Restitution and Historical Judgment

Restitution und historische Urteilskraft


A few days ago, in a festive ceremony the Baden-Württemberg Minister of Culture handed over the Bible and Whip of Hendrik Witbooi, which had previously been kept in the Linden Museum in Stuttgart, to the state of Namibia. These objects had been captured by German colonial troops during the Nama Uprising in South West Africa, which Witbooi had led until he was killed in 1905. The return of Witbooi’s personal property appears to amount to an acknowledgement of German guilt for colonial crimes. But are restitutions a suitable means for dealing with a burdened history?

“Everyone and everything back home?”

In November 2017, French President Emmanuel Macron publicly promised “temporary or permanent restitutions of the African heritage to Africa”[1] in the capital of Burkina Faso. Last spring, the President commissioned the French art historian Bénédicte Savoy and the Senegalese national economist Felwine Sarr to draw up implementation proposals. After only six months, the authors came to the recommendation – also highly regarded in the Federal Republic of Germany – that all colonial objects that had come into French possession by whatever means and using whatever methods by 1960 should be returned to their countries of origin for good.[2]

Such restitutions might lead one to think that the former European colonial powers are finally drawing appropriate conclusions from their post-colonial agenda. In dealing with Europe’s colonial heritage, historian Jürgen Zimmerer sees “one of the great, if not the greatest, identity debates of our time” and, like Savoy and Sarr, argues in favour of “restituting stolen objects”.[3] On the other hand, journalist Patrick Bahners draws attention to some irritating postcolonial agendas of the French Yellow Vest (Gilets jaunes) movement, where restitution and immigration restrictions appear in the program of the presidential critics’ movement as a means related to restoring, according to Bahners, the “purity of the nation”. The Cameroonian political scientist Achille Mbembe had raised the question of whether we really want to live in a world in which “everyone and everything must return home.” The Gilets jaunes seem to answer this question in the affirmative, thus turning Macron’s zeal for restitution against himself.[4]

The Cross of Cape Cross

It is highly doubtful whether all complicated legal and historical valuation questions can be solved with the stroke of a pen, so to speak, based on a key year. Provenance research provides the basis for the formation of an historical judgment that can vary greatly depending on the perspective and position of the speaker and the stories told about museum objects, but an historical judgment is not limited to such findings.

In a new magazine, the German Historical Museum sets forth a good example by raising the question of historical justice using the example of a single exhibit from its permanent exhibition that has been researched for its origin[5]: In 1486, Portuguese colonizers erected a stone cross with a coat-of-arms column on a coastal strip of southwest Africa, known today as Cape Cross, on behalf of their king. In 1893, the crew of a German ship “discovered” the artefact, which had suffered from considerable exposure to the weather in the meantime, and took it with them to their homeland, at that time the colonial „protective” power over South West Africa. At the behest of the German emperor, a replica of the Portuguese Padrão was erected at Cape Cross, supplemented by an inscription by which William II. intended to inscribe himself into the European colonial tradition. The original column was given a prominent place in the Berlin Museum of Oceanography until the destruction of the war put an end to it in 1944. These remains of German colonial rule were dug out of the rubbles of history in 1953.

After the decolonisation of South West Africa, the Imperial replica became Namibia’s national monument in 1968, while the original column and cross from the Portuguese 15th century now adorned the chapter “Age of Discovery” of the GDR Museum of German History. Even after the transfer of this exhibit to the permanent exhibition of the present German Historical Museum, it remained in this role. In 2017, the Namibian government, however, demanded the return of the original cross of Cape Cross.[6] Historical judgment should provide an answer as to whether or not the Museum will meet or reject this demand.

“Historical Justice”

Is the striving for “historical justice” a suitable means of historical judgment? If one follows the moral philosopher Lukas Meyer, in this case an approach of compensatory justice related to the past does not apply, but a “future-oriented” approach does: The persistence of a colonial regime of injustice moves into the foreground and generates duties on the part of “the descendants towards earlier generations”[7], as France’s president also emphasizes.  Here history again becomes the teacher of life; an exemplary narrative in the sense of Jörn Rüsen is told.

The Namibian government commissioner Phanuel Kaapama roundly denies any legitimacy to international law because it is Eurocentric and has served to justify genocide.[8] According to legal expert Sophie Schönberger this is true, but it must be borne in mind that international law anyway answers the question of justice only at the price of violations of the prohibition of retroactivity under the rule of law, and the (unsolicited) development of an “American universal jurisdiction for international human rights violations”. Consequently, it is the task of national legislation to set political standards for historical justice and to draw conclusions about its possible effects on restitution practices.[9]

Botswana curator Winani Thebele-Kgwatalala points out that the Cape Cross cross tells a different story for Germans than for communities in Namibia.[10] Historian Sebastian Conrad, on the other hand, criticizes the “essentialism” of the restitution campaign: similar to Achille Mbembe, he considers that a return to the place of origin, with the traditional justification that an object allegedly is “forever inseparably connected with this place, this group”, constitutes disguised nationalism. However, this criticism against thinking in terms of origin does not lead to a tangible solution either, because the human universalism that supports it can serve as an argument for the preservation of the status quo. Conrad’s proposal: return of the cross and substitution of the artefact by a narrative about its restitution.[11] This narrative is a critical one, directed against traditionalism and “essentialism”.

Multi-perspectivity

The question of “historical justice” obviously cannot be answered if the answer is to be history-conscious. However, the reverse conclusion cannot be drawn from this either, i.e. that history should be limited to factual judgments, as the historian Andreas Rödder recently demanded.[12] For, as can be seen, the formation of historical judgment in public space always encompasses two sides, the historical and the political. At the same time, the current debate about restitution and the provenance of objects shows once again that the distinction between factual judgment and value judgment does not suffice because it is not domain-specific: only in the multi-perspective narrative of history does a norm reflection give rise to historical judgment. This is relevant not only for the identity of the community demanding restitution, but also for the society in which the object in question is located.

Jeremy Silvester, Director of the Museum Association of Namibia, suggests declining the various perspectives. The more abstract the perspective – the cross of Cape Cross as a physical object, as an immobile cultural heritage, and ultimately as an object of meta-narration – the more convincing the narrative construct told about this artefact becomes. For the cross is “wrapped in several narratives and thus offers the possibility to use it for the development of an international collaborative project of parallel presentations.”[13]

This recommendation is based on an original historical judgment. It seems to me that it is clearly superior to the postcolonial demand for a return of colonial objects to their places of origin, because it draws from narrative told as genetical history a conclusion that is viable in terms of current historical culture and debate.

_____________________

Further Reading

  • Frey, Marc. “A Revolutionary Process? Decolonization and International Law.” In Toward a New Moral World Order? Menschenrechtspolitik und Völkerrecht seit 1945, edited by Norbert Frei and Anette Weinke, 94-105. Göttingen: Wallstein, 2016.
  • Rüsen, Jörn. “Werturteile im Geschichtsunterricht.” In Handbuch der Geschichtsdidaktik, edited by Klaus Klaus Bergmann et al., 304-308. Seelze-Velber: Kallmeyer 1997.
  • Zimmerer, Jürgen and Joachim Zeller, eds. Völkermord in Deutsch-Südwestafrika. Der Kolonialkrieg (1904-1908) in Namibia und seine Folgen. Berlin: Christoph Links, 2003.

Web Resources

_____________________

[1] Discours d’Emanuel Macron à l’Université de Ouagadougou, 28 November 2017, https://www.elysee.fr/emmanuel-macron/2017/11/28/discours-demmanuel-macron-a-luniversite-de-ouagadougou (last accessed 10 March 2019).
[2] Felwine Sarr, Bénédicte Savoy, The Restitution of African Cultural Heritage. Toward a New Relational Ethics; see the French and English versions at https://restitutionreport2018.com (last accessed 10 March 2019).
[3] Jürgen Zimmerer,  “Die größte Identitätsdebatte unserer Zeit,” Süddeutsche Zeitung, 20 February 2019, https://www.sueddeutsche.de/kultur/kolonialismus-postkolonialismus-humboldt-forum-raubkunst-1.4334846 (last accessed 10 March 2019).
[4] Patrick Bahners, “Französisches Ausleerungsgeschäft. Der ‘Bericht über die Restitution afrikanischen Kulturerbes’,” Merkur 73 (2019) No. 838: 6.
[5] Lukas H. Meyer, “Gerechtigkeit zur rechten Zeit. Philosophische Betrachtungen zur Rückgabe des padrão,Historische Urteilskraft. Magazin des Deutschen Historischen Museums 1 (2019): 22-33; Jeremy Silvester, “Museumsobjekte, Erinnerung und Identität in Namibia,” Historische Urteilskraft. Magazin des Deutschen Historischen Museums 1 (2019): 43-47; Julia Voss im Gespräch mit Sebastian Conrad, Lukas H. Meyer, Ruprecht Polenz und Winani Thebele-Kgwatalala, “Koloniale Objekte und historische Gerechtigkeit,” Historische Urteilskraft. Magazin des Deutschen Historischen Museums 1 (2019): 48-54.
[6] Sabine Witt, “Chronologie,” Historische Urteilskraft. Magazin des Deutschen Historischen Museums 1 (2019): 11.
[7] Lukas H. Meyer, “Gerechtigkeit zur rechten Zeit. Philosophische Betrachtungen zur Rückgabe des padrão,Historische Urteilskraft. Magazin des Deutschen Historischen Museums 1 (2019): 22-26.
[8] Sophie Schönberger, “Die Säule von Cape Cross und das Völkerrecht,” Historische Urteilskraft. Magazin des Deutschen Historischen Museums 1 (2019): 33.
[9] Sophie Schönberger, “Die Säule von Cape Cross und das Völkerrecht,” Historische Urteilskraft. Magazin des Deutschen Historischen Museums 1 (2019): 28-31.
[10] Julia Voss im Gespräch mit Sebastian Conrad, Lukas H. Meyer, Ruprecht Polenz und Winani Thebele-Kgwatalala, “Koloniale Objekte und historische Gerechtigkeit,” Historische Urteilskraft. Magazin des Deutschen Historischen Museums 1 (2019): 53.
[11] Julia Voss im Gespräch mit Sebastian Conrad, Lukas H. Meyer, Ruprecht Polenz und Winani Thebele-Kgwatalala, “Koloniale Objekte und historische Gerechtigkeit”, Historische Urteilskraft. Magazin des Deutschen Historischen Museums 1 (2019): 52-54.
[12] During a panel discussion of the German Historians‘ Association (VHD) on “Challenges of Historical Sciences Today” in Berlin, 14 February 2019; see the recording of the concluding discussion with the panel public at https://lisa.gerda-henkel-stiftung.de (56:20-57:00), (last accessed 28 February 2019).
[13] Jeremy Silvester, “Museumsobjekte, Erinnerung und Identität in Namibia,” Historische Urteilskraft. Magazin des Deutschen Historischen Museums 1 (2019): 43-47.

_____________________

Image Credits

Kříže na Cape Cross – Namibie © Pavel Špindler CC BY-3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

Recommended Citation

Sandkühler, Thomas: Restitution and Historical Judgment. In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 9, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-13510.

Editorial Responsibility

Dominika Uczkiewicz / Krzysztof Ruchniewicz (Team Wrocław)

Vor einigen Tagen übergab in einer feierlichen Zeremonie die baden-württembergische Kultusministerin die bisher im Stuttgarter Linden-Museum aufbewahrte Bibel und Peitsche Hendrik Witboois an den Staat Namibia. Diese Gegenstände waren von deutschen Kolonialtruppen während des Aufstands der Nama in Südwestafrika erbeutet worden, den Witbooi bis zu seiner Tötung 1905 angeführt hatte. Die Rückgabe des persönlichen Eigentums Witboois erscheint als Konsequenz aus dem Anerkenntnis deutscher Schuld an kolonialen Verbrechen. Aber sind Restitutionen geeignete Mittel für den Umgang mit belasteter Geschichte?

“Jeder und alles wieder nach Hause?”

Im November 2017 sagte der französische Staatspräsident Emmanuel Macron in der Hauptstadt Burkina Fasos “vorübergehende oder endgültige Restitutionen des afrikanischen Erbes nach Afrika”[1] öffentlich zu. Im vergangenen Frühjahr beauftragte der Präsident die französische Kunsthistorikerin Bénédicte Savoy und den senegalesischen Nationalökonomen Felwine Sarr, Umsetzungsvorschläge auszuarbeiten. Nach nur sechs Monaten kamen die Autor*innen zu der auch in der Bundesrepublik stark beachteten Empfehlung, alle kolonialen Objekte endgültig in die Herkunftsländer zu restituieren, die auf welchen Wegen und mit welchen Methoden auch immer bis 1960 in französischen Besitz gelangt waren.[2]

Durch Restitutionen, so könnte man meinen, ziehen die ehemaligen europäischen Kolonialmächte endlich angemessene Schlussfolgerungen aus der postkolonialen Agenda. Der Historiker Jürgen Zimmerer sieht im Umgang mit dem kolonialen Erbe Europas “eine der großen, wenn nicht die größte Identitätsdebatte unserer Zeit”, und spricht sich wie Savoy und Sarr dafür aus, “geraubte Objekte zu restituieren”.[3] Dagegen macht der Journalist Patrick Bahners auf irritierende postkoloniale Agenden der französischen Gelbwesten-Bewegung aufmerksam: Restitution und Einwanderungsbeschränkungen erscheinen im Programm der Präsidentenkritiker*innenbewegung als verwandte Mittel für die Wiederherstellung der, so Bahners, “Reinheit der Nation”. Der kamerunische Politikwissenschaftler Achille Mbembe hatte die Frage aufgeworfen, ob wir wirklich in einer Welt leben wollten, in der “jeder und alles wieder nach Hause zurückmuss”. Die Gilets jaunes scheinen diese Frage zu bejahen, Macrons Restitutionseifer gegen ihn selbst kehrend.[4]

Das Kreuz von Cape Cross

Überhaupt ist zweifelhaft, ob man komplizierte rechtliche und historische Bewertungsfragen gleichsam mit dem Federstrich eines Stichjahres ausblenden kann. Die Provenienzforschung stellt Grundlagen für die Bildung eines historischen Urteils dar, das höchst unterschiedlich ausfallen kann, je nach Perspektive und Sprecherposition und den Geschichten, die über museale Objekte erzählt werden, aber ein historisches Urteil geht in solchen Befunden nicht auf.

Das Deutsche Historische Museum geht in einem neuen Magazin mit gutem Beispiel voran, indem es am Beispiel eines einzelnen, seiner Herkunft nach ausgeforschten, Exponats aus der Dauerausstellung die Frage nach der historischen Gerechtigkeit aufwirft[5]: 1486 stellten portugiesische Kolonisatoren im Auftrag ihres Königs an einem heute Kreuzkap genannten Küstenstreifen Südwestafrikas ein steinernes Kreuz mit Wappensäule auf. 1893 “entdeckte” die Besatzung eines deutschen Schiffs das inzwischen stark verwitterte Artefakt und nahm es kurzerhand mit in die Heimat, die nunmehrige koloniale „Schutzmacht” Südwestafrikas. Auf Geheiß des deutschen Kaisers wurde am Kreuzkap eine Replika des portugiesischen Padrão errichtet, ergänzt um eine Inschrift, durch die sich Wilhelm II. in die europäische Kolonialtradition einzuschreiben gedachte. Die ursprüngliche Säule erhielt einen prominenten Platz im Berliner Museum für Meereskunde, bis die Zerstörungen des Krieges dem 1944 ein Ende machten. Diese Überbleibsel deutscher Kolonialherrschaft wurden 1953 aus dem Schutt der Geschichte gegraben.

Nach der Dekolonisierung Südwestafrika avancierte die kaiserzeitliche Replika 1968 zum Nationaldenkmal Namibias, während die ursprüngliche Säule aus dem portugiesischen 15. Jahrhundert das Kapitel “Entdeckungszeitalter” des DDR-Museums für Deutsche Geschichte zierte. Dabei blieb es auch nach der Überführung dieses Exponats in das jetzige Deutsche Historische Museum. 2017 forderte jedoch die namibische Regierung die Rückgabe des ursprünglichen Kreuzes vom Kreuzkap.[6] Historische Urteilskraft sollte eine Antwort auf die Frage bereitstellen, ob oder ob nicht das Museum diesen Forderungen nachkommen wird.

“Historische Gerechtigkeit”

Ist die Suche nach “historischer Gerechtigkeit” ein geeignetes Mittel, um ein historisches Urteil zu bilden? Folgt man dem Moralphilosophen Lukas Meyer, greift in diesem Fall ein auf die Vergangenheit bezogener Ansatz ausgleichender Gerechtigkeit nicht, wohl aber ein “zukunftsorientierter” Ansatz: Die Persistenz eines kolonialen Unrechtsregimes rückt in den Vordergrund und generiert Pflichten “der Nachkommen gegenüber früheren Generationen”[7], wie sie auch Frankreichs Präsident hervorhebt. Hier wird Geschichte wieder zur Lehrmeisterin des Lebens; eine exemplarische Geschichte im Sinne Jörn Rüsens wird erzählt.

Der namibische Regierungsbeauftragte Phanuel Kaapama spricht dem Völkerrecht rundweg jede Legitimität ab, weil es eurozentrisch sei und der Rechtfertigung von Völkermord gedient habe.[8] Das treffe zu, so die Juristin Sophie Schönberger, gibt aber zu bedenken, dass das Völkerrecht Antworten auf die Gerechtigkeitsfrage nur um den Preis von Verstößen gegen das rechtsstaatliche Rückwirkungsverbot und die (unerbetene) Herausbildung einer “amerikanischen Universalgerichtsbarkeit für internationale Menschenrechtsverletzungen” gebe. Folglich sei es die Aufgabe nationaler Gesetzgebung, Maßstäbe für historische Gerechtigkeit politisch festzulegen und Schlussfolgerungen auf mögliche Restitutionswirkungen zu ziehen.[9]

Die botswanische Kuratorin Winani Thebele-Kgwatalala hebt hervor, dass das Kreuz vom Kreuzkap für die Deutschen eine andere Geschichte erzähle als für Gemeinschaften in Namibia.[10] Der Historiker Sebastian Conrad kritisiert hingegen den “Essentialismus” der Rückgabekampagne: Ähnlich wie Achille Mbembe hält er eine Rückkehr zu den Ursprüngen mit der traditionalen Begründung,  ein Objekt sei angeblich “auf ewig unzertrennbar mit diesem Ort, dieser Gruppe” verbunden, für verkappten Nationalismus. Die Kritik am Ursprungsdenken führe aber zu keiner greifbaren Lösung, weil der sie tragende menschheitliche Universalismus einer globalen Verflechtungsstruktur der Bewahrung des Status quo dienen kann. Conrads Vorschlag: Rückgabe des Kreuzes und Substitution des Artefakts durch eine Erzählung über seine Rückführung.[11] Dies ist eine kritische Geschichtserzählung, die sich gegen Traditionalismus und “Essentialismus” richtet.

Multi-Perspektivität

Die Frage nach der “historischen Gerechtigkeit” kann offenbar nicht beantwortet werden, wenn die Antwort geschichtsbewusst ausfallen soll. Allerdings lässt sich daraus nicht der Umkehrschluss ziehen, das Fach Geschichte habe sich auf Sachurteile zu beschränken, wie das unlängst der Historiker Andreas Rödder gefordert hat.[12] Denn historische Urteilsbildung im öffentlichen Raum umfasst, wie gesehen, stets beide Seiten, die historische und die politische. Zugleich zeigt die aktuelle Debatte um Restitution und Verbleib aufs Neue, dass die Unterscheidung zwischen Sachurteil und Werturteil nicht hinreicht, weil sie nicht domänenspezifisch ist: Erst in der multiperspektivischen Geschichtserzählung erwächst aus einer Normreflexion historische Urteilskraft. Sie ist relevant nicht nur für die Identität der Rückgabe fordernden Gemeinschaft, sondern auch für die Gesellschaft, in der sich das fragliche Objekt befindet.

Jeremy Silvester, Direktor des Museums Association of Namibia, schlägt vor, die verschiedenen Perspektiven durchzudeklinieren. Je abstrakter die Perspektive – das Kreuz von Cape Cross als physisches Objekt, als immobiles Kulturerbe und letztlich als Gegenstand von Metaerzählungen –, desto  überzeugender das narrative Konstrukt, das über dieses Artefakt gebildet wird. Denn das Kreuz ist “in mehrere Narrative gehüllt und bietet so die Möglichkeit, es für die Entwicklung eines internationalen gemeinschaftlichen Projekts paralleler Präsentationen zu nutzen.”[13]

Diese Empfehlung beruht auf einem originär historischen Urteil. Sie ist, wie mir scheint, der postkolonialen Forderung nach der Rückkehr von Objekten zu ihren Ursprüngen deutlich überlegen, weil sie aus einer genetischen Geschichtserzählung eine geschichtskulturell tragfähige und der gegenwärtigen Debatte angemessene Schlussfolgerung zieht.

_____________________

Literaturhinweise

  • Frey, Marc. “A Revolutionary Process? Decolonization and International Law.” In Toward a New Moral World Order? Menschenrechtspolitik und Völkerrecht seit 1945, edited by Norbert Frei and Anette Weinke, 94-105. Göttingen: Wallstein, 2016.
  • Rüsen, Jörn. “Werturteile im Geschichtsunterricht.” In Handbuch der Geschichtsdidaktik, edited by Klaus Klaus Bergmann et al., 304-308. Seelze-Velber: Kallmeyer 1997.
  • Zimmerer, Jürgen and Joachim Zeller, eds. Völkermord in Deutsch-Südwestafrika. Der Kolonialkrieg (1904-1908) in Namibia und seine Folgen. Berlin: Christoph Links, 2003.

Webressourcen

_____________________

[1] Rede von Emanuel Macron an der Universität Ouagadougougou, 28. November 2017, https://www.elysee.fr/emmanuel-macron/2017/11/28/discours-demmanuel-macron-a-luniversite-de-ouagadougou (Letzter Zugriff am 10.03.2019).
[2] Felwine Sarr, Bénédicte Savoy, The Restitution of African Cultural Heritage. Toward a New Relational Ethics; siehe die französische und englische Fassung unter https://restitutionreport2018.com (Letzter Zugriff am 10.03.2019).
[3] Jürgen Zimmerer,  “Die größte Identitätsdebatte unserer Zeit,” Süddeutsche Zeitung, 20 February 2019, https://www.sueddeutsche.de/kultur/kolonialismus-postkolonialismus-humboldt-forum-raubkunst-1.4334846 (Letzter Zugriff am 10.03.2019).
[4] Patrick Bahners, “Französisches Ausleerungsgeschäft. Der ‘Bericht über die Restitution afrikanischen Kulturerbes’,” Merkur 73 (2019) No. 838: 6.
[5] Lukas H. Meyer, “Gerechtigkeit zur rechten Zeit. Philosophische Betrachtungen zur Rückgabe des padrão,Historische Urteilskraft. Magazin des Deutschen Historischen Museums 1 (2019): 22-33; Jeremy Silvester, “Museumsobjekte, Erinnerung und Identität in Namibia,” Historische Urteilskraft. Magazin des Deutschen Historischen Museums 1 (2019): 43-47; Julia Voss im Gespräch mit Sebastian Conrad, Lukas H. Meyer, Ruprecht Polenz und Winani Thebele-Kgwatalala, “Koloniale Objekte und historische Gerechtigkeit,” Historische Urteilskraft. Magazin des Deutschen Historischen Museums 1 (2019): 48-54.
[6] Sabine Witt, “Chronologie,” Historische Urteilskraft. Magazin des Deutschen Historischen Museums 1 (2019): 11.
[7] Lukas H. Meyer, “Gerechtigkeit zur rechten Zeit. Philosophische Betrachtungen zur Rückgabe des padrão,Historische Urteilskraft. Magazin des Deutschen Historischen Museums 1 (2019): 22-26.
[8] Sophie Schönberger, “Die Säule von Cape Cross und das Völkerrecht,” Historische Urteilskraft. Magazin des Deutschen Historischen Museums 1 (2019): 33.
[9] Sophie Schönberger, “Die Säule von Cape Cross und das Völkerrecht,” Historische Urteilskraft. Magazin des Deutschen Historischen Museums 1 (2019): 28-31.
[10] Julia Voss im Gespräch mit Sebastian Conrad, Lukas H. Meyer, Ruprecht Polenz und Winani Thebele-Kgwatalala, “Koloniale Objekte und historische Gerechtigkeit,” Historische Urteilskraft. Magazin des Deutschen Historischen Museums 1 (2019): 53.
[11] Julia Voss im Gespräch mit Sebastian Conrad, Lukas H. Meyer, Ruprecht Polenz und Winani Thebele-Kgwatalala, “Koloniale Objekte und historische Gerechtigkeit”, Historische Urteilskraft. Magazin des Deutschen Historischen Museums 1 (2019): 52-54.
[12] Während einer am 14. Februar 2019 in Berlin stattfindenden Podiumsdiskussion des Verbands der Historiker und Historikerinnen Deutschlands (VHD) über die “Herausforderungen der Geschichtswissenschaft heute“, vgl. den Mitschnitt der Diskussion mit dem Publikum unter https://lisa.gerda-henkel-stiftung.de (56:20-57:00), (Letzter Zugriff am 10.03.2019).
[13] Jeremy Silvester, “Museumsobjekte, Erinnerung und Identität in Namibia,” Historische Urteilskraft. Magazin des Deutschen Historischen Museums 1 (2019): 43-47.

_____________________

Abbildungsnachweis

Kříže na Cape Cross – Namibie © Pavel Špindler CC BY-3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

Empfohlene Zitierweise

Sandkühler, Thomas: Restitution und historische Urteilskraft. In: Public History Weekly 7 (2019) 9, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-13510.

Redaktionelle Verantwortung

Dominika Uczkiewicz / Krzysztof Ruchniewicz (Team Wrocław)

Copyright (c) 2019 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact the editor-in-chief (see here). All articles are reliably referenced via a DOI, which includes all comments that are considered an integral part of the publication.

The assessments in this article reflect only the perspective of the author. PHW considers itself as a pluralistic debate journal, contributions to discussions are very welcome. Please note our commentary guidelines (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/contribute/).


Categories: 7 (2019) 9
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2019-13510

Tags: , ,

1 reply »

  1. To all our non-English speaking readers we recommend the automatic DeepL-Translator. Just copy and paste.

    Sometimes events overtake reflection. Immediately before the publication of this essay, the German Historical Museum did decide to restitute the Cape Cross column. The Director of the Museum, Raphael Gross, has justified this decision in an Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung article (“Steinsäule des Anstoßes“) of 13 March 2019.

    The same date saw the rough outline (“Eckpunkte”) of a recommendation of the German Ministers of Cuture (Kultusministerkonferenz), the Federal Government Commissioner for Culture and the Media, and the Municipal Central Associations for the appropriate treatment of colonial objects in museum custody, including their restitution under certain legal conditions of unlawful appropriation in the past.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest