Public History and Spaces of Knowledge

Public History und die Wiederöffnung des Wissenschaftsraumes

 

Scientists have a whole set of scientific workspaces at their disposal in their quest to create knowledge, both in research and teaching. These range from (secret) laboratories with their highly restricted access and traditional classrooms to a variety of publicly available media platforms. Against the background of public history’s focus on active participation, cooperation and even collaboration: where does public history position itself in this ‘question of space’? And why do historians ask this question in the first place?

Spatial Demarcation of Knowledge

The relocation of (natural) scientific work into laboratories is a development of the 18th century. Not long after that the concept of seminar was introduced on a very modest level in the humanities. The ever-growing institutions that have emerged from these humble beginnings have, not unjustly, been accused of turning into “fortresses” which would isolate themselves “against their academic environment.”[1] However, the simultaneous demarcation process in the public sphere had consequences far worse than the exclusion of fellow academics.

Both colleagues and the general public began to view the work of researchers as something elusive. The contact with the audience, which had for a long time consisted of a rather small part of society, was merely maintained by generally understandable lectures and corresponding publications. This communication gap exists to this day.

Diverging Role Perceptions

The wooing for attention, today also called successful science communication, has produced the doyens of 19th century German historiography. Next to a considerable number of early public historians Leopold von Ranke, Johann Gustav Droysen and Theodor Mommsen are important exponents. At the same time, the exact opposite perception of the role of the historian in the public sphere arises. This perception was much deplored. The French historian Lucien Febvre criticized his colleagues by stating that historical research should not be “sedentary work at desks and behind papers, with closed and covered windows.”[2] In order for the public to take notice of their research, this kind of historians had to rely on external ‘translators.’

Translation Processes of Science

Especially during the second half of the 20th century professional science journalists translated scientific results and research into a language that was comprehensible for the public. Their professional task was to properly reformulate these results for a selected, sometimes only assumed, audience – which was not always well-received by the involved historians. The history educator Joachim Rohlfes considered these translators not as a necessary but superfluous evil:

“For a long time, the academic field of history in Germany cared very little about what happened to its research results, if these – beyond schools and universities – got into the hands of journalists, artists, amateurs, or even ignorants.”[3]

In other words: on the one hand, researchers had lost control of the public debate. The beneficiaries were representatives of non-academic mass media. On the other hand, the direct dialogue with the public audience was (yet again) lost. “The evasion of the daily test for relevance and value under the eyes of a wider audience” is regarded as a “strangely despondent refusal of discourse,”[4] argues the German media scientist Bernhard Pörksen.

Perhaps not everyone in the humanities is equally open to the strongly recommended “self-medialization.”[5] Therefore, at this point, a glance at the places and workspaces in which (historical) research and the public meet and where historians are able to present their results shall suffice.

Public History. Back to the Roots?!

Results of scientific research have always been exchanged across different transition zones – a fact known not only to attendees of meetings and conferences. In years past, these zones included lounges, clubs or even coffeehouses with their significantly more informal character, compared to public lecture halls.[6] The so-called ivory tower has indeed become a standard term in colloquial language but is barely accepted as an actual place. We associate it with a strict physical separation of academia and the public. Only if we remove this separation and understand the places/spaces of scientific exchange as marketplaces in the sense of the Greek agora, we will be able to shine a light on the required communicative procedures and processes.[7]

These marketplaces can give visibility to the audience’s barely quantifiable expectations. They rank among the few contact zones where these expectations can be ascertained with empirical significance. Marketplaces also point to the digital places/spaces that can bridge the divide between academia and the public: they share the fact that they enable researchers to once again have (more) direct contact with their audiences.

Of course, this concept does not describe a fundamentally new scenario: the rise of dialogue-oriented formats takes us back to the roots of science communication. However, a new culture of debate in which the hierarchical difference between experts and laypersons is eliminated has yet to emerge.

Historians should become translators, but this time on their own behalf. And last but not least, this approach should resonate with public historians more than with anyone. Their ‘mission statement’ helps reduce the distance to potential audiences of science communication, take into account heterogeneous target audiences, each with their own demands, and shine a stronger light on new places/spaces of historical knowledge. And it appears obvious that public historians in particular should attach more importance to the relevance of specific rooms or spaces in their discussions of scientific/research practice.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Meusburger, Peter. “Wissen und Raum – ein subtiles Beziehungsgeflecht”, in Bildung und Wissensgesellschaft, ed. Klaus Kempter et al, 269-308. Heidelberg: Heidelberger Jahrbücher 49, 2005.
  • Pörksen, Bernhard. “Die Angst des Geisteswissenschaftlers vor den Medien”, Pop. Kultur und Kritik 1 (2012): no. 1, 21-25.

Web Resources

  • Gräßner, Claudia Anna. “Wissensräume, Raumwissen und Wissensordnungen. Historisch-kulturwissenschaftliche Forschungen zum Korrelat Raum – Wissen.” In: eTopoi. Journal for Ancient Studies 1 (2011), Berlin: Cluster of Excellence 264 Topoi. 105-113. http://journal.topoi.org/index.php/etopoi/article/view/47/187 (last accessed 8 September 2016).

_____________________

[1] Hartmut Boockmann, “Wissen und Widerstand. Geschichte der deutschen Universität“. (Berlin: Siedler 1999), 204-210, here 206.
[2] Lucien Febvre, “Ein Historiker prüft sein Gewissen”, in Das Gewissen des Historikers, ed. Lucien Febvre (Berlin: Wagenbach, 1988), 9-22, here 11.
[3] Joachim Rohlfes, “Geschichte in der Öffentlichkeit”, Geschichte in Wissenschaft und Unterricht 29 (1978): 307-311, here 307.
[4] Bernhard Pörksen, “Die Angst des Geisteswissenschaftlers vor den Medien”, Pop. Kultur und Kritik 1 (2012): 21-25, here 23.
[5] Ibid., 25.
[6] Peter Meusburger, “Wissen und Raum – ein subtiles Beziehungsgeflecht”, in Bildung und Wissensgesellschaft, ed. Klaus Kempter et al. (Heidelberg: Heidelberger Jahrbücher 49, 2005), 269-308, here 296.
[7] Urs Dahinden, “Steht die Wissenschaft unter Mediatisierungsdruck? Eine Positionsbestimmung zwischen Glashaus und Marktplatz”, in Mediengesellschaft. Strukturen, Merkmale, Entwicklungsdynamiken, ed. Kurt Imhof et al. (Wiesbaden: Mediensymposium Luzern 8, 2004), 159-175, here 169f.

_____________________

Image Credits
Albion Cafe © Visual punch.ch, 17.4.2011, via Flickr (last accessed 19 September 2016)

Recommended Citation
Arendes, Cord: Public History and Spaces of Knowledge. In: Public History Weekly 4 (2016) 32, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-7194. 

Editorial Responsibility
Isabella Schild / Thomas Hellmuth

Copyright (c) 2016 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

WissenschaftlerInnen steht bei ihrer Tätigkeit in Forschung und Lehre eine ganze Bandbreite unterschiedlicher Räumlichkeiten für die Wissensproduktion zur Verfügung. Diese reichen heute vom (geheimen) Laboratorium, mit seinem stark eingeschränkten und oft gleichzeitig auch kontrollierten Zugang, über den Seminarraum bis hin zur Palette quasi uneingeschränkt öffentlich zugänglicher medialer Plattformen. Wo positioniert sich die auf aktive Beteiligung, auf Kooperation und Kollaboration ausgerichtete Public History im Rahmen dieser “Raumfrage”? Und warum lohnt es sich, diese Frage überhaupt zu formulieren?

Räumliche Abschottung des Wissens

Die Verlagerung (natur-)wissenschaftlicher Arbeit in Laboratorien stellt eine Entwicklung des 18. Jahrhunderts dar. Nur wenig später etablierten sich – wenn auch auf einem anfangs sehr bescheidenen Niveau – die Seminare in den geisteswissenschaftlichen Fächern. Den sich in der Folge herausbildenden immer größeren Instituten ist nicht ohne Grund vorgeworfen worden, sich in “Festungen” verwandelt zu haben, die “sich gegen ihre akademische Umwelt abkapseln.”[1]

Weitaus entscheidendere Konsequenzen gingen aber mit der gleichzeitigen Abschottung nach außen einher. Die Arbeit von WissenschaftlerInnen entzog sich zunehmend nicht nur den Augen der KollegInnen, sondern auch denen der Öffentlichkeit. Den Kontakt zum Publikum, wenn lange Zeit auch nur zu einem eher kleinen Teil der Gesellschaft, hielt man von Seiten der Wissenschaft nun durch “allgemein verständliche” Vorträge und entsprechende Publikationen aufrecht. Dieses Kommunikationsgefälle findet sich bis heute.

Unterschiedliche Rollenverständnisse

Das Buhlen um Aufmerksamkeit – wir sprechen heute lieber von erfolgreicher Wissenschaftskommunikation – brachte in der deutschen Geschichtswissenschaft des 19. Jahrhunderts, mit ausgewählten Doyens der Disziplin wie Leopold von Ranke, Johann Gustav Droysen oder Theodor Mommsen, eine nicht unerhebliche Zahl an frühen Public Historians hervor. Gleichzeitig finden wir, wieder und wieder beklagt, auch die geradezu entgegengesetzte Haltung bezüglich des Drangs an die Öffentlichkeit zu treten: Nicht nur der französische Historiker Lucien Febvre forderte, dass die Geschichtswissenschaft nicht “eine sitzende Tätigkeit am Schreibtisch und hinter Papier, bei geschlossenen und verhängten Fenstern” sein dürfe.[2] HistorikerInnen waren auf externe ÜbersetzerInnen bei der Darstellung ihrer Forschungsergebnisse angewiesen.

Übersetzungsleistungen der Wissenschaft

Vor allem in der zweiten Hälfte des 20. Jahrhunderts lag diese Tätigkeit in den Händen professioneller WissenschaftsjournalistInnen. Zu deren Profession gehörte es, eine Botschaft für ein ausgewähltes, manchmal auch nur vermutetes Publikum sachgerecht aufzubereiten. Nicht immer zur Freude der beteiligten HistorikerInnen. Der Geschichtsdidaktiker Joachim Rohlfes sah in den ÜbersetzerInnen eher ein überflüssiges denn ein notwendiges Übel:

“Die akademische Historie in Deutschland hat sich lange Zeit wenig darum gekümmert, was aus ihren Forschungsergebnissen wird, wenn diese – außerhalb der Schulen und Hochschulen – in die Hände von Journalisten, Künstlern, Dilettanten, ja selbst Ignoranten geraten”[3] sind.

Die ForscherInnen, so ließe sich diese Kritik zuspitzen, haben sich zum einen von VertreterInnen wissenschaftsexterner Massenmedien das Heft aus der Hand nehmen lassen. Zum anderen entfiel auf diesem Weg (erneut) der direkte Dialog mit dem Publikum: Den “täglichen Relevanz- und Nützlichkeitstest eben nicht mehr unter den Augen eines größeren Publikums” durchzuführen, komme aber einer “seltsam mutlosen Diskursverweigerung”[4] gleich, so der Medienwissenschaftler Bernhard Pörksen.

Vielleicht sind nicht alle GeisteswissenschaftlerInnen gleichermaßen aufgeschlossen gegenüber der dringend empfohlenen “Selbstmedialisierung”[5]. Ein kurzer Blick auf die Orte bzw. Räumlichkeiten mag genügen, an/in denen sich (Geschichts-)Wissenschaft und Öffentlichkeit heute begegnen und HistorikerInnen ihre Arbeiten präsentieren.

Public History. Zurück zu den Wurzeln?!

Ergebnisse wissenschaftlicher Forschung wurden – und dies ist nicht allein langjährigen TeilnehmerInnen an Tagungen und Kongressen bekannt – immer auch in ganz unterschiedlichen Übergangszonen ausgetauscht. In früheren Jahren zählten hierzu Salons, Clubs oder auch das Kaffeehaus mit ihrem gegenüber dem Vortragssaal deutlich informelleren Charakter.[6] Der sogenannte “Elfenbeinturm” ist zwar als stehender Begriff in die Umgangssprache eingegangen, wird als konkreter Ort aber kaum noch goutiert – assoziieren wir mit ihm doch eine strikte räumliche Trennung von Wissenschaft und Öffentlichkeit. Hebt man diese Trennung auf und versteht die Orte/Räume wissenschaftlichen Austausches als gemeinsame Marktplätze im Sinne der griechischen Agora, so geraten die notwendigen kommunikativen Aushandlungsverfahren und -prozesse wieder verstärkt in den Blick.[7]

Solche Marktplätze können helfen, die nur schwer messbaren Erwartungshaltungen des Publikums sichtbar zu machen. Sie gehören zu den wenigen Kontaktzonen, an denen sich diese Erwartungen mit einer empirischen Signifikanz aufspüren lassen. Marktplätze verweisen aber auch auf die Orte/Räume, in denen im digitalen Zeitalter Trennungen überwunden werden können: Ihnen gemein ist, dass ForscherInnen wieder direkt(er) mit ihrem Publikum diskutieren.

Mit dieser Feststellung ist kein grundlegend neues Szenario beschrieben: Der Boom dialogorientierter Formate führt uns denn auch eher zurück zu den Wurzeln wissenschaftlicher Kommunikation – selbst wenn sich eine zeitgemäße oder auch ganz neue Diskussionskultur, die das Gefälle von Experten und Laien überbrückt, wohl erst noch herausbilden muss.

HistorikerInnen sollten also wieder in eigener Sache zu ÜbersetzerInnen werden. Und nicht zuletzt sollten sich die VertreterInnen der Public History angesprochen fühlen. Gerade diese tragen qua ihres “Mission Statement” dazu bei, die Distanz zu den potenziellen AdressatInnen zu verringern, heterogene Zielgruppen mit ihren jeweils eigenen Ansprüchen zu berücksichtigen und die neuen Orte/Räume der historischen Wissensvermittlung noch stärker in den Fokus historischer Untersuchungen zu rücken. Und hier scheint es doch evident, die Bedeutung von konkretem Raum bzw. Räumlichkeiten für wissenschaftliche Praxis stärker in die Betrachtungen miteinzubeziehen.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Meusburger, Peter: Wissen und Raum – ein subtiles Beziehungsgeflecht. In: Kempter, Klaus/Ders. (Hrsg.), Bildung und Wissensgesellschaft (Heidelberger Jahrbücher 49). Heidelberg/Berlin 2005, S. 269-308.
  • Pörksen, Bernhard: Die Angst des Geisteswissenschaftlers vor den Medien. In: Pop. Kultur und Kritik 1 (2012), Heft 1, S. 21-25.

Webressourcen

  • Gräßner, Claudia Anna: Wissensräume, Raumwissen und Wissensordnungen. Historisch-kulturwissenschaftliche Forschungen zum Korrelat Raum – Wissen. In: eTopoi. Journal for Ancient Studies 1 (2011), S. 105-113. http://journal.topoi.org/index.php/etopoi/article/view/47/187 (letzter Zugriff am 8.9.2016).

_____________________

[1] Vgl. Boockmann, Hartmut: Wissen und Widerstand. Geschichte der deutschen Universität. Berlin 1999, S. 204-210.

[2] Febvre, Lucien: Ein Historiker prüft sein Gewissen. In: Ders., Das Gewissen des Historikers. Berlin 1988, S. 9-22, hier S. 11.
[3] Rohlfes, Joachim: Geschichte in der Öffentlichkeit. In: Geschichte in Wissenschaft und Unterricht 29 (1978), S. 307-311, hier S. 307.
[4] Pörksen, Bernhard: Die Angst des Geisteswissenschaftlers vor den Medien. In: Pop. Kultur und Kritik 1 (2012), Heft 1, S. 21-25, hier S. 23.
[5] Ebd., S. 25.
[6] Meusburger, Peter: Wissen und Raum – ein subtiles Beziehungsgeflecht. In: Kempter, Klaus/Ders. (Hg.): Bildung und Wissensgesellschaft (Heidelberger Jahrbücher 49). Heidelberg/Berlin 2005, S. 269-308, hier S. 296.
[7] Vgl. Dahinden, Urs: Steht die Wissenschaft unter Mediatisierungsdruck? Eine Positionsbestimmung zwischen Glashaus und Marktplatz. In: Imhof, Kurt et al. (Hg.): Mediengesellschaft. Strukturen, Merkmale, Entwicklungsdynamiken (Mediensymposium Luzern 8), Wiesbaden 2004, S. 159-175, hier S. 169f.

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis
Albion Cafe © Visual punch.ch, 17.4.2011, via Flickr (letzter Zugriff am 19.9.2016)

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Arendes, Cord: Public History und die Wiedereröffnung des Wissenschaftsraumes. In: Public History Weekly 4 (2016) 32, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-7194 .

Redaktionelle Verantwortung
Isabella Schild / Thomas Hellmuth

Copyright (c) 2016 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

 

 


Categories: 4 (2016) 32
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-7194

Tags: , ,

Pin It on Pinterest