The Ethics of History – Just Nice To Have?

Geschichtsethik – lediglich nettes Beiwerk?

 


Explicit discussions of ethical issues were previously virtually unknown in the historical sciences of German language. Ethical problem areas are usually only broached implicitly, as elements of (academic) controversy. But in doing so, fundamental complex ethical problems in this field are then, at least, flushed to the surface. Systematic approaches that try to lay open the sore points and to anchor them in terms of professionalization in the relevant studies and training are scarce.[1]

 

Ethics as an aside

During seminars in which I have offered “history consulting” as well as the opportunity to discuss ethical aspects of public history, the majority of students reacted with a lack of interest. This lack of interest seemed similar to what we know from discussions in professional circles. There the notion is prevalent, that the reflection of ethical moments is not particularly important, since the principle of neutrality (also within the context of previous debates on objectivity and intersubjectivity) as a guiding principle, coupled with a notion that science per se is ethically neutral, is sufficient to ensure ethical standards. Such an understanding follows the epistemological schools of thought of the last century, which the Australian historian, Rhys Isaac, also observed:

“The basic rules of conduct have remained as they had been for some generations before I commenced my studies. Researchers had long been required to consult all the relevant documents, and to show how the history they wrote was developed out of critical reasoning from those documents – which had to be cited in precise footnotes and bibliographies.”[2]

Epistemological innocence?

Going back to an epistemic innocence that ignores ethical issues at a time when, more than ever, the personal involvement of scientists and their social situation is addressed in their work is absurd – and not least in hermeneutic contexts. The philosopher Clemens Sedmak rightly observes that science must constantly reach new decisions on issues, definitions, classifications, etc., and this does not function in a world of its own – as art for art’s sake. No, it is rooted in the middle of this world:

“Combinations of scientific actions are connected to combinations of non-scientific actions. […] The scientist works as part of a scientific community, to which she is accountable, and also in relation to a broader, non-scientific community, which provides an infrastructural and institutional framework. Hence the need for reflection on an ‘ethic of the community’, as is also found in current codes of ethics in many disciplines, which refer to responsibility for the ‘bonum cummune’ and for one’s peers.”[3]

Code of ethics for the science of history

Is it still appropriate today that historians, who inevitably encounter moral and ethical problem areas during their practice of historical studies in universities, museums, or historical agencies, and for which they lack major subject-specific models or assistance have therefore to rely on random selections from their studies or personal/professional experience from the field to make decisions or act in a way that is morally “right”? Ultimately, German-speaking historians should therefore also strive to overcome this merely informal and sometimes idiosyncratic approach to ethical issues within the field, as has already been achieved in other disciplines.[4] A stimulating first confrontation with this area of discussion, which has, to date, only been dealt with rudimentarily in German-speaking countries, is offered by the “code of ethics and principles of freedom of scientific historical research and teaching” published by the Swiss Society of History (SGG).[5]

Forthcoming approaches

If the suggested contexts are taken seriously, questions arise like those that were recently referred to by Cord Arendes and Angela Siebold, when they asked about the added value of a Code of Ethics and Conduct for the historical profession.[6] And it is, in fact, necessary to broaden the base of subject-specific discussions on ethical issues related to historical work in its diverse fields (tertiary research institutions, museums, corporate archives, the media, schools, etc.) by using case studies. The problem areas and dilemmas we trace there can provide the basis for a tight ethical debate, using the discussion to leave the awkward, abstract, and overly theoretical views behind. In terms of discourse ethics, as many historians as possible from different areas should be involved, so as not to narrow the envisaged applied ethics down to one field of history. The aim here is to mutually promote the professionalization of the discipline.

_____________________

Literature

  • Karamanski, Theodore J. (ed.), Ethics and Public History: An Anthology. Malabar/ Florida 1990.
  • Kühberger, Christoph/ Sedmak, Clemens: Ethik der Geschichtswissenschaft. Zur Einführung. Vienna 2008.
  • Weber, Karl-Christian: Ethisch reflektierter Geschichtsunterricht. Göttingen 2013.

External links

_____________________
[1] The number of German language science of history works on the subject is relatively manageable – among others Rüsen, Jörn: Kann gestern besser werden? Zum Bedenken der Geschichte [Can Yesterday Get Better? Reflections on History]. Berlin 2003; Kühberger, Christoph/ Lübke, Christian/ Terberger, Thomas (Hg.): Wahre Geschichte – Geschichte als Ware. Die Verantwortung der historischen Forschung gegenüber Wissenschaft und Gesellschaft [True Story – History as a Commodity. The Responsibilities of Historical Research towards Science and Society]. Rahden/ Westf. 2007; Kühberger, Christoph/ Sedmak, Clemens: Ethik der Geschichtswissenschaft. Zur Einführung [Ethics in the Science of History. An Introduction]. Wien 2008; Gadebusch Bondio, Mariacarla/ Stamm-Kuhlmann (Hg.): Wissen und Gewissen. Historische Untersuchungen zu den Zielen von Wssenschaft und Technik [Knowledge and Belief. Historical Studies on the Goals of Science and Technology]. Berlin 2009; Tillmanns, Jenny: Was heißt Verantwortung? Historisches Unrecht und seine Folgen für die Gegenwart [What is Responsibility? Historical Injustice and its Consequences for the Present]. Bielefeld 2012; Kühberger, Christoph/ Pudlat, Andreas: Vergangenheitsbewirtschaftung. Public History zwischen Wirtschaft und Wissenschaft [Managing the Past. Public History between Business and Science]. Innsbruck – Wien 2012.
[2] Isaac, Rhys: Inclusive History. In: The Historian’s Conscience. Australian Historians on Ethics of History. ed. V. Stuart Macintry. Melbourne 2004, 64-74, 65.
[3] Sedmak, Clemens: Wissenschaftsethik in der Geisteswissenschaft. In: > kunst > kommunikation > macht. Sechster Österreichischer Zeitgeschichtstag 2003. Hg. v. I. Bauer et al., Wien – Innsbruck 2004, 26-28, 27.
[4] Cf. Beaudry, Mary C .: Ethical Issues in Historical Archeology. In: International Handbook of Historical Archeology. ed. V. T. Majewski/ D. Gaimster. New York 2009, 17-29, 17.
[5] Schweizerische Gesellschaft für Geschichtswissenschaft (Hg.): Ethik-Kodex und Grundsätze zur Freiheit der wissenschaftlichen historischen Forschung und Lehre. Bern 2004. – http://www.hist-pro.ch/fileadmin/user_upload/SGG-EthikKodex.pdf (20.8.2015)
[6] Arendes, Cord/ Siebold, Angela: Zwischen akademischer Berufung und privatwirtschaftlichem Beruf. Für eine Debatte um Ethik- und Verhaltenskodizes in der historischen Profession. In: GWU 3/4/2015/66, 152-166.

_____________________

Image Credits
Weighing Scale. Original Source: Bibliothek allgemeinen und praktischen Wissens für Militäranwärter Band III, 1905 / Deutsches Verlaghaus Bong & Co Berlin, Leipzig, Wien, Stuttgart; https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Gleicharmige_Waage.png?uselang=de-ch (Last accessed 10.8.2015)

Recommended Citation
Kühberger, Christoph: Ethics of History – Just Nice To Have? In: Public History Weekly 3 (2015) 28, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2015-4514.

Copyright (c) 2015 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

Explizite ethische Diskussionen kennt die deutschsprachige Geschichtswissenschaft bislang eher nicht. Ethische Problemzonen werden meist nur implizit als Bestandteile von (akademischen) Kontroversen angeschnitten. Auf diese Weise werden dann aber zumindest grundlegende ethische Problemkonstellationen des Faches an die Oberfläche gespült. Systematische Ansätze, die versuchen, die neuralgischen Punkte offen zu legen und im Sinne einer Professionalisierung auch in den einschlägigen Studien und Ausbildungen zu verankern, sind rar.[1]

 

 

Ethik als Randbemerkung

In Seminaren, die ich zum “Geschichtsmarketing” angeboten habe und in denen ethische Aspekte der Public History diskutiert wurden, reagierte die Mehrzahl der Studierenden ähnlich desinteressiert, wie man dies auch aus der Diskussion in Fachkreisen kennt: Die Reflexion von ethischen Momenten wäre nicht besonders wichtig, wo doch das Neutralitätsgebot (durchaus im Sinn der älteren Debatten um Objektivität und Intersubjektivität) als Handlungsmaxime, gepaart mit einer Vorstellung, wonach Wissenschaft per se ethisch neutral ist, ausreichend wäre. Ein derartiges Verständnis schließt unmittelbar an jene erkenntnistheoretischen Richtungen des vorigen Jahrhunderts an, die auch der australische Historiker Rhys Isaac beobachtete:

“The basic rules of conduct have remained as they had been for some generations before I commenced my studies. Researchers had long been required to consult all the relevant documents, and to show how the history they wrote was developed out of critical reasoning from those documents – which had to be cited in precise footnotes and bibliographies.”[2]

Erkenntnistheoretische Unschuld?

Sich auf eine epistemische Unschuldigkeit zurückzuziehen, welche ethische Fragen ausspart, ist – nicht zuletzt in hermeneutisch arbeitenden Fächern – zu Zeiten, in denen mehr denn je die persönliche Involviertheit der ForscherInnen in ihre Arbeiten und ihre soziale Situierung thematisiert wird, absurd. Der Philosoph Clemens Sedmak merkt zu Recht an, dass Wissenschaft stets neue Entscheidungen über Themen, Begriffe, Klassifikationen etc. zu treffen hat und dabei nicht außerhalb dieser Welt als l‘art pour l‘art betrieben wird, sondern mitten in ihr verortet ist:

“Wissenschaftliche Handlungszusammenhänge sind mit außerwissenschaftlichen Handlungszusammenhängen verbunden. […] Die Wissenschaftlerin arbeitet im Rahmen einer scientific community, der gegenüber sie auch Rechenschaft schuldet, und auch in Bezug auf eine weitere, außerwissenschaftliche Gemeinschaft, die infrastrukturelle und institutionelle Rahmenbedingungen bereitstellt. Daraus ergibt sich die Notwendigkeit einer Reflexion auf eine ‘Ethik der Gemeinschaft’, wie sie sich etwa auch in gängigen Ethikkodizes vieler Disziplinen [findet; C.K.], in denen von der Verantwortung für das ‘bonum cummune’ und gegenüber den ‘peers’ die Rede ist.”[3]

Ethik-Kodex für die Geschichtswissenschaften

Ist es daher heute noch zeitgemäß, dass HistorikerInnen in ihrer Praxis des geschichtswissenschaftlichen Arbeitens an Universitäten, Museen oder Geschichtsagenturen, in der sie unweigerlich auf ethisch-moralische Problemzonen stoßen, ohne größere fachspezifische Orientierungsmuster oder Hilfestellungen und auf der Grundlage von zufälligen Versatzstücken aus dem Studium oder persönlichen Erfahrungen aus dem Berufsfeld moralisch “richtig” entscheiden bzw. handeln sollen? Letztlich sollte sich auch die deutschsprachige Geschichtswissenschaft darum bemühen, diesen nur informellen und bisweilen idiosynkratischen Zugang zu ethischen Fragen innerhalb des Faches zu überwinden, wie dies anderen Disziplinen bereits gelungen ist.[4] Eine anregende erste Auseinandersetzung mit diesem im deutschsprachigen Raum bislang nur rudimentär bearbeiteten Diskussionsfeld bietet der “Ethik-Kodex und Grundsätze zur Freiheit der wissenschaftlichen historischen Forschung und Lehre” der Schweizerischen Gesellschaft für Geschichte (SGG).[5]

Anstehende Wege

Nimmt man die vorgebrachten Kontexte ernst, werden jene Fragen aufgeworfen, auf die unlängst auch Cord Arendes und Angela Siebold verwiesen, indem sie nach dem Mehrwert eines Ethik- und Verhaltenskodex’ für die historische Profession fragten.[6] Und in der Tat ist es notwendig, die Basis der fachspezifischen Diskussion zu ethischen Fragen des geschichtswissenschaftlichen Arbeitens in den unterschiedlichsten Feldern (tertiäre Forschungseinrichtungen, Museen, Unternehmensarchive, Medienarbeit, Schule etc.) über Fallbeispiele zu verbreitern. Dort auffindbare Problemzonen und Dilemmata können die Grundlage für eine dichte ethische Auseinandersetzung bieten, um in der Diskussion einen hölzernen, abstrakten und allzu theoretischen Blick hinter sich zu lassen. Im Sinn der Diskursethik sollten an einer solchen Auseinandersetzung aber möglichst viele HistorikerInnen aus unterschiedlichsten Kontexten eingebunden werden, um die damit angestrebte angewandte Ethik der Geschichtswissenschaft nicht auf ein Arbeitsfeld von HistorikerInnen zu verengen. Ziel sollte es dabei sein, die Professionalisierung der Disziplin gemeinsam voranzutreiben.

_____________________

Literatur

  • Karamanski, Theodore J. (Hg.): Ethics and Public History: An Anthology, Malabar/ Florida 1990.
  • Kühberger, Christoph/ Sedmak, Clemens: Ethik der Geschichtswissenschaft. Zur Einführung, Wien 2008.
  • Weber, Karl-Christian: Ethisch reflektierter Geschichtsunterricht, Göttingen 2013.

Externe Links

_____________________

[1] Die Anzahl an deutschsprachigen geschichtswissenschaftlichen Arbeiten zum Thema ist relativ überschaubar u. a. Rüsen, Jörn: Kann gestern besser werden? Zum Bedenken der Geschichte. Berlin 2003; Kühberger, Christoph/ Lübke, Christian/ Terberger, Thomas (Hg.): Wahre Geschichte – Geschichte als Ware. Die Verantwortung der historischen Forschung gegenüber Wissenschaft und Gesellschaft. Rahden/ Westf. 2007; Kühberger, Christoph/ Sedmak, Clemens: Ethik der Geschichtswissenschaft. Zur Einführung. Wien 2008; Gadebusch Bondio, Mariacarla/ Stamm-Kuhlmann (Hg.): Wissen und Gewissen. Historische Untersuchungen zu den Zielen von Wssenschaft und Technik. Berlin 2009; Tillmanns, Jenny: Was heißt Verantwortung? Historisches Unrecht und seine Folgen für die Gegenwart. Bielefeld 2012; Kühberger, Christoph/ Pudlat, Andreas: Vergangenheitsbewirtschaftung. Public History zwischen Wirtschaft und Wissenschaft. Innsbruck – Wien 2012.
[2] Isaak, Rhys: Inclusive History. In: The historian’s conscience. Australian historians on ethics of history. Hg. V. Stuart Macintry. Melbourne 2004, 64-74, 65.
[3] Sedmak, Clemens: Wissenschaftsethik in der Geisteswissenschaft. In: > kunst > kommunikation > macht. Sechster Österreichischer Zeitgeschichtstag 2003. Hg. v. I. Bauer et al., Wien – Innsbruck 2004, 26-28, 27.
[4] Vgl. Beaudry, Mary C.: Ethical Issues in Historical Archeology. In: International Handbook of Historical Archeology. Hg. v. T. Majewski/ D. Gaimster. New York 2009, 17-29, 17.
[5] Schweizerische Gesellschaft für Geschichtswissenschaft (Hg.): Ethik-Kodex und Grundsätze zur Freiheit der wissenschaftlichen historischen Forschung und Lehre. Bern 2004. – http://www.hist-pro.ch/fileadmin/user_upload/SGG-EthikKodex.pdf (20.8.2015)
[6] Arendes, Cord/ Siebold, Angela: Zwischen akademischer Berufung und privatwirtschaftlichem Beruf. Für eine Debatte um Ethik- und Verhaltenskodizes in der historischen Profession. In: GWU 66 (2015), S. 152-166.

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis
Gleicharmige Waage. Originalquelle: Bibliothek allgemeinen und praktischen Wissens für Militäranwärter Band III, 1905 / Deutsches Verlaghaus Bong & Co Berlin, Leipzig, Wien, Stuttgart; https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Gleicharmige_Waage.png?uselang=de-ch (Letzter Zugriff am 10.8.2015)

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Kühberger, Christoph: Geschichtsethik – lediglich nettes Beiwerk? In: Public History Weekly 3 (2015) 28, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2015-4514.

Copyright (c) 2015 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.


Categories: 3 (2015) 28
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2015-4514

Tags: ,

Pin It on Pinterest