For what it is ‘worth’? Neoliberalism and Public History

Worin besteht der ‘Wert’? Neoliberalismus und Public History


This work arose from considerations of the relationship between Public History and the newly marketized UK University sector, mainly through focussing on the skills and impact agenda. Does Public History offer a resistance to technocratic marketisation of universities, suggesting a ‘different’ type or citizenship? Might Public History provide a means to challenge neoliberal market-driven models of knowledge?

The Corporatization of Universities

The relationship between business, education, and knowledge has become complicated in the West over the past two decades.[1] The increasing annexing of formerly ‘public’ space by the corporate world in education has been led by organisations – private universities, private schools, private educational companies – which take the place of public institutions or provide part of the wider service. This has been driven by an ideological desire for more choice in the education context, by rhetoric of the market, and effected often by opening up the provision of services such as catering, teaching, or location management to private companies. This has had a key effect on universities themselves. Andrew McGettigan has argued, “the majority of universities […] become more akin to commercial operations, charging for services”.[2] Stefan Collini suggests:

“The logic of such reform is to reclassify people as consumers, thereby reducing them to economic agents in a market. The cunning of government propaganda, in higher education as elsewhere, is to pose as the champion of the consumer in order to force through the financialisation and marketisation of more and more areas of life.”[3]

Collini has attacked the shift towards a neoliberal university system and the model of national economic interest. In particular he critiques the importance of the economic ‘impact’ of research as a way of marketising the very purpose and importance of the University: “The requirement introduced as a result of this intervention – that academics demonstrate the social and economic ‘impact’ of their research – is another metric designed to redirect universities’ research in politically approved directions”.[4] For Collini and McGettigan the utilitarian model enables an incipient corporatization.

Public History and Business

The intellectual relationship between Public History and business goes at least back to the original issues of The Public Historian and the setting up of the NCPH.[5] Robert Kelley’s 1978 outline suggests a changing of business culture:

“We anticipate, therefore, that graduate students in PH will move into positions in the community at large, either at the governmental or corporate business level, not so much as ‘historians’ to fill a post specifically so designated, but as planners, analysts, managers of the internal flow of information, directors of public affairs offices in private corporations, assistants to administrators, and the like.”[6]

Yet what has actually happened is a shift in the other direction, as the academy became comfortable with managerial models imported from private corporations. In Martha Nussbaum’s words “nations prefer to pursue short-term profit by the cultivation of the useful and highly applied skills suited to profit-making”.[7] Certainly the Public Historian in the UK-based University is increasingly part of a set of discussions about ‘impact’, skills, public engagement, and the ‘value’ of scholarship.

There is little engagement between Public Historians and those working in disciplines that conceive of businesses as problematic spaces that might be engaged with and critically understood. Public History lacks theoretical engagement in this area, a lack of acuity at historiographical level regarding the institutions Public Historians work with (not just businesses, of course, but also charities, archives, museums and universities).[8] This has led the discipline to a lack of self-awareness when engaging with corporations, and means that there are few internal tools of critique for the increasingly privatised neoliberal university context either.

Public History and Employability Skills

Public History courses in the UK, Europe and USA emphasise their engagement with non-university organisations and the way that they prepare the student for employment. However this relationship is rarely theorised. Pedagogy is predicated upon practice and application outside the academy, combining discourses of employability, career prospect, and apprenticeship. The internship or placement is a means to garner particular skills and experience for ’employability’. The student is consumer, seeking training in skills in order to enter into a particular part of the knowledge economy.

The normalization of university and academic pursuits within a framework of market, employability, and competition is of course hardly unique to Public History. If neoliberalism in higher education is expressed in the normalization of market vocabulary and the increased commodification of interrelationships, Public History courses are part of a wider phenomenon driven by globalization and ideology. Public History has always had an engagement with employability and skills. Yet how critical has this positioning been?

The Future of Public History?

Public History is imbricated with non-academic bodies, some of which are charities and public institutions such as archives, but some of which are themselves corporations and businesses.[9] Indeed, many ‘public’ institutions are increasingly aware of themselves as corporate entities. Public institutions are increasingly part of a wider neoliberal economy – either in terms of funding, sponsorship, or managerial structure. Definitions of the public have changed, and those institutions in the public eye are audited, undertake fundraising, seek sponsorship, develop their economic potential.

Kelley conceived of his Public History in contradistinction to an idealised ‘academy’; as that becomes increasingly monetised, directed by business models and vested interests, how might Public History define itself as different? The lack of a robust theorisation of the discipline contributes to its diversity, but at the moment more rigour is needed when considering how Public History thinks of ‘public’ and how it conceives of ‘history’.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Brown, Roger, and Helen Carasso. Everything For Sale? The Marketisation of UK Higher Education. London and New York: Routledge, 2013.
  • McGettigan, Andrew. The Great University Gamble: Money, Markets, and the Future of Higher Education. London: Pluto, 2013.
  • Nussbaum, Martha. Not for Profit: Why Democracy needs the Humanities. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2010.

Web Resources

_____________________


[1] See Dave Hill and Ravi Kumar, “Neoliberalism and Its Impacts,” in Global Neoliberalism and Education, ed. Hill and Kumar (London and New York: Routledge, 2012), 12-30. This is particularly the case in the UK, Australia, Canada and the USA, and I recognise that some of what I am writing about might not chime with the experience of those in, say, Argentina or Italy or India or Brazil.
[2] Andrew McGettigan, The Great University Gamble: Money, Markets, and the Future of Higher Education (London: Pluto, 2013), p. 5.
[3] Stefan Collini, “Sold Out,” London Review of Books 35:20 (2013), 3-12 (4).
[4] Stefan Collini, What are Universities for? (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 2012), p. 5, pp. 168-78.
[5] A.E. Klauser, “A Need for Historians within Businesses”, The Public Historian 1:1 (1978), 13-14. See also the Special Review Section in 33:1 (2011), 73-95 on “Corporate Presentations of History” and note the continuing interrelation of Public History and Business History in the USA.
[6] Robert Kelley, “Public History: Its Origins, Nature, and Prospects”, The Public Historian 1:1 (1978), 16-28 (23).
[7] Martha Nussbaum, Not for Profit: Why Democracy needs the Humanities (Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2010), p. 7.
[8] See the brief discussion of “historians as entrepreneurs” in Thomas Cauvin, Public History: A Textbook of Practice (London and New York: Routledge, 2016), p. 13 where he cites Peter Novick’s critique of Public History in That Noble Dream (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988).
[9] Cauvin, Public History: A Textbook of Practice, pp. 250-72.

_____________________

Image Credits

Staff and students protesting on the steps of the Leeds University Parkinson Building during the 2018 USS Pension Strikes. © Alarichall, www.commons.wikimedia.org/Staff_and_students_protesting (last accessed 12 March 2018), CC BY-SA 4.0.

Recommended Citation

de Groot, Jerome: For what it is ‘worth’? Neoliberalism and Public History. In: Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 12, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-11315

Editorial Responsibility

Christian Bunnenberg / Peter Gautschi

Copyright (c) 2018 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

Diese Arbeit entsprang den Überlegungen zur Beziehung zwischen der Public History und dem neuerdings vermarkteten britischen Universitätssektor, hauptsächlich durch die Fokussierung auf die Kompetenz- und Wirkungsagenda. Leistet die Public History Widerstand gegenüber der technokratischen Vermarktung von Universitäten, indem sie einen ‘anderen’ Typus oder Staatszugehörigkeit vorschlägt? Könnte die Public History ein Mittel sein, um neoliberale, marktorientierte Wissensmodelle in Frage zu stellen?

Die Korporatisierung der Universitäten

Die Beziehung zwischen Wirtschaft, Bildung und Wissen ist im Westen in den letzten zwei Jahrzehnte komplizierter geworden.[1] Die zunehmende Annexion des vormals ‘öffentlichen’ Bereichs der Bildung durch die Geschäftswelt wird angeführt durch Organisationen – private Universitäten, private Schulen, private Bildungsunternehmen – welche den Platz von öffentlichen Institutionen einnehmen oder einen Teil der breitgefächerten Dienstleistungen anbieten. Dies wurde durch ein ideologisches Verlangen nach mehr Auswahl im Bildungskontext, begründet mit der Rhetorik des Marktes und oftmals durch die Öffnung von Dienstleistungen wie Catering, Lehre oder Standortverwaltung für private Unternehmen bewirkt. Auf die Universitäten hatte das eine wesentliche Wirkung. So sagt Andrew McGettigan, dass “der Grossteil der Universitäten […] sich zunehmend kommerziellen Betrieben an[nähert], indem sie für ihre Dienstleistungen finanzielle Abgeltung verlangen”.[2] Und Stefan Collini führt Folgendes aus:

“Die Logik einer solchen Reform besteht darin, Menschen neu zu klassifizieren und sie damit auf ökonomische Akteure in einem Markt zu reduzieren. Die Gerissenheit der Regierungspropaganda, in der Hochschulbildung wie anderswo, besteht darin, sich als Fürsprecher des Konsumenten in Pose zu werfen, um die Finanzialisierung und Vermarktung von immer mehr Lebensbereichen durchzuboxen.”[3]

Collini hat den Wandel hin zu einem neoliberalen Universitätssystem und das Modell des nationalen ökonomischen Interesses angegriffen. Er kritisiert insbesondere die Bedeutung des ökonomischen ‘Nutzens’ von Forschung als Mittel der Vermarktung des eigentlichen Zwecks und Bedeutung der Universität: “Die als Ergebnis dieser Intervention neu eingeführte Anforderung – dass Wissenschaftler den sozialen und ökonomischen ‘Nutzen’ ihrer Forschung darlegen – ist eine weitere Metrik, konzipiert, um die universitäre Forschung in politisch genehme Richtungen umzudirigieren”.[4] Für Collini und McGettigan unterstützt das utilitaristische Modell eine aufkeimende Korporatisierung.

Public History und Wirtschaft

Das intellektuelle Verhältnis zwischen der Public History und der Wirtschaft geht zurück auf die Anfänge der Zeitschrift ‘The Public Historian’ und die Gründung des NCPH.[5] Robert Kelleys Darstellung aus dem Jahre 1978 weist auf einen Wandel der Unternehmenskultur hin:

“Wir erwarten deshalb, dass Hochschulabsolventen der PH sich in Positionen in der ganzen Breite der Gesellschaft wiederfinden werden, entweder auf Regierungs- oder Firmengeschäftsebene, jedoch nicht so sehr um einen Posten als ‘Historiker’ zu besetzen, der als solcher spezifisch dazu ausersehen ist, vielmehr aber als Planer, Analysten, Managers des internen Informationsflusses, Direktoren von Büros für öffentliche Angelegenheiten in privaten Unternehmungen, Assistenten von Verwaltern und dergleichen.”[6]

Was nun effektiv stattgefunden hat, ist eine Verschiebung in die andere Richtung, als die Akademie sich an die aus den Privatunternehmen übernommenen Verwaltungsmodelle zu gewöhnen begann. Um es mit Martha Nussbaus Worten auszudrücken, “die Staaten ziehen es vor, kurzfristigen Gewinn durch die Kultivierung von nutzbringenden und anwendungsorientierten Fertigkeiten zu realisieren, die auf Gewinnerzielung ausgerichtet sind.”[7] Der Public Historian an einer britischen Universität wird mit Sicherheit zunehmend Diskussionen über ‘Nutzen’, Fertigkeiten, öffentlicher Einbindung und dem ‘Wert’ der Wissenschaft ausgesetzt sein.

Es gibt wenig Verbindendes zwischen Public Historians und denen, die in Feldern arbeiten, wo Unternehmen als problematische Räume begriffen werden, da diese möglicherweise Verpflichtungen unterliegen und kritisch beurteilt werden müssten. Der Public History fehlt die theoretische Ausrichtung auf diesem Gebiet, ein Mangel an Sehschärfe auf einer historiographischen Ebene hinsichtlich der Institutionen, mit welchen Public Historians zusammenarbeiten (natürlich nicht nur Unternehmen, sondern auch Wohltätigkeitsorganisationen, Archive, Museen und Universitäten).[8] Dies hat die Disziplin zu einem Mangel an Selbsterkenntnis im Umgang mit Unternehmen geführt und bedeutet, dass es auch für den zunehmend privatisierten neoliberalen Hochschulkontext nur wenige interne Kritikinstrumente gibt.

Public History und “Employability”

Veranstaltungen für Public History in Grossbritannien, Europa und den USA betonen ihre Anbindung an nicht-universitären Organisationen und bereiten die Studierenden für diesen Arbeitsmarkt vor. Diese Beziehung wird jedoch selten theoretisiert. Die Pädagogik ist auf die Praxis ausgerichtet und die Anwendung ausserhalb des akademischen Kontexts und kombiniert Diskurse bezüglich Arbeitsmarktfähigkeit, Berufsperspektive und Berufsausbildung. Das Praktikum oder die Vermittlung dient als Mittel, um spezielle Fertigkeiten und ‘arbeitsmarkt-orientierte’ Erfahrungen zu bündeln. Die Studierenden werden zu Konsumenten, die danach streben, Qualifikationen zu erwerben, die den Zugang zu einem speziellen Bereich der Wissensökonomie erlauben.

Die Normalisierung der universitären und akademischen Bestrebungen im Rahmen von Markt, Arbeitsmarktfähigkeit und Wettbewerb ist natürlich nicht nur der Public History eigen. Falls der Neoliberalismus in der Hochschulbildung in der Normalisierung von Marktvokabular und der erhöhten Kommodifizierung von Verflechtungen zum Ausdruck kommt, sind Veranstaltungen zur Public History Teil eines breiteren Phänomens, das  durch Globalisierung und Ideologie angetrieben wird. Public History hat sich schon immer mit Beschäftigungsfähigkeit und Fähigkeiten beschäftigt. Doch wie kritisch war diese Positionierung?

Zukunft der Public History?

Die Public History ist durchdrungen von nicht-akademischen Körperschaften. Bei einigen von ihnen handelt es sich um Wohltätigkeitsorganisationen und öffentlichen Institutionen wie z.B. Archive, aber einige davon sind selber Unternehmen und Firmen.[9] Viele der ‘öffentlichen’ Institutionen verstehen sich, in der Tat, zunehmend selber als Kapitalgesellschaften. Öffentliche Institutionen sind immer mehr Teil einer grösseren neoliberalen Wirtschaft – entweder in Bezug auf Finanzierung, Sponsoring oder Führungsstruktur. Die Definitionen von ‘public’ hat sich verändert und die Institutionen im Fokus der Öffentlichkeit werden auditiert, beschaffen Spenden, suchen nach Sponsoring und entwickeln ihr eigenes ökonomisches Potential.

Kelley hat seine Public History im Gegensatz zu einer idealisierten Universität konzipiert, die zunehmend monetarisiert, von Geschäftsmodellen und Eigeninteressen geleitet wird. Aber wie könnte sich Public History anders definieren? Das Fehlen einer soliden Theoretisierung der Disziplin trägt zu ihrer Diversität bei, zum jetzigen Zeitpunkt jedoch ist mehr Stringenz vonnöten, bedenkt man, wie sich die Public History ‘öffentlich’ versteht und was sie sich unter ‘History’ vorstellt.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Brown, Roger, and Helen Carasso. Everything For Sale? The Marketisation of UK Higher Education. London and New York: Routledge, 2013.
  • McGettigan, Andrew. The Great University Gamble: Money, Markets, and the Future of Higher Education. London: Pluto, 2013.
  • Nussbaum, Martha. Not for Profit: Why Democracy needs the Humanities. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2010.

Webressourcen

_____________________


[1] Siehe Dave Hill und Ravi Kumar, “Neoliberalism and Its Impacts,” in Global Neoliberalism and Education, ed. Hill und Kumar (London and New York: Routledge, 2012), 12-30. Dies ist speziell der Fall in Grossbritannien, Australien, Kanada und den USA, und ich gebe zu, dass einiges, über was ich schreibe, möglicherweise nicht im Einklang ist mit der Erfahrung von denen in, sagen wir mal, Argentinien oder Italien oder Indien oder Brasilien.
[2] Andrew McGettigan, The Great University Gamble: Money, Markets, and the Future of Higher Education (London: Pluto, 2013), S. 5.
[3] Stefan Collini, “Sold Out,” London Review of Books 35:20 (2013), 3-12 (4).
[4] Stefan Collini, What are Universities for? (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 2012), S. 5, S. 168-78.
[5] A.E. Klauser, “A Need for Historians within Businesses”, The Public Historian 1:1 (1978), 13-14. Siehe auch the Special Review Section in 33:1 (2011), 73-95 über “Corporate Presentations of History” sowie auch die fortdauernde Wechselbeziehung zwischen der Public History und der Business History in den USA.
[6] Robert Kelley, “Public History: Its Origins, Nature, and Prospects”, The Public Historian 1:1 (1978), 16-28 (23).
[7] Martha Nussbaum, Not for Profit: Why Democracy needs the Humanities (Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2010), S. 7.
[8] Siehe die kurze Abhandlung von “historians as entrepreneurs” in See Thomas Cauvin, Public History: A Textbook of Practice (London and New York: Routledge, 2016), S. 13, worin er Peter Novicks Kritik von Public History in That Noble Dream (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988) zitiert.
[9] Cauvin, Public History: A Textbook of Practice, S. 250-72.

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Staff and students protesting on the steps of the Leeds University Parkinson Building during the 2018 USS Pension Strikes. © Alarichall, www.commons.wikimedia.org/Staff_and_students_protesting (last accessed 12 March 2018), CC BY-SA 4.0.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

de Groot, Jerome: For what it is ‘worth’? Neoliberalism and Public History. In: Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 12, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-11315

Übersetzung

Translated by Kurt Brügger swissamericanlanguageexpert

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Christian Bunnenberg / Peter Gautschi

Copyright (c) 2018 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.


Categories: 6 (2018) 12
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-11315

Tags: , , ,

1 reply »

  1. To all our non-English speaking readers we recommend the wonderful automatic DeepL-Translator.

    Although the post stems first from the situation in the UK, it raises important questions for the academic world and public history in general. I cannot talk much about the neoliberal system in British universities, but I think Jerome touches upon important – and sensitive – issues regarding public history and the corporate world. The question is not new, especially in the UK, as economic liberalism invoked by Thatcher in the 1980s greatly affected cultural and public institutions.

    Jerome is right in identifying key aspects of public history that connect with the corporate world. The focus on audiences (communication or participation) fits very well neoliberal marketing policy. Besides, the development of public history in the 1970s in North American universities derived partly from a wish to broaden the range of possible careers for history students. It was, in a sense, a way to encourage history students to consider working in for-profit companies. There is no coincidence whether public history training developed in American universities where the ties between academia and business have been more tenuous than in some European countries. Actually, business history and historical methodology applied to the corporate world were very important in the first years of the National Council on Public History. Different syllabi of Business History were discussed and proposed in the early 1980s by the board of the NCPH. During his tour of Europe in the early 1980s, Wesley Johnson – one of the founding members of the public history movement in the US – witnessed some criticism in France and Germany regarding the questionable links between public history and the corporate world, and, therefore the possible bias of public history.

    There are two aspects I would like to bring nuance to. First, even if corporate history and public policy are still very important in the US, public history underwent a shift in the 1990s, and much more is done today about non-profit institutions, social justice, and activism. There are several currents under the public history umbrella and the field may not be taken as a whole. Second, I am not sure there is a lack of critical theory in the field – most of university programs proposed courses and seminar on historiography and historical practice – but what is problematic is the distinction between “traditional” courses and skill-oriented public history courses and projects. Each public history project and partner – I think here in part about Jerome’s work on DNA and Genealogy as public history fields and agencies – should be coupled with discussion on what “public” means in public history and how working “for” corporate clients affect the historian’s role. I think Jerome raises important questions that should be discussed in our current process of internationalizing public history.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest