in exceptional circumstances, the possibility of directing the perception of people towards history in this way. Nevertheless, this must somehow happen, because only if people direct their attention towards history, history becomes public, Public History can succeed, and historical construction of meaning can succeed at all: As is well known, perception is the first activity of historical construction of meaning.[8]

Gaining Perception

As part of its biological endowment, our perceptual system now apparently possesses selected categories of meaning, of which “valuable – worthless” seems to be one. These categories of our perception of the world are, as it were, the docking sites for the information provided by our senses.[9] There is much to suggest that the mental structure consisting of seven interrelated double structures[10] and referred to as “historical consciousness” by Hans-Jürgen Pandel gives structure to our history-oriented perception of the world. Thus, this model can then provide clues to us history teachers in schools and public historians as to how to gain attention.

“Cultural heritage” as a Magic Word

As regards stamps, this works nowadays. Stamps obviously address several aspects of our historical consciousness, captivate our perception and attract attention. They appear “valuable”, “real”, “from yesterday”, “made by humans”, “significant”, “symbolic” to us – in short: they approach us as “cultural heritage” which needs to be protected, preserved, saved and made accessible.[11] Thus, stamps represent an interesting development. They were created as objects of a present that referred to history. Now they have become objects of the past which bear witness of former human creative power. Historical culture became cultural heritage. Public History and history education in schools needs to deal with both.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Müller, Burkhard. Verschollene Länder: Eine Weltgeschichte in Briefmarken. Lüneburg: Verlag zu Klampen, 2013.
  • Ferri, Marino. Schweizer Briefmarken erzählen: Die Visualisierung nationaler Wertvorstellungen auf Schweizer Briefmarken 1850-1950. Rapperswil: swiss stamp show GmbH, 2015.
  • Fuchs, Karin, Hans Utz, and Peter Gautschi. Gezähnt und gestempelt: Briefmarken als Fenster zur Schweizer Geschichte und zur Geschichtskultur. Ein kompetenzorientiertes Lehrmittel für die Sekundarstufen I und II. Luzern: Lehrmittelzentrale des Kantons Luzern, 2018.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] Cf. also the conference report: Gezähnte Geschichte: Die Briefmarke als historische Quelle, 12.10.2017 – 15.10.2017 Erfurt, in: H-Soz-Kult, 28.02.2018, www.hsozkult.de/conferencereport (last accessed 19 March 2018).
[2] Cf. also the exhibition: “EXTREM – 175 Jahre Schweizer Briefmarken” vom 2. März bis 8. Juli 2018 im Museum für Kommunikation Bern, www.mfk.ch/ausstellungen (last accessed 19 March 2018).
[3] Cf. also for example: Karin Fuchs, Hans Utz und Peter Gautschi. Gezähnt und gestempelt: Briefmarken als Fenster zur Schweizer Geschichte und zur Geschichtskultur. Ein kompetenzorientiertes Lehrmittel für die Sekundarstufen I und II. (Luzern: Lehrmittelzentrale des Kantons Luzern, 2018), www.shop.lmvdmz.lu.ch (last accessed 19 March 2018).
[4] Cf. also www.wikipedia.org/Penny_Black (last accessed 19 March 2018).
[5] Cf. also e.g. different newspaper reports dealing with the new stamps issued in North Korea, for example Martin Belam, “North Korean stamps commemorate Hwasong-15 missile launch,” The Guardian, 29 December 2017, www.theguardian.com (last accessed 19 March 2018).
[6] The Swiss Pro Patria Foundation has issued stamps with the motto “use the heritage – create the future” since 1938, www.propatria.ch (last accessed 19 March 2018).
[7] Like footnote 2.
[8] Jörn Rüsen, Historik: Theorie der Geschichtswissenschaft (Köln, Weimar, Wien: Böhlau Verlag, 2013), 35.
[9] Rainer Mausfeld, “Wahrnehmungspsychologie: Geschichte und Ansätze,” in Handwörterbuch Allgemeine Psychologie. Kognition, ed. Joachim Funke, Peter A. Frensch (Göttingen: Hogrefe, 2006), 97-107.
[10] Hans-Jürgen Pandel, “Dimensionen des Geschichtsbewusstseins: Ein Versuch, seine Struktur für Empirie und Pragmatik diskutierbar zu machen,” in Geschichtsdidaktik. Probleme, Projekte, Perspektiven Bd. 12, H. 2, 1987, 130–142, www.sowi-online.de (last accessed 19 März 2018)
[11] Cf. also the project “Cultural heritage for everybody”, www.kulturerbefueralle.ch (last accessed 19 March 2018).

_____________________

Image Credits

“Basler Taube” © Cover picture of the textbook “Gezähnt und gestempelt. Briefmarken als Fenster zur Schweizer Geschichte und zur Geschichtskultur”. The picture shows a number of Swiss stamps which are highlighted in color within the contours of the Swiss border. The “Basle Pigeon” for which high six-digit Swiss franc and euro amounts, respectively, are paid can be recognized in the middle. The map was designed by Urs Bernet of “Die Büchermacher”, Zürich. Karin Fuchs, Hans Utz, Peter Gautschi: Gezähnt und gestempelt. Briefmarken als Fenster zur Schweizer Geschichte und zur Geschichtskultur. Ein kompetenzorientiertes Lehrmittel für die Sekundarstufen I und II. Luzern: Lehrmittelzentrale des Kantons Luzern, 2018.

Recommended Citation

Gautschi, Peter: Briefmarken beeinflussen und spiegeln Public History. In: Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 12, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-11478

Translated by Kurt Brügger swissamericanlanguageexpert

Editorial Responsibility

Rachel Huber/Christian Bunnenberg

Copyright (c) 2018 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

Geschichte ist überall – aber es ist nicht immer einfach, sie wahrzunehmen. Es braucht dafür einen geschärften Blick, wie das Beispiel “Briefmarke” zeigt. Briefmarken sind nämlich ein ideales Fenster in die Geschichte. Nun aber verschwinden sie langsam aus unserem Alltag. Das Mailen löst das Briefeschreiben ab. Maschinell gefertigte Wertdrucke ersetzen die kunstvoll gestalteten Briefmarken. Diese werden selber zur Geschichte. Allerhöchste Zeit also, das Kulturgut “Briefmarke” wieder in Erinnerung zu rufen.

Spannende Geschichte

Und in der Tat werden heute Briefmarken sowohl in den Geschichtswissenschaften[1] als auch in der Public History[2] oder der schulischen Geschichtsvermittlung[3] neu thematisiert. Da erfahren wir, dass ursprünglich die EmpfängerInnen den Postboten bezahlen mussten, dies aber nicht immer taten, weshalb die Idee aufkam, dass die SenderInnen die Kosten im Voraus tragen sollten, und zwar mit aufgeklebten Postwertzeichen. Diese bildeten von allem Anfang an auch Menschen ab. So war auf der ersten Briefmarke der Welt 1840 in Großbritannien die 21-jährige Königin Victoria abgebildet.[4]

Schon bald erkannten die entstehenden Nationalstaaten in Europa die Bedeutung von Briefmarken zur Verbreitung von identitätsstiftenden Motiven, und auch heute noch sind Briefmarken Träger von Propaganda.[5] Briefmarken beeinflussen auch den Umgang einer breiten Öffentlichkeit mit Geschichte, wenn zum Beispiel ausgewählte Kulturgüter wie Schlösser oder Denkmäler abgebildet und damit bekannter gemacht werden.[6] Und in diesem Zusammenhang spannend sind insbesondere die Fragen nach Institutionen und Akteuren: Wer bestimmt auf welche Weise, was auf die Briefmarke gedruckt wird?

Teure Leidenschaft

Schon bald wurden viele Menschen auch von der Ästhetik und Symbolhaftigkeit der Briefmarken gefangen genommen. Die Postwertzeichen wurden zu Sammelobjekten, die nach unterschiedlichen Gesichtspunkten geordnet werden konnten, zum Beispiel nach Motiven, Ländern – und natürlich entlang der Chronologie, was deutlich macht, dass Briefmarken als historische Quellen genutzt werden können. Die Sammelleidenschaft ließ die Preise von seltenen Briefmarken explodieren, sodass heute für ausgewählte Briefmarken – wie für die (auf der Schweizer Karte oben in der Mitte abgebildete) “Basler Taube” – hohe sechsstellige Franken- bzw. Eurobeträge gezahlt werden.

Aufmerksamkeit gewinnen

Wenn etwas teuer ist, gewinnt es automatisch Aufmerksamkeit – das ist auch in der Public History so, und damit spielt das Berner Museum für Kommunikation, wenn es seiner neuen Briefmarkenausstellung den Titel “Extrem” gibt:

“Extrem teuer! Im Museum für Kommunikation ist vom 2. März bis zum 8. Juli 2018 eine Show der Superlative zu sehen: Ausgestellt werden die bedeutendsten 50 Perlen aus den ersten Schweizer Briefmarkenjahren. Zusammen sind sie mehrere Millionen Schweizerfranken wert.”[7]

Nun gibt es natürlich auch in der Public History nur in Ausnahmefällen die Möglichkeit, auf diese Weise die Wahrnehmung von Menschen auf Geschichte zu richten. Trotzdem muss dies irgendwie passieren, denn nur wenn Menschen ihre Aufmerksamkeit auf Geschichte richten, wird Geschichte öffentlich, gelingt Public History, gelingt überhaupt historische Sinnbildung: Wahrnehmung ist bekanntlich die erste Aktivität der historischen Sinnbildung.[8]

Wahrnehmung finden

Nun verfügt unser Wahrnehmungssystem offenbar als Teil seiner biologischen Ausstattung über ausgewählte Bedeutungskategorien, von denen “wertvoll – wertlos” eine zu sein scheint. Diese Kategorien unserer Weltwahrnehmung sind gewissermassen die Andockstellen für die von den Sinnen gelieferten Informationen.[9] Es spricht viel dafür, dass die von Hans-Jürgen Pandel als “Geschichtsbewusstsein” bezeichnete mentale Struktur, die aus sieben aufeinander bezogenen Doppelstrukturen besteht[10], unsere geschichtsorientierte Weltwahrnehmung strukturiert. So kann denn dieses Modell uns GeschichtsvermittlerInnen in Schule und Öffentlichkeit Hinweise liefern, wie wir Aufmerksamkeit gewinnen.

Kulturerbe als Zauberwort

Bei Briefmarken klappt dies heute. Briefmarken berühren offenbar mehrere Aspekte unseres Geschichtsbewusstseins, fesseln unsere Wahrnehmung und gewinnen Aufmerksamkeit. Sie scheinen uns “wertvoll”, “real”, “von gestern”, “von Menschen gemacht”, “bedeutsam”, “symbolträchtig” – kurz: Sie kommen uns als “Kulturerbe” entgegen, das geschützt, erhalten, aufbewahrt und zugänglich gemacht werden soll.[11] Damit stehen Briefmarken für eine interessante Entwicklung. Entstanden sind sie als Objekte einer Gegenwart, die auf Geschichte verwiesen haben. Geworden sind sie jetzt Objekte der Vergangenheit, die von damaliger menschlicher Schaffens- und Schöpfungskraft zeugen. Aus Geschichtskultur wurde Kulturgut. Public History und schulische Geschichtsvermittlung hat sich mit beidem zu beschäftigen.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Müller, Burkhard. Verschollene Länder: Eine Weltgeschichte in Briefmarken. Lüneburg: Verlag zu Klampen, 2013.
  • Ferri, Marino. Schweizer Briefmarken erzählen: Die Visualisierung nationaler Wertvorstellungen auf Schweizer Briefmarken 1850-1950. Rapperswil: swiss stamp show GmbH, 2015.
  • Fuchs, Karin, Hans Utz, and Peter Gautschi. Gezähnt und gestempelt: Briefmarken als Fenster zur Schweizer Geschichte und zur Geschichtskultur. Ein kompetenzorientiertes Lehrmittel für die Sekundarstufen I und II. Luzern: Lehrmittelzentrale des Kantons Luzern, 2018.

Webressourcen

_____________________


[1] Vgl. dazu den Tagungsbericht: Gezähnte Geschichte: Die Briefmarke als historische Quelle, 12.10.2017 – 15.10.2017 Erfurt, in: H-Soz-Kult, 28.02.2018, www.hsozkult.de/conferencereport (letzter Zugriff 15. März 2018).
[2] Vgl. dazu die Ausstellung: “EXTREM – 175 Jahre Schweizer Briefmarken” vom 2. März bis 8. Juli 2018 im Museum für Kommunikation Bern, www.mfk.ch/ausstellungen (letzter Zugriff 15. März 2018).
[3] Vgl. dazu zum Beispiel: Karin Fuchs, Hans Utz und Peter Gautschi. Gezähnt und gestempelt: Briefmarken als Fenster zur Schweizer Geschichte und zur Geschichtskultur. Ein kompetenzorientiertes Lehrmittel für die Sekundarstufen I und II. (Luzern: Lehrmittelzentrale des Kantons Luzern, 2018), www.shop.lmvdmz.lu.ch (letzter Zugriff 15. März 2018).
[4] Vgl. dazu www.wikipedia.org/Penny_Black (letzter Zugriff 15. März 2018).
[5] Vgl. dazu z.B. verschiedene Zeitungsberichte, die sich mit neuen Briefmarken in Nord-Korea auseinandersetzen, zum Beispiel Martin Belam, “North Korean stamps commemorate Hwasong-15 missile launch,” The Guardian, 29 December 2017, www.theguardian.com (letzter Zugriff 15. März 2018).
[6] Die Schweizerische Stiftung Pro Patria gibt mit dem Motto “Erbe nutzen – Zukunft stiften” seit 1938 Briefmarken heraus, www.propatria.ch (letzter Zugriff 15. März 2018).
[7] Wie Fussnote 2.
[8] Jörn Rüsen, Historik: Theorie der Geschichtswissenschaft (Köln, Weimar, Wien: Böhlau Verlag, 2013), 35.
[9] Rainer Mausfeld, “Wahrnehmungspsychologie: Geschichte und Ansätze,” in Handwörterbuch Allgemeine Psychologie. Kognition, ed. Joachim Funke, Peter A. Frensch (Göttingen: Hogrefe, 2006), 97-107.
[10] Hans-Jürgen Pandel, “Dimensionen des Geschichtsbewusstseins: Ein Versuch, seine Struktur für Empirie und Pragmatik diskutierbar zu machen,” in Geschichtsdidaktik. Probleme, Projekte, Perspektiven Bd. 12, H. 2, 1987, 130–142, www.sowi-online.de (letzter Zugriff 15. März 2018)
[11] Vgl. dazu das Projekt “Kulturerbe für alle”, www.kulturerbefueralle.ch (letzter Zugriff 15. März 2018).

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

“Basler Taube” © Titelbild des Lehrmittels “Gezähnt und gestempelt. Briefmarken als Fenster zur Schweizer Geschichte und zur Geschichtskultur”. Das Bild zeigt eine Reihe von bekannten Schweizer Briefmarken, die innerhalb der Konturen der Schweizer Grenze farbig herausgestellt sind. In der Mitte erkennbar ist die “Basler Taube”, für die hohe sechsstellige Franken- bzw. Eurobeträge gezahlt werden. Gestaltet hat die Karte Urs Bernet von “Die Büchermacher”, Zürich. Karin Fuchs, Hans Utz, Peter Gautschi: Gezähnt und gestempelt. Briefmarken als Fenster zur Schweizer Geschichte und zur Geschichtskultur. Ein kompetenzorientiertes Lehrmittel für die Sekundarstufen I und II. Luzern: Lehrmittelzentrale des Kantons Luzern, 2018.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Gautschi, Peter: Briefmarken beeinflussen und spiegeln Public History. In: Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 12, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-11478

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Rachel Huber/Christian Bunnenberg

Copyright (c) 2018 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.


Categories: 6 (2018) 12
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-11478

Tags: , , ,

2 replies »

  1. For an English version, please, scroll down.

    Die Philatelie – eine historische Wissenschaft?

    In seinem Beitrag würdigt Peter Gautschi die Briefmarke als historische Quelle im dreifachen Spannungsfeld von Geschichtswissenschaften, Public History und schulischer Geschichtsvermittlung. Er verweist dabei auf einige gegenwärtige Bestrebungen, Postwertzeichen für historisches Denken und Vermitteln fruchtbar zu machen: eine Konferenz, eine Publikation, eine Ausstellung. Es scheint also von mancherlei Seite das Interesse zu bestehen, die Briefmarke in Forschung und Unterricht miteinzubeziehen, den Ausblick durch dieses “Fenster in die Geschichte”, wie Gautschi treffend schreibt, zu wagen.

    Es stellen sich dabei einige Herausforderungen, die von ambitionierten und innovativen HistorikerInnen im schulischen, wissenschaftlichen und öffentlichen Feld angenommen werden müssen. Ich möchte als Replik auf Peter Gautschis Text zwei dieser Herausforderungen ansprechen:

    1) “Wenn etwas teuer ist, gewinnt es automatisch Aufmerksamkeit”. Dieser Schluss ist einleuchtend, er stellt im Kampf um das knappe Gut der öffentlichen Wahrnehmung sicherlich eine Chance dar. Nichtsdestotrotz offenbart sich hier auch eine Problematik: die Philatelie, also die Briefmarkenkunde, ist traditionell keine Domäne der Geschichtsforschung und -vermittlung. Während andere Kunden, die sich ebenfalls mit Hoheitszeichen beschäftigen, etwa die Numismatik (Münzen) oder die Sphragistik (Siegel), gerne im Kanon der Historischen Hilfswissenschaften erscheinen, ist der Philatelie dieses Privileg bisher nicht vergönnt. Noch ist die Briefmarkenkunde weitgehend eine Angelegenheit des freien Marktes, ihr Gegenstand ist Handelsware auf Messen, Märkten und Auktionen. Es bedarf heute dieser von der aktuellen MfK-Ausstellung zitierten Extreme, um nur schon die Aufmerksamkeit von Geschichtsvermittlern und Wissenschaft zu wecken. Deren Anerkennung und systematische Bearbeitung der Philatelie könnte zu einer theoretisch besser gestützten, gezielteren Einbindung von Briefmarken in die Public History führen.

    2) Die “Ästhetik und Symbolhaftigkeit” der Briefmarken habe die ersten Sammler hervorgelockt, schreibt Peter Gautschi. Auf dem Markt sind es heute, gut einhundertfünfzig Jahre später, andere Kategorien, die “Wert” generieren: Provenienz, Prestige, Seltenheit. Im Zentrum der Sammler-Aufmerksamkeit steht oftmals nicht das Symbolhafte, sondern, im Gegenteil, das Partikulare. Am Beispiel der ersten gesamtschweizerischen Markenausgabe, der sogenannten Rayon von 1850, verdeutlicht: nicht auf das Schweizerkreuz, das diese Ausgabe ziert, kommt es an, sondern darauf, ob dieses Schweizerkreuz von einem dünnen schwarzen Rahmen eingefasst ist oder nicht. Vom ersten Typ sind nicht einmal 50 Stück bekannt, der Preisunterschied kann sich auf mehrere zehntausend Franken belaufen. Es empfiehlt sich jedoch aus Sicht der Geschichtsvermittlung, diesen Aufmerksamkeitsmaschinen der Sammlerzunft nicht allzu hohen Wert beizumessen – und sich stattdessen auf das Ästhetische, das Symbolhafte zu besinnen. Der grösste wissenschaftliche Gehalt und die wirksamsten Vermittlungsinstrumente liegen in der Bildgestalt der Briefmarken, im visuellen Kosmos, den sie erzeugen. In dieser Hinsicht lohnt stets ein Blick zurück, zum Beispiel in Aby Warburgs unvollendeten Bilderatlas “Mnemosyne”, in welchem ein bemerkenswerter früher Versuch angelegt ist, die Bildsprache von Postwertzeichen in eine umfassende Visual History zu integrieren.

    Zuletzt sei darauf hingewiesen, dass ich keinesfalls dafür plädiere, die Welt der Philatelie des freien Marktes von jener einer künftigen ‘Geschichts-Philatelie’ zu trennen. Vielmehr sollten die beiden Welten, wie dies im Rahmen von Ausstellungen und Lehrmitteln bereits geschieht, miteinander in einen Dialog treten, voneinander lernen und profitieren. So kann am effizientesten Wahrnehmung generiert, Aufmerksamkeit erzeugt und Sinnbildung gefördert werden. Die Potenziale sind riesig. Wenn die Geschichtswissenschaften auf die unerschlossenen Wissensbestände der Dokumentationen und Publikationen eifriger Philatelisten zugreifen dürfen; wenn SammlerInnen die Methoden historischer Quellenkritik zu beachten lernen; wenn KuratorInnen und Auktionatoren einen Austausch von Wissen und Ware beginnen – dann werden “spannende Geschichte” und “teure Leidenschaft” eine Schnittmenge bilden, in welcher die Briefmarke unter jenem von Peter Gautschi in seinem Text herbeizitierten “Zauberwort” des “Kulturerbes” ihren Platz finden wird. Es ist Zeit, den Dialog zu beginnen.

    —————————————–

    Philately – a historical science?

    In his contribution, Peter Gautschi pays tribute to the stamp as a historical source at the intersection of historical studies, Public History and the teaching of history at school. He refers to current efforts to make postage stamps useful for historical thought and education: a conference, a publication, an exhibition. These are evidence to suggest there is an interest from many sides to include the stamp in research and teaching, to dare to look through this “window into history”, as Gautschi aptly writes.

    This poses a number of challenges that ambitious historians must meet in the academic, scientific and public arena. With reference to Peter Gautschi’s text, I would like to address two of these challenges:

    1) “If something is expensive, it automatically attracts attention”. This conclusion is obvious; it certainly represents an opportunity in the fight for the scarce commodity of public attention. Nevertheless, one problem is revealed here: philately, i.e. the study of stamps, is not traditionally a domain of historical research and education. While other fields of study who also deal with national emblems, such as numismatics (coins) or sphragistics (seals), tend to appear in the canon of auxiliary sciences of history, philately has not yet been granted this privilege. Philately is still largely a matter of the free market, its subject is merchandise at trade fairs, markets and auctions. Today, these “extremes” quoted by the current exhibition at the MfK are needed to arouse the attention of researchers and educators. Their recognition and systematic treatment of philately could lead to the theoretically supported and target-oriented inclusion of stamps into Public History that is needed.

    2) The “aesthetics and symbolism” of stamps attracted the first collectors, writes Peter Gautschi. On the market today, a good one hundred and fifty years later, different categories generate “value”: provenance, prestige, rarity. At the centre of collectors’ attention is often not the symbolic but, on the contrary, the particular. Using the example of Switzerland’s first nationwide stamp issue, the so-called Rayon from 1850, it becomes clear that it is not the Swiss cross that decorates this issue that matters, but whether this Swiss cross is bordered by a thin black frame or not. Not even 50 of the first type are known, the price difference can amount to tens of thousands of francs. From the point of view of history education and research, however, it is advisable not to attach too much importance to these ‘attention machines’ of the collectors’ guild – but instead to reflect on the aesthetic, the symbolic. The greatest scientific content and the most effective means of education lie in stamps’ images, in the visual cosmos they create. In this respect, it is always worth looking back, for example into Aby Warburg’s unfinished picture atlas “Mnemosyne”, in which a remarkable early attempt is made to integrate the visual language of postage stamps into a comprehensive visual history.

    Finally, I would like to point out that I am in no way advocating separating the world of free market philately from that of a future ‘history philately’. Rather, as is already the case with exhibitions and teaching materials, the two worlds should enter into a dialogue to learn and benefit from each other. This is the most efficient way to gain perception, generate attention and construct meaning. The potential is enormous. As soon as the historical sciences gain access to the unexplored knowledge of the documentation and publications of avid philatelists; as soon as collectors learn to observe the methods of historical source criticism; as soon as curators and auctioneers begin an exchange of knowledge and goods – “exciting history” and “expensive passion” will form an intersection in which the stamp will find its place among the “cultural heritage” quoted by Peter Gautschi in his text. It’s time to start the dialogue.

  2. To all our non-German speaking readers we recommend the wonderful automatic DeepL-Translator.

    Ausstellungen rücken Themen ins Wahrnehmungsfeld – und sie können im Idealfall ein Erlebnis kreieren, das noch Erinnerungsspuren zurücklässt. Das versuchen wir im Museum für Kommunikation. Wer beispielsweise die weltweit erste Briefmarke vor sich hat, den ersten Schweizer Brief mit einer Briefmarke mit der Lupe betrachten kann und mit den 320 Sammelbüchern von Postverwalter Kurt Rolli – alle gefüllt mit Briefmarken, auf denen Queen Elisabeth zu sehen ist – einen Einblick in die Sammelleidenschaft von Philatelisten erhält, der wird einen neuen Blick auf den Alltagsgegenstand Briefmarke werfen. Das kleine aufklebbare Papierstück erhält plötzlich Konnotationen von Innovation, Selbstdarstellung, Spiegel der Geschichte.

    Damit gelingt es uns Museen im Idealfall, das Geschichtsbewusstsein der BesucherInnen auf spielerische Weise zu fördern und zu neuen Sichtweisen einzuladen. Kulturerbe wird damit spürbar und darauf aufbauend können die Themen so weitergetragen werden.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

Pin It on Pinterest