Collaborative History Writings

La scrittura collaborativa della storia

Editoriale Mensile: Gennaio 2021 | Monthly Editorial: January 2021

Abstract:
Once upon a time, historians studied primary and secondary sources and presented their own interpretation of the past, whereas today a Wikipedia page is written by “n” that is, an anonymous author; once upon a time, primary sources were gathered in archives, whereas today we find collaborative collections on social media; once upon a time, historical research was based on purely scholarly criteria, whereas today it can be combined with social commitment and be conveyed via platforms that allow citizens to participate in research and in enhancing cultural heritage. Have the paradigms of doing history been overturned?
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2022-19325
Languages: English, Italian


Collaborative writing in history is not new in historiographic production, but has certainly received a very strong impulse and undergone an unprecedented development in the last twenty years, largely due to the rise of online platforms, which facilitate user collaboration or rely mainly on crowdsourcing. At the same time, the number of projects in the citizen humanities has grown exponentially. Such ventures involve the participation and active involvement of citizens in humanities research.

A Privileged Field

Due to its public, participatory and collaborative orientation, digital public history is a privileged field of application for citizen humanities. Muki Haklay (2012) has identified four levels of citizen involvement in participatory science activities: first, crowdsourcing, where citizens are “sensors” and acquire data following precise indications; second, “distributed intelligence,” which refers to data interpretation; third, “participatory science,” which requires citizen involvement in defining research hypotheses and methodology; and finally, the “extreme” level, which relates to data collection, the interpretation of results and the formulation of research questions.

The opportunities that the digital environment enables by creating platforms dedicated to collaborative writing are manifold, with each raising specific methodological issues largely concerning the question of shared responsibility.

The emergence of collaborative writing and its growth marks an important milestone in the process of “democratising history,” initiated by Roy Rosenzweig in 1994 and leading to the establishment of the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University.

Even if an article or monograph provides author details and defines their (shared) responsibilities, the terms of sharing are not as clear when looking at public comments on a cultural heritage site (Library of Congress 2008) or at the complex dynamics between interviewers and interviewees in collections of oral sources (Frisch 1990). Collaborative writing enables incorporating different voices, and multiple audiences, which become protagonists in an operation aiming to preserve individual and collective memories. The digital world has multiplied exponentially the possibilities for sharing the reading and rewriting of the past, to the extent that even attempting a rough typologisation appears to involve constantly pursuing an excessively fluid and dynamic future.

Rules and Institutions

One aspect worth considering in this regard is the possible impact of collaborative writing on the creation of historical knowledge. We need to ask ourselves whether this possibility is not purely utopian, and whether collaborative writing is ultimately not merely a tool for disseminating a common sense of history. Because even if collaborative writing projects respond primarily to the discipline’s principal methods, public intervention inevitably shapes the outcome. Not to mention that the evolution may translate into a result completely at odds with the premises.

Old Weather[1] — one of the earliest and most successful examples in crowdsourced scientific initiatives — demonstrates that fact. The original research motivation (to create meteorological models based on manuscript sources from the mid-19th century onwards) was combined with well-conceived data collection methods and with discussion groups that are now fairly autonomous or at least far removed from the initial intentions.

It is also evident that the so-called pro-am[2] is more concerned with reporting anecdotes and preserving factual accuracy, whereas historians are more concerned with critical thinking based on interpretation and contextualisation. Wikipedia, for example, involves the often uncontrolled development of entries despite the five pillars,[3] while the possibility of debating statements is a positive sign.

One problematic issue that collaborative writing is not always able to remedy — or even tends to fuel — is the lacking contextualisation of online sources. This is a major limitation, in particular when sensitive historical issues are subject to public debate, and which may lend themselves to instrumentalisation. Thus, amateur platforms, not just Wikipedia, – as the contribution by Marta Severo  explains – can trigger highly political dynamics.

Engagement and Sharing

There is a social dimension to collaborative writing, which comes into play when the focus lies on creating a text rather than on the product. On these amateur platforms, responsibility is shared within a cooperative process: peer-to-peer collaboration triggers a mechanism of mutual support, integration and social inclusion. The resulting conditions facilitate the development of writing skills, which emerge from continuous exchange among participants. The collaborative dimension can promote implementing social inclusion projects in which ideally conflicts are mitigated within the communities of reference. This also requires a code of ethics. Wikipedia, for example, is based on the just mentioned five pillars. These constitute a set of rules that contributors should not breach if they wish to avoid expulsion. However, the edit wars reveal a tendency to want to impose a point of view, even if it is clearly controversial, and despite the fourth pillar stating that “Wikipedia has no firm rules.” While this implies the adoption of consensual behaviour, there is no guarantee of “peaceful” conflict resolution.

Which Stories

The shared writing of history leads to the creation of products with peculiar characteristics that distinguish them from those of the historiographical mainstream. In the past, interpretations were essentially the product of the thoughts expressed by each author, although scholars can of course be attributed to one or more historiographical schools a posteriori. With collaborative writing, the situation changes and prospectively involves a real paradigm shift. First, collaborative projects might complicate the interpretations, those of the “project managers” and those of the participants. Second, mainly in digital public history projects, who might initially disagree, and therefore promote different readings, might later converge on a common vision of the past.

The Contributions

The first contribution (by Marta Severo) addresses the platforms that are used nowadays to encourage or enable citizen participation in research and to valorise cultural heritage in general. Platforms are never neutral, whether they are created by amateurs or by institutions and research centres. It is essential to understand how they work, as well as to experiment with forms of convergence between the two models (amateur and institutional), in order to conceive collaborative platforms as facilitators of dialogue between social actors.

DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2022-19327.

The second article (by Roberto Bianchi) is dedicated to Wikipedia — the collaborative platform par excellence — and its relationship with historians. While professional historians have yet to contribute to the online encyclopaedia, there is growing interest in how history is presented in its pages. The reasons for this controversial relationship include the lack of acceptance of Wikipedia’s  “five pillars,” but also the objective difficulties encountered by historians when analysing entries.

DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2022-19332.

The third and last contribution, by author 3, deals with a very famous social network, Facebook, from the perspective of using history and historiographical writing. Facebook is a perfect natural collector of historical sources. As such, it constantly suggests that its users re-proposition their memories in what amounts to flattening the past in the present. At the same time, it invites them to comment on, as well as collaboratively and spontaneously archive sources, thus creating collaborative re-readings of history.

DOI: [to come]

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Frisch, M. A Shared Authority: Essays on the Craft and Meaning of Oral and Public History. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1990.
  • Haklay, M. “Citizen Science and Volunteered Geographic Information – overview and typology of participation.” In Crowdsourcing Geographic Knowledge: Volunteered Geographic Information in Theory and Practice, edited by Daniel Z. Sui, Sarah Elwood, Michael F. Goodchild, 105-122. Berlin: Springer, 2012.

Web Resources

  • Library of Congress 2008. Library of Congress. Prints and Photographs Division, et al. “For the common good: The Library of Congress Flickr pilot project.” Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, 2008 https://www.loc.gov/rr/print/flickr_report_final.pdf (last accessed 21 december 2021).

_____________________

[1] See https://www.oldweather.org/ (last accessed 12 January 2022). Old Weather volunteers explore, mark, and transcribe historic ship’s logs from the 19th and early 20th centuries in order to help the research of climate scientists.
[2] Professionals and amateurs.
[3] The fundamental principles of Wikipedia may be summarized in five “pillars” (principles): 1) Wikipedia is an encyclopedia; 2) it is written from a neutral point of view; 3) it is free content that anyone can use, edit, and distribute; 4) its editors should treat each other with respect and civility; 5) it ha guidelines but no firm rules, See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Five_pillars (last accessed 12 January 2022).

_____________________

Image Credits

Map of Atlantic Coast of North America from the Chesapeake Bay to Florida © 1630s, Joan Vingboons.

Recommended Citation

Paci, Deborah, Enrica Salvatori: Collaborative History Writings. In: Public History Weekly 10 (2022) 1, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2022-19325.

Editorial Responsibility

Marko Demantowsky

La scrittura collaborativa in ambito storico non è una novità in termini assoluti nella produzione storiografica, ma certo ha ricevuto negli ultimi vent’anni un impulso fortissimo e uno sviluppo senza precedenti, dovuti alla nascita nel web di piattaforme che agevolano la collaborazione tra gli utenti o che adottano il crowdsourcing come modalità privilegiata. Contestualmente sono cresciuti esponenzialmente i progetti che si collocano nel contesto delle citizen humanities che comportano la partecipazione e il coinvolgimento attivo dei cittadini nelle attività di ricerca scientifica nell’ambito delle humanities.

Un campo privilegiato

La digital public history, per la sua vocazione pubblica, partecipativa e collaborativa è uno campi di applicazione privilegiata dalle citizen humanities. Muki Haklay (2012) ha individuato quattro livelli di coinvolgimento dei cittadini nelle attività di scienza partecipata: il primo livello è quello del crowdsourcing, dove i cittadini sono “sensors”, e dunque acquisiscono i dati sulla base di indicazioni precise; il secondo livello è quello della “distributed intelligence”, che si riferisce all’interpretazione dei dati raccolti; il terzo livello è quello della “participatory science”, che richiede il coinvolgimento dei cittadini nelle fasi di definizione delle ipotesi di ricerca e della metodologia; infine il livello “extreme” è relativo alla raccolta dei dati, all’interpretazione dei risultati e alla formulazione dei quesiti di ricerca.

Le possibilità che l’ambiente digitale consente di attivare con la realizzazione di piattaforme dedicate alla scrittura collaborativa sono numerose e ciascuna pone questioni metodologiche specifiche relative in gran parte alla questione della responsabilità condivisa.

L’emergere delle scritture collaborative e il loro incremento segna un importante traguardo nel processo di “democratizzazione della storia” che era stato l’obiettivo perseguito sin dal 1994, con la creazione del Center for History and New Media della George Mason University, da Roy Rosenzweig.

Se un articolo o una monografia hanno autori dichiarati e responsabilità condivise palesi, i termini della condivisione non sono altrettanto chiari quando si guarda ai commenti del pubblico su una collezione di beni culturali (Library of Congress 2008) o la complessa dinamica tra intervistatore e intervistato nella raccolta delle fonti orali (Frisch 1990). La scrittura collaborativa permette di incorporare voci diverse, pubblici molteplici che si rendono protagonisti in un’operazione che vuole preservare le memorie individuali e collettive. Il mondo digitale ha moltiplicato in maniera esponenziale le combinazioni in cui la compartecipazione alla lettura e riscrittura del passato è possibile, al punto che anche tentare una sommaria tipologizzazione appare come un’attività in costante rincorsa di un futuro troppo fluido e dinamico.

Regole e istituzioni

Un elemento che merita una riflessione riguarda l’eventuale incidenza della scrittura collaborativa sulla creazione di conoscenza storica. Occorre interrogarsi se questa eventualità non sia pura utopia e se invece la scrittura collaborativa non finisca per essere uno strumento attraverso il quale si diffonde un senso comune della storia. Questo perché seppure gli intenti iniziali dei progetti di scrittura collaborativa rispondano ai metodi precipui della disciplina, inevitabilmente il pubblico intervenendo orienta il prodotto e l’evoluzione può tradursi in un risultato totalmente discordante dalle premesse.

Old Weather[1] – uno dei primi esempi di attività in questo settore ed esempio di estremo successo – ne è la dimostrazione. La motivazione di ricerca (creazione di modelli metereologici sulla base di fonti manoscritte a partire dalla metà del XIX secolo) si è combinato con un impianto di raccolta dati ben congeniato e ha sviluppato  gruppi di discussione abbastanza autonomi o comunque lontani da quelle che potevano essere le intenzioni originarie.

È inevitabile inoltre che i cosiddetti Pro–am[2] siano più attenti a riportare l’aneddoto preoccupandosi di preservare l’accuratezza del fatto, laddove gli storici investono invece sull’elaborazione di un pensiero critico fondato sull’interpretazione e sulla contestualizzazione. Su Wikipedia, ad esempio, riscontriamo uno sviluppo spesso incontrollato delle voci nonostante la presenza dei cinque pilastri,[3] ma al contempo di segno positivo è la possibilità di dare luogo a discussioni sugli enunciati.

Un nodo problematico a cui la scrittura collaborativa non sempre è in grado di porre rimedio – anzi, per taluni versi tende ad alimentarlo – riguarda l’assenza di contestualizzazione delle fonti online. Questo risulta un grande limite nella misura in cui ci troviamo di fronte a voci di argomento storico che sono sensibili nel dibattito pubblico e che possono prestarsi alle strumentalizzazioni. Pertanto le piattaforme amatoriali, non soltanto Wikipedia, possono innescare dinamiche fortemente politiche.

Impegno e condivisione

Esiste una dimensione sociale della scrittura collaborativa: essa si genera nella misura in cui l’attenzione è posta sul processo di creazione del testo, ancor prima che sul prodotto. In queste piattaforme amatoriali la responsabilità è condivisa all’interno di una logica cooperativa: questa collaborazione peer to peer innesca un meccanismo di supporto reciproco, di integrazione e di inclusione sociale. Il clima che si viene a generare facilita lo sviluppo di abilità di scrittura che nascono grazie al confronto continuo con i contributori. La dimensione collaborativa può favorire la realizzazione di progetti di inclusione sociale in cui idealmente i conflitti siano attenuati all’interno delle comunità di riferimento. In tal caso è necessario che sia posto in essere un codice deontologico. Wikipedia, ad esempio, si fonda sui cinque pilastri che costituiscono l’insieme delle regole da non trasgredire, pena l’allontanamento. Tuttavia le edit wars sono rivelatrici della tendenza a voler imporre un punto di vista, seppur palesamente controverso, e nonostante il quarto pilastro reciti “Wikipedia ha un codice di condotta”, suggerendo così l’adozione di un comportamento consensuale, non vi sono garanzie circa la risoluzione “pacifica” di un conflitto.

Quali storie

La scrittura condivisa della storia determina la creazione di prodotti dotati di caratteristiche peculiari, che li distinguono da quelli propri della tradizione storiografica. Un tempo le interpretazioni erano sostanzialmente  figlie del pensiero espresso da ciascun autore, benché a posteriori sia sempre possibile raggruppare gli studiosi all’interno di una o più scuole storiografiche. Con la scrittura collaborativa la situazione cambia e si potrebbe assistere, in prospettiva, a un vero e proprio cambiamento di paradigma. In un progetto a cui partecipano più utenti innanzitutto potrebbe essere difficile distinguere tra l’interpretazione dei “responsabili di progetto” e partecipati; in secondo luogo i collaboratori, inizialmente non concordi e quindi portatori di letture diverse, grazie ad un’attività di digital public history potrebbero alla fine convergere su una comune visione del passato.

I contributi

Il primo contributo di Marta Severo affronta la questione delle piattaforme utilizzate al giorno d’oggi per favorire o consentire la partecipazione dei cittadini nel settore della ricerca e della valorizzazione dei beni culturali in genere. Le piattaforme non sono mai neutre, sia che nascano in ambiente amatoriale, sia che siano create da istituzioni e centri di ricerca. Comprenderne il diverso funzionamento è essenziale, così come sperimentare forme di convergenza tra i due modelli allo scopo di concepire le piattaforme collaborative come facilitatori di dialogo tra gli attori sociali.

DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2022-19327.

Il secondo articolo di Roberto Bianchi è dedicato alla piattaforma collaborativa per eccellenza – Wikipedia – e al suo rapporto con gli storici. Non si registra una vera partecipazione degli storici di professione all’enciclopedia, ma cresce l’interesse su come la storia è presentata nelle sue pagine. Tra le ragioni di questa relazione controversa troviamo certamente la mancata accettazione dei celebri “cinque pilastri” di Wikipedia, ma anche le difficoltà oggettive che si incontrano nell‘analisi delle voci.

DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2022-19332.

Il terzo e ultimo contributo, di Author 3, affronta dal punto di vista dell’uso della storia e della scrittura storiografica un celeberrimo social network, Facebook. Collettore naturale di fonti storiche, che ripropone costantemente ai suoi utenti la riproposizione delle sue memorie in un appiattimento oggettivo del passato nel presente, consente anche di commentare e implementare collaborativamente spontanei archivi di fonti, che diventano, di fatto, riletture collaborative della storia.

DOI:

_____________________

Per approfondire

  • Frisch, M. A Shared Authority: Essays on the Craft and Meaning of Oral and Public History. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1990.
  • Haklay, M. “Citizen Science and Volunteered Geographic Information – overview and typology of participation.” In Crowdsourcing Geographic Knowledge: Volunteered Geographic Information in Theory and Practice, edited by Daniel Z. Sui, Sarah Elwood, Michael F. Goodchild, 105-122. Berlin: Springer, 2012.

Siti web

  • Library of Congress 2008. Library of Congress. Prints and Photographs Division, et al. “For the common good: The Library of Congress Flickr pilot project.” Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, 2008 https://www.loc.gov/rr/print/flickr_report_final.pdf (last accessed 21 December 2021).

_____________________

[1] See https://www.oldweather.org/ (last accessed 12 January 2022). Old Weather volunteers explore, mark, and transcribe historic ship’s logs from the 19th and early 20th centuries in order to help the research of climate scientists.
[2] Professionals and amateurs.
[3] The fundamental principles of Wikipedia may be summarized in five “pillars” (principles): 1) Wikipedia is an encyclopedia; 2) it is written from a neutral point of view; 3) it is free content that anyone can use, edit, and distribute; 4) its editors should treat each other with respect and civility; 5) it ha guidelines but no firm rules, See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Five_pillars (last accessed 12 January 2022).

_____________________

Image Credits

Map of Atlantic Coast of North America from the Chesapeake Bay to Florida © 1630s, Joan Vingboons.

Recommended Citation

Paci, Deborah, Enrica Salvatori: Collaborative History Writings. In: Public History Weekly 10 (2022) 1, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2022-19325.

Editorial Responsibility

Marko Demantowsky

Copyright © 2021 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 10 (2022) 1
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2022-19325

Tags: , , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

I accept that my given data and my IP address is sent to a server in the USA only for the purpose of spam prevention through the Akismet program.More information on Akismet and GDPR.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest