Teaching Historical Thinking: Dilemmas not Dichotomies!

Historisches Denken unterrichten: Dilemmata, keine Gegensätze!

 

Breadth versus depth, content versus skills, inquiry versus memorization, textbooks versus primary sources; history educators in the U.S. hear dichotomies like these all the time. But framing these as dichotomies, …

 


Breadth versus depth, content versus skills, inquiry versus memorization, textbooks versus primary sources; history educators in the U.S. hear dichotomies like these all the time. But framing these as dichotomies, as contrasting and competing goals and methods that ultimately require a choice obfuscates and distorts the complex nature of the teaching and learning of history. And it may persuade teachers that they must make a choice between one or the other which would ultimately impoverish the teaching and learning in their classrooms.

A Changing Landscape: More Historical Thinking

History instruction in the U.S. has long been characterized by teacher and textbook-centered instruction that focuses on remembering a rather dull story about the past replete with specified names, dates, and places.[1] There were maverick teachers and schools who were having students work with authentic sources, consider varied interpretations of the past, and construct and write historical arguments, but this kind of instruction was not common given a lack of easily available teaching resources, and few assessments, policies and structures that supported this kind of instruction. But that seems to be changing. Open digital high-quality resources have, arguably, significantly contributed to this shift and history teachers can now easily access a wealth of archives and tools that support teaching for historical thinking.[2] Social media platforms like Twitter and Facebook allow teachers to participate in professional communities that go beyond the local to share ideas and solve problems relative to this shift. New standards that acknowledge discipline-specific literacies and specify the use of authentic materials also support this shift. Overall, teaching history as a way of knowing as well as a body of knowledge is more supported now than it was 15 years ago in the U.S. This is a welcome change: teaching for historical thinking and literacy not only makes pre-collegiate history education more “intellectually honest”,[3] but it also embeds skills that are important to citizenship into a course, reflects students’ lived experience of history where communities and family argue over the past, and is just more engaging for most students.

Teachers’ Concerns

As experienced teachers and teacher candidates are introduced to these new resources and see examples of how to teach history like the thinking endeavor it is, they are excited by the prospect of teaching in ways that are more consistent with their original purposes in becoming history teachers, but they are also concerned. They wonder and worry aloud about what is still “allowed” when teaching historical thinking and analysis. Can they lecture? Use their textbook? How will students learn the “content” if lessons focus on “skills”? How will they incorporate lessons where students investigate a narrow historical question when their courses cover 300+ years of history? In a discourse saturated with dichotomies, they look for the yeses and nos. But this is a misguided approach. We need to talk about dilemmas rather than dichotomies and embrace a hybrid model of teaching and learning if we are to support teachers in bringing more historical thinking and analysis into the classroom. Consider the following examples.

Breadth or Depth?

Curricular depth and breadth are both important to teaching pre-collegiate students effectively. Students should learn to go deep and interrogate and synthesize multiple sources and perspectives to understand a historical event. But they also need to build a broad framework and chronology of the past, to know significant events that had far-reaching impacts, and important turning points. Both are necessary to understand the discipline and both are valued in states’ standards that include concepts like change over time that require a broader view of the past to understand and concepts like corroboration of evidence that require a closer and more in depth view. So it’s not a choice between breadth or depth for most pre-collegiate teachers, it’s more a question of how to teach for both. Similarly “either/or” needs to be replaced by “both/and” when considering pedagogical methods.

Lecture’s Value as Contingent

Often vilified as a key culprit in a recall-oriented mode of teaching, when teachers adopt the goal of historical thinking and an approach where students “do history,” they question whether lecture can be used at all. But lectures can be an indispensible tool in the classroom when thoughtfully crafted and used purposefully. It is all about why, how, and when they are used. Former high school teacher Professor Robert Bain shared how he carefully timed his use of lecture to help his students answer some of the questions they had generated after encountering discrepant accounts of Columbus’ journey.[4] In this case, lecture provided necessary background knowledge that facilitated students’ investigation. In another instance, lectures were an opportunity to model historical argument and thinking. Using questions to launch her lectures, and moving from provable premise to provable premise, one master teacher used this as an opportunity to make explicit the contours of historical argumentation. Painting lectures as ineffective pedagogy overlooks how the specific uses of a pedagogical tool matters to its efficacy.

What Works to Help Students Learn?

Talking and thinking about teaching history as riddled with dichotomies and absolutes ignores the practical nature of teaching. Too often there is value in what is rejected. Reframing seemingly opposing methods and approaches as dilemmas allows us to honor contrasting features. It’s not breadth or depth, content or skills, or even lecture or source work. Rather the question is what works to help students learn the complex discipline of history. What methods can be used to serve particular learning goals for particular lessons? What approaches can be used to help students understand and engage with the many aspects of history? Let’s not swing back between one method and approach to another so absolutes become our lens for the classroom. History helps teach us the complexity of human societies and actions, and the difficulties of understanding them. It honors complexity and rewards finding connections between seemingly disparate phenomena. So why do we oversimplify the teaching of it?

____________________

Literature

  • Bain, Robert. B. (2005). “They thought the world was flat?” Applying the principles of how people learn in teaching high school history, 207-208. Retrieved from http://books.nap.edu/books/0309074339/html/179.html (last accessed 16.10.2014)
  • Cuban, Larry (1993). How teachers taught: Constancy and change in American classrooms 1880-1990 (2nd ed.). New York: Teachers College Press.

External links

____________________


[1] Goodlad, John (1984). A place called school. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill – Weiss, I. B. (1978). Report of the 1977 National Survey of Science, Mathematics, and social Studies Education. Center for Educational Research and Evaluation. Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.
[2] A few examples include teachinghistory.org, SHEG, World History for Us All, and History Now.
[3] Bruner, Jerome (1960/1977). The process of education. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
[4] Bain, Robert B. (2005). “They thought the world was flat?” Applying the principles of how people learn in teaching high school history, 207-208. Retrieved from http://books.nap.edu/books/0309074339/html/179.html (last accessed 16.10.2014).

____________________

Image Credits
Winslow Homer: The See-Saw (1873) © Wikimedia Commons (Public Domain).
http://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Winslow_Homer_-_The_See-Saw_(1873).jpg&oldid=122943755

Recommended Citation
Martin, Daisy: Dilemmas not Dichotomies. In: Public History Weekly 2 (2014) 36, DOI:  dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2014-2763.

Copyright (c) 2014 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: julia.schreiner (at) degruyter.com.

Breite oder Tiefe, Inhalte oder Fähigkeiten, Forschen oder auswendig Lernen, Schulbücher oder Quellen: Geschichtslehrerinnen und Geschichtslehrer in den USA sind dauernd mit solchen Gegensatzpaaren konfrontiert. Doch indem man den Geschichtsunterricht mit solchen Gegensätzen konstruiert, worin widerstreitende, kontrastierende Ziele und Methoden schließlich eine Entscheidung erfordern, wird die komplexe Natur des Historischen Lernens und Lehrens verschleiert. Diese Gegenüberstellungen können Lehrpersonen zu Annahmen verleiten, dass sie zwischen dem einen oder anderen Ziel wählen müssten. Doch das würde letztlich zu einer Verarmung des historischen Lernens und des Geschichtsunterrichts führen.

Eine sich verändernde Landschaft: Mehr historisches Denken

Der Geschichtsunterricht in den USA war lange geprägt von Lehrer- und Schulbuchzentrierung und fokussierte auf das Auswendiglernen von eher langweiligen Geschichten über die Vergangenheit voller spezifischer Namen, Daten und Orte.[1] Es gab zwar Sonderlinge unter den Geschichtslehrpersonen, die ihre SchülerInnen mit Quellenmaterial arbeiten, sie unterschiedliche Interpretationen der Vergangenheit beurteilen und historische Abhandlungen schreiben ließen. Doch diese Art des Geschichtsunterrichts war nicht weit verbreitet, da geeignete Unterrichtsmaterialien kaum erhältlich waren und Prüfungsordnungen und institutionelle Rahmenbedingungen diese Formen des Geschichtsunterrichts auch nicht unterstützten. Doch die Situation scheint sich nun zu ändern. Urheberrechtsfreie Unterrichtsmaterialien von hoher Qualität haben wohl erheblich zu diesem Wandel beigetragen und ermöglichen Geschichtslehrpersonen heutzutage den einfachen Zugang auf ein umfassendes Angebot an Archivmaterialien und Hilfsmitteln, die einen auf das Historische Denken ausgerichteten Unterricht unterstützen.[2] Social Media-Plattformen wie Twitter oder Facebook erlauben den Lehrpersonen, sich in professionellen Gemeinschaften außerhalb der örtlichen Fachschaften oder jährlicher Konferenzen zu beteiligen. In diesen Gemeinschaften können sie Ideen jenseits eines lokalen Zusammenhangs teilen oder Probleme lösen, die sich ihnen im Zusammenhang mit diesem Wandel stellen. Der Wandel wird auch getragen von neuen Standards, die disziplin-spezifische Kompetenzen (Literacies) berücksichtigen und dabei die Verwendung von authentischem Material (d.h. Quellen) definieren. Insgesamt ist der Geschichtsunterricht in den USA als Art des Wissens wie auch als Bestand von Wissen besser handhabbar und besser unterstützt als noch vor 15 Jahren.
Das ist ein willkommener Wandel: Unterricht, der sich der Entwicklung historischen Denkens und historischer Kompetenzen widmet, führt nicht nur zu einem “intellektuell ehrlichen”[3] schulischen Geschichtsunterricht. Ein solcher Unterricht fördert auch Fähigkeiten, die mündige BürgerInnen auszeichnet, und widerspiegelt die gelebten Erfahrungen der SchülerInnen im alltäglichen Umgang mit Geschichte, wie er in Familien und Gemeinschaften stattfindet, und gestaltet sich damit für die meisten SchülerInnen interessanter und anregender.

Bedenken von Lehrkräften

Sobald erfahrene Lehrpersonen und Lehramtsstudierende diese neuen Möglichkeiten kennenlernen und Beispiele dafür sehen, wie Geschichte als genau jene Herausforderung des Denkens unterrichtet werden kann, die sie ja auch tatsächlich darstellt, reagieren sie einerseits begeistert auf die Aussicht, Geschichte auf eine Art und Weise zu unterrichten, für die sie eigentlich GeschichtslehrerInnen geworden sind – doch sie sind auch besorgt. Sie fragen sich, was denn noch “erlaubt” sei, wenn sie historisches Denken und Analysieren unterrichten. Dürfen sie noch Lehrervorträge halten? Schulbücher verwenden? Wie sollen SchülerInnen die “Inhalte” lernen, wenn der Unterricht auf “Fähigkeiten” ausgerichtet ist? Wie sollen sie Lektionen gestalten, in denen die SchülerInnen eine enge historische Frage erforschen, wo sie mit ihrem Unterricht über 300 Jahre Geschichte behandeln sollen? In einem mit Gegensätzen gesättigten Diskurs halten sie Ausschau nach Jas und Neins. Doch dies ist ein fehlgeleiteter Ansatz. Wir müssen eher über Dilemmata als über Gegensätze sprechen und uns ein hybrides Modell von Lehren und Lernen zu eigen machen, wenn wir die LehrerInnen dabei unterstützen wollen, mehr historisches Denken und Analysieren in den Unterricht einzubringen. Zur Veranschaulichung sollen folgende Beispiele dienen.

Breite oder Tiefe?

Curriculare Tiefe und Breite sind für den schulischen Geschichtsunterricht gleichermaßen bedeutsam. SchülerInnen sollten lernen, in die Tiefe zu gehen und dabei mehrere Quellen multiperspektivisch befragen und verknüpfen, um einen historischen Sachverhalt zu verstehen. Sie sollten aber ebenso ein breites begriffliches und chronologisches Bezugssystem über die Vergangenheit aufbauen, um bedeutsame Ereignisse zu kennen, die weitreichende Konsequenzen hatten und die wichtige Wendepunkte darstellen. Beide Zugänge sind für das Fachverständnis notwendig, und beide werden in den Standards verschiedener US-Staaten gewürdigt, die Konzepte enthalten wie das Konzept des Wandels in der Zeit, das eher einen breit angelegten Blick auf die Vergangenheit voraussetzt, oder das Konzept der Überprüfung von Quellenaussagen, was einen detaillierten und vertiefenden Zugang zur Geschichte erfordert. Folglich stehen die meisten schulischen Lehrpersonen nicht vor der Entscheidung zwischen Breite oder Tiefe, sondern vor der Herausforderung, beides im Unterricht zu berücksichtigen. Ebenso ist “entweder/oder” durch “sowohl/als auch” zu ersetzen, wenn es um Unterrichtsmethoden geht.

Der kontingente Wert des Lehrervortrags

Sobald Lehrpersonen in ihrem Unterricht das Ziel, historisches Denken zu fördern, umsetzen wollen und die SchülerInnen dafür “Geschichte machen” lassen, fragen sie, ob Lehrervorträge in diesem Unterricht überhaupt noch sinnvoll eingesetzt werden können. Sind doch diese oft als Hauptschuldige eines auf Auswendig-Lernen ausgerichteten Geschichtsunterrichts verunglimpft worden. Doch Lehrervorträge können einen unverzichtbaren Bestandteil des Unterrichts darstellen, wenn sie klug geplant und sinnvoll eingesetzt werden. Es geht nur darum, warum, wie und wann sie zur Anwendung kommen. Der frühere Gymnasiallehrer Robert Bain berichtete davon, wie er gezielt das Mittel des Lehrervortrags einsetzte, um auf Schülerfragen zu antworten, die sich bei der Auseinandersetzung mit sich widersprechenden Quellen zu Kolumbus’ Reise nach Amerika ergaben.[4] In diesem Fall lieferte der Lehrervortrag notwendiges Hintergrundwissen, um den SchülerInnen die erkundende Arbeit an den Quellen zu erleichtern. In einem anderen Fall boten Lehrvorträge die Gelegenheit, historisches Denken und Argumentieren anschaulich zu modellieren. Indem sie mit Fragen ihren Vortrag begann und dann von Annahme zu Annahme weiter vorarbeitete, konnte eine erfahrene Lehrperson diese Methode als Gelegenheit nutzen, um die Konturen einer historischen Argumentation herauszuarbeiten. Wer Lehrervorträge als nutzlose Methoden bezeichnet, übersieht, dass die konkrete Anwendung einer Unterrichtsmethode deren Wirkung bestimmt.

Was funktioniert, um SchülerInnen beim Lernen zu helfen?

Das Ansinnen, über Geschichtsunterricht zu sprechen und nachzudenken, als ein verrätseltes Vorhaben voller Gegensätze und absoluter Wahrheiten zu verstehen, ignoriert die praktische Natur des Unterrichtens. Zu oft werden Dinge abgelehnt, die noch einen Wert haben. Sich scheinbar widersprechende Methoden und Zugänge als Dilemma zu verstehen, erlaubt es uns, deren kontrastierende Effekte zu würdigen. Es geht nicht um Breite oder Tiefe, um Inhalt oder Fähigkeiten, oder gar um Lehrervorträge oder Quellenarbeit. Die Frage ist vielmehr: Was hilft den SchülerInnen dabei, das komplexe Fach Geschichte zu erlernen? Welche Methoden können dabei helfen, spezifische Lernziele in verschiedenen Lektionen zu erreichen? Welche Zugänge können SchülerInnen dabei helfen, sich mit verschiedenen Aspekten der Geschichte auseinander zu setzen und diese zu verstehen? Wir sollten nicht in einer Weise zwischen verschiedenen Methoden und Ansätzen hin- und herpendeln, dass nur einseitige, verabsolutierende Lösungen im Unterricht Anwendung finden.

Geschichte hilft uns dabei, die Komplexität menschlicher Gesellschaften und des Handelns von Menschen zu lehren, ebenso wie die Schwierigkeiten, sie zu verstehen. Sie würdigt die Komplexität und belohnt das Auffinden von Zusammenhängen zwischen scheinbar unvereinbaren Phänomenen. Warum sollten wir dann den Geschichtsunterricht simplifizieren?

____________________

Literatur

  • Bain, Robert. B. (2005). “They thought the world was flat?” Applying the principles of how people learn in teaching high school history, 207-208. Retrieved from http://books.nap.edu/books/0309074339/html/179.html (last accessed 16.10.2014)
  • Cuban, Larry (1993). How teachers taught: Constancy and change in American classrooms 1880-1990 (2nd ed.). New York: Teachers College Press.

Externe Links

____________________

[1] Goodlad, John (1984). A place called school. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill – Weiss, I. B. (1978). Report of the 1977 National Survey of Science, Mathematics, and social Studies Education. Center for Educational Research and Evaluation. Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.
[2] Zum Beispiel: teachinghistory.org, SHEG, World History for Us All, and History Now.
[3] Bruner, Jerome (1960/1977). The process of education. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
[4] Bain, Robert B. (2005). “They thought the world was flat?” Applying the principles of how people learn in teaching high school history, 207-208. Verfügbar unter http://books.nap.edu/books/0309074339/html/179.html (letzter Zugriff 16.10.2014).

____________________

Abbildungsnachweis
Winslow Homer: The See-Saw (1873) © Wikimedia Commons (Public Domain).
http://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Winslow_Homer_-_The_See-Saw_(1873).jpg&oldid=122943755

Übersetzung aus dem Englischen
von Jan Hodel

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Martin, Daisy: Dilemmas not Dichotomies. In: Public History Weekly 2 (2014) 36, DOI:  dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2014-2763.

Copyright (c) 2014 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: julia.schreiner (at) degruyter.com.


Categories: 2 (2014) 36
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2014-2763

Tags: , ,

1 reply »

  1. Thank you for this thoughtful article on an important issue. In the state where I live right now (Kentucky) there’s a huge debate about the new draft of the state social studies standards based on the C3 Framework. Some people think this means we won’t teach content anymore, and I see it as an opportunity to teach historical thinking AND content–content determined locally based on what students need instead of dictated by the state. Naturally, what you state above as “turning points” in history will also be important for our students to learn. With so much emphasis on US history lately. I’m curious as to your thoughts about teaching world civilization, geography, and some of the other branches of social studies? Thanks again for a great article!

Pin It on Pinterest