Remembrance Policy on World War 2 in Japan

Erinnerungspolitik in Japan nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg

 

Abstract: When we talk about Japanese politics of memory and the Second World War, it is a complex matter. The armed conflict began as a war only with the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor December 1941. But as early as September 1931, Japan invaded the Manchuria in northern China. 6 years later, Japanese troops attacked other parts of China. In addition, Korea had been annexed since 1910 and formally became part of Japan. Mass crimes have been committed in all the above-mentioned phases. There are special and sometimes very different aspects of memory policy in all phases. Even if, in retrospect, it appears that this is a commemorative period, heterogeneous political and legal structures are at work. Irrespective of this, superordinate structures of remembrance policy can be presented, which for selected aspects are also illuminated in contrast with those of Germany. To sum up, it can be said that Japanese remembrance policy can be described with four central characteristics: 1. Japan directed its aggressive actions mainly abroad and less against its own population. Accordingly, there was no pressure to punish atrocities taken place in the one country. 2. The places of Japanese crimes were sometimes many thousands of kilometers away from their own country and, unlike in the case of ‘Germany, there was no land border with the former enemies. 3. The allied military administrations informed Japanese services about every single court decision, and as early as the 1960s, they produced very detailed overviews of war crimes trials.
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-16304
Languages: English, German


WWII ended for Japan with the capitulation on September 2, 1945, but dating its beginning is more complicated. Japan began its occupation policy in September 1931[1] with the invasion of Manchuria. The next stage of aggression began on July 7, 1937 with the Second Sino-Japanese War.[2] Following the Japanese invasion of the US naval base at Pearl Harbor, the USA declared war on Japan on 8 December 1941.[3] In addition, there is the special relationship between Korea and Japan. Already in 1910 Korea was annexed and became part of Japan. After the end of the WWII, Korea became independent again.

Three Periods of Commemoration

All three phases of Japanese aggression are characterized by their own dynamics of violence. While the first two remained concentrated on China, they expanded with the declaration of war by the USA and subsequently by a number of other states into whose territories Japanese troops invaded: UK, Australia, New Zealand, the Netherlands and the USSR. The Tokyo International Military Tribunal for the Far East (IMTFE, 1946 – 1948) referred to these different phases. Article 5 defined: “Crimes against Peace: Namely, the planning, preparation, initiation or waging of a declared or undeclared war of aggression […]”. Accordingly, war crimes could already be committed by Japan in the early 1930s. One of the most famous war events was the massacre of Nanking (China) on December 13, 1937. Tens of thousands of girls and women were raped and many more Chinese became victims of massive violence. Analogous to the regulations for the IMTFE, these atrocities were considered war crimes. Such atrocities against other Allies could only be committed from December 1941 onwards. This results in two different periods for remembrance politics: 1931 – 1945 and 1941 – 1945.

Remembrance of Japanese and Korean Victims

Mass violence against Koreans in Korea and during the war is to be assessed differently. Since they were considered to be the population of Japan, no war crimes could be committed against Koreans. This is particularly evident in the assessment of crimes of forced prostitution (Comfort Women). About 80 percent of all forced prostitutes were Koreans. This group of victims fell out of the focus of Allied criminal proceedings.[4]

To complete the picture, the territory of Japan must be mentioned. Here there were not only a large number of P.O.W. camps, in which the inmates were subjected to unspeakable suffering. In addition, P.O.W. were forced to work for the Japanese armaments industry. An independent war crime trial program dealt primarily with such atrocities: so-called Yokohama Trails. A total of around 1,050 defendants were brought to trial here.[5]

The overall picture is one of different regions of violence with specific dynamics. What most of them have in common is that some of them were located many thousands of miles away from Japan. And in addition, there was practically no common border with the home country Japan. This is a special feature in comparison to the war in Europe. Many of the states occupied by the Nazi regime had common borders with Germany. Moreover, Japanese aggressiveness was not mainly directed against its own population. This finding is the second, general characteristic of Japanese remembrance policy. Memorial traditions as reactions to violence against a Japanese victim population – during the armed conflicts from the early 1930s until the end of WWII – are not in focus of national politics of rememberness. In other words, there is a lack of larger interstate victim groups to which political attention should have been paid. This is not meant to be an absolution, but simply a historical finding.

Neglecting the German Model of Dealing with the Past

Another cornerstone of Japanese remembrance policy is the knowledge of allied punishment for war crimes. Unlike Germany, Japanese services had a very precise overview of war crimes trials. The measures of the Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers (SCAP) were decisive. It’s documented that the Japanese government received regular reports on probably all proceedings before Allied military courts.[6] Allied military missions supplied the information to SCAP. This gave Japan the opportunity to create very precise overviews of the suspicions of its own crimes. The reports were supplemented by documents from Japanese defense lawyers. These compilations were published in Japanese in the 1980s and 1990s.[7] No comparable work has been done by German services. In this sense, Japan has done a more detailed analysis of the war crimes trials than the Federal Republic of Germany.

This does not, however, say anything about the extent to which these works shaped the historical-political image of Japan. For the existence of detailed overviews on the punishment of Japanese war crimes is not yet proof of a political and social debate on the consequences of the WWII. According to Japanese Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida in 2015 on the occasion of German Chancellor Angele Merkel’s visit to Japan, the open approach to Germany’s own past cannot be transferred to Japan. Rather, he said, it was inappropriate to compare Japan and Germany with regard to their wartime past. Moreover, Germany and Japan are surrounded by other neighbors.[8]

In the 1990s – supported by research on Comfort Women by Yuki Tanaka[9] or Hirofumi Hayashi[10] – there was a liberalization of Japan’s politics of memory. The national confrontation with Japan’s wartime past as a whole seemed to have taken an important step. However, the mood in the Land of the Rising Sun lasted only a few years. Gradually, the liberal-democratic government of Shinzō Abe relativized the perspective of the 1990s. A flare-up of Japanese nationalism and historical revisionism spread. Abe distanced himself from the groundbreaking statements of his predecessors. This included Japan’s responsibility for the war of aggression with many millions of victims and the fate of Comfort Women.

Controversies around Yasukuni Shrine

As a commemorative political statement, Abe officially visited the controversial Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo on August 15 (the day of the capitulation in 1945) to commemorate the Japanese war dead (like prime minister Nakasone Yasuhiro in the 1980s did). The political assessment in Japan is very different. Right-wing conservative circles see the Yasukuni Shrine as a symbol of religious worship.[11] For critics, however, in view of Japan’s crimes in WWII, the shrine is a sign of a growing militarism and the denial of a critical approach to its own history. This is particularly true of the veneration of officers of the Japanese army sentenced at the IMTFE and Yokohama (as well as many other places in the Asia-Pacific region).[12] Among them were members of Unit 731[13], which conducted experiments with chemical and biological weapons not far from the northern Chinese city of Harbin. It is interesting to note that the Japanese Tennō (emperor of Japan) have not visited the shrine since the official commemoration of convicted war criminals in the 1970s. International criticism is primarily directed at the official visits of leading Japanese politicians. First and foremost, China as well as North and South Korea.

The history of the building in which the IMTFE met can be seen as an impressive example of Japanese remembrance politics. In the 1951 Treaty of San Francisco[14], the verdict of the tribunal was explicitly recognized. However, this did not preserve the demolition of the building. The new IMTFE Memorial – Ichigaya Memorial Hall [15] – is located on the premises of the Ministry of Defense. It is indicative of Japanese remembrance policy that the memorial is not located in the historic site. The Ichigaya Memorial Hall shows an installation of the outer entrance area of the historical ensemble. “Inside, the entrance hall to the auditorium, the auditorium, as well as the office of the Minister of Armed Forces and the room that served the Tennō as a resting place during his visits were reconstructed.”[16] There is no exhibition that could even remotely be compared to the Memorium Nuremberg Trials.

Weak Educational Approach

Another aspect of Japanese dealing with the past that is hotly debated both nationally and internationally are the so-called Japanese history textbook controversies.[17] It is not only about the uncritical presentation in textbooks. Rather, it is also about the constitutionality of the state admission system for educational materials. In some textbooks, war crimes such as the massacre of Nanking or the invasion of Manchuria were insufficiently reported. There have been complaints from China and South Korea since the early 1980s. However, the disputes intensified noticeably after 2000, when the Society for the Creation of New History Books published a book with an obviously revisionist perspective.[18] It should not be forgotten, however, that there are also textbooks with more historical accuracy. A study by the Stanford University shows that less than one percent of Japanese textbooks used provocative and inflammatory language and imagery, but that these few books, printed by just one publisher, received greater media attention.[19]

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Seraphim, Franziska. War Memory and Social Politics in Japan, 1945–2005. Harvard University: Harvard East Asian monographs, 2006.
  •  Seaton, Philip A. Japan’s Contested War Memories, The ‘Memory Rifts’ in Historical Consciousness of World War II, London and New York: Routledge, 2007.
  • Szczepanska, Kamila. The Politics of War Memory in Japan. Progressive Civil Society Groups and Contestation of Memory of the Asia-Pacific War, London and New York: Routledge, 2014

Web Resources

_____________________
[1] Charles River, The Japanese Invasion of Manchuria: The History of the Occupation of Northeastern China that Presaged World War II, Independent Publishing Platform, 23.3.2017.
[2] John Ferris, Evan Mawdsley, The Cambridge History of the Second World War, Volume I: Fighting the War (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 2015).
[3] JOINT RESOLUTION Declaring that a state of war exists between the Imperial Government of Japan and the Government and the people of the United States and making provisions to prosecute the same, 55 Stat. 795 (Pub. Law 77-328) https://uslaw.link/citation/stat/55/796 (last accessed 15 May 2020).
[4] ICWC University of Marburg Database (April 2020).
[5] ICWC University of Marburg Database (April 2020).
[6] US National Archive Record Group 331 SCAP box 1375-1377.
[7] Chaen Yoshio, ed., Nihon be-shi kyu senpan shiryo (Tokyo: Fuji shuppan 1983), Chaen Yoshio, ed., Bi-shi kyū senpan. Oranda saiban shiryō, zenkan tsūran, (Tokyo: Fuji shuppan, 1992), Franziska Seraphim, “War criminals‘ prisons in Asia”, in The Dismantling of Japan’s Empire in East Asia, eds. Barak Kushner and Sherzod Muninov, (New York: Routledge 2017), 125-146, here: 132.
[8] Schwieriger Umgang mit der Vergangenheit [Difficult dealing with the past]. Deutsche Welle from 14. August 2015 https://www.dw.com/de/schwieriger-umgang-mit-der-vergangenheit/a-18641314 (last accessed 15 May 2020).
[9] Yuki Tanaka, Japan’s Comfort Women: Sexual Slavery and Prostitution During World War II and the US Occupation (New York: Routledge 2002).
[10] Hirofumi Hayashi, “Japanese comfort women in Southeast Asia”, Japan Forum, 10 (2), 211-219. Hirofumi Hayashi, “Disputes in Japan over the Japanese Military Comfort. Women System and Its Perception in History”, The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Vol. 617 (May, 2008), 123-132; Caroline Norma, The Japanese Comfort Women and Sexual Slavery during the China and Pacific Wars (London, Oxford: Bloomsbury Academic 2017).
[11] Mark Mullins, “How Yasukuni Shrine Survived the Occupation”, Monumenta Nipponica 65 (1) 2010, 89-136.
[12] Yoshinobu Higurashi, “Yasukuni and the Enshrinement of War Criminals”, Nippon.com 26 December 2013.
[13] Peter Williams, David Wallace, Unit 731 – Japans Secret Biological Warfare in World War II (Free Press 1989); Toshiyuki Tanaka, Yuki Tanaka, Hidden Horrors: Japanese War Crimes in World War II (Westview Press Inc. 1998), See also Unit 731. Japan’s Biological Warfare Project https://unit731.org/ (last accessed 15 May 2020).
[14]Treaty of San Francisco of 1951, United Nations Treaty Series 1952. https://treaties.un.org/doc/Publication/UNTS/Volume%20136/volume-136-I-1832-English.pdf (last acessed: 15.05.2020).
[15] Ichigaya Memorial Hall tour https://www.tokyocreative.com/articles/18715-following-macarthurs-footsteps-part-iii-ichigaya-memorial-hall (last accessed 15 May 2020).
[16] André Hertrich, Nürnberg und Tokyo erinnern: die Musealisierung der Kriegsverbrecherprozesse an ihrem historischen Schauplatz, https://oeaw.academia.edu/Andr%C3%A9Hertrich (last accessed 15 May 2020).
[17] Saburō Ienaga, Japan’s past, Japan’s future: one historian’s odyssey, (Boston: Rowman & Littlefield 2001), in particular section: The textbook trials and the struggle at Tokyo University of Education, p.175-196; Sven Saaler, Politics, Memory and Public Opinion. The History Textbook Controversy and Japanese Society (München: Iudicium 2005), Onuma Yasuaki, “Japanese War Guilt and Postwar Responsibilities of Japan”, Berkeley Journal of International Law 20 (3) 2003, 600-620.
[18] Norimitsu Onishi, “Japan’s Textbooks Reflect Revised History”, 1.4.2007. https://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/01/world/asia/01japan.html (last accessed 15 May 2020).
[19] Daniel Chirot et al., Confronting Memories of World War II: European and Asian Legacies (Washington: University of Washington Press, 2014).

_____________________

Image Credits

USS Bunker Hill hit by two Kamikazes 1945 © Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Recommended Citation

Form, Wolfgang: Remembrance Policy on World War 2 in Japan. In: Public History Weekly 8 (2020) 5, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-16304.

Editorial Responsibility

Dominika Uczkiewicz / Krzysztof Ruchniewicz (Team Wrocław)

Der Zweite Weltkrieg endete für Japan mit der Kapitulation am 15. August 1945 (am 2. September 1945 fand die Kapitulationszeremonie an Deck der USS Missouri statt). Den Beginn des Zweiten Weltkriegs im pazifisch-asiatischen Raum zu datieren ist dagegen komplizierter. Japan begann seine Okkupationspolitik im September 1931 mit dem Überfall auf die Mandschurei.[1] Die nächste Stufe der Aggression begann am 7. Juli 1937 mit dem Zweiten Japanisch-Chinesischen Krieg.[2] Nach dem japanischen Überfall auf den US-amerikanischen Marinestützpunkt Pearl Harbor erklärten die USA am 8. Dezember 1941 Japan den Krieg.[3] Hinzu kommt noch das besondere Verhältnis Koreas zu Japan. Bereits 1910 wurde Korea annektiert und zu einem Teil Japans. Nach dem Ende des Zweiten Weltkriegs wurde Korea wieder selbstständig.

Drei Perioden des Gedenkens

Alle drei Phasen japanischer Aggression zeichnen sich durch eigene Gewaltdynamiken aus. Blieben die ersten beiden auf China konzentriert, so erweiterte sie sich mit der Kriegserklärung der USA und in der Folge einer Reihe anderer Staaten, in deren Territorien japanische Truppen einmarschierten: Großbritannien, Australien, Neuseeland, die Niederlande und die Sowjetunion. Im Hauptkriegsverbrecherprozess in Tokyo (IMTFE, 1946 – 1948) wurde auf die unterschiedlichen Phasen Bezug genommen. Artikel 5 definierte: “Crimes against Peace: Namely, the planning, preparation, initiation or waging of a declared or undeclared war of aggression […]”. Dementsprechend konnten Kriegsverbrechen bereits Anfang der 1930er Jahre von Japan begangen werden. Eines der bekanntesten Kriegsereignisse war das Massaker von Nangking (China) ab dem 13. Dezember 1937. Zehntausende chinesischer Mädchen und Frauen wurden vergewaltigt und viele weitere Chines*innen wurden Opfer massiver Gewalt. In Analogie zu den Regelungen für das Tokioter Kriegsverbrechertribunal wurden diese Gräueltaten als Kriegsverbrechen gewertet. Gegen alle anderen Alliierten konnten Kriegsverbrechen erst ab Dezember 1941 begangen werden. Dadurch ergeben sich zwei unterschiedliche Zeiträume für Erinnerungspolitik: 1931 – 1945 und 1941 – 1945.

Gedenken an japanische und koreanische Opfer

Anders ist Massengewalt in Korea und während der Kriegsphasen gegen Koreaner zu bewerten. Da sie als Bevölkerung Japans galten, konnte gegen Koreaner kein Kriegsverbrechen verübt werden. Das ist insbesondere bei der Beurteilung der Verbrechen wegen Zwangsprostitution evident. Etwa 80 Prozent aller Zwangsprostituierten waren Koreanerinnen. Diese Opfergruppe fiel aus dem Fokus alliierter Strafverfahren heraus.[4]

Um das Bild zu komplettieren, muss noch das Gebiet Japans genannt werden. Hier gab es nicht nur eine große Anzahl von Kriegsgefangenenlager, in denen den Insassen unsägliches Leid angetan wurde. Darüber hinaus wurden alliierte Soldaten zur Arbeit für die japanische Rüstungsindustrie gezwungen. Ein eigenständiger Verfahrenskomplex thematisierte vornehmlich japanische Kriegsverbrechen an gefangengenommenen Soldaten: Yokohama Trails. Insgesamt wurden hier rund 1050 Angeklagte vor Gericht gestellt.[5]

In der Gesamtschau bietet sich ein Bild unterschiedlicher Gewaltregionen mit spezifischen Gewaltdynamiken. Den meisten ist gemein, dass sie sich zum Teil viele tausend Kilometer weit von Japan ereigneten. Zudem gab es praktisch keine gemeinsame Grenze mit dem Heimatland Japan. Dies ist ein besonderes Merkmal im Vergleich zum Kriegsgeschehen in Europa. Viele der vom Nazi-Regime okkupierten Staaten hatten gemeinsame Grenzen mit Deutschland. Daneben richtete sich japanische Aggression deutlich seltener gegen die eigene Bevölkerung. Dieser Befund ist das zweite, generelle Spezifikum japanischer Erinnerungspolitik. Gedenktraditionen als Reaktion auf Gewalt gegen eine japanische Opferbevölkerung – während der bewaffneten Konflikte ab den frühen 1930er Jahren bis zum Ende des Zweiten Weltkrieges – sind eher nicht zu erwarten. Dies belegen die Erfahrungen der vergangenen Jahrzehnte. Mit anderen Worten fehlen größere interstaatliche Opfergruppen, denen man politische Aufmerksamkeit hätte widmen müssen. Dies soll keiner Absolution, sondern schlicht einem historischen Befund entsprechen.

Unterschiede zum deutschen Modell der Vergangenheitsbewältigung

Ein weiterer Eckpunkt japanischer Erinnerungspolitik ist das Wissen um die alliierte Ahndung von Kriegsverbrechen. Anders als Deutschland hatten japanische Dienststellen einen sehr genauen Überblick über Kriegsverbrecherprozesse. Ausschlaggebend waren die Maßnahmen des Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers (SCAP). Es ist belegt, dass die japanische Regierung wahrscheinlich über alle Verfahren vor alliierten Militärgerichten turnusmäßig Meldungen erhielt.[6] Die Informationen lieferten die alliierten Militärmissionen an SCAP. Damit hatte Japan die Möglichkeit sehr genaue Übersichten über die Ahnung eigener Verbrechen zu erstellen. Ergänzt wurden die Berichte durch Unterlagen japanischer Strafverteidiger*innen. Diese Zusammenstellungen wurden in den 1980er und 1990er Jahren auf japanisch publiziert.[7] Vergleichbares haben deutsche Dienststellen nicht erarbeitet. In diesem Sinne hat Japan eine ausführlichere Aufarbeitung der Kriegsverbrecherprozesse geleistet als die Bundesrepublik Deutschland.

Dies sagt allerdings noch nichts dazu aus, inwieweit diese Arbeiten das geschichtspolitische Bild Japans prägten. Denn die Existenz ausführlicher Übersichten zur Ahndung japanischer Kriegsverbrechen ist noch kein Beleg für eine politische und gesellschaftliche Auseinandersetzung mit den Folgen des Zweiten Weltkrieges. Der offene Umgang mit der eigenen Vergangenheit in Deutschland, so der japanische Außenminister Fumio Kishida 2015 anlässlich des Besuches der deutschen Bundeskanzlerin Angela Merkel in Japan, sei nicht auf Japan übertragbar. Vielmehr sei es unangemessen Japan und Deutschland im Hinblick auf deren Kriegsvergangenheit zu vergleichen. Zudem seien Deutschland und Japan von anderen Nachbarn umgeben.[8]

In den 1990er Jahren gab es – unterstützt durch die Forschungen von Yuki Tanaka[9] oder Hirofumi Hayashi[10] zu Comfort Women – eine Liberalisierung der Erinnerungspolitik Japans. Die nationale Auseinandersetzung mit der japanischen Kriegsvergangenheit schien insgesamt einen wichtigen Schritt getan zu haben. Allerdings hielt sich diese Stimmung im Land der aufgehenden Sonne nur wenige Jahre. Nach und nach relativierte die liberaldemokratische Regierung von Shinzō Abe die Sichtweise der 1990er Jahren. Es machte sich ein aufflammender japanischer Nationalismus und Geschichtsrevisionismus breit. Abe distanzierte sich von den wegweisenden Äußerungen seiner Amtsvorgänger. U.a. auch hinsichtlich der Verantwortung Japans für den Angriffskrieg mit vielen Millionen Opfern und das Schicksal der Comfort Women.

Kontroverse um den Yasukuni-Schrein

Als erinnerungspolitisches Statement besuchte Abe zum Andenken an die japanischen Kriegstoten (wie Nakasone Yasuhiro in den 1980er Jahren) am 15. August (Tag der Kapitulation 1945) offiziell den umstrittenen Yasukuni-Schrein in Tokio. Die politische Bewertung des Schreins in Japan fällt sehr unterschiedlich aus. Rechtskonservative Kreise sehen im Yasukuni-Schrein ein Sinnbild religiöser Verehrung.[11] Für Kritiker*innen allerdings ist der Schrein angesichts der Verbrechen Japans im Zweiten Weltkrieg ein Zeichen eines erstarkenden Militarismus und des Leugnens eines kritischen Umgangs mit der eigenen Geschichte. Dies betrifft insbesondere die Verehrung von bei den Kriegsverbrecherprozessen in Tokio und Yokohama (sowie an vielen anderen Orten im asiatisch-pazifischen Raum) verurteilten Offizieren der japanischen Armee.[12] Darunter waren auch Angehörige der Einheit 731,[13] die unweit der nordchinesischen Stadt Harbin Experimente mit chemischen und biologischen Waffen durchführte. Interessant ist, dass die japanischen Tennō (Japans Kaiser) seit dem offiziellen Gedenken an verurteilte Kriegsverbrecher in den 1970er Jahren den Schrein nicht mehr besuchten. Die internationale Kritik richtet sich in erster Linie gegen die offiziellen Besuche führender japanischer Politiker. An erster Stelle von China sowie Nord- und Südkorea.

Die Geschichte des Gebäudes, in dem das IMTFE tagte, kann als eindrücklicher Beleg japanischer Erinnerungspolitik gelten. Im Vertrag von San Francisco (1951[14]) ist das Urteil des Tokioter Kriegsverbrecher-Tribunals ausdrücklich anerkannt. Dennoch verhinderte dies nicht den Abriss des Hauses. Die IMTFE-Gedenkstätte (Ichigaya Memorial Hall[15]) befindet sich auf dem Gelände des Verteidigungsministeriums. Bezeichnend für die japanische Erinnerungspolitik ist, dass das Memorium nicht am historischen Ort zu finden ist. Die Ichigaya-Gedenkstätte zeigt eine Installation des äußeren Eingangsbereichs des historischen Ensembles. „Im Inneren wurde die Eingangshalle zum Auditorium, das Auditorium, sowie das Büro des Heeresministers und der Raum, der dem Tenno während seiner Besuche zur Rast diente (binden no ma) rekonstruiert.”[16] Eine Ausstellung, die auch nur im Entferntesten mit der des Memoriums Nürnberger Prozesse verglichen werden könnte, findet sich nicht.

Der Schulbuchstreit

Ein weiterer national und international heftig diskutierter Aspekt japanischer Geschichtspolitik ist der sogenannte Schulbuchstreit.[17] Er betrifft die öffentlichen Auseinandersetzungen über die Behandlung von Kriegsverbrechen in Geschichtsbüchern. Es geht nicht nur um eine unkritische Darstellung. Vielmehr auch um die Verfassungsmäßigkeit des staatlichen Zulassungssystems für Ausbildungsmaterialien. In einigen Schulbüchern wurde auf Kriegsverbrechen wie das Massaker von Nanking oder den Überfall auf die Mandschurei unzureichend hingewiesen. Beschwerden von China und Korea gab es schon seit den früher 1980er Jahren. Allerdings spitzen sich die Auseinandersetzungen ab 2000 merklich zu, als die Gesellschaft zur Erstellung neuer Geschichtsbücher ein Buch mit offensichtlich revisionistischer Sichtweise veröffentlichte.[18] Es darf hingegen nicht vergessen werden, dass es auch Schulbücher mit mehr historischer Genauigkeit gibt. Eine Studie der Stanford Universersity belegt, dass “less than one percent of Japanese textbooks used provocative and inflammatory language and imagery, but that these few books, printed by just one publisher, received greater media attention”.[19]

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Seraphim, Franziska. War Memory and Social Politics in Japan, 1945–2005. Harvard University: Harvard East Asian monographs, 2006.
  •  Seaton, Philip A. Japan’s Contested War Memories, The ‘Memory Rifts’ in Historical Consciousness of World War II, London and New York: Routledge, 2007.
  • Szczepanska, Kamila. The Politics of War Memory in Japan. Progressive Civil Society Groups and Contestation of Memory of the Asia-Pacific War, London and New York: Routledge, 2014

Webressourcen

_____________________
[1] Charles River, The Japanese Invasion of Manchuria: The History of the Occupation of Northeastern China that Presaged World War II, Independent Publishing Platform, 23.3.2017.
[2] John Ferris, Evan Mawdsley, The Cambridge History of the Second World War, Volume I: Fighting the War (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 2015).
[3] JOINT RESOLUTION Declaring that a state of war exists between the Imperial Government of Japan and the Government and the people of the United States and making provisions to prosecute the same, 55 Stat. 795 (Pub. Law 77-328) https://uslaw.link/citation/stat/55/796 (letzter Zugriff 15. Mai 2020).
[4] ICWC University of Marburg Database (April 2020).
[5] ICWC University of Marburg Database (April 2020).
[6] US National Archive Record Group 331 SCAP box 1375-1377.
[7] Chaen Yoshio, ed., Nihon be-shi kyu senpan shiryo (Tokyo: Fuji shuppan 1983), Chaen Yoshio, ed., Bi-shi kyū senpan. Oranda saiban shiryō, zenkan tsūran, (Tokyo: Fuji shuppan, 1992), Franziska Seraphim, “War criminals‘ prisons in Asia”, in The Dismantling of Japan’s Empire in East Asia, eds. Barak Kushner and Sherzod Muninov, (New York: Routledge 2017), 125-146, here: 132.
[8] Schwieriger Umgang mit der Vergangenheit [Difficult dealing with the past]. Deutsche Welle from 14. August 2015 https://www.dw.com/de/schwieriger-umgang-mit-der-vergangenheit/a-18641314 (letzter Zugriff 15. Mai 2020).
[9] Yuki Tanaka, Japan’s Comfort Women: Sexual Slavery and Prostitution During World War II and the US Occupation (New York: Routledge 2002).
[10] Hirofumi Hayashi, “Japanese comfort women in Southeast Asia”, Japan Forum, 10 (2), 211-219. Hirofumi Hayashi, “Disputes in Japan over the Japanese Military Comfort. Women System and Its Perception in History”, The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Vol. 617 (May, 2008), 123-132; Caroline Norma, The Japanese Comfort Women and Sexual Slavery during the China and Pacific Wars (London, Oxford: Bloomsbury Academic 2017).
[11] Mark Mullins, “How Yasukuni Shrine Survived the Occupation”, Monumenta Nipponica 65 (1) 2010, 89-136.
[12] Yoshinobu Higurashi, “Yasukuni and the Enshrinement of War Criminals”, Nippon.com 26 December 2013.
[13] Peter Williams, David Wallace, Unit 731 – Japans Secret Biological Warfare in World War II (Free Press 1989); Toshiyuki Tanaka, Yuki Tanaka, Hidden Horrors: Japanese War Crimes in World War II (Westview Press Inc. 1998), See also Unit 731. Japan’s Biological Warfare Project https://unit731.org/ (letzter Zugriff 15. Mai 2020).
[14]Treaty of San Francisco of 1951, United Nations Treaty Series 1952. https://treaties.un.org/doc/Publication/UNTS/Volume%20136/volume-136-I-1832-English.pdf (last acessed: 15.05.2020).
[15] Ichigaya Memorial Hall tour https://www.tokyocreative.com/articles/18715-following-macarthurs-footsteps-part-iii-ichigaya-memorial-hall (letzter Zugriff 15. Mai 2020).
[16] André Hertrich, Nürnberg und Tokyo erinnern: die Musealisierung der Kriegsverbrecherprozesse an ihrem historischen Schauplatz, https://oeaw.academia.edu/Andr%C3%A9Hertrich (letzter Zugriff 15. Mai 2020).
[17] Saburō Ienaga, Japan’s past, Japan’s future: one historian’s odyssey, (Boston: Rowman & Littlefield 2001), in particular section: The textbook trials and the struggle at Tokyo University of Education, p.175-196; Sven Saaler, Politics, Memory and Public Opinion. The History Textbook Controversy and Japanese Society (München: Iudicium 2005), Onuma Yasuaki, “Japanese War Guilt and Postwar Responsibilities of Japan”, Berkeley Journal of International Law 20 (3) 2003, 600-620.
[18] Norimitsu Onishi, “Japan’s Textbooks Reflect Revised History”, 1.4.2007. https://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/01/world/asia/01japan.html (letzter Zugriff 15. Mai 2020).
[19] Daniel Chirot et al., Confronting Memories of World War II: European and Asian Legacies (Washington: University of Washington Press, 2014).

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

USS Bunker Hill hit by two Kamikazes 1945 © Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Form, Wolfgang: Remembrance Policy on World War 2 in Japan. In: Public History Weekly 8 (2020) 5, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-16304.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Dominika Uczkiewicz / Krzysztof Ruchniewicz (Team Wrocław)

Copyright (c) 2020 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 8 (2020) 5
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2020-16304

Tags: , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

I accept that my given data and my IP address is sent to a server in the USA only for the purpose of spam prevention through the Akismet program.More information on Akismet and GDPR.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest